Intercountry Adoption

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Country Information

Uganda

Uganda
Republic of Uganda
Exercise increased caution in Uganda due to crime.

Exercise increased caution in Uganda due to crime.                      

Violent crime, such as armed robbery, home invasion, and sexual assault, is common, especially in larger cities including Kampala and Entebbe. Local police lack the resources to respond effectively to serious crime.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Uganda:

  • Do not physically resist any robbery attempt.
  • Food and drinks should never be left unattended in public especially in local clubs.
  • Remain with a group of friends in public.
  • Use caution when walking or driving at night.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and visa (if applicable) and leave originals in your hotel safe.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Report for Uganda.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
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Hague Convention Participation

Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No

U.S. Immigration Requirements

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Uganda, you must meet certain suitability and eligibility requirements. USCIS determines who is suitable and eligible to adopt a child from another country and bring that child to live in the United States under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States with an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

Last Updated: December 27, 2016

Uganda Adoption Information

The Uganda country specific information page is currently being updated. In the meantime, we wanted to provide an update on the Children’s Act Amendments.

On June 2, 2016, amendments to Uganda’s Children Act went into effect.  The full text of the amendments can be found on the Ministry of Women, Gender, Labour, and Social Development’s website. Part of the text from the State Department’s June 2 notice about the amendments is pasted below for your reference:

On May 20, 2016, the Ugandan president signed into law amendments to the Children Act that include changes to guardianship and adoption laws in Uganda. Among the many changes, the amendments limit applications for legal guardianships to citizens of Uganda who have lived in Uganda for at least three continuous months. The amendments state that intercountry adoption “shall be considered as the last option” available to children in need of permanency. They also shorten the required pre-adoption residency and fostering period for foreign prospective adoptive parents from three years to one, and state that those requirements may be waived in “exceptional circumstances.”

The U.S. Embassy in Kampala continues to seek further information from the Government of Uganda on the amendments’ practical impact. The government of Uganda is in the process of drafting implementing regulations. Until their issuance, the potential for uncertainty and delays in case processing exist, and prospective adoptive parents should proceed cautiously at this time, and seek guidance from an accredited adoption service provider and/or attorney regarding law or procedure. 

The U.S. Embassy in Kampala will continue to process all intercountry adoption cases in accordance with relevant U.S. and Ugandan laws. If you have questions about your guardianship or adoption case after consulting with your adoption service provider, please write to adoption@state.gov.

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Kampala
Plot 1577 Ggaba Road
Kampala, Uganda
Telephone
+(256)(0) 414-306-001
Emergency
+(256)(0) 414-306-001
Fax
No Fax

Uganda Map