Emergency Alert
September 17, 2017
Hurricanes Irma and Jose
Emergency Alert
October 2, 2017
Hurricane Maria

Intercountry Adoption

English

Country Information

Papua New Guinea

Country Information

Papua New Guinea
Independent State of Papua New Guinea
ALL /
ALL /
Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One blank page is required 

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Available upon arrival for stays of fewer than 60 days 

VACCINATIONS:

None required

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

More than PGK 10,000 must be declared. 

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

More than PGK 10,000 must be declared. 

ALL /
ALL /
Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Port Moresby

Douglas Street, adjacent to the Bank of Papua New Guinea,
P.O. Box 1492
Port Moresby, NCD 121
Papua New Guinea

Telephone: +(675) 321-1455

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(675) 7200-9439

ALL /
ALL /
Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Papua New Guinea for information on U.S.-Papua New Guinea relations.

ALL /
ALL /
Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

To enter Papua New Guinea, you must have a passport that is valid for at least six months from the date of intended travel, an onward/return airline ticket, and proof of sufficient funds. You may obtain a tourist visa (valid for stays of up to 60 days, with extensions available for an additional 30 days) and single-entry business visas (valid for stays of up to 30 days) when you arrive at Jacksons International Airport in Port Moresby. You must apply for a visa in advance if you are traveling for reasons other than business or tourism. The Embassy of Papua New Guinea is located at 1779 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Suite 805, Washington, DC 20036; telephone: 202-745-3680. Visit the Embassy of Papua New Guinea website and the Papua New Guinea Immigration website for the most current visa information.

If you transit other countries en route to PNG, please follow all necessary exit/entry procedures for the countries that you transit. You may need to obtain visas or travel authorizations for some of those countries, such as Australia.

HIV/AIDS Restrictions:  The Government of Papua New Guinea imposes HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors and foreign residents. If you request residency or intend to remain long term in Papua New Guinea, you are required to have an AIDS test performed at a U.S. medical facility.  Please verify this information with the Embassy of Papua New Guinea before you travel.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

ALL /
ALL /
Safety and Security
  • Tensions between communal or clan groups may result in local conflicts involving bush knives, machetes, or firearms.
  • Exercise a high degree of caution in Bougainville. Law enforcement in this area is limited, and tourist and transportation facilities are inadequate.
  • Avoid areas near the Panguna mine that have been officially designated “no go zones” by the Autonomous Government of Bougainville.
  • Unexploded ordinance and mines may be found in Bougainville, East New Britain, and throughout the Papua New Guinea islands. Exercise caution when walking or hiking off marked roads and trails.

Crime: Papua New Guinea has a high crime rate. U.S. citizens have been victims of violent crime, including gang-rape, carjacking, home invasions, kidnappings, and armed robberies. Crime rates are highest in and around major cities such as Port Moresby, Lae, Madang, Mount Hagen, and Goroka, but crimes can occur anywhere. You are at a greater risk of violent crimes such as robbery or sexual assault if you travel alone, especially if you plan to hike in isolated rural areas. Pickpockets and opportunistic bag-snatchers frequent crowded public areas, including parks, golf courses, beaches, and cemeteries. Bag-snatchers may try to open doors of automobiles that are stopped or moving slowly in traffic. Please see our page on Personal Safety.

  • Organized tours booked through travel agencies remain the safest means to visit Papua New Guinea, although on rare occasions, even persons participating in organized tours have been subject to violent robbery, assault, or serious injury.
  • Avoid using local taxis or buses, known as Public Motor Vehicles (PMVs). Rely on your sponsor or hotel to arrange for hotel transportation or a rental car.  

See Road Conditions and Safety below for information on road security and areaas to avoid. 

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams. 

Hiking Trails: Exercise caution if you plan to hike the Kokoda Track, the Black Cat Track, or other trails in Papua New Guinea. Travel with guides from a reputable tour company. Local landowners occasionally threaten to close parts of the tracks due to local land and compensation disputes. Check with your travel agent and/or tour operator for contingency plans in the event that a track is blocked. Hikers have been attacked even though they are part of an organized tour, some sustaining serious injuries or death. You are strongly advised to purchase appropriate travelers/medical insurance, including medical evacuation coverage, before arriving in Papua New Guinea. The Kokoda Track Authority (KTA) has stationed rangers along the track and at airports to collect fees from trekkers who have not obtained a valid trekking permit. The KTA can be contacted by telephone at 675-325-5540 or 675-325-1887 regarding payment of applicable fees. 

Victims of Crime:

To report crimes to the local police, contact your nearest police station and contact the U.S. Embassy at +675-321-1455.  There is no nation-wide number like 911.  Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime. Police have been known to demand gas money or other forms of compensation before leaving the station to investigate a crime. For petty crime, they will often not investigate. 

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide information on victim’s compensation programs in the United States
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical
  • support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

ALL /
ALL /
Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.  Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Papua New Guinea are severe. Driving under the influence could land you immediately in jail.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers:  Same-sex sexual relations are criminalized in Papua New Guinea. However, there are no known incidents of the prosecution of consenting adults. Papua New Guinea is a conservative country and public displays of affection are not welcomed. 

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance:  Papua New Guinea does not have legislation that mandates access to transportation, communication, and public buildings for persons with disabilities. The road network in Papua New Guinea is in poor condition and foot paths and road crossings in most major towns are congested and uneven, limiting access and movement for people with disabilities.

Students:  See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: There have been multiple cases of sexual assault, including gang rapes.  Sexual violence occurs not only in the capital of Port Moresby but is common in many parts of the country, against both local and expatriate women. Women especially are cautioned not to travel alone in Papua New Guinea. Women should observe stringent security precautions, including avoiding use of public transport, especially after dark, restricting evening entertainment to venues with good security, and avoiding isolated areas when alone at any time of day.  When possible, travel with groups of well-known, trusted people rather than alone.  Women traveling in Papua New Guinea are advised to respect local dress and customs.  Customary everyday dress for women throughout the country is conservative, and even more so in non-urban areas, with women wearing clothing that covers their legs past the knee and shoulders.  Some hotels in Papua New Guinea offer a female-only floor or section for added safety, so women traveling alone may wish to inquire if their lodging offers such a choice.  See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Special Circumstances:  

Customs: Papua New Guinean customs authorities enforce strict regulations governing firearms, certain prescription drugs, wooden artifacts, animal products, food, and sexually explicit material. Other products may be subject to quarantine. You should contact the Embassy of Papua New Guinea in Washington, D.C. for specific information regarding customs requirements.

