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Intercountry Adoption

English

Country Information

Kyrgyzstan

Country Information

Kyrgyzstan
The Kyrgyz Republic
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Six Months from date of entry

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One full page

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Yes

VACCINATIONS:

None required

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

Up to the equivalent of 3,000 USD.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

Up to the equivalent of 3,000 USD.

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Bishkek

171 Prospect Mira
Bishkek 720016
Kyrgyz Republic

Telephone: +(996)(312) 597-000

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(996)(312) 597-733

Fax: +(996)(312) 597-744

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Destination Description

The Kyrgyz Republic is a mountainous country of 6 million people. Tourism is not highly developed, despite spectacular natural beauty, and there is substantial rural poverty. Air and land travel internally and to neighboring countries is limited and can be subject to delays due to infrastructure shortcomings and winter weather. Rural and urban areas are subject to power, natural gas, and water outages. Read the Department of State’s Fact Sheet for information on U.S.-Kyrgyz relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Visas:

  • You are permitted to enter the country for tourism for up to 60 days without obtaining a Kyrgyz visa prior to arrival.
  • If you travel to the Kyrgyz Republic in any religious capacity, you must obtain a work visa and register with the Office of Religious Affairs.
  • Journalists traveling to the Kyrgyz Republic for work should obtain the appropriate visa at the nearest Kyrgyz Embassy prior to their arrival.  In addition to visas, journalists are also required to register their stay and receive Ministry of Justice approval in order to conduct press activities in country.
  • If traveling in the Kyrgyz Republic, you should consider obtaining visas for Russia, as commercial air travel out of the Kyrgyz Republic is limited. 
  • If you plan on using Kazakhstan as a transit point, you should review Kazakhstan Country Specific Information regarding Kazakh visa regulations before traveling.
  • For the most up-to-date visa information and information regarding entry/exit requirements, contact the Embassy of the Kyrgyz Republic.
  • The Kyrgyz Republic now requires all visitors staying longer than 60 days to register with the State Registration Service.  Additional information on the registration process can be found on the website for the Kyrgyz State Registration Service.

Some HIV/AIDS restrictions exist for visitors and residents in the Kyrgyz Republic. You must provide proof that you are HIV negative if requested by local authorities.  Refusal to do so could result in administrative charges.  Travelers applying for a work permit must submit to an HIV test as a part of the process.  However, a positive test result will not necessarily result in the refusal of the work permit.  Please verify current requirements with the Embassy of the Kyrgyz Republic before you travel.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information page.

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Safety and Security

Ethnic, political, and socio-economic tensions continue to exist in the Kyrgyz Republic, especially in the south. Supporters of terrorist groups and anti-Western, anti-Semitic extremist organizations have expressed anti-U.S. sentiments and may attempt to target U.S. or Western interests in the region, including the Kyrgyz Republic.  On August 30, 2016 a vehicle-borne explosive device was detonated at the Chinese Embassy located less than 300 meters from the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek.  Kyrgyz police located and detonated several explosive devices near downtown Bishkek in September 2016 and have since made several terrorism-related arrests throughout the Kyrgyz Republic.

  • U.S. citizens should limit travel to the Batken province (Oblast); travel of U.S. government employees to Batken is highly regulated.
  • Land mines in Batken Oblast and near the Kyrgyz-Tajik border continue to be a concern.
  • Areas along the Kyrgyz-Uzbek and Kyrgyz-Tajik borders continue to have small, but sometimes violent and deadly, skirmishes between border guards on both sides, and often include civilians.
  • Organized crime and narcotics trafficking are widespread in the southern areas of the Kyrgyz Republic.

Protests and demonstrations can break out without advance notice. During times of political unrest, demonstrators often gather in front of the Presidential Administration building (White House), the Parliament, and on Alatoo Square in Bishkek’s city center. Avoid the vicinity of any protests, because even protests that are intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and possibly escalate into violence.

Crime: The greatest threats to tourists and travelers in Bishkek are traffic accidents and street crime. There have been reports of violent muggings of foreigners in downtown Bishkek at night, as well as in more rural areas outside of Bishkek. Other common crimes include auto theft and pick-pocketing in crowded places such as markets, internet cafes, and on public transportation. U.S. citizens have been robbed by groups of young men who followed them back to their residences from hotels and bars. In addition, U.S. citizens have been victims of rape, assault, and kidnapping in the past. Attackers do not always avoid violent confrontation with their victims.

  • Exercise caution in urban areas.
  • After dark, you should avoid walking alone or using public transportation.
  • Be extremely cautious in or near hotels, bars, parks, and all Do not use unlicensed cabs.
  • If you are arriving at Manas International Airport, arrange your transportation from the airport in advance.

Harassment and extortion by people who purport to be Kyrgyz police officers take place occasionally.  Reports of these incidents are increasing, especially in the local markets and in areas frequented by Westerners.

  • Do not act upon requests by people, whether in civilian dress or in police uniform, if they have no official identification.  If  provided with identification, take note of the name of the official and the badge number. It is also advisable to ask at which police station the officers work, as many individuals report that often the officers are stopping foreigners in areas that are out of their normal jurisdiction (targets of opportunity).
  • Do not get into cars with anyone you do not know, even if the person claims to be a police officer.
  • Many people report that these individuals have taken money and other valuables while going through bags and wallets.  Always be aware of how much money you are carrying and ask for a receipt of some sort if forced to pay a fine.

Victims of Crime: If you are the victim of rape or another crime, you should first contact the U.S. Embassy and then local police.  The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in the Kyrgyz Republic is 102 for police, and 103 for emergency ambulance service.

The U.S. Embassy can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police, but only local authorities can investigate and prosecute crimes
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

More info: See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

 

Scams: See the Department of State and the FBI pages for more information.

For further information:

 

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Carry a copy of your U.S. passport and Kyrgyz visa with you at all times, so that, if questioned by local officials, proof of identity and citizenship are readily available.

You must obey all laws in the Kyrgyz Republic. 

  • If you violate them, even without knowing you did, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.
  • You may be taken in for questioning if you do not have your passport with you. The U.S. Embassy can provide you with a certified copy of your passport, which may be used in lieu of a physical passport if stopped by law enforcement or security officials.  The cost of this service is $50.00.  Appointments are scheduled online via the Embassy’s website.
  • It is illegal to take pictures of certain buildings. Ask before taking pictures of anything of possible military or security interest, including government buildings, people in police or military uniforms, and food markets. 
  • The legal blood alcohol level for driving in the Kyrgyz Republic is zero. Driving under the influence may land you immediately in jail, no matter how little you consumed.
  • Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs in the Kyrgyz Republic are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
  • Some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately.

Women Travelers: Please review our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Faith-Based Travelers:  It is illegal to practice a religion in groups or to proseltyze without being registered with the State Commission of Religious Affairs.   See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

Students:  See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

LGBTI Travelers:

  • The Kyrgyz Republic does not recognize sexual orientation as a protected category within the context of discrimination and there are no laws that define hate crimes in the Kyrgyz Republic to include LGBTI individuals.
  • LGBTI individuals may be subject to discrimination in the application of current laws and many LGBTI individuals report that they are often threatened and harassed by law enforcement officials.For more detailed information about LGBTI rights in the Kyrgyz Republic you may review the State Department’s Country Reports on Human Rights Practices.
  • For further information on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) travel, please read our LGBTI Travel Information page.

Persons with Mobility Issues: Public transportation, sidewalks and road crossings, hotels, and restaurants are rarely wheelchair accessible.

Hunting and Trekking Issues: 

  • It is illegal to hunt without a proper license.  You must get a permit from the Kyrgyz government prior to arrival in country in order to import or own firearms in the country.
  • Foreigners who do not have official permission to hunt or take trophies out of the country may face criminal and/or civil charges. 
  • Hunting and trekking infrastructure is underdeveloped with limited services, especially in the high mountainous regions.  Medical evacuations can take many hours or days depending on the weather and the availability of rescue service resources.

 

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Health

Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan covers you when you are outside of the United States.

  • We cannot pay your medical bills.
  • U.S. Medicare does not pay overseas.
  • The U.S. Embassy cannot provide you with medical treatment or advice.
  • Doctors and hospitals often expect cash payment for health services prior to dispensing medication or providing treatment.
  • We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation, since medical transport out of the country can be prohibitively expensive or logistically impossible. 
  • See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.  

Medical Care: Health care resources are limited and often below US standards. U.S. citizens often travel outside of the Kyrgyz Republic for medical treatment, including many routine procedures. Doctors and medical/hospital staff rarely speak English, and prices for treatment are not fixed.  It is advisable to utilize the services of a translator or Russian/Kyrgyz speaking friend or family member to assist with medical treatment.

Prescriptions: Carry prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription. 

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all recommended vaccinations, per CDC’s information. 

Further Health Information:   

The Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek maintains a list of local clinics that have agreed to provide medical care to U.S. citizens. 

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Travel and Transportation

Driving Hazards:  Traffic accidents involving serious injury to drivers, passengers, and pedestrians are common. Drunk driving and hit-and-run accidents are significant problems.

