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Intercountry Adoption

English

Country Information

Argentina

Country Information

Argentina
Argentine Republic
Last Updated: September 1, 2015
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Must be valid at time of entry

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required for entry stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Not required for stays of 90 days or less

VACCINATIONS:

 None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

Up to US$10,000 or equivalent undeclared for people over 16; US$5,000 or equivalent for those under 16.

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Buenos Aires

Av. Colombia 4300
(C1425GMN) Buenos Aires
Argentina
Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4533
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4354
Fax: +(54)(11) 5777-4240

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Argentina for information on U.S. - Argentina relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS FOR U.S. CITIZENS: U.S. citizens need a valid passport to enter Argentina. U.S. citizens with expired or damaged passports may not be allowed to enter and could be sent back to the United States at their own expense. 

Diplomatic or official passport holders must get visas prior to arrival. Private U.S. citizens do not need a visa for visits of up to 90 days for tourism or business. The U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires cannot help travelers with obtaining Brazilian or Paraguayan visas. For more information, see the Country Specific Information for Brazil and Paraguay.

Visit the Embassy of Argentina’s website for visa information. For information about customs rules, please read our customs information page and the Argentine customs page.

SPECIAL ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS FOR DUAL NATIONALS: Different rules may apply to dual U.S.-Argentine citizens, depending on when they became U.S. citizens. Visit the Argentine Ministry of the Interior website for the most current information.

SPECIAL ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS: Children under 18 who live in Argentina and are not traveling with both parents must have the notarized consent of both parents to leave Argentina (see international parental child abduction for more information).

Find information on dual nationality and international parental child abduction on our website.

HIV/AIDS RESTRICTIONS: The U.S. Department of State does not know of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for foreign visitors or residents of Argentina.

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Safety and Security

Demonstrations are common in Buenos Aires and happen in other cities as well. Protesters often block streets and highways. Demonstrations are usually nonviolent, but can turn confrontational. U.S. citizens should avoid any areas where crowds gather to protest. 

CRIME: Street crime is a problem in Buenos Aires, Rosario and Mendoza. Look out for muggers, pickpockets, scam artists, and purse-snatchers who work on the street, in restaurants and hotel lobbies, at bus and train stations, in public transportation, and in cruise ship ports. 

  • Violent robberies often occur in the San Telmo, Recoleta, and La Boca neighborhoods of Buenos Aires. 
  • While crime occurs at all times of day, tourists who go to La Boca should only visit the tourist street during the day. 
  • Avoid “villas” or shanty towns in Buenos Aires and other major cities, even if they are in tourist zones.     

Scams involving yellow and black taxis have been reported at international airports and around Buenos Aires. Pre-arrange a ride or select one of the flat-rate “remise” services (private car with driver) from the airport. In town, use radio taxis from places like a hotel when possible. See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

  • Drivers pretend to help tourists with money while trading good bills for counterfeit ones.
  • A “handler” at the airport accepts payment for the ride, but then the driver also demands money at the end of the ride.
  • The taxi “breaks down” on the road, and a second taxi comes to get the passenger. Both drivers demand payment.
  • Spraying mustard or another substance on the tourist from a distance. An accomplice robs the victim while pretending to help clean the stain.
  • Do not place handbags on the back of your chair or on the floor at a restaurant. Keep them in your lap. 

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"Express kidnappings" also occur, where victims are grabbed and forced to take out as much money as possible from ATMs. Family or co-workers are contacted and told to bring all the cash they have on hand or can gather in a couple of hours. Once the ransom is paid, the victim is usually released unharmed. There have been some foreign victims of express kidnappings. Fake telephone kidnappings are very common. Learning important phone numbers and, if robbed, immediately finding a phone and letting family members know you are alright are important in stopping this crime. 

Travelers should not pack valuables in checked bags. 

The U.S. Embassy sees many reports of stolen passports. Passports and other valuables should be locked in a hotel safe. Carry a photocopy of your passport with you. 

VICTIMS OF CRIME: Report crimes to the local police at the numbers below and contact the U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires:

  • Dial 911 to report emergencies, call the police, an ambulance or the fire department. 
  • In Cordoba, Mendoza, Iguazu, Tucuman and Tierra del Fuego, dial 101.

Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance. If you are in immediate danger, call the police at 911.

For more information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some crimes are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:

  • Dual Nationals: U.S.-Argentine dual nationals may have to follow special rules that apply to Argentine citizens. In some cases, the U.S. government may have trouble providing protection abroad to dual citizens.
  • Currency Exchange and Access: You must show your passport to exchange money. Keep all receipts related to buying pesos.  Be careful if you are offered illegal exchange rates. The Embassy does not exchange money.

Some U.S. citizens report problems using their ATM cards issued by U.S. banks at certain ATMs. There is no set list of ATMs or banks where you can use U.S. cards. If your ATM card does not work at one ATM, try another one or use a reputable bank or exchange house. Daily withdrawal limits may also be lower than in the U.S.

  • Hunting and Fishing/Transporting Firearms: If you plan to hunt or fish, follow all gun and game laws. Some U.S. citizens report problems bringing guns into and out of Argentina. More information can be found here.
  • Adventure Travel: For local authorities, helping visitors lost or injured in remote areas can be hard. Travelers visiting isolated and wilderness areas must learn about local conditions and give their itinerary to park or police officials. 

Argentina has the highest mountain outside of the Himalayas, Mount Aconcagua.  Several U.S. citizens, including expert climbers, have died while climbing the mountain.  Rescue missions are often impossible. 

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Argentina. 

See our LGBTI travel information page and section 6 of the Department of State's Human Rights report for further details.


Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance:
 People with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different than in the United States.  The law mandates access to buildings for persons with disabilities, but while the federal government has protective laws, many provinces do not.

Students:  See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers:  See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.   See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.


If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Argentina to ensure the medication is legal in Argentina.  Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

The following diseases are common:

  • Hepatitis A
  • Yellow Fever
  • Dengue
  • Typhoid
  • Rabies

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and CDC recommendations for travel to Argentina.

More health information:

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Travel and Transportation

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: Driving is more dangerous than in the United States. Drivers in Argentina tend to be aggressive, especially in Buenos Aires, and often ignore traffic regulations. Drivers should prepare in advance when taking long road trips. Gas stations are often far apart and not always easily identified from the main roadway. You need an Argentine or international driver’s license to drive, but verify with local authorities for the most current information.

Please see our road safety page for more information. You should visit the websites of Argentina's national tourist office and national roadways office (available only in Spanish).

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Argentina’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Argentina’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

MARITIME TRAVEL: Mariners planning travel to Argentina should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website and the NGA broadcast warnings website select “broadcast warnings”.

 

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Buenos Aires

Av. Colombia 4300
(C1425GMN) Buenos Aires
Argentina
Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4533
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4354
Fax: +(54)(11) 5777-4240

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General Information

Argentina and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) since June 1, 1991.

For information concerning travel to Argentina, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Argentina.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Argentina.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact Information:

U.S. Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Website

The Argentine Central Authority for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship.  The Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship performs the duties given to central authorities under the Hague Abduction Convention, including processing Hague Abduction Convention applications for return of and access to children.  They can be reached at:

Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship
Legal Affairs Department
International Legal Cooperation Department
Esmeralda 1212 - 4th floor
1007 Buenos Aires
Argentina
Telephone:  +54 (11) 4819 7170; +54 (11) 4819 7172
Fax:  +54 (11) 4819 7170; +54 (11) 4819 7172
E-mail
Website

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Argentina, the left-behind parent must submit a Hague application to the Argentine Central Authority (the Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship), either directly, or through the U.S. Central Authority (USCA).  The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to the Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the United States or Argentine central authorities.  Attorney fees, if necessary, are the sole responsibility of the person hiring the attorney.  Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Argentina.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Argentina.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Retaining an Attorney

In Argentina, Hague Abduction Convention cases cannot be filed in an Argentine court without legal representation. The Argentine Central Authority (Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship) provides a list of lawyers licensed to practice in the appropriate jurisdiction. When parents cannot afford a private attorney and meet the Argentine Central Authority’s financial requirements for assistance, the Argentine Central Authority will appoint a public defender or pro bono legal counsel. 