Natural Disasters: Papua New Guinea lies in an active seismic zone. Earthquakes, destructive tsunamis, and landslides can occur. There are active volcanoes in PNG with regular eruptions around Rabaul, Bougainville, West New Britain, and Manam Island. Ash from volcanoes in the Rabaul region occasionally disrupts airline schedules at Kokopo airport. Flights may be cancelled at short notice.

Documentation: Carry a copy of your U.S. passport at all times so that you can demonstrate your proof of identity and U.S. citizenship to authorities if asked. 

ALL /
ALL /
Health

The quality of medical facilities in Papua New Guinea varies greatly between larger towns and remote areas.Medical care in remote areas is poor and access can be very difficult.

With the development of the New PIH hospital in Port Moresby the standard of general medical care has improved. They offer 24/7 Emergency service with fully equipped Ambulances.

They have specialty clinics including Pathology, Xrays,U/S and CT scanner.

Severe  injuries will almost always require medical evacuation. The Medevac Centre for Port Morseby is Singapore. Urgent cases can be medevaced to Australia.  Medical evacuation companies may charge thousands of dollars for transport to Australia or the United States. If you anticipate the possible need for medical treatment in Australia, obtain a visa or entry permission for Australia in advance and confirm if your health insurance will cover the costs of a medical evacuation. 

Pharmacies in Papua New Guinea are found mainly in urban centers.  Pharmacy care in Port Morseby is improving. There are now some bigger chain pharmacies available that offer a wide range of medications. The medications in these larger pharmacies are now  sourced from reliable vendors. There have been some reported problems  with counterfeit drugs that are not efficacious being sold at pharmacies in PNG. Doctors and hospitals often expect immediate cash payment for medical services. Additional Health and Medical Information is available on the Embassy website.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.   See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Papua New Guinea to ensure the medication is legal in Papua New Guinea.  Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

The following diseases are prevelant:

  • Communicable diseases
    • Malaria
    • Tuberculosis
    • Diarrhoeal diseases
    • Acute respiratory diseases
  • HIV - driven mainly by heterosexual transmission.
  • Cholera
  • Typhoid Fever
  • Filariasis (elephantiasis)
  • Leprosy
  • Zika

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

World Health Organization
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Water Sports:  If you scuba dive or snorkel while in Papua New Guinea, be sure to

  • Check the references, licenses, and equipment of tour operators before agreeing to a tour.  Confirm that the dive operator you use is certified through one of the international diving associations, and that their certification is current. Confirm with the diving association directly that the operator is certified. Local dive masters may not consider your skill level when they organize a trip.  
  • Rent equipment only from trustworthy operators and be sure to receive training before using the equipment.  Some rental diving equipment may not be properly maintained or inspected. 
  • Ensure that your travel insurance covers what some consider “risky” outdoor activities.  You can also look at the Divers Alert Network (DAN) website for diver’s insurance.

Deaths and serious accidents have occurred in the past because basic safety measures were not taken during diving and snorkeling trips. Remember that safety precautions and emergency responses may not meet U.S. standards.  

Papua New Guinea has one hyperbaric recompression chamber to provide medical assistance for dive-related injuries, which is located in Port Moresby. However, it is routinely inaccessible or non-operational. Diving injuries will therefore almost always require medical evacuation to Australia. Many of the popular dive sites are located on other islands, and it may take several hours to reach facilities in the event of an accident.  

ALL /
ALL /
Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Motor vehicle accidents are a common cause of serious injury in Papua New Guinea.  Road travel outside of major towns can be hazardous due to criminal roadblocks near bridges, curves in the road, or other areas where vehicle speed and mobility is restricted.  Be sure to:

  • Lock your doors and keep your windows rolled up. 
  • Avoid driving after dark, if possible. 
  • Consult with local law enforcement officials concerning security conditions before driving between towns.
  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.

Safety risks include:    

  • Roads, especially in rural areas, are in a poor state of repair.
  • Erratic and drunk drivers
  • Poorly maintained vehicles
  • Over-crowded vehicles.
  • Landslides occur on some stretches of the Highlands Highway between Lae and Mount Hagen during the rainy season
  • criminal roadblocks on the Highlands Highway during the day and after dark. 

Traffic Laws: Traffic in Papua New Guinea moves on the left. Police roadblocks to check vehicle registrations are a regular occurrence at night in Port Moresby. As a driver, you should ensure that your vehicle registration and safety stickers are up-to-date in order to minimize difficulties at roadblocks.

Crowds can react emotionally and violently after road accidents. Crowds form quickly after an accident and may attack those whom they hold responsible by stoning and/or burning vehicles. Friends and relatives of an injured party may demand immediate compensation from the party they hold responsible for injuries, regardless of legal responsibility. If you are involved in an accident and you feel threatened, go directly to the nearest police station instead of remaining at the scene of the accident.

Public Transportation: 

Avoid using local taxis or buses, known as Public Motor Vehicles (PMVs). Rely on your sponsor or hotel to arrange for hotel transportation or a rental car. 

See our Road Safety page for more information.  For specific information concerning Papua New Guinea driving permits, vehicle inspection, road tax, road safety and mandatory insurance, please call the Papua New Guinea’s Motor Vehicle Institute Limited at 675-325-9666 or 675-302-4600. 