  • Many city roads are hazardous due to potholes, uncovered manholes, poor lighting, and pedestrians ignoring oncoming traffic.
  • Exercise particular caution and use defensive driving techniques, especially at night and on holidays and to avoid hazardous road conditions.
  • Drivers often speed on the newly upgraded roads that connect main cities and towns.
  • Many local drivers do not stop at red lights, pass vehicles when it is dangerous or prohibited to do so, drive into oncoming traffic, and do not stop for pedestrians.
  • There is no roadside assistance infrastructure.
  • Mountain roads in the Kyrgyz Republic are often narrow and treacherous, and may close without notice due to snow, ice, or rockslides. Guardrails and barriers are often missing.
  • The road between Almaty, Kazakhstan, and Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic, is especially unsafe at night or during poor weather. Travel on this route after dark is restricted for U.S. Embassy personnel.
  • See our Road Safety page for more information.

Traffic Laws: You must obey all local traffic laws.

  • Traffic police have been known to demand payment of arbitrary "fines" for purported infractions. Payment of traffic fines should be made at local banks.  Some police vehicles now offer terminals for individuals with bank cards to pay their fines immediately.
  • Passengers must wear seat belts and motorcycle riders must wear helmets.
  • International driving permits are recognized in the Kyrgyz Republic.

Public Transportation:

  • Buses tend to be very crowded and can be unsafe and unreliable.
  • Avoid using "private taxis" and unmarked taxis, or entering a cab that already contains passengers.
  • Negotiate a fare prior to entering a cab. Cab drivers often try to charge foreigners a higher fare. Some official taxi services now have cabs equipped with meters but passengers should confirm that they are functional before entering the cab.
  • Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in the Kyrgyz Republic, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of the Kyrgyz Republic’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
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U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
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Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters.
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Bishkek

171 Prospect Mira
Bishkek 720016
Kyrgyz Republic

Telephone: +(996)(312) 597-000

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(996)(312) 597-733

Fax: +(996)(312) 597-744

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General Information
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Hague Abduction Convention
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Return
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Visitation/Access
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Retaining an Attorney
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Mediation
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Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Only adoptions from The Kyrgyz Republic to the United States are possible.
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

The Kyrgyz Republic is a party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention or Convention). Intercountry adoption processing in Convention countries must be done in accordance with the requirements of the Hague Adoption Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations; as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of the Kyrgyz Republic.

Note: If any of the following occurred prior to November 1, 2016, the date on which the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the Kyrgyz Republic, the Hague Adoption Convention may not apply to your adoption: 1) you filed a Form I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition, identifying the Kyrgyz Republic as the country where you intended to adopt and the approval is still valid; 2) you filed a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, on behalf of a child from the Kyrgyz Republic, or 3) the adoption was completed. Under these circumstances, your adopted child’s adoption could continue to be processed as a non-Convention intercountry adoption. For more information, read about Hague Transition Cases. Please contact adoption@state.gov with the details of the case if this situation applies to you.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from the Kyrgyz Republic, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who is suitable and eligible to adopt a child from another country and bring that child to live in the United States under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of a Convention adoptee under U.S. immigration law in order to immigrate to the United States with an IH-3 or IH-4 immigrant visa

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to being found suitable and eligible to adopt by USCIS, prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) seeking to adopt a child from the Kyrgyz Republic must meet the following requirements imposed by the Kyrgyz Republic: 

  • Residency: There is no requirement to reside in the Kyrgyz Republic. However, prospective adoptive parents are required to spend ten days in the Kyrgyz Republic bonding with the child before the adoption may be finalized by the court.  During the bonding period the child is in the legal and physical custody of the orphanage in which he/she resides
  • Age of Adopting Parents: In general, an unmarried prospective adoptive parent must be at least 16 years older than the child (a court’s consent is required for an age difference of less than 16 years).  In general, prospective adoptive parents must be under 60 years of age (Ministry of Labor and Social Development’s (MoSD) consent is required for cases where the prospective adoptive parent(s) is over the age of 60).
  • Marriage: A single person or a married couple can adopt, but an unmarried couple cannot jointly adopt a child.  Marriage by LGBT couples is not recognized by the Kyrgyz Republic.
  • Income: There are no specific income requirements but prospective adoptive parents must have sufficient funds to support minimum life requirements according to Kyrgyz standards
  • Other: The following are NOT permitted to adopt in Kyrgzstan:
    • Persons found by a court to be incompetent or of limited competence;
    • Persons who have had their parental rights revoked or restricted by a court;
    • Persons who have been discharged by the court from the duties of guardian for the improper performance of those duties;
    • Persons who have had an adoption annulled by a court, if it was their fault;
    • Persons who for health reasons cannot exercise parental rights or have one of the diseases on the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic’s list of prohibited diseases; 
    • Persons found to have insufficient income to meet the minimum subsistence level established by the Kyrgyz government;
    • Persons who have no permanent residence or adequate housing for the child;  
    • Persons who have been convicted and sentenced to a crime against the life and health of others, have an unexpunged conviction for a serious crime, or are repeat offenders
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Who Can Be Adopted

Because the Kyrgyz Republic is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, children from the Kyrgyz Republic must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for intercountry adoption. For example, the adoption may take place only if the competent authorities of the Kyrgyz Republic have determined that placement of the child within the Kyrgyz Republic has been given due consideration and that an intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interests.

In addition to qualifying as a Convention adoptee under U.S. immigration law, a child must meet the following requirements of the Kyrgyz Republic:

  • A prospective adoptive child must be declared eligible for intercountry adoption by the MoSD. A minor child may be adopted if the parent(s)
    • Are dead.  
    • Are unknown or adjudged to be missing or declared dead.  
    • Have lost their parental rights in a court action.  
    • Have been declared incompetent by a court.  
    • Have abandoned the child. 
  • Relinquishment: Birth parents may relinquish their parental rights in anticipation of a specific Kyrgyz citizen adopting the child but may not relinquish their parental rights in order for the child to be adopted by specific non-Kyrgyz citizen parent(s) through the Convention adoption process. 
  • Abandonment: If the sole parent or parents have not lived with or cared for the child for a period of more than six months for reasons the court deems unacceptable, the court may declare the child as abandoned.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: A child between nine months and 18 years old may be declared eligible for intercountry adoption.  Children over the age of 10 must consent to the adoption.  Please note that in order for a child to meet the definition of Convention adoptee under U.S. immigration law, a Form I-800, Petition to Classify Convention Adoptee as an Immediate Relative, must be filed on the child’s behalf while the child is under the age of 16 (or under the age of 18 if the child is the birth sibling of another adopted child who has immigrated or will immigrate based on adoption by the same adoptive parent(s)).  Please see the USCIS website for special rules on filing dates for children aged 15-16 or siblings aged 17-18.
  • Sibling Adoptions: Generally, the separation of siblings is not permitted except in cases where to do so is deemed to be in the best interests of the children.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: Prospective adoptive parents will be provided with reports on the child from medical and social organizations that provide an analysis of the child’s physical and mental development.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Children must be on the register of “children without parental care” for 90 days before they are eligible for intercountry adoption. 
  • Other: None

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are eligible for adoption. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

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How to Adopt

Warning: Do not adopt or obtain legal custody of a child in the Kyrgyz Republic  before: 1) USCIS has approved your Form I-800A, Application for Determination of Suitability to Adopt a Child from a Convention Country, 2) the Central Authority of the Kyrgyz Republic  has determined the child is available for intercountry adoption, 3) USCIS has provisionally approved your Form I-800, Petition to Classify Convention Adoptee as an Immediate Relative, and 4) a U.S. consular officer has issued an “Article 5/17 Letter” in the case.  Read on for more information.

Kyrgyzstan’s Adoption Authority

The Ministry of Social Development

Note: Special transition provisions may apply to adoptions initiated before November 1, 2016  Read about Hague Transition Cases.

The Process

Because the Kyrgyz Republic is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adoptions from the Kyrgyz Republic must follow a specific process designed to meet the Convention’s requirements. A brief summary of the Convention adoption process is provided below. You must complete these steps in the following order to meet all necessary legal requirements. Adoptions completed out of order may result in the child not being eligible for an immigrant visa to the United States.

The process for adopting a child from Kyrgyzstan generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider (ASP) to Act as Your Primary Provider Which Has Been Authorized by the Kyrgyz Republic’s Central Authority to Operate in the Kyrgyz Republic
  2. Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt (Form I-800A)
  3. Apply to the Ministry of Labor and Social Development to Adopt and be Matched With a Child
  4. Apply to USCIS for the Child to be Found Provisionally Eligible for Immigration to the United States as a Convention Adoptee (Form I-800) and Receive U.S. Agreement to Proceed with the Adoption (Art. 5/17 letter)
  5. Adopt the Child in the Kyrgyz Republic or Obtain Legal Custody of the Child for Purposes of Emigration and Adoption 
  6. Obtain a U.S. Immigrant Visa for Your Child and Bring Your Child Home

1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider Which Has Authorized by the Kyrgyz Republic's Central Authority to Operate in the Kyrgyz Republic.

The first step in adopting a child from the Kyrgyz Republic is to select an adoption service provider in the United States which has been accredited or approved to provide services to U.S. citizens in Convention cases and which has been authorized by the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic. Please refer to the list of the accredited ASPs authorized to operate in the Kyrgyz Republic. A primary provider must be identified in each Convention case and only accredited or approved adoption service providers may act as the primary provider in your case. Your primary provider is responsible for:

  • Ensuring that all six adoption services defined at 22 CFR 96.2 are provided consistent with applicable laws and regulations;
  • Supervising and being responsible for supervised providers where used, and otherwise complying with the requirements regarding the provision of adoption services using other providers (see 22 CFR 96.14); and
  • Developing and implementing a service plan in accordance with 22 CFR 96.44.