The U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina posts a list of attorneys including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Argentina.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Intercountry adoptions are not currently possible between Argentina and the United States.
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
No
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Hague Convention Information

Argentina is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008, intercountry adoption processing for Argentina did not change.

Intercountry adoptions are not currently possible between Argentina and the United States. Argentina is not considered a country of origin in intercountry adoption.  While intercountry adoptions are legally possible, Argentine children eligible for adoptions are placed with Argentina’s residents. No children from Argentina eligible for adoption have received U.S. immigrant visas based on a Convention adoption in the past five fiscal years. The information provided is intended primarily to assist in extremely rare adoption cases from Argentina, including adoptions of Argentine children by relatives in the United States, as well as adoptions from third countries by U.S. citizens living in Argentina.

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Algeria, you must meet certain suitability and eligibility requirements. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt a child from another country and bring that child to live in the United States under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States with an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to being found suitable and eligible to adopt by USCIS, prospective adoptive parents seeking to adopt from Argentina must meet the following requirements:

  • Residency: Applicants must be Argentine nationals or permanent resident aliens of Argentina for at least the five years immediately preceding the application for guardianship (first step in the adoption process).
  • Age of Adopting Parents: If single, the prospective adoptive parent must be at least 30 years of age. There is no minimum age requirement for married prospective adoptive parents. At least one member of the couple must be at least 18 years older than the adoptee.
  • Marriage: Married couples must be married at least three years and have no offspring. If the couple can prove they are physically unable to have a child, the court will consider marriages under 3 years. Married couples must adopt jointly except when there is a legal separation decree, the spouse is declared mentally incompetent by a court, or there is a judicial declaration of absence of spouse (presumption of death).
  • Income: Prospective adoptive parents must prove financial ability.
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Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to qualifying as an orphan under U.S. immigration law, the child must meet the following requirements of Argentina:

  • Relinquishment: Biological parents may relinquish their children for adoption only through the courts. This release is irrevocable and can only be signed at the court by appointment set by a judge at least 60 days after the child's birth. It cannot be done immediately following the birth. The law provides for the 60-day window after the birth of the child to allow the birth mother time to think about her decision. During this 60-day period, the court may review the personal conditions of the biological parents, their age, ability to take care of the child, reasons for the release for adoption and any other considerations and information pertinent to this act. A judge may request the opinion of, technical advice from, and/or the effective participation of a Defensor de Menores e Incapaces from the Minsterio Publico de la Defensa to determine the best interests of the child.
  • Abandonment: A release by the biological parents will not be necessary in those instances when the child is a ward of the court, already an orphan on the streets, or has been housed in a government institution continuously for more than one year without any indication of interest from the birth parent(s).
  • Age of Adoptive Child: None. Please note that for a child to meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law, a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, must be filed on the child’s behalf while the child is under the age of 16 (or under the age of 18 if the child is the birth sibling of another adopted child who has immigrated or will immigrate based on adoption by the same adoptive parent(s)).
  • Sibling Adoptions: None.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: None.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: None.

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are eligible for adoption. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to the adoption of their child(ren).

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How to Adopt

Argentina’s Adoption Authority

While there is no official adoption authority, prospective adoptive parents must apply to Consejo Nacionalde Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia.

The Process

Because Argentina does not currently allow intercountry adoption, and adoption is restricted to Argentine citizens and permanent resident aliens residing in Argentina, the following information is meant to be a general overview of the process for those who are qualified to adopt.

The process for adopting a child from Argentina generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt (Form I-600A)
  3. Apply to Argentina’s Authorities to Adopt and be Matched with a Child
  4. Adopt the Child in Argentina
  5. Apply for Your Child to be Found Eligible to Immigrate to the United States as an Orphan (Form I-600)
  6. Apply for a U.S. Immigrant Visa for Your Child and Bring Your Child Home  

Note: By Argentine law, the adoptive parents must inform the child of his/her adoption before the age of 18. According to the laws of Argentina, adopted children have the right to know their true biological identity and will have access to their adoption file once they have reached the age of 18. This is a commitment that the adopting parents must sign at the court at the time the adoption is granted.

1.  Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

Before taking steps to adopt a child from Argentina, you should select a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider to be the primary provider in your case. As of July 14, 2014, a primary provider is required in every intercountry adoption case under the UAA, unless an exception applies. The primary provider is responsible for:

  • Ensuring that all six adoption services defined at 22 CFR 96.2 are provided;
  • Supervising and being responsible for supervised providers where used (see 22 CFR 96.14); and
  • Developing and implementing a service plan in accordance with 22 CFR 96.44

For more information on primary providers and the UAA, please see Universal Accreditation Act of 2012.

 2.  Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt

In order to adopt a child from Argentina, you will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Argentina and U.S. immigration law. 

To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also choose to file a Form I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition, with USCIS to be found suitable and eligible to adopt before you identify a child to adopt. You may also choose to file the Form I-600 petition along with all the required Form I-600A application supporting documentation, including an approved home study, once you have been matched with a child and have obtained all the necessary documentation. Please see the USCIS website for more information about filing options. Regardless of which approach you take, the home study must meet the same requirements. As of July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, the home study must comply with the requirements in 8 CFR 204.311 and 22 CFR Part 96.47

3.  Apply to Argentina’s Authorities to Adopt and be Matched with a Child

If you are found suitable and eligible to adopt under U.S. law, you must also submit an adoption application to the court having jurisdiction over their domicile in Argentina to be found eligible to adopt by Argentina. In that application, they may indicate their preference for the child's gender and age, and whether they consider themselves capable to adopt a child with health problems or other special needs.

The prospective adoptive parents' names will be placed on a single nationwide list by filing date and be made public. The Consejo de la Ninez, Adolenscencia y Familia will inform them when their turn is reached. Adoptive parents may check their name status by contacting the Consejo at the address included in the Contact Information Section.

If a child is eligible for intercountry adoption, the competent adoption authority or other authorized entity in Argentina will review your adoption dossier and, if an appropriate match is found, will provide you with a referral. We encourage families to consult with a medical professional and their adoption service provider to understand the needs of the specific child but each family must decide for itself whether it will be able to meet the needs of, and provide a permanent home for, a specific child, and must conform to the recommendations in the home study for the number of children and capacity to deal with any special needs of an adoptive child. Learn more about Health Considerations.

Once matched with a child, the court will release a child in guardianship to the prospective adoptive parents. The child will remain under the jurisdiction of the court for the full period of guardianship. In no case will the child be permitted to depart Argentina.

The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Argentina’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law.

 4.  Adopt the Child in Argentina

Application for adoption can only be filed after the guardianship period of no less than six months and not more than twelve months has elapsed. Birth parents will lose all rights and obligations after that time and these rights will be transferred to the prospective adoptive parents.