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Papua New Guinea, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Papua New Guinea’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
enter text here
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
enter text here
Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters.
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
ALL /
ALL /
Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Port Moresby

Douglas Street, adjacent to the Bank of Papua New Guinea,
P.O. Box 1492
Port Moresby, NCD 121
Papua New Guinea

Telephone: +(675) 321-1455

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(675) 7200-9439

ALL /
ALL /
General Information
enter link here
ALL /
ALL /
Hague Abduction Convention
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Return
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Visitation/Access
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Retaining an Attorney
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Mediation
enter text here

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
ALL /
ALL /
Hague Convention Information

Papua New Guinea is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention).  Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section  204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F). Under the Intercountry Adoption Universal Accreditation Act (UAA), which became effective on July 14, 2014, the accreditation requirement and standards, which previously only applied in Convention cases, now also apply in non-Convention or “orphan” cases. The UAA requires that an accredited or approved adoption service provider acts as a primary provider in every case, and that adoption service providers providing adoption services on behalf of prospective adoptive parents be accredited or approved, or be a supervised or exempted provider. Adoption service providers and prospective adoptive parents should review the State Department’s Universal Accreditation Act of 2012 webpage for further information. Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Convention countries continue to be processed under the Orphan Process with the filing of the Forms I-600A and I-600. However, adoption service providers should be aware of the information on the USCIS website on the impact on Form I-600A and Form I-600 adjudications under the UAA, including the requirement that all home studies, including home study updates and amendments, comply with the Convention home study requirements, which differ from the orphan home study requirements that were in effect before July 14, 2014.

According to the Papua New Guinea Adoption Act of 1968, prospective adoptive parents who wish to adopt a child from Papua New Guinea must be resident in Papua New Guinea for a period of six months before they can be eligible to adopt.

U.S. Immigration Requirements For Intercountry Adoptions

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Papua New Guinea, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States on an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

ALL /
ALL /
Who Can Adopt

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, you must also meet the following requirements in order to adopt a child from Papua New Guinea:

  • Residency: Prospective adoptive parents must be resident in Papua New Guinea for a minimum of six months before they are eligible to adopt.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: Prospective adoptive parents must be 21 years of age or older, healthy, fit, and capable of caring for the child.
  • Marriage: Prospective adoptive parents must be legally married.
  • Income: Prospective adoptive parents must be financially stable. Though there are no stated guidelines, a home study determines eligibility
  • Other: Adoption by same sex couples is not permitted in Papua New Guinea.
ALL /
ALL /
Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, Papua New Guinea has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption:

  • Relinquishment: The relinquishing parent(s) must provide verbal and written consent to a social welfare officer for the child to be adopted.
  • Abandonment: The Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) will evaluate the best interests of the child if one or both parents are alive. The Government of Papua New Guinea gives preference to domestic over foreign adoptions.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: The child must be under the age of 18.
  • Sibling Adoptions: Siblings may be adopted together by the same prospective adoptive family.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: Living conditions of prospective adoptive parents must be conducive to the child’s needs as determined by a home study.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: There is no mandated waiting period.

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

ALL /
ALL /
How to Adopt

Papua New Guinea’s Adoption Authority

The Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare), under the Department for Community Development and Religion, oversees intercountry adoption.

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Papua New Guinea generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be found eligible to adopt
  3. Be matched with a child
  4. Adopt (or obtain custody of) the child in Papua New Guinea
  5. Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status
  6. Bring your child home

1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

The recommended first step in adopting a child from Papua New Guinea is to decide whether to use a licensed adoption service provider in the United States that can help you with your adoption. Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate. The Department of State provides information on selecting an adoption service provider on its website.

There are no adoption agencies in Papua New Guinea. Prospective adoptive parents may use the services of a local attorney during the process. Prospective adoptive parents should also contact the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) for guidance.

2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt

In order to adopt a child from Papua New Guinea, you will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Papua New Guinea and U.S. immigration law. You must visit the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) for an interview to be found eligible to adopt. If the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) finds you eligible, then you may proceed with the adoption through a local lawyer, who will guide you through the process.

To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also file an I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition with U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to be found eligible and suitable to adopt.  As of July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, the home study must comply with the requirements in 8 CFR 204.311 and 22 CFR Part 96.47.

3. Be Matched with a Child

If you are determined to be eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare), Department for Community Development and Religion in Papua New Guinea will provide you with a referral. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of and provide a permanent home for a particular child.

The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Papua New Guinea’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of orphan under U.S. law in order to immigrate to the United States.

4. Adopt or Obtain Legal Custody of Child in Papua New Guinea

The process for finalizing the adoption (or obtaining legal custody) in Papua New Guinea generally includes the following:

  • Role of Adoption Authority: The Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) under the Department of Community Development and Religion oversees all adoptions, conducts personal interviews with prospective adoptive parents, conducts home studies, and works with the lawyer(s) responsible for the adoption case. 
  • Role of the Court: The prospective adoptive parents must file an Application for Adoption, through their lawyer, with the National Court. The court may approve an adoption order only when it receives the written consent of the Director of the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) and is satisfied with the home study and any other evidence submitted.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: There are no adoption agencies in Papua New Guinea. Prospective adoptive parents work with the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) and with a local lawyer. 
  • Adoption Application: The Office of Lukautin Pikinini (Child Welfare) does not maintain a standard application form for prospective adoptive parents applying to adopt a child from Papua New Guinea. Once the prospective adoptive parents have identified a prospective child, they must work through the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare). Prospective adoptive parents must visit this Office before they consult with a lawyer.  If the Office does not find the case viable, it may be impossible to proceed. A favorable opinion of the Office is required for the court to hear the case. The Office strongly recommends working with a local lawyer who has performed recent foreign adoptions.
  • Time Frame: An adoption in Papua New Guinea may take nine months or longer to finalize, not including the mandatory six-month residency period.
  • Adoption Fees: The Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) does not collect any fees with the adoption application. Prospective adoptive parents can expect to pay a minimum of K10,000 to K12,000 in legal fees to their lawyer for paperwork and to file documents with the court. The fee is paid after the adoption is finalized. The UAA and the Intercountry Adoption Act (IAA) make it unlawful to improperly influence relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing Central Authority functions.
  • Documents Required: The following documents are required to complete an adoption in Papua New Guinea:
    • Birth certificate
    • Medical reports for the prospective adoptive parents
    • Medical report for the prospective adoptive child, obtained through a physician determined by the court
    • Police background check
    • Employment and academic references
    • Bank statements
    • Marriage certificate
    • Family photos

Note: Additional documents may be requested. Some documents must be signed by a Papua New Guinea Commissioner of Oath.

  • Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof that documents from the United States are authentic. If so, the Department of State, Authentications Office may be able to assist.

5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Orphan Status

After you finalize the adoption (or gain legal custody) in Papua New Guinea, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services must determine whether the child meets the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law. You will need to file a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative. At the time you file your Form I-600 petition, the adjudicating officer will determine whether the UAA applies or if your case is UAA grandfathered. For more information on UAA grandfathering and transition cases, please see Universal Accreditation Act of 2012. Unless an exception applies, you must identify a primary provider in your case and the adjudicating officer may ask for the name and contact information of the primary provider if not provided in your Form I-600 petition. This information is required and, without it, your Form I-600 petition cannot be approved. 

6. Bring Your Child Home

Once your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), you need to apply for several documents for your child before you can apply for a U.S. immigrant visa to bring your child home to the United States:

Birth Certificate

If you have finalized the adoption in Papua New Guinea, you will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

After the adoption is finalized, the adoptive parents will submit an application for a new Birth Certificate together with the Court Order to the Civil Registry Office under the Department of Community Development and Religion.

Papua New Guinea Passport

Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Papua New Guinea.

After the adoption is finalized, the adoptive parents should immediately apply for a Papua New Guinea passport for the child by submitting a passport application, copies of the passport fee receipt of K100.00, court order, and birth certificate to Papua New Guinea Immigration and Citizenship Services Authority (PNGICSA).

U.S. Immigrant Visa

After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child and you have filed Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, you then need to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa for your child from the U.S. Embassy in Port Moresby. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you.  As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child.

You can find instructions for applying for an immigrant visa on the U.S. Embassy in Papua New Guinea’s website.

The U.S. Embassy in Port Moresby’s Consular Section provides immigrant visa services on Monday and Wednesday mornings, by appointment only, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.   After the final interview, the visa is usually issued the following morning. Generally it is not possible to provide the visa to adoptive parents on the same day as the immigrant visa interview. Adoptive parents should verify current processing times with the U.S. Embassy in Port Moresby before making final travel arrangements.

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States: A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States: An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible.  Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

ALL /
ALL /
Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Papua New Guinea

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Papua New Guinea, see the Department of State’s Country-Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country-Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Papua New Guinea, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

ALL /
ALL /
After Adoption

Post-Adoption/Post-Placement Reporting Requirements

Papua New Guinea does not have any post-adopting reporting requirements.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

ALL /
ALL /
Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Papua New Guinea
Embassy of the United States of America
P.O. Box 1492
Port Moresby, N.C.D. 121
Papua New Guinea
Tel: +(675) 321-1455
Fax: +(675) 320-0637
E-mail: consularportmoresby@state.gov
Internet: pg.usembassy.gov/

Papua New Guinea’s Adoption Authority
Office of Lukautim Pikinin (Child Welfare)
Department for Community Development and Religion
P.O. Box 7354
Boroko, NCD
Papua New Guinea
Tel: +(675) 325-9893
Fax: none
Email: none
Internet: none  

Embassy of Papua New Guinea
1779 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.
Suite 805
Washington, D.C.  20036
Tel: (202) 745-3680
Fax: (202) 745-3679
E-mail: info@pngembassy.org
Internet: pngembassy.org

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI, SA-17A, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
Email: Adoption@state.gov
Internet: adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-600A or I-600 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email: NBC.Adoptions@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 12 Months
A-2 None Multiple 12 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 $15.00 A Multiple A 12 Months A
B-2 $15.00 A Multiple A 12 Months A
B-1/B-2 $15.00 A Multiple A 12 Months A
C-1 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1/D N/A N/A N/A
C-2 None Multiple 60 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 36 Months
F-1 None Multiple 12 Months
F-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-1 None Multiple 12 Months
G-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-3 None Multiple 12 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 36 Months 3
I None One 3 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 36 Months
L-2 None Multiple 36 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None One 3 Months 3
O-2 None One 3 Months 3
O-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-1 None One 3 Months 3
P-2 None One 3 Months 3
P-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-4 None One 3 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 3 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 36 Months
R-2 None Multiple 36 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
ALL /
ALL /
Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

ALL /
ALL /
Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

ALL /
ALL /
General Documents

Please check back for update

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available from the Registrar General's Office, P.O. Box 470, Waigani, N.C.D. 131, Papua New Guinea; Phone:(675) 327-1732; Fax: (675) 327-1523. Most foreign nationals and residents of towns register births with this office. Births in rural areas are frequently not registered. A fee may be charged for this service.

Death Certificates

Available from the Registrar General's Office, P.O. Box 470, Waigani, N.C.D. 131, Papua New Guinea; Phone: (675) 327-1732; Fax: (675) 327-1523. The deaths of some foreign nationals and residents of towns are registered with this office. Deaths occurring in isolated or rural areas are frequently not registered with the Registrar General's Office. In these cases a medical certificate of death will normally be issued by the hospital where the death occurred or by the attending physician.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available for church and civil marriages (known as statutory marriages, to distinguish them from customary marriages) from the Registrar General's Office, P.O. Box 470, Waigani, N.C.D. 131, Papua New Guinea; Phone (675) 327-1732; Fax: (675) 327-1523. A fee may be charged for this service.

Customary marriages between Papua New Guineans are legal provided they are carried out in accordance with the custom or customs of the tribes involved, but they are not registered and no certificates are issued. It is not clear from Papua New Guinea marriage law whether expatriates or naturalized citizens may legally enter into customary marriages in Papua New Guinea.

Divorce Certificates

Available. A certified copy of a final divorce decree can be obtained from the Registrar of the National Court, P.O. Box 7018, Boroko, N.C.D.111, Papua New Guinea; Phone: (675) 325-709. A fee may be charged for this service.

Adoption Certificates

Available. A certified copy of a final adoption decree can be obtained from the Registrar of the National Court, P.O. Box 7018, Boroko, N.C.D 111, Papua New Guinea; Phone (675) 325-7099. A fee may be charged for this service.