Learn more about Agency Accreditation

2. Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt

After you choose an accredited or approved adoption service provider, you must be found suitable and eligible to adopt by USCIS by submitting Form I-800A, Application for Determination of Suitability to Adopt a Child from a Convention Country. You will need to submit a home study, fingerprints, and a background check as part of this application. Read more about Suitability and Eligibility Requirements.

3. Apply to the Kyrgyz Authorities to Adopt and Be Matched with a Child 

Submit Your Dossier to the Central Authority
After USCIS determines that you are suitable and eligible to adopt and approves the Form I-800A application, your adoption service provider will provide your approval notice, home study, and any other required information to the MoSD in the Kyrgyz Republic as part of your adoption application. The MoSD will review your application to determine whether you are also suitable and eligible to adopt under the Kyrgyz Republic’s law.

Receive a Referral for a Child from the Central Authority 
If both the United States and the Kyrgyz Republic determine that you are suitable and eligible to adopt, and the MoSD  has determined that a child is eligible for adoption and that intercountry adoption is in that child’s best interests, the MoSD may provide you with a referral for a child. The referral is a proposed match between you and a specific child based on a review of your dossier and the needs of the child. MoSD in the Kyrgyz Republic will provide a background study and other information, if available, about the child to help you decide whether to accept the referral or not. We encourage families to consult with a medical professional and their adoption service provider to understand the needs of the specific child but family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of, and provide a permanent home for, a specific child and must conform to the recommendations in the home study submitted to USCIS for the number of children and capacity to deal with any special needs of an adoptive child. Learn more about Health Considerations. If you accept the referral, the adoption service provider communicates that to the MoSD.  Learn more about this critical decision.  

4. Apply to USCIS for the Child to be Found Provisionally Eligible for Immigration to the United States as a Convention Adoptee and Receive U.S. Agreement to Proceed with the Adoption

Submit a Petition for a Determination on the Child’s Immigration Eligibility 
After you accept a match with a particular child, you will apply to USCIS for provisional approval for the child to immigrate to the United States by filing the Form I-800, Petition to Classify Convention Adoptee as an Immediate Relative. USCIS will make a provisional determination as to whether the child appears to meet the definition of a Convention adopteeand will likely be eligible to enter and remain in the United States.

Submit an Immigrant Visa Application 
After provisional approval of Form I-800 petition, you or your adoption service provider will submit a visa application to the consular section of the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek responsible for issuing immigrant visas to children from the Kyrgyz Republic. 

You should receive a letter from the National Visa Center (NVC) confirming receipt of the provisionally approved Form I-800 petition and assigning a case number and an invoice ID number. Use this information to log into the Consular Electronic Application Center (CEAC) to file the Electronic Immigrant Visa Application (DS-260) for your child.  You should fill out these forms in your prospective adoptive child's name. Answer every item on the form. If information is not applicable, please write “N/A” in the block. Please review the DS-260 FAQs, our Online Immigrant Visa Forms page, or contact the NVC at NVCAdoptions@state.gov or +1-603-334-0700 if you have questions about completing the online DS-260 form.  A consular officer will review the provisionally approved Form I-800 petition and the visa application and, if applicable, advises you of options for the waiver of any ineligibilities related to the visa application.

Warning: Do not attempt to adopt of a child in the Kyrgyz Republic before you receive provisional approval of your Form I-800 petition AND a U.S. consular officer issues the “Article 5/17 Letter” for your adoption case.

Remember: The consular officer will make a final decision about a child’s eligibility for an immigrant visa later in the adoption process.

5. Adopt the Child in the Kyrgyz Republic or Obtain Legal Custody of Child for Purposes of Emigration and Adoption of the Child

The process for finalizing the adoption (or obtain legal custody) in Kyrgyzstan generally includes the following

  • Role of Adoption Authority:
    • The MoSD authorizes foreign organizations to operate in the Kyrgyz Republic.
    • Prospective adoptive parents apply through authorized ASPs to the MoSD, which will examine their documents. 
    • The MoSD will match a child to the family, and issue a letter to the adoption service provider with information about the child. This letter is valid for 30 days.
    • After the adoptive parents have spent a minimum of 10 days bonding with the child (parents can stay longer if they wish), the prospective adoptive parents will provide the adoption service provider with a statement of intent to adopt the child, who will submit it to the MoSD. 
    • The MoSD will then issue a report of validity of adoption within 15 working days and give this to the representative of the adoption service provider.
  • Role of the Court: The Kyrgyz court considers the application and examines the documents for compliance with the laws of the Kyrgyz Republic. The court convenes after receiving the documents. In attendance are the prospective adoptive parents, a local social worker, and prosecutors. A conversation is held with the prospective adoptive parents and all of the documents are examined. The adoption becomes final 30 days after the court’s decision.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: ASPs must be authorized to operate within the Kyrgyz Republic. They can represent the interests of the prospective adoptive parents to the Kyrgyz authorities. They are responsible for submitting the adoption application along with the required supporting documents.
  • Adoption Application: All applications must be submitted by the accredited adoption provider to the MoSD. 
  • Time Frame: According to information provided by the MoSD, the adoption process will take around nine months.
  • Adoption Fees: The Government of the Kyrgyz Republic does not charge fees for adoption. However, the following fees may apply:
    • Court fee and state taxes $15-20
    • Fees charged by specialized professionals (such as for legal services, translation of documents, counseling) $550-650
    • Birth certificate and Kyrgyz Republic passport $100-120

Prospective adoptive parents are advised to obtain detailed receipts for all fees and donations paid, either directly or through your U.S. adoption service provider, and to raise any concerns regarding any payment that you believe may be contrary to the Convention, U.S. law, or the law of the Kyrgyz Republic with your adoption service provider, or, when appropriate, the Hague Complaint Registry. For more information in this regard, please refer to information concerning the Hague Complaint Registry. Improper payments may violate applicable law or create the appearance of child buying, and could put all future adoptions in the Kyrgyz Republic at risk. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, for instance, makes it unlawful to bribe foreign government officials to obtain or retain business. Further, the IAA makes certain actions relating to intercountry adoptions unlawful, and subject to civil and criminal penalties. These include to offering, giving, soliciting, or accepting inducement intended to influence or affect the relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing a central authority function or to engage another person as an agent to take any such action.

In the adoption services contract that you sign at the beginning of the adoption process, your agency will itemize the fees and estimated expenses related to your adoption process.

  • Documents Required: 
    • Prospective adoptive parents’ statement of their desire to adopt a child, including information concerning the child they would like to adopt (gender, age, special needs, other);
    • Copy of prospective adoptive parents’ passports;
    • Copy of marriage certificate, for married couples;
    • Certificate of employment, including position and salary or copy of income statement or other evidence of income;
    • Copy of property title or lease;
    • Criminal and/or child abuse registry checks;
    • Statement from the competent authority of the receiving state that the adopted child will be permitted to enter and reside permanently in the receiving state;
    • Prospective adoptive parents’ medical report, including confirmation of absence of drug (toxic) and alcohol dependence, and mental disorders;
    • Copy of the certificate confirming prospective adoptive parents have completed training for adoptive parents;
    • Copy of the contract between the prospective adoptive parents and the accredited adoption service provider to provide intercountry adoption services;
    • Home study report prepared by a licensed social worker or home study preparer;
    • Prospective adoptive parents’ written commitment stating they will:
      • register the adopted child with the Kyrgyz Republic’s diplomatic mission nearest to their state of residence upon the child’s entry to the United States;
      • permit Kyrgyz embassy or consulate officials to survey the living conditions of adopted child;
      • enroll the adopted child in an educational institution and medical facility in the adoptive parents state of residence;
      • maintain the adopted child’s Kyrgyz citizenship until he/she reaches 18 years of age;
      • provide post-adoption reports via their accredited ASP

Note: Additional documents may be requested.

Authentication of Documents: The United States and the Kyrgyz Republic are parties to the Hague Apostille Convention. U.S. public documents may be authenticated with Apostilles by the appropriate U.S. Competent Authority. Note

Note: Prospective adoptive parent(s) may obtain legal custody of a prospective adoptive child for purposes of emigration and adoption in the United States only if the prospective adoptive child is a relative (for example, if the child is the sister or brother of the prospective adoptive parent(s)). A power of attorney for full custody for purposes of emigration and adoption of the child must be reviewed and approved by the court via the local MoSD office.

6. Apply for a U.S. Immigrant Visa for Your Child and Bring Your Child Home

Once your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), you need to apply for several documents before you can apply for a U.S. immigrant visa to bring your child home to the United States:

Birth Certificate
If you have finalized the adoption in the Kyrgyz Republic, you will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

If you have been granted custody for the purpose of adopting the child in the United States, the birth certificate you obtain will, in most cases, not yet include your name.

The territorial Departments of Vital Records (ZAGS) issue a new birth certificate in the child’s new name, as well as the adoption certificate and the local Social Identification Number for the child. Additional information pertaining to documentary requirements for a new birth certificate, and the location of ZAGS, is available on the State Registration Service’s website. Please note that this information is in Kyrgyz and Russian only. Your adoption service provider’s local representative can assist you to obtain your child's new birth certificate, adoption certificate, and Social Identification Number on your behalf with a Power of Attorney.