The process for finalizing the adoption in Argentina generally includes the following:

  • Role of the Court: The Argentine court releases a child in guardianship to the prospective adoptive parents when a suitable match has been determined.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: As of July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, there must be a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider acting as the primary provider in every case. Also, any agency or person providing an adoption service on behalf of prospective adoptive parents in any Convention or non-Convention case must be accredited or approved, or be a supervised or exempted provider. Adoption service means any one of the following  six services:
    1. Identifying a child for adoption and arranging an adoption;
    2. Securing the necessary consent to termination of parental rights and to adoption;
    3. Performing a background study on a child or a home study on a prospective adoptive parent(s), and reporting on such a study;
    4. Making non-judicial determinations of the best interests of a child and the appropriateness of an adoptive placement for the child;
    5. Monitoring a case after a child has been placed with prospective adoptive parent(s) until final adoption; or
    6. When necessary because of a disruption before final adoption, assuming custody and providing (including facilitating the provision of) child care or any other social service pending an alternative placement.  22 CFR 96.2 Definitions.
  • Adoption Application: Adoption application can be filed after the guardianship period of 6-12 months has elapsed. After this guardianship period, birth parents lose all rights and obligations to the child.
  • Time Frame: Once guardianship has been awarded by the court, it takes between six months to a year to obtain the final adoption decree.
  • Adoption Fees: There are no fixed adoption fees to conclude an adoption in Argentina. Filing the petition for guardianship (to lead to adoption) is free. Prospective adoptive parents are responsible for attorney fees although some courts do provide free legal assistance. The judge may set fees for other services rendered.

    Prospective adoptive parents are advised to obtain detailed receipts for all fees and donations paid, either by themselves directly or through their U.S. adoption service provider, and to raise any concerns regarding any payment that you believe may be contrary to U.S. law, or the law of Argentina, with your adoption service provider. Please also refer to information concerning the Hague Complaint Registry. Improper payments may have the appearance of buying achild, violate applicable law, and could put all future adoptions in Argentina at risk.  The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, for instance, makes it unlawful to bribe foreign government officials to obtain or retain business. Further, the UAA and IAA make it unlawful to improperly influence relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing Central Authority functions.
  • Documents Required: 
    • Proof of Argentine citizenship or legal permanent residence in Argentina for the last five years
    • Copy of the prospective adoptive parents' marriage certificate (if applicable)
    • Evidence of good conduct
    • Evidence of financial ability

Note:  Additional documents may be requested.

  • Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic. The U.S Department of State’s Authentications Office has information on the subject.

5.  Apply for Your Child to be Found Eligible for Immigration to the United States as an Orphan

After you finalize the adoption, USCIS must determine whether the child meets the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law in order for the child to immigrate to the United States.  You will need to file a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative. At the time you file your Form I-600 petition, the adjudicating officer will determine whether the UAA applies or if your case is UAA grandfathered.  For more information on UAA grandfathering and transition cases, please see Universal Accreditation Act of 2012. Unless an exception applies, you must identify a primary provider in your case and the adjudicating officer may ask for the name and contact information of the primary provider if not provided in your Form I-600 petition. This information is required and, without it, your Form I-600 petition cannot be approved. 

If you have an approved, valid Form I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition, you may file your Form I-600 petition either in the United States with USCIS or in person at the U.S.Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

When a Form I-600 petition is adjudicated by USCIS in the United States, the consular section in Buenos Aires, Argentina, must complete a Form I-604, Determination on Child for Adoption (sometimes informally referred to as an orphan determination), to verify the child’s orphan status. When a Form I-600 petition is adjudicated by an international USCIS office, USCIS generally completes the Form I-604 determination.

For Form I-600 petitions filed with the Embassy’s consular section, the consular officer must complete the Form I-604 determination after you file your Form I-600 petition. Conducting the Form I-604 determination is a critical part of the orphan adoption process. It can take weeks to complete, depending upon the circumstances of your case. Consular officers appreciate that families are eager to bring their adopted child home as quickly as possible. Some of the factors that may contribute to the length of the process include prevailing fraud patterns in the country of origin, civil unrest or security concerns that restrict travel to certain areas of the country, and the number of determinations performed by available staff. Consular officers make every effort to conduct them as quickly and thoroughly as possible. You are advised to keep your travel plans flexible while awaiting the results.

6.  Apply for a U.S. Immigrant Visa for Your Child and Bring Your Child Home

Now that your adoption is complete, and the Form I-604 determination has been completed finding that your child meets the legal definition of an orphan for immigration purposes, there are a few more steps to take before you and your child can head home. Specifically, you need to apply for three documents before your child can travel to the United States:

  • Birth Certificate: You will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child, so that you can later apply for a passport. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

    Once the adoption is complete, the adoptive parents may request the issuance of a new birth certificate.
  • Argentina Passport: Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Argentina.

    After the adoption is finalized, the parents may apply to the Argentine Federal Police for the issuance of a passport. See http://www.policiafederal.gov.ar for more information. To travel outside of Argentina, the child must carry signed, written permission from both parents, or from the non-traveling parent (if traveling with only one parent).
  • U.S. Immigrant Visa: After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child and you have filed Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, you then need to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa for your child from the U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you and be admitted to the United States as your child. As part of this process, you must provide the consular officer the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child.

    Before coming for your child’s immigrant visa interview, please complete an Electronic Immigrant Visa Application (DS-260) online at the Consular Electronic Application Center (CEAC). If you filed a Form I-600 petition in the United States, you should receive a letter from the National Visa Center (NVC) confirming receipt of the petition and assignment of a case number and an invoice ID number. You will need this information to log into CEAC to file the DS-260 for your child. An adoptive parent should fill out these forms in your child's name.  Answer every item on the form. If information is not applicable, please write “N/A” in the block.  Print and bring the DS-260 form confirmation page to the visa interview. Please review the DS-260 FAQs, our Online Immigrant Visa Forms page, or contact the NVC at NVCAdoptions@state.gov or +1-603-334-0700 if you have questions about completing the online DS-260 form.

    Visa issuance after the final interview generally takes 24 hours. It is not usually possible to provide the visa to adoptive parents on the same day as the immigrant visa interview. Adoptive parents should verify current processing times with the U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires before making final travel arrangements.

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States: An adopted child residing in the United States in the legal and physical custody of the U.S. citizen parent pursuant to a lawful admission for permanent residence generally will acquire U.S. citizenship automatically upon entry into the United States if the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000, including the child is under the age of eighteen.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States: You will need to complete an adoption following your child’s entry into the United States and before the child turns eighteen for the child (if he or she otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000) to automatically acquire U.S. citizenship.

Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

U.S. citizens are required to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Once your child has acquired U.S. citizenship, s/he will need a U.S. passport for any international travel. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Department of State’s Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Argentina

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa.  Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Argentina, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country in the world about various issues, including health conditions, crime, currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State through our Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive important information from the Embassy about safety conditions in your destination country. Enrollment makes it possible for the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Argentina, to contact you in an emergency, whether natural disaster, civil unrest, or family emergency. Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

By Argentine law, adoptive parents must inform the child of his/her adoption before the child turns 18 years of age. Parents must sign this commitment at the court at the time the adoption is granted. According to the laws in Argentina, adopted children have the right to know their true biological identity and will have access to their adoption file once they have reached the age of 18.

We strongly urge you to comply with the wish of Argentina and complete all post-adoption requirements in a timely manner. Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to that country's history of positive experiences with American parents.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.  Your primary provider can provide or point you to post- placement/post-adoption services to help your adopted child and your family transition smoothly and deal effectively with the many adjustments required in an intercountry adoption. 

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

COMPLAINTS

If you have concerns about your adoption process, we ask that you share this information with the Embassy in Buenos AIres, particularly if it involves possible fraud or misconduct specific to your child’s case. The Department of State takes all allegations of fraud or misconduct seriously. Our Adoption Comment Page provides several points of contact for adoptive families to comment on their adoption service provider, their experience applying for their child’s visa, or about the Form I-600 petition process.