ALL /
ALL /
Identity Card

Please check back for update

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

 

Clients in the National Capital District:  To obtain your police record; submit the following to the National Criminal Records Office, Police Headquarters, P.O. Box 85, Konedobu, N.C.D 125, Papua New Guinea: 1) a Character Check Application, 2) an official service fee receipt of PGK10.00, and 3) a copy of your current passport, visa and work permit. The Character Check Application Form can only be obtained at National Criminal Records Office at Police Headquarters, Konedobu, Telephone: (675) 325-4188 / 325- 4472 ; Fax: (675) 325-5365. The Service Fee Receipt can be obtained at the Public Accounts Finance Haus Valupindi, Waigani, at the Firearms Registry Office at Boroko Police Station, or at the Central Provincial Government Cash Office at Konedobu. You must apply in person. Your fingerprints will be taken to verify identity.                                                                          

Clients in other Provinces (Papua New Guinea): To obtain your police record; submit the following to the National Criminal Records Office, Police Headquarters, P.O. Box 85, Konedobu, N.C.D 125, Papua New Guinea: 1) a Character Check Application, 2) an official service fee receipt of PGK10.00, and 3) a copy of your current passport, visa and work permit. The Character Check Application Form can only be obtained at National Criminal Records Office at Police Headquarters, Konedobu, Telephone: (675) 325-4188 / 325-4472; Fax: (675) 325-5365. The Service Fee Receipt can be obtained at the Provincial Treasury Office (BMS) in the province where you reside. You must also submit a set of fingerprints taken on Form FD-258 from the Provincial Police Station where you reside.        

Clients in other countries: To obtain your police record; submit the following to the National Criminal Records Office, Police Headquarters, P.O. Box 85, Konedobu, N.C.D 125, Papua New Guinea: 1) a Character Check Application, 2) an official service fee receipt of PGK10.00, and 3) a copy of your current passport, visa and work permit. The Character Check Application Form can only be obtained at National Criminal Records Office at Police Headquarters, Konedobu, Telephone: (675) 325-4188 / 325-4472; Fax: (675) 325-5365. You must also submit your fingerprints on Form FD-258. To obtain this form from the National Criminal Records Office, call or send an e-mail request to, kwumber@rpngc.gov.pg. Send the USD equivalent of the PGK 10.00 fee through “WESTERN UNION” Bank South Pacific (BSP). Send an e-mail to the abovementioned addresses to notify the National Criminal Records Office that you have sent the fee.

NOTE: The Police Clearance Certificate will be processed and mailed to you within appropriately two weeks. For the quickest turnaround, send the completed form by DHL or FEDEX and include a Pre-paid Return envelope for the return of the certificate when issued. Otherwise, certificates will be returned through the domestic mailing service, and the certificate may take 3-6 weeks to reach the applicant.

Prison Records

Available. The police clearance certificate will contain a complete record of any criminal convictions and imprisonment.

Military Records

Available. All members of the Papua New Guinea Defense Force receive a discharge card at the time they leave the service. If they have misplaced this card, they may request another copy by writing the Director of Manpower, Murray Barracks, Free Mail.

Bag, Boroko, N.C.D. 111, Papua New Guinea; Phones: (675-325-6166 or 324-2480; Fax: (675) 325-6117. Applicants should provide regimental numbers and dates of service.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

The Papua New Guinea Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade issues Certificates of Identity to Papua New Guineans, foreign nationals who must travel when a passport is not available, and refugees. These documents are passport-like documents with a gray cover and can be valid up to 24 months. Papua New Guinea's embassies and consulates overseas issue Documents of Identity to Papua New Guinea citizens under emergency conditions which are valid only for the return trip to Papua New Guinea and must be surrendered to the immigration officials upon entering the country. This document meets the requirements of section 101(A)(30) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Other Records

Not applicable

Visa Issuing Posts

Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (Embassy)

Street Address:
Douglas Street (adjacent to the Bank of Papua, New Guinea)

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 1492
Port Moresby, NCD 121
Papua, New Guinea

Tel: (675) 321-1455

Fax: (675) 321-1593

E-Mail: ConsularPortMoresby@state.gov

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 745-3680 (202) 745-3679

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Port Moresby
Douglas Street, adjacent to the Bank of Papua New Guinea,
P.O. Box 1492
Port Moresby, NCD 121
Papua New Guinea
Telephone
+(675) 321-1455
Emergency
+(675) 7200-9439
Fax
No Fax
Papua New Guinea Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Papua New Guinea
Independent State of Papua New Guinea
ALL /
ALL /
Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One blank page is required 

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Available upon arrival for stays of fewer than 60 days 

VACCINATIONS:

None required

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

More than PGK 10,000 must be declared. 

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

More than PGK 10,000 must be declared. 

ALL /
ALL /
Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Port Moresby

Douglas Street, adjacent to the Bank of Papua New Guinea,
P.O. Box 1492
Port Moresby, NCD 121
Papua New Guinea

Telephone: +(675) 321-1455

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(675) 7200-9439

ALL /
ALL /
Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Papua New Guinea for information on U.S.-Papua New Guinea relations.

ALL /
ALL /
Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

To enter Papua New Guinea, you must have a passport that is valid for at least six months from the date of intended travel, an onward/return airline ticket, and proof of sufficient funds. You may obtain a tourist visa (valid for stays of up to 60 days, with extensions available for an additional 30 days) and single-entry business visas (valid for stays of up to 30 days) when you arrive at Jacksons International Airport in Port Moresby. You must apply for a visa in advance if you are traveling for reasons other than business or tourism. The Embassy of Papua New Guinea is located at 1779 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Suite 805, Washington, DC 20036; telephone: 202-745-3680. Visit the Embassy of Papua New Guinea website and the Papua New Guinea Immigration website for the most current visa information.

If you transit other countries en route to PNG, please follow all necessary exit/entry procedures for the countries that you transit. You may need to obtain visas or travel authorizations for some of those countries, such as Australia.