The Kyrgyz Republic Passport
Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from the Kyrgyz Republic. The territorial Passport Desks under the State Registration Service will issue a passport in the new name of the child on the basis of the court adoption documents. 

Additional information pertaining to documentary requirements for a Kyrgyz passport, and the location of Passport Desks, is available on the State Registration Service’s website.  Please note that this information is in Kyrgyz and Russian only. Your adoption service provider’s local representative can assist you to obtain your child's passport on your behalf on the basis of Power of Attorney.

U.S. Immigrant Visa
After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to finalize your application for a U.S. visa for your child from the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek, the Kyrgyz Republic. After the adoption or custody for purposes of emigration and adoption is granted, visit the U.S Embassy in Bishkek for a final review of the case, and if applicable, the issuance of a U.S. Hague Adoption Certificate or Hague Custody Certificate, the final approval of the Form I-800 petition, and to obtain your child’s immigrant visa. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you and be admitted to the United States as your child. Please contact the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek by email at BishkekIV@state.gov to schedule your child’s immigrant visa appointment. As part of this process, you must provide the consular officer with the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child if you did not provide it during the provisional approval stage. Read more about the Medical Examination.

Before coming for your child’s immigrant visa interview, please be sure to complete an Electronic Immigrant Visa Application (DS-260) online at the Consular Electronic Application Center (CEAC). You should receive a letter from the National Visa Center (NVC) confirming receipt of the provisionally approved Form I-800 petition and assigning a case number and an invoice ID number. You will need this information to log into CEAC to file the DS-260 for your child. An adoptive parent should fill out these forms in your child's name.  Answer every item on the form. If information is not applicable, please write “N/A” in the block.  Print and bring the DS-260 form confirmation page to the visa interview. Please review the DS-260 FAQs, our Online Immigrant Visa Forms page, or contact the NVC at NVCAdoptions@state.gov or +1-603-334-0700 if you have questions about completing the online DS-260 form.

Please note that the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek, the Kyrgyz Republic now processes immigrant visas for non-U.S. citizens located in the Kyrgyz Republic. Additional information concerning immigrant visa processing at the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek can be found on the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek’s website.

Visa issuance after the final interview generally takes at least 24 hours (in most cases at 3:00 p.m. on the next business day). It is usually not possible to provide a visa on the same day as the immigrant visa interview. Adoptive parents should verify current processing times with the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek before making final travel arrangements.

Child Citizenship Act
For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States: A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States: An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary Complete the adoption or readoption) so that your child does qualify as soon as possible and that you apply for Certificate of Citizenship on your child's behalf. Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to the Kyrgyz Republic

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining visas for the Kyrgyz Republic, see the Department of State’s Country-Specific Information.

On November 1, 2016 the Kyrgyz Republic announced a new regulation requiring all foreign citizens traveling and living in the Kyrgyz Republic for more than five calendar days to register with the Kyrgyz State Registration Service. Additional information on this process can be found on the Department of State’s Country-Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country-Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State.  Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary.  Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in the Kyrgyz Republic, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

Post-Adoption Reporting Requirements

The Kyrgyz Republic requires four post-adoption reports: the first is due no more than seven months after the adoption is completed, then at one, two, and three years after the adoption is completed. After three years, reports shall be submitted if and as requested. Your adoption agency should help you with these reports. These reports should be done by a social worker, notarized and translated into Russian or Kyrgyz.

We strongly urge you to comply with the Kyrgyz Republic’s post-adoption requirements in a timely manner.  Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process.  Your cooperation will contribute to the Kyrgyz Republic’s history of positive experiences with U.S. citizen adoptive parents.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption.  There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin.  You may wish to advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

If you have concerns about your adoption process, we ask that you share this information with the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek, particularly if it involves possible fraud or misconduct specific to your child’s case.  The Department of State takes all allegations of fraud or misconduct seriously.  Our Adoption Comment Page provides several points of contact for adoptive families to comment on their adoption service provider, their experience applying for their child’s visa, or about the Form I-800 petition process.

The Hague Complaint Registry is an internet based registry for filing complaints about the compliance of U.S. accredited or approved adoption service providers with U.S. accreditation standards. If you think your provider's conduct may have been out of substantial compliance with accreditation standards, first submit your complaint in writing directly to your provider. If the complaint is not resolved through the provider's complaint process, you may file the complaint through the Hague Complaint Registry.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Bishkek Kyrgyz Republic
171 Prospect Mira 
Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 720016 
Tel.:  996 312 597 000 
Fax:  996 312 597 744 
Email: BishkekIV@state.gov 

The Kyrgyz Republic’s Adoption Authority
The Ministry of Labor and Social Development
215 Tynystanova Str.
Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Tel:  996-312-663-400
Email: mlsp@mlsp.kg

Embassy of the Kyrgyz Republic
2360 Massachusetts Ave, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20008
Tel:  202-449-9822
Fax:  202-386-7550
Email: kgdepus@gmail.com
Internet: kgembassy.org

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI, SA-17A, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Email: AdoptionUSCA@state.gov
Internet: adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-800A or I-800 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-913-275-5480 (local)
Email: NBC.Adoptions@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 24 Months
A-2 None Multiple 24 Months A
A-3 1 None One 12 Months
B-1 $45.00  Multiple 60 Months
B-2 $45.00  Multiple 60 Months
B-1/B-2 $45.00  Multiple 60 Months
C-1 None Multiple 3 Months
C-1/D N/A N/A N/A
C-2 None One 3 Months
C-3 None One 3 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 12 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 None Two 3 Months
E-2C 12 None Two 3 Months
F-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
F-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
G-1 None Multiple 12 Months
G-2 None One 3 Months
G-3 None One 3 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None One 12 Months
H-1B $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A $45.00 B N/A N/A3
H-2B $45.00 B N/A N/A3
H-2R $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
I $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
L-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
M-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
M-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
R-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
R-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Diplomatic Couriers (depending on the request of the host government)

  1. A-2 Multiple 12 Months
    A-2 One 3 Months
    A-2 (TDY) One

    3 Months

     

  2. Tiered Fee Schedule

    None One 3 Months
    $25.00 Multiple 6 Months
    $45.00 Multiple 12 Months

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Civil documents, except as noted below, are available in Kyrgyzstan. Certified copies of available documents may be exported. The person to whom the record pertains obtains a certified copy at a local notary office, authenticates the notary's seal and signature at the Ministry of Justice and authenticates the Ministry of Justice Official's signature and seal at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The American Embassy in Bishkek can authenticate the seal and signature of "certain" MFA officials, if that is desired.

In the U.S., Kyrgyz documents can be requested through the Embassy of Kyrgyzstan in Washington, DC. The process often takes several months.

Some civil records were destroyed during World War II and may not be available. Local authorities generally will issue a certificate to that effect, although the process may take months. A replacement statement of identity is also available from local authorities when the birth certificate is unavailable.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Available. Unauthenticated and uncertified copies of these documents may be obtained by Kyrgyz citizens for a nominal fee upon direct application to the Bureau of Acts of Civil Status (ZAGS) of the locality having custody of the records. See the introductory section above for exporting available civil documents.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Available. Unauthenticated and uncertified copies of these documents may be obtained by Kyrgyz citizens for a nominal fee upon direct application to the Bureau of Acts of Civil Status (ZAGS) of the locality having custody of the records. See the introductory section above for exporting available civil documents.

Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update.

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Identity Card

Please check back for update.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Available upon request. Individuals or their representatives should apply directly to the Information Center of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Kyrgyz Republic to obtain police records. The address is 469 Frunze str., Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic, 720011 website: http://mvd.kg/; duty officer: +996 (312) 662331. There is a small fee - 70 KGS for 5 day processing or 100 KGS for expedited 1 day processing - to be paid to the bank next door to the Ministry (on Erkindik boulevard/ Frunze str.). The information center operates daily from 9am to 11am.

Military Records

Available upon official written request. The U.S. Embassy in Bishkek can provide an official letter for use in obtaining these documents for immigrant visa applicants.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Available.

In accordance with INA 212(A)(7)(i) and INA 212(A)(7)(i)(i), the old style passports are no longer acceptable for non-immigrant visa issuance. Effective March 14, 2005, the old, 1994-style passports ceased to be valid for any visa issuance.

The new Kyrgyz passport is light blue in color and as of yet comes in only one type: Regular (P). There are, as of yet, no Diplomatic or Official passports for Kyrgyz officials, even though they are expected to be issued by the end of 2006.

The passport was issued by the State Agency for Information, Resources and Technology (SAIRT) until late 2005 and is now issued by the National Agency for Information, Resources, Technology and Communication (NAIRTC). NAIRTC offices can be found in regional capital throughout Kyrgyzstan.

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic (Embassy) -- Nonimmigrant visas except K

171 Prospect Mira,
720016 Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic

Tel: 996-312-551-241

Fax: 996-312-551-264

Almaty, Kazakhstan (Embassy) -- Immigrant and K visas

Visa Services

Nonimmigrant visas for all of Kyrgystan. IV & K visa applications for nationals of Kyrgyzstan are processed by the U.S. Embassy in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 449-9822 (202) 386-7550

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Bishkek
171 Prospect Mira
Bishkek 720016
Kyrgyz Republic
Telephone
+(996)(312) 597-000
Emergency
312) 597-733
Fax
+(996)(312) 597-744
Kyrgyzstan Country Map

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Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Kyrgyzstan
The Kyrgyz Republic
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Six Months from date of entry

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One full page

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Yes

VACCINATIONS:

None required

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

Up to the equivalent of 3,000 USD.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

Up to the equivalent of 3,000 USD.