The Hague Complaint Registry is an internet based registry for filing complaints about U.S. accredited or approved adoption service providers. If you think your provider's conduct may have been out of substantial compliance with accreditation standards, first submit your complaint in writing directly to your provider. If the complaint is not resolved through the provider's complaint process, you may file the complaint through the Hague Complaint Registry

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Argentina
4300 Avenida Colombia
1425 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Tel: (011)(54)(11) 5777-4533
Fax: (54)(11) 5777-4448
Email: BuenosAires.IV@state.gov
Internet: https://ar.usembassy.gov/embassy/embassy/

Argentina’s Adoption Authority
Secretaria National de la Ninez, Adolescencia y Familia
Av. Peron 524 piso 1 (for adoptions)
Tel: (54)(11) 4338-5800 into. 6012

Embassy of Argentina
1600 New Hampshire Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20009
Tel: (202) 939-6400
Internet: embassyofargentina.us

Argentina also has consulates in: Los Angeles, Miami, Atlanta, Chicago, New York, and Houston.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Email:  Adoption@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-600A application or I-600 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center\
Tel:  1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email:  NBC.Adoptions@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 6 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 6 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None One 1 Month
U-2 None One 1 Month
U-3 None One 1 Month
U-4 None One 1 Month
U-5 None One 1 Month
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

All document information (birth certificates, death certificates, Identity documents, passports, etc.) can be obtained through the Ministry of Interior, National Registry of people (Registro Nacional de las Personas). Police certificates can be obtained through the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights. 

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees: No fee is required unless the certificate is requested by a judicial authority.
  • Document Name: Acta de Nacimiento
  • Issuing Authority: Civil Registry (Registro Civil) of the municipality or rural area in which the birth occurred
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Birth certificates have no security features as they are a copy of the book where they are registered.  Each copy must have a blue or black stamp with a legend stating “ es copia fiel del original”.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Must contain stamp and signature of the registry’s authority.
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining:  Procedures vary depending on the province/ registry from which it must be obtained.
  • Certified Copies Available: Yes
  • Alternate Documents: No
  • Exceptions: No
  • Comments:  There are two types of birth records.  The "Acta de Nacimiento" is the official birth entry and should be used in place of the "Certificado de Nacimiento." These are obtained from the Civil Registry (Registro Civil) of the municipality or rural area in which the birth occurred.  If documentation of the birth is not available, the National Civil Registry (RENAPER) will issue a letter called “Certificación de datos personales” (Certification of personal data) stating such. The letter can be requested at RENAPER, or it can also be requested through the Civil Registry where the birth occurred.

 

Death/Burial

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees:  No fee is required in most cases.
  • Document Name: Acta de Defunción
  • Issuing Authority: Civil Registry (Registro Civil) where the death occurred
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Death certificates have no security features and are copies from the book where the death was registered. They must have a blue or black stamp stating “ es copia fiel del original”
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Must contain stamp and signature of the registry’s authority
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Procedures vary depending on the province/ registry from which it must be obtained.
  • Certified Copies Available: Yes
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: N/A
Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees: N/A
  • Document Name:  Acta de Matrimonio
  • Issuing Authority:  Civil Registry (Registro Civil) where the marriage was performed
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Marriage certificates have no security features as they are a copy of the book in which the registration was recorded.  They must have a blue or black stamp that states “es copia fiel del original”.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Must contain stamp and signature of the registry’s authority
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining:  Procedures vary depending on the province/registry from which it must be obtained.
  • Certified Copies Available:  Yes
  • Alternate Documents:  Marriage book “Libreta de matrimonio” is not considered an official document but may provide additional evidence of the marriage.
  • Exceptions:  N/A
  • Comments: N/A
     

Divorce

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees:  N/A
  • Document Name: Sentencia de Divorcio (Decree of divorce)- Divorce certificate ( acta de divorcio)
  • Issuing Authority: Civil Court or RENAPER
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Decrees of divorce have no security features and are only the written judge’s sentence of divorce.  Divorce certificates (acta de dicorcio) have no security features but are only a copy of the book where the original marriage was registered.  The divorce certificate is an amendment to the marriage certificate.  Copies must have a blue or black stamp with a legend stating “ es copia fiel del original”
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A
  • Registration Criteria: The original marriage certificate is amended upon presentation of the decree of divorce (sentencia de divorcio) from the civil court.
  • Procedure for Obtaining:  Procedures vary depending on the province/ registry.
  • Certified Copies Available:  Yes
  • Alternate Documents:  Decree of divorce (sentencia de divorcio) from the civil court
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments:  N/A

 

Adoption Certificates
  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: N/A
  • Document Name: Decreto De Adopcion
  • Issuing Authority: The judge that adjudicated the adoption case.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Judge (Juez)
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Request
  • Certified Copies Available:  Yes
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: The "Decreto De Adopcion" is available and is issued by an Argentine judge after final completion of the adoption procedures. Argentine Civil Registries may issue new identity documentation (birth certificate, cedula, or passport) to the adopted child showing the adoptive parents as the actual parents on the basis of this decree.
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Identity Card
  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees: Currently 60 AR$
  • Document Name: DNI, orDocumento Nacional de Identidad
  • Issuing Authority: National Registry of Persons (Registro Nacional de las Personas)
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: A secure document in the style of a  U.S. Driver’s License
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A
  • Registration Criteria: Available for citizens and permanent residents
  • Procedure for Obtaining:  Application to Registro Nacional de las Personas
  • Certified Copies Available: N/A
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions:  N/A
  • Comments:  N/A
Police, Court, Prison Records

Court/Prison Records

  • Available:  Court records are available.  Prison records are not.
  • Fees: N/A
  • Document Name: Varies
  • Issuing Authority: Court in which the case was processed.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Request
  • Certified Copies Available: Yes
  • Alternate Documents: No
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: N/A


Police Certificates

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees: Depending on the urgency of the request.
  • Document Name:  Certificado de Antecedentes Penales con excepción al artículo 51 del Código Penal
  • Issuing Authority:  Registro Nacional de Reincidencia
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Federal Ministry of Justice and Human Rights
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The certificate must be requested by scheduling an appointment and paying the fee at a bank: http://www.dnrec.jus.gov.ar/
  • Certified Copies Available: Yes
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: The document must have the annotation mentioned above, “Penales con excepción al artículo 51 del Código Penal”. Without this annotation, a full list of arrests and charges won’t be provided.

 

Military Records
  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees: N/A
  • Document Name: Varies
  • Issuing Authority: Military
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A
  • Registration Criteria: In person request
  • Procedure for Obtaining: In person request
  • Certified Copies Available: N/A
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions: N/A

 

Passports & Other Travel Documents
  • Types Available (Regular, Diplomatic, Official, etc.): Regular, Diplomatic, and Official
  • Fees: Passports normally cost AR$ 550, but may cost more if emergency service is needed.
  • Document Name:  Pasaporte
  • Issuing Government Authority: National Registry of Persons
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Electronic passport
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:
  • Registration Criteria: Must present birth certificate or previous DNI
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Must schedule an online appointment.
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: N/A
  • Other Documents Available: N/A

 

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts
  • Post Title: Embassy of the United States of America
  • Address:  Avenida Colombia 4300
  • Phone Number: (011) (54) (11) 5777-4533/34
  • Visa Services: All services for all types of visas
  • Comments / Additional Information: N/A
Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Argentina.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, D.C. (202) 238-6400/6401 (202) 332-3171

Atlanta, GA (404) 880-0805 (404) 880-0806

Chicago, IL (312) 819-2610 (312) 819-2626

Houston, TX (713) 871-8935 (713) 871-0639

Los Angeles, CA (323) 954-9155 (323) 934-9076

Miami, FL (305) 373-1889 (305) 373-1598

New York, NY (212) 603-0400 (212) 541-7746

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Buenos Aires
Av. Colombia 4300
(C1425GMN) Buenos Aires
Argentina
Telephone
+(54)(11) 5777-4533
Emergency
+(54)(11) 5777-4354
Fax
+(54)(11) 5777-4240
Argentina Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Argentina
Argentine Republic
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Must be valid at time of entry

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required for entry stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Not required for stays of 90 days or less

VACCINATIONS:

 None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

Up to US$10,000 or equivalent undeclared for people over 16; US$5,000 or equivalent for those under 16.