HIV/AIDS Restrictions:  The Government of Papua New Guinea imposes HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors and foreign residents. If you request residency or intend to remain long term in Papua New Guinea, you are required to have an AIDS test performed at a U.S. medical facility.  Please verify this information with the Embassy of Papua New Guinea before you travel.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

ALL /
ALL /
Safety and Security
  • Tensions between communal or clan groups may result in local conflicts involving bush knives, machetes, or firearms.
  • Exercise a high degree of caution in Bougainville. Law enforcement in this area is limited, and tourist and transportation facilities are inadequate.
  • Avoid areas near the Panguna mine that have been officially designated “no go zones” by the Autonomous Government of Bougainville.
  • Unexploded ordinance and mines may be found in Bougainville, East New Britain, and throughout the Papua New Guinea islands. Exercise caution when walking or hiking off marked roads and trails.

Crime: Papua New Guinea has a high crime rate. U.S. citizens have been victims of violent crime, including gang-rape, carjacking, home invasions, kidnappings, and armed robberies. Crime rates are highest in and around major cities such as Port Moresby, Lae, Madang, Mount Hagen, and Goroka, but crimes can occur anywhere. You are at a greater risk of violent crimes such as robbery or sexual assault if you travel alone, especially if you plan to hike in isolated rural areas. Pickpockets and opportunistic bag-snatchers frequent crowded public areas, including parks, golf courses, beaches, and cemeteries. Bag-snatchers may try to open doors of automobiles that are stopped or moving slowly in traffic. Please see our page on Personal Safety.

  • Organized tours booked through travel agencies remain the safest means to visit Papua New Guinea, although on rare occasions, even persons participating in organized tours have been subject to violent robbery, assault, or serious injury.
  • Avoid using local taxis or buses, known as Public Motor Vehicles (PMVs). Rely on your sponsor or hotel to arrange for hotel transportation or a rental car.  

See Road Conditions and Safety below for information on road security and areaas to avoid. 

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams. 

Hiking Trails: Exercise caution if you plan to hike the Kokoda Track, the Black Cat Track, or other trails in Papua New Guinea. Travel with guides from a reputable tour company. Local landowners occasionally threaten to close parts of the tracks due to local land and compensation disputes. Check with your travel agent and/or tour operator for contingency plans in the event that a track is blocked. Hikers have been attacked even though they are part of an organized tour, some sustaining serious injuries or death. You are strongly advised to purchase appropriate travelers/medical insurance, including medical evacuation coverage, before arriving in Papua New Guinea. The Kokoda Track Authority (KTA) has stationed rangers along the track and at airports to collect fees from trekkers who have not obtained a valid trekking permit. The KTA can be contacted by telephone at 675-325-5540 or 675-325-1887 regarding payment of applicable fees. 

Victims of Crime:

To report crimes to the local police, contact your nearest police station and contact the U.S. Embassy at +675-321-1455.  There is no nation-wide number like 911.  Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime. Police have been known to demand gas money or other forms of compensation before leaving the station to investigate a crime. For petty crime, they will often not investigate. 

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide information on victim’s compensation programs in the United States
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical
  • support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

ALL /
ALL /
Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.  Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Papua New Guinea are severe. Driving under the influence could land you immediately in jail.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers:  Same-sex sexual relations are criminalized in Papua New Guinea. However, there are no known incidents of the prosecution of consenting adults. Papua New Guinea is a conservative country and public displays of affection are not welcomed. 

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance:  Papua New Guinea does not have legislation that mandates access to transportation, communication, and public buildings for persons with disabilities. The road network in Papua New Guinea is in poor condition and foot paths and road crossings in most major towns are congested and uneven, limiting access and movement for people with disabilities.

Students:  See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: There have been multiple cases of sexual assault, including gang rapes.  Sexual violence occurs not only in the capital of Port Moresby but is common in many parts of the country, against both local and expatriate women. Women especially are cautioned not to travel alone in Papua New Guinea. Women should observe stringent security precautions, including avoiding use of public transport, especially after dark, restricting evening entertainment to venues with good security, and avoiding isolated areas when alone at any time of day.  When possible, travel with groups of well-known, trusted people rather than alone.  Women traveling in Papua New Guinea are advised to respect local dress and customs.  Customary everyday dress for women throughout the country is conservative, and even more so in non-urban areas, with women wearing clothing that covers their legs past the knee and shoulders.  Some hotels in Papua New Guinea offer a female-only floor or section for added safety, so women traveling alone may wish to inquire if their lodging offers such a choice.  See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Special Circumstances:  

Customs: Papua New Guinean customs authorities enforce strict regulations governing firearms, certain prescription drugs, wooden artifacts, animal products, food, and sexually explicit material. Other products may be subject to quarantine. You should contact the Embassy of Papua New Guinea in Washington, D.C. for specific information regarding customs requirements.

Natural Disasters: Papua New Guinea lies in an active seismic zone. Earthquakes, destructive tsunamis, and landslides can occur. There are active volcanoes in PNG with regular eruptions around Rabaul, Bougainville, West New Britain, and Manam Island. Ash from volcanoes in the Rabaul region occasionally disrupts airline schedules at Kokopo airport. Flights may be cancelled at short notice.

Documentation: Carry a copy of your U.S. passport at all times so that you can demonstrate your proof of identity and U.S. citizenship to authorities if asked. 

ALL /
ALL /
Health

The quality of medical facilities in Papua New Guinea varies greatly between larger towns and remote areas.Medical care in remote areas is poor and access can be very difficult.

With the development of the New PIH hospital in Port Moresby the standard of general medical care has improved. They offer 24/7 Emergency service with fully equipped Ambulances.

They have specialty clinics including Pathology, Xrays,U/S and CT scanner.

Severe  injuries will almost always require medical evacuation. The Medevac Centre for Port Morseby is Singapore. Urgent cases can be medevaced to Australia.  Medical evacuation companies may charge thousands of dollars for transport to Australia or the United States. If you anticipate the possible need for medical treatment in Australia, obtain a visa or entry permission for Australia in advance and confirm if your health insurance will cover the costs of a medical evacuation. 