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Bishkek

171 Prospect Mira
Bishkek 720016
Kyrgyz Republic

Telephone: +(996)(312) 597-000

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(996)(312) 597-733

Fax: +(996)(312) 597-744

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Destination Description

The Kyrgyz Republic is a mountainous country of 6 million people. Tourism is not highly developed, despite spectacular natural beauty, and there is substantial rural poverty. Air and land travel internally and to neighboring countries is limited and can be subject to delays due to infrastructure shortcomings and winter weather. Rural and urban areas are subject to power, natural gas, and water outages. Read the Department of State’s Fact Sheet for information on U.S.-Kyrgyz relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Visas:

  • You are permitted to enter the country for tourism for up to 60 days without obtaining a Kyrgyz visa prior to arrival.
  • If you travel to the Kyrgyz Republic in any religious capacity, you must obtain a work visa and register with the Office of Religious Affairs.
  • Journalists traveling to the Kyrgyz Republic for work should obtain the appropriate visa at the nearest Kyrgyz Embassy prior to their arrival.  In addition to visas, journalists are also required to register their stay and receive Ministry of Justice approval in order to conduct press activities in country.
  • If traveling in the Kyrgyz Republic, you should consider obtaining visas for Russia, as commercial air travel out of the Kyrgyz Republic is limited. 
  • If you plan on using Kazakhstan as a transit point, you should review Kazakhstan Country Specific Information regarding Kazakh visa regulations before traveling.
  • For the most up-to-date visa information and information regarding entry/exit requirements, contact the Embassy of the Kyrgyz Republic.
  • The Kyrgyz Republic now requires all visitors staying longer than 60 days to register with the State Registration Service.  Additional information on the registration process can be found on the website for the Kyrgyz State Registration Service.

Some HIV/AIDS restrictions exist for visitors and residents in the Kyrgyz Republic. You must provide proof that you are HIV negative if requested by local authorities.  Refusal to do so could result in administrative charges.  Travelers applying for a work permit must submit to an HIV test as a part of the process.  However, a positive test result will not necessarily result in the refusal of the work permit.  Please verify current requirements with the Embassy of the Kyrgyz Republic before you travel.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information page.

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Safety and Security

Ethnic, political, and socio-economic tensions continue to exist in the Kyrgyz Republic, especially in the south. Supporters of terrorist groups and anti-Western, anti-Semitic extremist organizations have expressed anti-U.S. sentiments and may attempt to target U.S. or Western interests in the region, including the Kyrgyz Republic.  On August 30, 2016 a vehicle-borne explosive device was detonated at the Chinese Embassy located less than 300 meters from the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek.  Kyrgyz police located and detonated several explosive devices near downtown Bishkek in September 2016 and have since made several terrorism-related arrests throughout the Kyrgyz Republic.

  • U.S. citizens should limit travel to the Batken province (Oblast); travel of U.S. government employees to Batken is highly regulated.
  • Land mines in Batken Oblast and near the Kyrgyz-Tajik border continue to be a concern.
  • Areas along the Kyrgyz-Uzbek and Kyrgyz-Tajik borders continue to have small, but sometimes violent and deadly, skirmishes between border guards on both sides, and often include civilians.
  • Organized crime and narcotics trafficking are widespread in the southern areas of the Kyrgyz Republic.

Protests and demonstrations can break out without advance notice. During times of political unrest, demonstrators often gather in front of the Presidential Administration building (White House), the Parliament, and on Alatoo Square in Bishkek’s city center. Avoid the vicinity of any protests, because even protests that are intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and possibly escalate into violence.

Crime: The greatest threats to tourists and travelers in Bishkek are traffic accidents and street crime. There have been reports of violent muggings of foreigners in downtown Bishkek at night, as well as in more rural areas outside of Bishkek. Other common crimes include auto theft and pick-pocketing in crowded places such as markets, internet cafes, and on public transportation. U.S. citizens have been robbed by groups of young men who followed them back to their residences from hotels and bars. In addition, U.S. citizens have been victims of rape, assault, and kidnapping in the past. Attackers do not always avoid violent confrontation with their victims.

  • Exercise caution in urban areas.
  • After dark, you should avoid walking alone or using public transportation.
  • Be extremely cautious in or near hotels, bars, parks, and all Do not use unlicensed cabs.
  • If you are arriving at Manas International Airport, arrange your transportation from the airport in advance.

Harassment and extortion by people who purport to be Kyrgyz police officers take place occasionally.  Reports of these incidents are increasing, especially in the local markets and in areas frequented by Westerners.

  • Do not act upon requests by people, whether in civilian dress or in police uniform, if they have no official identification.  If  provided with identification, take note of the name of the official and the badge number. It is also advisable to ask at which police station the officers work, as many individuals report that often the officers are stopping foreigners in areas that are out of their normal jurisdiction (targets of opportunity).
  • Do not get into cars with anyone you do not know, even if the person claims to be a police officer.
  • Many people report that these individuals have taken money and other valuables while going through bags and wallets.  Always be aware of how much money you are carrying and ask for a receipt of some sort if forced to pay a fine.

Victims of Crime: If you are the victim of rape or another crime, you should first contact the U.S. Embassy and then local police.  The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in the Kyrgyz Republic is 102 for police, and 103 for emergency ambulance service.

The U.S. Embassy can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police, but only local authorities can investigate and prosecute crimes
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

More info: See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

 

Scams: See the Department of State and the FBI pages for more information.

For further information:

 

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Carry a copy of your U.S. passport and Kyrgyz visa with you at all times, so that, if questioned by local officials, proof of identity and citizenship are readily available.

You must obey all laws in the Kyrgyz Republic. 

  • If you violate them, even without knowing you did, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.
  • You may be taken in for questioning if you do not have your passport with you. The U.S. Embassy can provide you with a certified copy of your passport, which may be used in lieu of a physical passport if stopped by law enforcement or security officials.  The cost of this service is $50.00.  Appointments are scheduled online via the Embassy’s website.
  • It is illegal to take pictures of certain buildings. Ask before taking pictures of anything of possible military or security interest, including government buildings, people in police or military uniforms, and food markets. 
  • The legal blood alcohol level for driving in the Kyrgyz Republic is zero. Driving under the influence may land you immediately in jail, no matter how little you consumed.
  • Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs in the Kyrgyz Republic are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
  • Some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately.

Women Travelers: Please review our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Faith-Based Travelers:  It is illegal to practice a religion in groups or to proseltyze without being registered with the State Commission of Religious Affairs.   See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

Students:  See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

LGBTI Travelers:

  • The Kyrgyz Republic does not recognize sexual orientation as a protected category within the context of discrimination and there are no laws that define hate crimes in the Kyrgyz Republic to include LGBTI individuals.
  • LGBTI individuals may be subject to discrimination in the application of current laws and many LGBTI individuals report that they are often threatened and harassed by law enforcement officials.For more detailed information about LGBTI rights in the Kyrgyz Republic you may review the State Department’s Country Reports on Human Rights Practices.
  • For further information on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) travel, please read our LGBTI Travel Information page.

Persons with Mobility Issues: Public transportation, sidewalks and road crossings, hotels, and restaurants are rarely wheelchair accessible.

Hunting and Trekking Issues: 

  • It is illegal to hunt without a proper license.  You must get a permit from the Kyrgyz government prior to arrival in country in order to import or own firearms in the country.
  • Foreigners who do not have official permission to hunt or take trophies out of the country may face criminal and/or civil charges. 
  • Hunting and trekking infrastructure is underdeveloped with limited services, especially in the high mountainous regions.  Medical evacuations can take many hours or days depending on the weather and the availability of rescue service resources.

 

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Health

Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan covers you when you are outside of the United States.

  • We cannot pay your medical bills.
  • U.S. Medicare does not pay overseas.
  • The U.S. Embassy cannot provide you with medical treatment or advice.
  • Doctors and hospitals often expect cash payment for health services prior to dispensing medication or providing treatment.
  • We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation, since medical transport out of the country can be prohibitively expensive or logistically impossible. 
  • See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.  

Medical Care: Health care resources are limited and often below US standards. U.S. citizens often travel outside of the Kyrgyz Republic for medical treatment, including many routine procedures. Doctors and medical/hospital staff rarely speak English, and prices for treatment are not fixed.  It is advisable to utilize the services of a translator or Russian/Kyrgyz speaking friend or family member to assist with medical treatment.

Prescriptions: Carry prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription. 

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all recommended vaccinations, per CDC’s information. 

Further Health Information:   

The Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek maintains a list of local clinics that have agreed to provide medical care to U.S. citizens. 

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Travel and Transportation

Driving Hazards:  Traffic accidents involving serious injury to drivers, passengers, and pedestrians are common. Drunk driving and hit-and-run accidents are significant problems.