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Buenos Aires

Av. Colombia 4300
(C1425GMN) Buenos Aires
Argentina
Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4533
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4354
Fax: +(54)(11) 5777-4240

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Argentina for information on U.S. - Argentina relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS FOR U.S. CITIZENS: U.S. citizens need a valid passport to enter Argentina. U.S. citizens with expired or damaged passports may not be allowed to enter and could be sent back to the United States at their own expense. 

Diplomatic or official passport holders must get visas prior to arrival. Private U.S. citizens do not need a visa for visits of up to 90 days for tourism or business. The U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires cannot help travelers with obtaining Brazilian or Paraguayan visas. For more information, see the Country Specific Information for Brazil and Paraguay.

Visit the Embassy of Argentina’s website for visa information. For information about customs rules, please read our customs information page and the Argentine customs page.

SPECIAL ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS FOR DUAL NATIONALS: Different rules may apply to dual U.S.-Argentine citizens, depending on when they became U.S. citizens. Visit the Argentine Ministry of the Interior website for the most current information.

SPECIAL ENTRY/EXIT REQUIREMENTS FOR MINORS: Children under 18 who live in Argentina and are not traveling with both parents must have the notarized consent of both parents to leave Argentina (see international parental child abduction for more information).

Find information on dual nationality and international parental child abduction on our website.

HIV/AIDS RESTRICTIONS: The U.S. Department of State does not know of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for foreign visitors or residents of Argentina.

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Safety and Security

Demonstrations are common in Buenos Aires and happen in other cities as well. Protesters often block streets and highways. Demonstrations are usually nonviolent, but can turn confrontational. U.S. citizens should avoid any areas where crowds gather to protest. 

CRIME: Street crime is a problem in Buenos Aires, Rosario and Mendoza. Look out for muggers, pickpockets, scam artists, and purse-snatchers who work on the street, in restaurants and hotel lobbies, at bus and train stations, in public transportation, and in cruise ship ports. 

  • Violent robberies often occur in the San Telmo, Recoleta, and La Boca neighborhoods of Buenos Aires. 
  • While crime occurs at all times of day, tourists who go to La Boca should only visit the tourist street during the day. 
  • Avoid “villas” or shanty towns in Buenos Aires and other major cities, even if they are in tourist zones.     

Scams involving yellow and black taxis have been reported at international airports and around Buenos Aires. Pre-arrange a ride or select one of the flat-rate “remise” services (private car with driver) from the airport. In town, use radio taxis from places like a hotel when possible. See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

  • Drivers pretend to help tourists with money while trading good bills for counterfeit ones.
  • A “handler” at the airport accepts payment for the ride, but then the driver also demands money at the end of the ride.
  • The taxi “breaks down” on the road, and a second taxi comes to get the passenger. Both drivers demand payment.
  • Spraying mustard or another substance on the tourist from a distance. An accomplice robs the victim while pretending to help clean the stain.
  • Do not place handbags on the back of your chair or on the floor at a restaurant. Keep them in your lap. 

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"Express kidnappings" also occur, where victims are grabbed and forced to take out as much money as possible from ATMs. Family or co-workers are contacted and told to bring all the cash they have on hand or can gather in a couple of hours. Once the ransom is paid, the victim is usually released unharmed. There have been some foreign victims of express kidnappings. Fake telephone kidnappings are very common. Learning important phone numbers and, if robbed, immediately finding a phone and letting family members know you are alright are important in stopping this crime. 

Travelers should not pack valuables in checked bags. 

The U.S. Embassy sees many reports of stolen passports. Passports and other valuables should be locked in a hotel safe. Carry a photocopy of your passport with you. 

VICTIMS OF CRIME: Report crimes to the local police at the numbers below and contact the U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires:

  • Dial 911 to report emergencies, call the police, an ambulance or the fire department. 
  • In Cordoba, Mendoza, Iguazu, Tucuman and Tierra del Fuego, dial 101.

Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance. If you are in immediate danger, call the police at 911.

For more information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some crimes are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES:

  • Dual Nationals: U.S.-Argentine dual nationals may have to follow special rules that apply to Argentine citizens. In some cases, the U.S. government may have trouble providing protection abroad to dual citizens.
  • Currency Exchange and Access: You must show your passport to exchange money. Keep all receipts related to buying pesos.  Be careful if you are offered illegal exchange rates. The Embassy does not exchange money.

Some U.S. citizens report problems using their ATM cards issued by U.S. banks at certain ATMs. There is no set list of ATMs or banks where you can use U.S. cards. If your ATM card does not work at one ATM, try another one or use a reputable bank or exchange house. Daily withdrawal limits may also be lower than in the U.S.

  • Hunting and Fishing/Transporting Firearms: If you plan to hunt or fish, follow all gun and game laws. Some U.S. citizens report problems bringing guns into and out of Argentina. More information can be found here.
  • Adventure Travel: For local authorities, helping visitors lost or injured in remote areas can be hard. Travelers visiting isolated and wilderness areas must learn about local conditions and give their itinerary to park or police officials. 

Argentina has the highest mountain outside of the Himalayas, Mount Aconcagua.  Several U.S. citizens, including expert climbers, have died while climbing the mountain.  Rescue missions are often impossible. 

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Argentina. 

See our LGBTI travel information page and section 6 of the Department of State's Human Rights report for further details.


Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance:
 People with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different than in the United States.  The law mandates access to buildings for persons with disabilities, but while the federal government has protective laws, many provinces do not.

Students:  See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers:  See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.   See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.


If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Argentina to ensure the medication is legal in Argentina.  Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

The following diseases are common:

  • Hepatitis A
  • Yellow Fever
  • Dengue
  • Typhoid
  • Rabies

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and CDC recommendations for travel to Argentina.

More health information:

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Travel and Transportation

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: Driving is more dangerous than in the United States. Drivers in Argentina tend to be aggressive, especially in Buenos Aires, and often ignore traffic regulations. Drivers should prepare in advance when taking long road trips. Gas stations are often far apart and not always easily identified from the main roadway. You need an Argentine or international driver’s license to drive, but verify with local authorities for the most current information.

Please see our road safety page for more information. You should visit the websites of Argentina's national tourist office and national roadways office (available only in Spanish).

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Argentina’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Argentina’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

MARITIME TRAVEL: Mariners planning travel to Argentina should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website and the NGA broadcast warnings website select “broadcast warnings”.

 

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Buenos Aires

Av. Colombia 4300
(C1425GMN) Buenos Aires
Argentina
Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4533
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(54)(11) 5777-4354
Fax: +(54)(11) 5777-4240

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General Information

Argentina and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) since June 1, 1991.

For information concerning travel to Argentina, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Argentina.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Argentina.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact Information:

U.S. Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Website

The Argentine Central Authority for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship.  The Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship performs the duties given to central authorities under the Hague Abduction Convention, including processing Hague Abduction Convention applications for return of and access to children.  They can be reached at:

Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship
Legal Affairs Department
International Legal Cooperation Department
Esmeralda 1212 - 4th floor
1007 Buenos Aires
Argentina
Telephone:  +54 (11) 4819 7170; +54 (11) 4819 7172
Fax:  +54 (11) 4819 7170; +54 (11) 4819 7172
E-mail
Website

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Argentina, the left-behind parent must submit a Hague application to the Argentine Central Authority (the Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship), either directly, or through the U.S. Central Authority (USCA).  The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to the Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the United States or Argentine central authorities.  Attorney fees, if necessary, are the sole responsibility of the person hiring the attorney.  Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Argentina.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Argentina.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Retaining an Attorney

In Argentina, Hague Abduction Convention cases cannot be filed in an Argentine court without legal representation. The Argentine Central Authority (Ministry of Foreign Relations and Worship) provides a list of lawyers licensed to practice in the appropriate jurisdiction. When parents cannot afford a private attorney and meet the Argentine Central Authority’s financial requirements for assistance, the Argentine Central Authority will appoint a public defender or pro bono legal counsel. 