Pharmacies in Papua New Guinea are found mainly in urban centers.  Pharmacy care in Port Morseby is improving. There are now some bigger chain pharmacies available that offer a wide range of medications. The medications in these larger pharmacies are now  sourced from reliable vendors. There have been some reported problems  with counterfeit drugs that are not efficacious being sold at pharmacies in PNG. Doctors and hospitals often expect immediate cash payment for medical services. Additional Health and Medical Information is available on the Embassy website.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.   See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Papua New Guinea to ensure the medication is legal in Papua New Guinea.  Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

The following diseases are prevelant:

  • Communicable diseases
    • Malaria
    • Tuberculosis
    • Diarrhoeal diseases
    • Acute respiratory diseases
  • HIV - driven mainly by heterosexual transmission.
  • Cholera
  • Typhoid Fever
  • Filariasis (elephantiasis)
  • Leprosy
  • Zika

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

World Health Organization
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Water Sports:  If you scuba dive or snorkel while in Papua New Guinea, be sure to

  • Check the references, licenses, and equipment of tour operators before agreeing to a tour.  Confirm that the dive operator you use is certified through one of the international diving associations, and that their certification is current. Confirm with the diving association directly that the operator is certified. Local dive masters may not consider your skill level when they organize a trip.  
  • Rent equipment only from trustworthy operators and be sure to receive training before using the equipment.  Some rental diving equipment may not be properly maintained or inspected. 
  • Ensure that your travel insurance covers what some consider “risky” outdoor activities.  You can also look at the Divers Alert Network (DAN) website for diver’s insurance.

Deaths and serious accidents have occurred in the past because basic safety measures were not taken during diving and snorkeling trips. Remember that safety precautions and emergency responses may not meet U.S. standards.  

Papua New Guinea has one hyperbaric recompression chamber to provide medical assistance for dive-related injuries, which is located in Port Moresby. However, it is routinely inaccessible or non-operational. Diving injuries will therefore almost always require medical evacuation to Australia. Many of the popular dive sites are located on other islands, and it may take several hours to reach facilities in the event of an accident.  

ALL /
ALL /
Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Motor vehicle accidents are a common cause of serious injury in Papua New Guinea.  Road travel outside of major towns can be hazardous due to criminal roadblocks near bridges, curves in the road, or other areas where vehicle speed and mobility is restricted.  Be sure to:

  • Lock your doors and keep your windows rolled up. 
  • Avoid driving after dark, if possible. 
  • Consult with local law enforcement officials concerning security conditions before driving between towns.
  • Wear a seatbelt at all times.

Safety risks include:    

  • Roads, especially in rural areas, are in a poor state of repair.
  • Erratic and drunk drivers
  • Poorly maintained vehicles
  • Over-crowded vehicles.
  • Landslides occur on some stretches of the Highlands Highway between Lae and Mount Hagen during the rainy season
  • criminal roadblocks on the Highlands Highway during the day and after dark. 

Traffic Laws: Traffic in Papua New Guinea moves on the left. Police roadblocks to check vehicle registrations are a regular occurrence at night in Port Moresby. As a driver, you should ensure that your vehicle registration and safety stickers are up-to-date in order to minimize difficulties at roadblocks.

Crowds can react emotionally and violently after road accidents. Crowds form quickly after an accident and may attack those whom they hold responsible by stoning and/or burning vehicles. Friends and relatives of an injured party may demand immediate compensation from the party they hold responsible for injuries, regardless of legal responsibility. If you are involved in an accident and you feel threatened, go directly to the nearest police station instead of remaining at the scene of the accident.

Public Transportation: 

Avoid using local taxis or buses, known as Public Motor Vehicles (PMVs). Rely on your sponsor or hotel to arrange for hotel transportation or a rental car. 

See our Road Safety page for more information.  For specific information concerning Papua New Guinea driving permits, vehicle inspection, road tax, road safety and mandatory insurance, please call the Papua New Guinea’s Motor Vehicle Institute Limited at 675-325-9666 or 675-302-4600. 

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Papua New Guinea, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Papua New Guinea’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
enter text here
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
enter text here
Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters.
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
ALL /
ALL /
Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Port Moresby

Douglas Street, adjacent to the Bank of Papua New Guinea,
P.O. Box 1492
Port Moresby, NCD 121
Papua New Guinea

Telephone: +(675) 321-1455

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(675) 7200-9439

ALL /
ALL /
General Information
enter link here
ALL /
ALL /
Hague Abduction Convention
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Return
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Visitation/Access
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Retaining an Attorney
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Mediation
enter text here

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
ALL /
ALL /
Hague Convention Information

Papua New Guinea is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention).  Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section  204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F). Under the Intercountry Adoption Universal Accreditation Act (UAA), which became effective on July 14, 2014, the accreditation requirement and standards, which previously only applied in Convention cases, now also apply in non-Convention or “orphan” cases. The UAA requires that an accredited or approved adoption service provider acts as a primary provider in every case, and that adoption service providers providing adoption services on behalf of prospective adoptive parents be accredited or approved, or be a supervised or exempted provider. Adoption service providers and prospective adoptive parents should review the State Department’s Universal Accreditation Act of 2012 webpage for further information. Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Convention countries continue to be processed under the Orphan Process with the filing of the Forms I-600A and I-600. However, adoption service providers should be aware of the information on the USCIS website on the impact on Form I-600A and Form I-600 adjudications under the UAA, including the requirement that all home studies, including home study updates and amendments, comply with the Convention home study requirements, which differ from the orphan home study requirements that were in effect before July 14, 2014.

According to the Papua New Guinea Adoption Act of 1968, prospective adoptive parents who wish to adopt a child from Papua New Guinea must be resident in Papua New Guinea for a period of six months before they can be eligible to adopt.

U.S. Immigration Requirements For Intercountry Adoptions

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Papua New Guinea, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States on an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

ALL /
ALL /
Who Can Adopt

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, you must also meet the following requirements in order to adopt a child from Papua New Guinea:

  • Residency: Prospective adoptive parents must be resident in Papua New Guinea for a minimum of six months before they are eligible to adopt.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: Prospective adoptive parents must be 21 years of age or older, healthy, fit, and capable of caring for the child.
  • Marriage: Prospective adoptive parents must be legally married.
  • Income: Prospective adoptive parents must be financially stable. Though there are no stated guidelines, a home study determines eligibility
  • Other: Adoption by same sex couples is not permitted in Papua New Guinea.
ALL /
ALL /
Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, Papua New Guinea has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption:

  • Relinquishment: The relinquishing parent(s) must provide verbal and written consent to a social welfare officer for the child to be adopted.
  • Abandonment: The Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) will evaluate the best interests of the child if one or both parents are alive. The Government of Papua New Guinea gives preference to domestic over foreign adoptions.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: The child must be under the age of 18.
  • Sibling Adoptions: Siblings may be adopted together by the same prospective adoptive family.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: Living conditions of prospective adoptive parents must be conducive to the child’s needs as determined by a home study.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: There is no mandated waiting period.