  • Many city roads are hazardous due to potholes, uncovered manholes, poor lighting, and pedestrians ignoring oncoming traffic.
  • Exercise particular caution and use defensive driving techniques, especially at night and on holidays and to avoid hazardous road conditions.
  • Drivers often speed on the newly upgraded roads that connect main cities and towns.
  • Many local drivers do not stop at red lights, pass vehicles when it is dangerous or prohibited to do so, drive into oncoming traffic, and do not stop for pedestrians.
  • There is no roadside assistance infrastructure.
  • Mountain roads in the Kyrgyz Republic are often narrow and treacherous, and may close without notice due to snow, ice, or rockslides. Guardrails and barriers are often missing.
  • The road between Almaty, Kazakhstan, and Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic, is especially unsafe at night or during poor weather. Travel on this route after dark is restricted for U.S. Embassy personnel.
  • See our Road Safety page for more information.

Traffic Laws: You must obey all local traffic laws.

  • Traffic police have been known to demand payment of arbitrary "fines" for purported infractions. Payment of traffic fines should be made at local banks.  Some police vehicles now offer terminals for individuals with bank cards to pay their fines immediately.
  • Passengers must wear seat belts and motorcycle riders must wear helmets.
  • International driving permits are recognized in the Kyrgyz Republic.

Public Transportation:

  • Buses tend to be very crowded and can be unsafe and unreliable.
  • Avoid using "private taxis" and unmarked taxis, or entering a cab that already contains passengers.
  • Negotiate a fare prior to entering a cab. Cab drivers often try to charge foreigners a higher fare. Some official taxi services now have cabs equipped with meters but passengers should confirm that they are functional before entering the cab.
  • Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in the Kyrgyz Republic, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of the Kyrgyz Republic’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
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U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
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Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters.
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Bishkek

171 Prospect Mira
Bishkek 720016
Kyrgyz Republic

Telephone: +(996)(312) 597-000

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(996)(312) 597-733

Fax: +(996)(312) 597-744

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General Information
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Hague Abduction Convention
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Return
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Visitation/Access
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Retaining an Attorney
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Mediation
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Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Only adoptions from The Kyrgyz Republic to the United States are possible.
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

The Kyrgyz Republic is a party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention or Convention). Intercountry adoption processing in Convention countries must be done in accordance with the requirements of the Hague Adoption Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations; as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of the Kyrgyz Republic.

Note: If any of the following occurred prior to November 1, 2016, the date on which the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the Kyrgyz Republic, the Hague Adoption Convention may not apply to your adoption: 1) you filed a Form I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition, identifying the Kyrgyz Republic as the country where you intended to adopt and the approval is still valid; 2) you filed a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, on behalf of a child from the Kyrgyz Republic, or 3) the adoption was completed. Under these circumstances, your adopted child’s adoption could continue to be processed as a non-Convention intercountry adoption. For more information, read about Hague Transition Cases. Please contact adoption@state.gov with the details of the case if this situation applies to you.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from the Kyrgyz Republic, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who is suitable and eligible to adopt a child from another country and bring that child to live in the United States under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of a Convention adoptee under U.S. immigration law in order to immigrate to the United States with an IH-3 or IH-4 immigrant visa

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to being found suitable and eligible to adopt by USCIS, prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) seeking to adopt a child from the Kyrgyz Republic must meet the following requirements imposed by the Kyrgyz Republic: 

  • Residency: There is no requirement to reside in the Kyrgyz Republic. However, prospective adoptive parents are required to spend ten days in the Kyrgyz Republic bonding with the child before the adoption may be finalized by the court.  During the bonding period the child is in the legal and physical custody of the orphanage in which he/she resides
  • Age of Adopting Parents: In general, an unmarried prospective adoptive parent must be at least 16 years older than the child (a court’s consent is required for an age difference of less than 16 years).  In general, prospective adoptive parents must be under 60 years of age (Ministry of Labor and Social Development’s (MoSD) consent is required for cases where the prospective adoptive parent(s) is over the age of 60).
  • Marriage: A single person or a married couple can adopt, but an unmarried couple cannot jointly adopt a child.  Marriage by LGBT couples is not recognized by the Kyrgyz Republic.
  • Income: There are no specific income requirements but prospective adoptive parents must have sufficient funds to support minimum life requirements according to Kyrgyz standards
  • Other: The following are NOT permitted to adopt in Kyrgzstan:
    • Persons found by a court to be incompetent or of limited competence;
    • Persons who have had their parental rights revoked or restricted by a court;
    • Persons who have been discharged by the court from the duties of guardian for the improper performance of those duties;
    • Persons who have had an adoption annulled by a court, if it was their fault;
    • Persons who for health reasons cannot exercise parental rights or have one of the diseases on the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic’s list of prohibited diseases; 
    • Persons found to have insufficient income to meet the minimum subsistence level established by the Kyrgyz government;
    • Persons who have no permanent residence or adequate housing for the child;  
    • Persons who have been convicted and sentenced to a crime against the life and health of others, have an unexpunged conviction for a serious crime, or are repeat offenders
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Who Can Be Adopted

Because the Kyrgyz Republic is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, children from the Kyrgyz Republic must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for intercountry adoption. For example, the adoption may take place only if the competent authorities of the Kyrgyz Republic have determined that placement of the child within the Kyrgyz Republic has been given due consideration and that an intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interests.

In addition to qualifying as a Convention adoptee under U.S. immigration law, a child must meet the following requirements of the Kyrgyz Republic:

  • A prospective adoptive child must be declared eligible for intercountry adoption by the MoSD. A minor child may be adopted if the parent(s)
    • Are dead.  
    • Are unknown or adjudged to be missing or declared dead.  
    • Have lost their parental rights in a court action.  
    • Have been declared incompetent by a court.  
    • Have abandoned the child. 
  • Relinquishment: Birth parents may relinquish their parental rights in anticipation of a specific Kyrgyz citizen adopting the child but may not relinquish their parental rights in order for the child to be adopted by specific non-Kyrgyz citizen parent(s) through the Convention adoption process. 
  • Abandonment: If the sole parent or parents have not lived with or cared for the child for a period of more than six months for reasons the court deems unacceptable, the court may declare the child as abandoned.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: A child between nine months and 18 years old may be declared eligible for intercountry adoption.  Children over the age of 10 must consent to the adoption.  Please note that in order for a child to meet the definition of Convention adoptee under U.S. immigration law, a Form I-800, Petition to Classify Convention Adoptee as an Immediate Relative, must be filed on the child’s behalf while the child is under the age of 16 (or under the age of 18 if the child is the birth sibling of another adopted child who has immigrated or will immigrate based on adoption by the same adoptive parent(s)).  Please see the USCIS website for special rules on filing dates for children aged 15-16 or siblings aged 17-18.
  • Sibling Adoptions: Generally, the separation of siblings is not permitted except in cases where to do so is deemed to be in the best interests of the children.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: Prospective adoptive parents will be provided with reports on the child from medical and social organizations that provide an analysis of the child’s physical and mental development.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Children must be on the register of “children without parental care” for 90 days before they are eligible for intercountry adoption. 
  • Other: None

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are eligible for adoption. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

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How to Adopt

Warning: Do not adopt or obtain legal custody of a child in the Kyrgyz Republic  before: 1) USCIS has approved your Form I-800A, Application for Determination of Suitability to Adopt a Child from a Convention Country, 2) the Central Authority of the Kyrgyz Republic  has determined the child is available for intercountry adoption, 3) USCIS has provisionally approved your Form I-800, Petition to Classify Convention Adoptee as an Immediate Relative, and 4) a U.S. consular officer has issued an “Article 5/17 Letter” in the case.  Read on for more information.

Kyrgyzstan’s Adoption Authority

The Ministry of Social Development

Note: Special transition provisions may apply to adoptions initiated before November 1, 2016  Read about Hague Transition Cases.

The Process

Because the Kyrgyz Republic is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adoptions from the Kyrgyz Republic must follow a specific process designed to meet the Convention’s requirements. A brief summary of the Convention adoption process is provided below. You must complete these steps in the following order to meet all necessary legal requirements. Adoptions completed out of order may result in the child not being eligible for an immigrant visa to the United States.

The process for adopting a child from Kyrgyzstan generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider (ASP) to Act as Your Primary Provider Which Has Been Authorized by the Kyrgyz Republic’s Central Authority to Operate in the Kyrgyz Republic
  2. Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt (Form I-800A)
  3. Apply to the Ministry of Labor and Social Development to Adopt and be Matched With a Child
  4. Apply to USCIS for the Child to be Found Provisionally Eligible for Immigration to the United States as a Convention Adoptee (Form I-800) and Receive U.S. Agreement to Proceed with the Adoption (Art. 5/17 letter)
  5. Adopt the Child in the Kyrgyz Republic or Obtain Legal Custody of the Child for Purposes of Emigration and Adoption 
  6. Obtain a U.S. Immigrant Visa for Your Child and Bring Your Child Home

1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider Which Has Authorized by the Kyrgyz Republic's Central Authority to Operate in the Kyrgyz Republic.

The first step in adopting a child from the Kyrgyz Republic is to select an adoption service provider in the United States which has been accredited or approved to provide services to U.S. citizens in Convention cases and which has been authorized by the Government of the Kyrgyz Republic. Please refer to the list of the accredited ASPs authorized to operate in the Kyrgyz Republic. A primary provider must be identified in each Convention case and only accredited or approved adoption service providers may act as the primary provider in your case. Your primary provider is responsible for:

  • Ensuring that all six adoption services defined at 22 CFR 96.2 are provided consistent with applicable laws and regulations;
  • Supervising and being responsible for supervised providers where used, and otherwise complying with the requirements regarding the provision of adoption services using other providers (see 22 CFR 96.14); and
  • Developing and implementing a service plan in accordance with 22 CFR 96.44.