The U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina posts a list of attorneys including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Argentina.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Intercountry adoptions are not currently possible between Argentina and the United States.
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
No
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Hague Convention Information

Argentina is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008, intercountry adoption processing for Argentina did not change.

Intercountry adoptions are not currently possible between Argentina and the United States. Argentina is not considered a country of origin in intercountry adoption.  While intercountry adoptions are legally possible, Argentine children eligible for adoptions are placed with Argentina’s residents. No children from Argentina eligible for adoption have received U.S. immigrant visas based on a Convention adoption in the past five fiscal years. The information provided is intended primarily to assist in extremely rare adoption cases from Argentina, including adoptions of Argentine children by relatives in the United States, as well as adoptions from third countries by U.S. citizens living in Argentina.

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Algeria, you must meet certain suitability and eligibility requirements. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt a child from another country and bring that child to live in the United States under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States with an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to being found suitable and eligible to adopt by USCIS, prospective adoptive parents seeking to adopt from Argentina must meet the following requirements:

  • Residency: Applicants must be Argentine nationals or permanent resident aliens of Argentina for at least the five years immediately preceding the application for guardianship (first step in the adoption process).
  • Age of Adopting Parents: If single, the prospective adoptive parent must be at least 30 years of age. There is no minimum age requirement for married prospective adoptive parents. At least one member of the couple must be at least 18 years older than the adoptee.
  • Marriage: Married couples must be married at least three years and have no offspring. If the couple can prove they are physically unable to have a child, the court will consider marriages under 3 years. Married couples must adopt jointly except when there is a legal separation decree, the spouse is declared mentally incompetent by a court, or there is a judicial declaration of absence of spouse (presumption of death).
  • Income: Prospective adoptive parents must prove financial ability.
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Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to qualifying as an orphan under U.S. immigration law, the child must meet the following requirements of Argentina:

  • Relinquishment: Biological parents may relinquish their children for adoption only through the courts. This release is irrevocable and can only be signed at the court by appointment set by a judge at least 60 days after the child's birth. It cannot be done immediately following the birth. The law provides for the 60-day window after the birth of the child to allow the birth mother time to think about her decision. During this 60-day period, the court may review the personal conditions of the biological parents, their age, ability to take care of the child, reasons for the release for adoption and any other considerations and information pertinent to this act. A judge may request the opinion of, technical advice from, and/or the effective participation of a Defensor de Menores e Incapaces from the Minsterio Publico de la Defensa to determine the best interests of the child.
  • Abandonment: A release by the biological parents will not be necessary in those instances when the child is a ward of the court, already an orphan on the streets, or has been housed in a government institution continuously for more than one year without any indication of interest from the birth parent(s).
  • Age of Adoptive Child: None. Please note that for a child to meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law, a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, must be filed on the child’s behalf while the child is under the age of 16 (or under the age of 18 if the child is the birth sibling of another adopted child who has immigrated or will immigrate based on adoption by the same adoptive parent(s)).
  • Sibling Adoptions: None.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: None.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: None.

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are eligible for adoption. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to the adoption of their child(ren).

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How to Adopt

Argentina’s Adoption Authority

While there is no official adoption authority, prospective adoptive parents must apply to Consejo Nacionalde Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia.

The Process

Because Argentina does not currently allow intercountry adoption, and adoption is restricted to Argentine citizens and permanent resident aliens residing in Argentina, the following information is meant to be a general overview of the process for those who are qualified to adopt.

The process for adopting a child from Argentina generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt (Form I-600A)
  3. Apply to Argentina’s Authorities to Adopt and be Matched with a Child
  4. Adopt the Child in Argentina
  5. Apply for Your Child to be Found Eligible to Immigrate to the United States as an Orphan (Form I-600)
  6. Apply for a U.S. Immigrant Visa for Your Child and Bring Your Child Home  

Note: By Argentine law, the adoptive parents must inform the child of his/her adoption before the age of 18. According to the laws of Argentina, adopted children have the right to know their true biological identity and will have access to their adoption file once they have reached the age of 18. This is a commitment that the adopting parents must sign at the court at the time the adoption is granted.

1.  Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

Before taking steps to adopt a child from Argentina, you should select a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider to be the primary provider in your case. As of July 14, 2014, a primary provider is required in every intercountry adoption case under the UAA, unless an exception applies. The primary provider is responsible for:

  • Ensuring that all six adoption services defined at 22 CFR 96.2 are provided;
  • Supervising and being responsible for supervised providers where used (see 22 CFR 96.14); and
  • Developing and implementing a service plan in accordance with 22 CFR 96.44

For more information on primary providers and the UAA, please see Universal Accreditation Act of 2012.

 2.  Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt

In order to adopt a child from Argentina, you will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Argentina and U.S. immigration law. 

To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also choose to file a Form I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition, with USCIS to be found suitable and eligible to adopt before you identify a child to adopt. You may also choose to file the Form I-600 petition along with all the required Form I-600A application supporting documentation, including an approved home study, once you have been matched with a child and have obtained all the necessary documentation. Please see the USCIS website for more information about filing options. Regardless of which approach you take, the home study must meet the same requirements. As of July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, the home study must comply with the requirements in 8 CFR 204.311 and 22 CFR Part 96.47

3.  Apply to Argentina’s Authorities to Adopt and be Matched with a Child

If you are found suitable and eligible to adopt under U.S. law, you must also submit an adoption application to the court having jurisdiction over their domicile in Argentina to be found eligible to adopt by Argentina. In that application, they may indicate their preference for the child's gender and age, and whether they consider themselves capable to adopt a child with health problems or other special needs.

The prospective adoptive parents' names will be placed on a single nationwide list by filing date and be made public. The Consejo de la Ninez, Adolenscencia y Familia will inform them when their turn is reached. Adoptive parents may check their name status by contacting the Consejo at the address included in the Contact Information Section.

If a child is eligible for intercountry adoption, the competent adoption authority or other authorized entity in Argentina will review your adoption dossier and, if an appropriate match is found, will provide you with a referral. We encourage families to consult with a medical professional and their adoption service provider to understand the needs of the specific child but each family must decide for itself whether it will be able to meet the needs of, and provide a permanent home for, a specific child, and must conform to the recommendations in the home study for the number of children and capacity to deal with any special needs of an adoptive child. Learn more about Health Considerations.

Once matched with a child, the court will release a child in guardianship to the prospective adoptive parents. The child will remain under the jurisdiction of the court for the full period of guardianship. In no case will the child be permitted to depart Argentina.

The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Argentina’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law.

 4.  Adopt the Child in Argentina

Application for adoption can only be filed after the guardianship period of no less than six months and not more than twelve months has elapsed. Birth parents will lose all rights and obligations after that time and these rights will be transferred to the prospective adoptive parents.