Learn more about Agency Accreditation

2. Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt

After you choose an accredited or approved adoption service provider, you must be found suitable and eligible to adopt by USCIS by submitting Form I-800A, Application for Determination of Suitability to Adopt a Child from a Convention Country. You will need to submit a home study, fingerprints, and a background check as part of this application. Read more about Suitability and Eligibility Requirements.

3. Apply to the Kyrgyz Authorities to Adopt and Be Matched with a Child 

Submit Your Dossier to the Central Authority
After USCIS determines that you are suitable and eligible to adopt and approves the Form I-800A application, your adoption service provider will provide your approval notice, home study, and any other required information to the MoSD in the Kyrgyz Republic as part of your adoption application. The MoSD will review your application to determine whether you are also suitable and eligible to adopt under the Kyrgyz Republic’s law.

Receive a Referral for a Child from the Central Authority 
If both the United States and the Kyrgyz Republic determine that you are suitable and eligible to adopt, and the MoSD  has determined that a child is eligible for adoption and that intercountry adoption is in that child’s best interests, the MoSD may provide you with a referral for a child. The referral is a proposed match between you and a specific child based on a review of your dossier and the needs of the child. MoSD in the Kyrgyz Republic will provide a background study and other information, if available, about the child to help you decide whether to accept the referral or not. We encourage families to consult with a medical professional and their adoption service provider to understand the needs of the specific child but family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of, and provide a permanent home for, a specific child and must conform to the recommendations in the home study submitted to USCIS for the number of children and capacity to deal with any special needs of an adoptive child. Learn more about Health Considerations. If you accept the referral, the adoption service provider communicates that to the MoSD.  Learn more about this critical decision.  

4. Apply to USCIS for the Child to be Found Provisionally Eligible for Immigration to the United States as a Convention Adoptee and Receive U.S. Agreement to Proceed with the Adoption

Submit a Petition for a Determination on the Child’s Immigration Eligibility 
After you accept a match with a particular child, you will apply to USCIS for provisional approval for the child to immigrate to the United States by filing the Form I-800, Petition to Classify Convention Adoptee as an Immediate Relative. USCIS will make a provisional determination as to whether the child appears to meet the definition of a Convention adopteeand will likely be eligible to enter and remain in the United States.

Submit an Immigrant Visa Application 
After provisional approval of Form I-800 petition, you or your adoption service provider will submit a visa application to the consular section of the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek responsible for issuing immigrant visas to children from the Kyrgyz Republic. 

You should receive a letter from the National Visa Center (NVC) confirming receipt of the provisionally approved Form I-800 petition and assigning a case number and an invoice ID number. Use this information to log into the Consular Electronic Application Center (CEAC) to file the Electronic Immigrant Visa Application (DS-260) for your child.  You should fill out these forms in your prospective adoptive child's name. Answer every item on the form. If information is not applicable, please write “N/A” in the block. Please review the DS-260 FAQs, our Online Immigrant Visa Forms page, or contact the NVC at NVCAdoptions@state.gov or +1-603-334-0700 if you have questions about completing the online DS-260 form.  A consular officer will review the provisionally approved Form I-800 petition and the visa application and, if applicable, advises you of options for the waiver of any ineligibilities related to the visa application.

Warning: Do not attempt to adopt of a child in the Kyrgyz Republic before you receive provisional approval of your Form I-800 petition AND a U.S. consular officer issues the “Article 5/17 Letter” for your adoption case.

Remember: The consular officer will make a final decision about a child’s eligibility for an immigrant visa later in the adoption process.

5. Adopt the Child in the Kyrgyz Republic or Obtain Legal Custody of Child for Purposes of Emigration and Adoption of the Child

The process for finalizing the adoption (or obtain legal custody) in Kyrgyzstan generally includes the following

  • Role of Adoption Authority:
    • The MoSD authorizes foreign organizations to operate in the Kyrgyz Republic.
    • Prospective adoptive parents apply through authorized ASPs to the MoSD, which will examine their documents. 
    • The MoSD will match a child to the family, and issue a letter to the adoption service provider with information about the child. This letter is valid for 30 days.
    • After the adoptive parents have spent a minimum of 10 days bonding with the child (parents can stay longer if they wish), the prospective adoptive parents will provide the adoption service provider with a statement of intent to adopt the child, who will submit it to the MoSD. 
    • The MoSD will then issue a report of validity of adoption within 15 working days and give this to the representative of the adoption service provider.
  • Role of the Court: The Kyrgyz court considers the application and examines the documents for compliance with the laws of the Kyrgyz Republic. The court convenes after receiving the documents. In attendance are the prospective adoptive parents, a local social worker, and prosecutors. A conversation is held with the prospective adoptive parents and all of the documents are examined. The adoption becomes final 30 days after the court’s decision.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: ASPs must be authorized to operate within the Kyrgyz Republic. They can represent the interests of the prospective adoptive parents to the Kyrgyz authorities. They are responsible for submitting the adoption application along with the required supporting documents.
  • Adoption Application: All applications must be submitted by the accredited adoption provider to the MoSD. 
  • Time Frame: According to information provided by the MoSD, the adoption process will take around nine months.
  • Adoption Fees: The Government of the Kyrgyz Republic does not charge fees for adoption. However, the following fees may apply:
    • Court fee and state taxes $15-20
    • Fees charged by specialized professionals (such as for legal services, translation of documents, counseling) $550-650
    • Birth certificate and Kyrgyz Republic passport $100-120

Prospective adoptive parents are advised to obtain detailed receipts for all fees and donations paid, either directly or through your U.S. adoption service provider, and to raise any concerns regarding any payment that you believe may be contrary to the Convention, U.S. law, or the law of the Kyrgyz Republic with your adoption service provider, or, when appropriate, the Hague Complaint Registry. For more information in this regard, please refer to information concerning the Hague Complaint Registry. Improper payments may violate applicable law or create the appearance of child buying, and could put all future adoptions in the Kyrgyz Republic at risk. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, for instance, makes it unlawful to bribe foreign government officials to obtain or retain business. Further, the IAA makes certain actions relating to intercountry adoptions unlawful, and subject to civil and criminal penalties. These include to offering, giving, soliciting, or accepting inducement intended to influence or affect the relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing a central authority function or to engage another person as an agent to take any such action.

In the adoption services contract that you sign at the beginning of the adoption process, your agency will itemize the fees and estimated expenses related to your adoption process.

  • Documents Required: 
    • Prospective adoptive parents’ statement of their desire to adopt a child, including information concerning the child they would like to adopt (gender, age, special needs, other);
    • Copy of prospective adoptive parents’ passports;
    • Copy of marriage certificate, for married couples;
    • Certificate of employment, including position and salary or copy of income statement or other evidence of income;
    • Copy of property title or lease;
    • Criminal and/or child abuse registry checks;
    • Statement from the competent authority of the receiving state that the adopted child will be permitted to enter and reside permanently in the receiving state;
    • Prospective adoptive parents’ medical report, including confirmation of absence of drug (toxic) and alcohol dependence, and mental disorders;
    • Copy of the certificate confirming prospective adoptive parents have completed training for adoptive parents;
    • Copy of the contract between the prospective adoptive parents and the accredited adoption service provider to provide intercountry adoption services;
    • Home study report prepared by a licensed social worker or home study preparer;
    • Prospective adoptive parents’ written commitment stating they will:
      • register the adopted child with the Kyrgyz Republic’s diplomatic mission nearest to their state of residence upon the child’s entry to the United States;
      • permit Kyrgyz embassy or consulate officials to survey the living conditions of adopted child;
      • enroll the adopted child in an educational institution and medical facility in the adoptive parents state of residence;
      • maintain the adopted child’s Kyrgyz citizenship until he/she reaches 18 years of age;
      • provide post-adoption reports via their accredited ASP

Note: Additional documents may be requested.

Authentication of Documents: The United States and the Kyrgyz Republic are parties to the Hague Apostille Convention. U.S. public documents may be authenticated with Apostilles by the appropriate U.S. Competent Authority. Note

Note: Prospective adoptive parent(s) may obtain legal custody of a prospective adoptive child for purposes of emigration and adoption in the United States only if the prospective adoptive child is a relative (for example, if the child is the sister or brother of the prospective adoptive parent(s)). A power of attorney for full custody for purposes of emigration and adoption of the child must be reviewed and approved by the court via the local MoSD office.

6. Apply for a U.S. Immigrant Visa for Your Child and Bring Your Child Home

Once your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), you need to apply for several documents before you can apply for a U.S. immigrant visa to bring your child home to the United States:

Birth Certificate
If you have finalized the adoption in the Kyrgyz Republic, you will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

If you have been granted custody for the purpose of adopting the child in the United States, the birth certificate you obtain will, in most cases, not yet include your name.

The territorial Departments of Vital Records (ZAGS) issue a new birth certificate in the child’s new name, as well as the adoption certificate and the local Social Identification Number for the child. Additional information pertaining to documentary requirements for a new birth certificate, and the location of ZAGS, is available on the State Registration Service’s website. Please note that this information is in Kyrgyz and Russian only. Your adoption service provider’s local representative can assist you to obtain your child's new birth certificate, adoption certificate, and Social Identification Number on your behalf with a Power of Attorney.

The Kyrgyz Republic Passport
Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from the Kyrgyz Republic. The territorial Passport Desks under the State Registration Service will issue a passport in the new name of the child on the basis of the court adoption documents. 

Additional information pertaining to documentary requirements for a Kyrgyz passport, and the location of Passport Desks, is available on the State Registration Service’s website.  Please note that this information is in Kyrgyz and Russian only. Your adoption service provider’s local representative can assist you to obtain your child's passport on your behalf on the basis of Power of Attorney.

U.S. Immigrant Visa
After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to finalize your application for a U.S. visa for your child from the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek, the Kyrgyz Republic. After the adoption or custody for purposes of emigration and adoption is granted, visit the U.S Embassy in Bishkek for a final review of the case, and if applicable, the issuance of a U.S. Hague Adoption Certificate or Hague Custody Certificate, the final approval of the Form I-800 petition, and to obtain your child’s immigrant visa. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you and be admitted to the United States as your child. Please contact the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek by email at BishkekIV@state.gov to schedule your child’s immigrant visa appointment. As part of this process, you must provide the consular officer with the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child if you did not provide it during the provisional approval stage. Read more about the Medical Examination.

Before coming for your child’s immigrant visa interview, please be sure to complete an Electronic Immigrant Visa Application (DS-260) online at the Consular Electronic Application Center (CEAC). You should receive a letter from the National Visa Center (NVC) confirming receipt of the provisionally approved Form I-800 petition and assigning a case number and an invoice ID number. You will need this information to log into CEAC to file the DS-260 for your child. An adoptive parent should fill out these forms in your child's name.  Answer every item on the form. If information is not applicable, please write “N/A” in the block.  Print and bring the DS-260 form confirmation page to the visa interview. Please review the DS-260 FAQs, our Online Immigrant Visa Forms page, or contact the NVC at NVCAdoptions@state.gov or +1-603-334-0700 if you have questions about completing the online DS-260 form.

Please note that the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek, the Kyrgyz Republic now processes immigrant visas for non-U.S. citizens located in the Kyrgyz Republic. Additional information concerning immigrant visa processing at the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek can be found on the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek’s website.

Visa issuance after the final interview generally takes at least 24 hours (in most cases at 3:00 p.m. on the next business day). It is usually not possible to provide a visa on the same day as the immigrant visa interview. Adoptive parents should verify current processing times with the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek before making final travel arrangements.

Child Citizenship Act
For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States: A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States: An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary Complete the adoption or readoption) so that your child does qualify as soon as possible and that you apply for Certificate of Citizenship on your child's behalf. Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to the Kyrgyz Republic

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining visas for the Kyrgyz Republic, see the Department of State’s Country-Specific Information.

On November 1, 2016 the Kyrgyz Republic announced a new regulation requiring all foreign citizens traveling and living in the Kyrgyz Republic for more than five calendar days to register with the Kyrgyz State Registration Service. Additional information on this process can be found on the Department of State’s Country-Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country-Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State.  Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary.  Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in the Kyrgyz Republic, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

Post-Adoption Reporting Requirements

The Kyrgyz Republic requires four post-adoption reports: the first is due no more than seven months after the adoption is completed, then at one, two, and three years after the adoption is completed. After three years, reports shall be submitted if and as requested. Your adoption agency should help you with these reports. These reports should be done by a social worker, notarized and translated into Russian or Kyrgyz.

We strongly urge you to comply with the Kyrgyz Republic’s post-adoption requirements in a timely manner.  Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process.  Your cooperation will contribute to the Kyrgyz Republic’s history of positive experiences with U.S. citizen adoptive parents.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption.  There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin.  You may wish to advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

If you have concerns about your adoption process, we ask that you share this information with the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek, particularly if it involves possible fraud or misconduct specific to your child’s case.  The Department of State takes all allegations of fraud or misconduct seriously.  Our Adoption Comment Page provides several points of contact for adoptive families to comment on their adoption service provider, their experience applying for their child’s visa, or about the Form I-800 petition process.

The Hague Complaint Registry is an internet based registry for filing complaints about the compliance of U.S. accredited or approved adoption service providers with U.S. accreditation standards. If you think your provider's conduct may have been out of substantial compliance with accreditation standards, first submit your complaint in writing directly to your provider. If the complaint is not resolved through the provider's complaint process, you may file the complaint through the Hague Complaint Registry.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Bishkek Kyrgyz Republic
171 Prospect Mira 
Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 720016 
Tel.:  996 312 597 000 
Fax:  996 312 597 744 
Email: BishkekIV@state.gov 

The Kyrgyz Republic’s Adoption Authority
The Ministry of Labor and Social Development
215 Tynystanova Str.
Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan
Tel:  996-312-663-400
Email: mlsp@mlsp.kg

Embassy of the Kyrgyz Republic
2360 Massachusetts Ave, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20008
Tel:  202-449-9822
Fax:  202-386-7550
Email: kgdepus@gmail.com
Internet: kgembassy.org

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI, SA-17A, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Email: AdoptionUSCA@state.gov
Internet: adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-800A or I-800 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-913-275-5480 (local)
Email: NBC.Adoptions@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 24 Months
A-2 None Multiple 24 Months A
A-3 1 None One 12 Months
B-1 $45.00  Multiple 60 Months
B-2 $45.00  Multiple 60 Months
B-1/B-2 $45.00  Multiple 60 Months
C-1 None Multiple 3 Months
C-1/D N/A N/A N/A
C-2 None One 3 Months
C-3 None One 3 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 12 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 None Two 3 Months
E-2C 12 None Two 3 Months
F-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
F-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
G-1 None Multiple 12 Months
G-2 None One 3 Months
G-3 None One 3 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None One 12 Months
H-1B $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A $45.00 B N/A N/A3
H-2B $45.00 B N/A N/A3
H-2R $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
I $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
L-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
M-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
M-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months 3
R-1 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
R-2 $45.00 B Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Diplomatic Couriers (depending on the request of the host government)

  1. A-2 Multiple 12 Months
    A-2 One 3 Months
    A-2 (TDY) One

    3 Months

     

  2. Tiered Fee Schedule

    None One 3 Months
    $25.00 Multiple 6 Months
    $45.00 Multiple 12 Months

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Civil documents, except as noted below, are available in Kyrgyzstan. Certified copies of available documents may be exported. The person to whom the record pertains obtains a certified copy at a local notary office, authenticates the notary's seal and signature at the Ministry of Justice and authenticates the Ministry of Justice Official's signature and seal at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The American Embassy in Bishkek can authenticate the seal and signature of "certain" MFA officials, if that is desired.

In the U.S., Kyrgyz documents can be requested through the Embassy of Kyrgyzstan in Washington, DC. The process often takes several months.

Some civil records were destroyed during World War II and may not be available. Local authorities generally will issue a certificate to that effect, although the process may take months. A replacement statement of identity is also available from local authorities when the birth certificate is unavailable.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Available. Unauthenticated and uncertified copies of these documents may be obtained by Kyrgyz citizens for a nominal fee upon direct application to the Bureau of Acts of Civil Status (ZAGS) of the locality having custody of the records. See the introductory section above for exporting available civil documents.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Available. Unauthenticated and uncertified copies of these documents may be obtained by Kyrgyz citizens for a nominal fee upon direct application to the Bureau of Acts of Civil Status (ZAGS) of the locality having custody of the records. See the introductory section above for exporting available civil documents.

Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update.

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Identity Card

Please check back for update.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Available upon request. Individuals or their representatives should apply directly to the Information Center of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Kyrgyz Republic to obtain police records. The address is 469 Frunze str., Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic, 720011 website: http://mvd.kg/; duty officer: +996 (312) 662331. There is a small fee - 70 KGS for 5 day processing or 100 KGS for expedited 1 day processing - to be paid to the bank next door to the Ministry (on Erkindik boulevard/ Frunze str.). The information center operates daily from 9am to 11am.

Military Records

Available upon official written request. The U.S. Embassy in Bishkek can provide an official letter for use in obtaining these documents for immigrant visa applicants.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Available.

In accordance with INA 212(A)(7)(i) and INA 212(A)(7)(i)(i), the old style passports are no longer acceptable for non-immigrant visa issuance. Effective March 14, 2005, the old, 1994-style passports ceased to be valid for any visa issuance.

The new Kyrgyz passport is light blue in color and as of yet comes in only one type: Regular (P). There are, as of yet, no Diplomatic or Official passports for Kyrgyz officials, even though they are expected to be issued by the end of 2006.

The passport was issued by the State Agency for Information, Resources and Technology (SAIRT) until late 2005 and is now issued by the National Agency for Information, Resources, Technology and Communication (NAIRTC). NAIRTC offices can be found in regional capital throughout Kyrgyzstan.

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic (Embassy) -- Nonimmigrant visas except K

171 Prospect Mira,
720016 Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic

Tel: 996-312-551-241

Fax: 996-312-551-264

Almaty, Kazakhstan (Embassy) -- Immigrant and K visas

Visa Services

Nonimmigrant visas for all of Kyrgystan. IV & K visa applications for nationals of Kyrgyzstan are processed by the U.S. Embassy in Almaty, Kazakhstan.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 449-9822 (202) 386-7550

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Bishkek
171 Prospect Mira
Bishkek 720016
Kyrgyz Republic
Telephone
+(996)(312) 597-000
Emergency
312) 597-733
Fax
+(996)(312) 597-744
Kyrgyzstan Country Map

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Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.