The process for finalizing the adoption in Argentina generally includes the following:

  • Role of the Court: The Argentine court releases a child in guardianship to the prospective adoptive parents when a suitable match has been determined.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: As of July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, there must be a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider acting as the primary provider in every case. Also, any agency or person providing an adoption service on behalf of prospective adoptive parents in any Convention or non-Convention case must be accredited or approved, or be a supervised or exempted provider. Adoption service means any one of the following  six services:
    1. Identifying a child for adoption and arranging an adoption;
    2. Securing the necessary consent to termination of parental rights and to adoption;
    3. Performing a background study on a child or a home study on a prospective adoptive parent(s), and reporting on such a study;
    4. Making non-judicial determinations of the best interests of a child and the appropriateness of an adoptive placement for the child;
    5. Monitoring a case after a child has been placed with prospective adoptive parent(s) until final adoption; or
    6. When necessary because of a disruption before final adoption, assuming custody and providing (including facilitating the provision of) child care or any other social service pending an alternative placement.  22 CFR 96.2 Definitions.
  • Adoption Application: Adoption application can be filed after the guardianship period of 6-12 months has elapsed. After this guardianship period, birth parents lose all rights and obligations to the child.
  • Time Frame: Once guardianship has been awarded by the court, it takes between six months to a year to obtain the final adoption decree.
  • Adoption Fees: There are no fixed adoption fees to conclude an adoption in Argentina. Filing the petition for guardianship (to lead to adoption) is free. Prospective adoptive parents are responsible for attorney fees although some courts do provide free legal assistance. The judge may set fees for other services rendered.

    Prospective adoptive parents are advised to obtain detailed receipts for all fees and donations paid, either by themselves directly or through their U.S. adoption service provider, and to raise any concerns regarding any payment that you believe may be contrary to U.S. law, or the law of Argentina, with your adoption service provider. Please also refer to information concerning the Hague Complaint Registry. Improper payments may have the appearance of buying achild, violate applicable law, and could put all future adoptions in Argentina at risk.  The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, for instance, makes it unlawful to bribe foreign government officials to obtain or retain business. Further, the UAA and IAA make it unlawful to improperly influence relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing Central Authority functions.
  • Documents Required: 
    • Proof of Argentine citizenship or legal permanent residence in Argentina for the last five years
    • Copy of the prospective adoptive parents' marriage certificate (if applicable)
    • Evidence of good conduct
    • Evidence of financial ability

Note:  Additional documents may be requested.

  • Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic. The U.S Department of State’s Authentications Office has information on the subject.

5.  Apply for Your Child to be Found Eligible for Immigration to the United States as an Orphan

After you finalize the adoption, USCIS must determine whether the child meets the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law in order for the child to immigrate to the United States.  You will need to file a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative. At the time you file your Form I-600 petition, the adjudicating officer will determine whether the UAA applies or if your case is UAA grandfathered.  For more information on UAA grandfathering and transition cases, please see Universal Accreditation Act of 2012. Unless an exception applies, you must identify a primary provider in your case and the adjudicating officer may ask for the name and contact information of the primary provider if not provided in your Form I-600 petition. This information is required and, without it, your Form I-600 petition cannot be approved. 

If you have an approved, valid Form I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition, you may file your Form I-600 petition either in the United States with USCIS or in person at the U.S.Embassy in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

When a Form I-600 petition is adjudicated by USCIS in the United States, the consular section in Buenos Aires, Argentina, must complete a Form I-604, Determination on Child for Adoption (sometimes informally referred to as an orphan determination), to verify the child’s orphan status. When a Form I-600 petition is adjudicated by an international USCIS office, USCIS generally completes the Form I-604 determination.

For Form I-600 petitions filed with the Embassy’s consular section, the consular officer must complete the Form I-604 determination after you file your Form I-600 petition. Conducting the Form I-604 determination is a critical part of the orphan adoption process. It can take weeks to complete, depending upon the circumstances of your case. Consular officers appreciate that families are eager to bring their adopted child home as quickly as possible. Some of the factors that may contribute to the length of the process include prevailing fraud patterns in the country of origin, civil unrest or security concerns that restrict travel to certain areas of the country, and the number of determinations performed by available staff. Consular officers make every effort to conduct them as quickly and thoroughly as possible. You are advised to keep your travel plans flexible while awaiting the results.

6.  Apply for a U.S. Immigrant Visa for Your Child and Bring Your Child Home

Now that your adoption is complete, and the Form I-604 determination has been completed finding that your child meets the legal definition of an orphan for immigration purposes, there are a few more steps to take before you and your child can head home. Specifically, you need to apply for three documents before your child can travel to the United States:

  • Birth Certificate: You will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child, so that you can later apply for a passport. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

    Once the adoption is complete, the adoptive parents may request the issuance of a new birth certificate.
  • Argentina Passport: Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Argentina.

    After the adoption is finalized, the parents may apply to the Argentine Federal Police for the issuance of a passport. See http://www.policiafederal.gov.ar for more information. To travel outside of Argentina, the child must carry signed, written permission from both parents, or from the non-traveling parent (if traveling with only one parent).
  • U.S. Immigrant Visa: After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child and you have filed Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, you then need to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa for your child from the U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you and be admitted to the United States as your child. As part of this process, you must provide the consular officer the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child.

    Before coming for your child’s immigrant visa interview, please complete an Electronic Immigrant Visa Application (DS-260) online at the Consular Electronic Application Center (CEAC). If you filed a Form I-600 petition in the United States, you should receive a letter from the National Visa Center (NVC) confirming receipt of the petition and assignment of a case number and an invoice ID number. You will need this information to log into CEAC to file the DS-260 for your child. An adoptive parent should fill out these forms in your child's name.  Answer every item on the form. If information is not applicable, please write “N/A” in the block.  Print and bring the DS-260 form confirmation page to the visa interview. Please review the DS-260 FAQs, our Online Immigrant Visa Forms page, or contact the NVC at NVCAdoptions@state.gov or +1-603-334-0700 if you have questions about completing the online DS-260 form.

    Visa issuance after the final interview generally takes 24 hours. It is not usually possible to provide the visa to adoptive parents on the same day as the immigrant visa interview. Adoptive parents should verify current processing times with the U.S. Embassy in Buenos Aires before making final travel arrangements.

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States: An adopted child residing in the United States in the legal and physical custody of the U.S. citizen parent pursuant to a lawful admission for permanent residence generally will acquire U.S. citizenship automatically upon entry into the United States if the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000, including the child is under the age of eighteen.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States: You will need to complete an adoption following your child’s entry into the United States and before the child turns eighteen for the child (if he or she otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000) to automatically acquire U.S. citizenship.

Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

U.S. citizens are required to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Once your child has acquired U.S. citizenship, s/he will need a U.S. passport for any international travel. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Department of State’s Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Argentina

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa.  Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Argentina, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country in the world about various issues, including health conditions, crime, currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State through our Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive important information from the Embassy about safety conditions in your destination country. Enrollment makes it possible for the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Argentina, to contact you in an emergency, whether natural disaster, civil unrest, or family emergency. Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

By Argentine law, adoptive parents must inform the child of his/her adoption before the child turns 18 years of age. Parents must sign this commitment at the court at the time the adoption is granted. According to the laws in Argentina, adopted children have the right to know their true biological identity and will have access to their adoption file once they have reached the age of 18.

We strongly urge you to comply with the wish of Argentina and complete all post-adoption requirements in a timely manner. Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to that country's history of positive experiences with American parents.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.  Your primary provider can provide or point you to post- placement/post-adoption services to help your adopted child and your family transition smoothly and deal effectively with the many adjustments required in an intercountry adoption. 

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

COMPLAINTS

If you have concerns about your adoption process, we ask that you share this information with the Embassy in Buenos AIres, particularly if it involves possible fraud or misconduct specific to your child’s case. The Department of State takes all allegations of fraud or misconduct seriously. Our Adoption Comment Page provides several points of contact for adoptive families to comment on their adoption service provider, their experience applying for their child’s visa, or about the Form I-600 petition process.

The Hague Complaint Registry is an internet based registry for filing complaints about U.S. accredited or approved adoption service providers. If you think your provider's conduct may have been out of substantial compliance with accreditation standards, first submit your complaint in writing directly to your provider. If the complaint is not resolved through the provider's complaint process, you may file the complaint through the Hague Complaint Registry

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Argentina
4300 Avenida Colombia
1425 Buenos Aires, Argentina
Tel: (011)(54)(11) 5777-4533
Fax: (54)(11) 5777-4448
Email: BuenosAires.IV@state.gov
Internet: https://ar.usembassy.gov/embassy/embassy/

Argentina’s Adoption Authority
Secretaria National de la Ninez, Adolescencia y Familia
Av. Peron 524 piso 1 (for adoptions)
Tel: (54)(11) 4338-5800 into. 6012

Embassy of Argentina
1600 New Hampshire Ave., N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20009
Tel: (202) 939-6400
Internet: embassyofargentina.us

Argentina also has consulates in: Los Angeles, Miami, Atlanta, Chicago, New York, and Houston.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Email:  Adoption@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-600A application or I-600 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center\
Tel:  1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email:  NBC.Adoptions@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 6 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 6 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None One 1 Month
U-2 None One 1 Month
U-3 None One 1 Month
U-4 None One 1 Month
U-5 None One 1 Month
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

All document information (birth certificates, death certificates, Identity documents, passports, etc.) can be obtained through the Ministry of Interior, National Registry of people (Registro Nacional de las Personas). Police certificates can be obtained through the Ministry of Justice and Human Rights. 

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees: No fee is required unless the certificate is requested by a judicial authority.
  • Document Name: Acta de Nacimiento
  • Issuing Authority: Civil Registry (Registro Civil) of the municipality or rural area in which the birth occurred
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Birth certificates have no security features as they are a copy of the book where they are registered.  Each copy must have a blue or black stamp with a legend stating “ es copia fiel del original”.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Must contain stamp and signature of the registry’s authority.
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining:  Procedures vary depending on the province/ registry from which it must be obtained.
  • Certified Copies Available: Yes
  • Alternate Documents: No
  • Exceptions: No
  • Comments:  There are two types of birth records.  The "Acta de Nacimiento" is the official birth entry and should be used in place of the "Certificado de Nacimiento." These are obtained from the Civil Registry (Registro Civil) of the municipality or rural area in which the birth occurred.  If documentation of the birth is not available, the National Civil Registry (RENAPER) will issue a letter called “Certificación de datos personales” (Certification of personal data) stating such. The letter can be requested at RENAPER, or it can also be requested through the Civil Registry where the birth occurred.

 

Death/Burial

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees:  No fee is required in most cases.
  • Document Name: Acta de Defunción
  • Issuing Authority: Civil Registry (Registro Civil) where the death occurred
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Death certificates have no security features and are copies from the book where the death was registered. They must have a blue or black stamp stating “ es copia fiel del original”
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Must contain stamp and signature of the registry’s authority
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Procedures vary depending on the province/ registry from which it must be obtained.
  • Certified Copies Available: Yes
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: N/A
Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees: N/A
  • Document Name:  Acta de Matrimonio
  • Issuing Authority:  Civil Registry (Registro Civil) where the marriage was performed
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Marriage certificates have no security features as they are a copy of the book in which the registration was recorded.  They must have a blue or black stamp that states “es copia fiel del original”.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Must contain stamp and signature of the registry’s authority
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining:  Procedures vary depending on the province/registry from which it must be obtained.
  • Certified Copies Available:  Yes
  • Alternate Documents:  Marriage book “Libreta de matrimonio” is not considered an official document but may provide additional evidence of the marriage.
  • Exceptions:  N/A
  • Comments: N/A
     

Divorce

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees:  N/A
  • Document Name: Sentencia de Divorcio (Decree of divorce)- Divorce certificate ( acta de divorcio)
  • Issuing Authority: Civil Court or RENAPER
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Decrees of divorce have no security features and are only the written judge’s sentence of divorce.  Divorce certificates (acta de dicorcio) have no security features but are only a copy of the book where the original marriage was registered.  The divorce certificate is an amendment to the marriage certificate.  Copies must have a blue or black stamp with a legend stating “ es copia fiel del original”
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A
  • Registration Criteria: The original marriage certificate is amended upon presentation of the decree of divorce (sentencia de divorcio) from the civil court.
  • Procedure for Obtaining:  Procedures vary depending on the province/ registry.
  • Certified Copies Available:  Yes
  • Alternate Documents:  Decree of divorce (sentencia de divorcio) from the civil court
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments:  N/A

 

Adoption Certificates
  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: N/A
  • Document Name: Decreto De Adopcion
  • Issuing Authority: The judge that adjudicated the adoption case.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Judge (Juez)
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Request
  • Certified Copies Available:  Yes
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: The "Decreto De Adopcion" is available and is issued by an Argentine judge after final completion of the adoption procedures. Argentine Civil Registries may issue new identity documentation (birth certificate, cedula, or passport) to the adopted child showing the adoptive parents as the actual parents on the basis of this decree.
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Identity Card
  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees: Currently 60 AR$
  • Document Name: DNI, orDocumento Nacional de Identidad
  • Issuing Authority: National Registry of Persons (Registro Nacional de las Personas)
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: A secure document in the style of a  U.S. Driver’s License
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A
  • Registration Criteria: Available for citizens and permanent residents
  • Procedure for Obtaining:  Application to Registro Nacional de las Personas
  • Certified Copies Available: N/A
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions:  N/A
  • Comments:  N/A
Police, Court, Prison Records

Court/Prison Records

  • Available:  Court records are available.  Prison records are not.
  • Fees: N/A
  • Document Name: Varies
  • Issuing Authority: Court in which the case was processed.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Request
  • Certified Copies Available: Yes
  • Alternate Documents: No
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: N/A


Police Certificates

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees: Depending on the urgency of the request.
  • Document Name:  Certificado de Antecedentes Penales con excepción al artículo 51 del Código Penal
  • Issuing Authority:  Registro Nacional de Reincidencia
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Federal Ministry of Justice and Human Rights
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The certificate must be requested by scheduling an appointment and paying the fee at a bank: http://www.dnrec.jus.gov.ar/
  • Certified Copies Available: Yes
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: The document must have the annotation mentioned above, “Penales con excepción al artículo 51 del Código Penal”. Without this annotation, a full list of arrests and charges won’t be provided.

 

Military Records
  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees: N/A
  • Document Name: Varies
  • Issuing Authority: Military
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A
  • Registration Criteria: In person request
  • Procedure for Obtaining: In person request
  • Certified Copies Available: N/A
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions: N/A

 

Passports & Other Travel Documents
  • Types Available (Regular, Diplomatic, Official, etc.): Regular, Diplomatic, and Official
  • Fees: Passports normally cost AR$ 550, but may cost more if emergency service is needed.
  • Document Name:  Pasaporte
  • Issuing Government Authority: National Registry of Persons
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Electronic passport
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:
  • Registration Criteria: Must present birth certificate or previous DNI
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Must schedule an online appointment.
  • Alternate Documents: N/A
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: N/A
  • Other Documents Available: N/A

 

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts
  • Post Title: Embassy of the United States of America
  • Address:  Avenida Colombia 4300
  • Phone Number: (011) (54) (11) 5777-4533/34
  • Visa Services: All services for all types of visas
  • Comments / Additional Information: N/A
Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Argentina.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, D.C. (202) 238-6400/6401 (202) 332-3171

Atlanta, GA (404) 880-0805 (404) 880-0806

Chicago, IL (312) 819-2610 (312) 819-2626

Houston, TX (713) 871-8935 (713) 871-0639

Los Angeles, CA (323) 954-9155 (323) 934-9076

Miami, FL (305) 373-1889 (305) 373-1598

New York, NY (212) 603-0400 (212) 541-7746

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Buenos Aires
Av. Colombia 4300
(C1425GMN) Buenos Aires
Argentina
Telephone
+(54)(11) 5777-4533
Emergency
+(54)(11) 5777-4354
Fax
+(54)(11) 5777-4240
Argentina Country Map

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Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.