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

ALL /
ALL /
How to Adopt

Papua New Guinea’s Adoption Authority

The Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare), under the Department for Community Development and Religion, oversees intercountry adoption.

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Papua New Guinea generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be found eligible to adopt
  3. Be matched with a child
  4. Adopt (or obtain custody of) the child in Papua New Guinea
  5. Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status
  6. Bring your child home

1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

The recommended first step in adopting a child from Papua New Guinea is to decide whether to use a licensed adoption service provider in the United States that can help you with your adoption. Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate. The Department of State provides information on selecting an adoption service provider on its website.

There are no adoption agencies in Papua New Guinea. Prospective adoptive parents may use the services of a local attorney during the process. Prospective adoptive parents should also contact the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) for guidance.

2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt

In order to adopt a child from Papua New Guinea, you will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Papua New Guinea and U.S. immigration law. You must visit the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) for an interview to be found eligible to adopt. If the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) finds you eligible, then you may proceed with the adoption through a local lawyer, who will guide you through the process.

To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also file an I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition with U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to be found eligible and suitable to adopt.  As of July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, the home study must comply with the requirements in 8 CFR 204.311 and 22 CFR Part 96.47.

3. Be Matched with a Child

If you are determined to be eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare), Department for Community Development and Religion in Papua New Guinea will provide you with a referral. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of and provide a permanent home for a particular child.

The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Papua New Guinea’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of orphan under U.S. law in order to immigrate to the United States.

4. Adopt or Obtain Legal Custody of Child in Papua New Guinea

The process for finalizing the adoption (or obtaining legal custody) in Papua New Guinea generally includes the following:

  • Role of Adoption Authority: The Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) under the Department of Community Development and Religion oversees all adoptions, conducts personal interviews with prospective adoptive parents, conducts home studies, and works with the lawyer(s) responsible for the adoption case. 
  • Role of the Court: The prospective adoptive parents must file an Application for Adoption, through their lawyer, with the National Court. The court may approve an adoption order only when it receives the written consent of the Director of the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) and is satisfied with the home study and any other evidence submitted.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: There are no adoption agencies in Papua New Guinea. Prospective adoptive parents work with the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) and with a local lawyer. 
  • Adoption Application: The Office of Lukautin Pikinini (Child Welfare) does not maintain a standard application form for prospective adoptive parents applying to adopt a child from Papua New Guinea. Once the prospective adoptive parents have identified a prospective child, they must work through the Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare). Prospective adoptive parents must visit this Office before they consult with a lawyer.  If the Office does not find the case viable, it may be impossible to proceed. A favorable opinion of the Office is required for the court to hear the case. The Office strongly recommends working with a local lawyer who has performed recent foreign adoptions.
  • Time Frame: An adoption in Papua New Guinea may take nine months or longer to finalize, not including the mandatory six-month residency period.
  • Adoption Fees: The Office of Lukautim Pikinini (Child Welfare) does not collect any fees with the adoption application. Prospective adoptive parents can expect to pay a minimum of K10,000 to K12,000 in legal fees to their lawyer for paperwork and to file documents with the court. The fee is paid after the adoption is finalized. The UAA and the Intercountry Adoption Act (IAA) make it unlawful to improperly influence relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing Central Authority functions.
  • Documents Required: The following documents are required to complete an adoption in Papua New Guinea:
    • Birth certificate
    • Medical reports for the prospective adoptive parents
    • Medical report for the prospective adoptive child, obtained through a physician determined by the court
    • Police background check
    • Employment and academic references
    • Bank statements
    • Marriage certificate
    • Family photos

Note: Additional documents may be requested. Some documents must be signed by a Papua New Guinea Commissioner of Oath.

  • Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof that documents from the United States are authentic. If so, the Department of State, Authentications Office may be able to assist.

5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Orphan Status

After you finalize the adoption (or gain legal custody) in Papua New Guinea, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services must determine whether the child meets the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law. You will need to file a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative. At the time you file your Form I-600 petition, the adjudicating officer will determine whether the UAA applies or if your case is UAA grandfathered. For more information on UAA grandfathering and transition cases, please see Universal Accreditation Act of 2012. Unless an exception applies, you must identify a primary provider in your case and the adjudicating officer may ask for the name and contact information of the primary provider if not provided in your Form I-600 petition. This information is required and, without it, your Form I-600 petition cannot be approved. 

6. Bring Your Child Home

Once your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), you need to apply for several documents for your child before you can apply for a U.S. immigrant visa to bring your child home to the United States:

Birth Certificate

If you have finalized the adoption in Papua New Guinea, you will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

After the adoption is finalized, the adoptive parents will submit an application for a new Birth Certificate together with the Court Order to the Civil Registry Office under the Department of Community Development and Religion.

Papua New Guinea Passport

Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Papua New Guinea.

After the adoption is finalized, the adoptive parents should immediately apply for a Papua New Guinea passport for the child by submitting a passport application, copies of the passport fee receipt of K100.00, court order, and birth certificate to Papua New Guinea Immigration and Citizenship Services Authority (PNGICSA).

U.S. Immigrant Visa

After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child and you have filed Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, you then need to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa for your child from the U.S. Embassy in Port Moresby. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you.  As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child.

You can find instructions for applying for an immigrant visa on the U.S. Embassy in Papua New Guinea’s website.

The U.S. Embassy in Port Moresby’s Consular Section provides immigrant visa services on Monday and Wednesday mornings, by appointment only, from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.   After the final interview, the visa is usually issued the following morning. Generally it is not possible to provide the visa to adoptive parents on the same day as the immigrant visa interview. Adoptive parents should verify current processing times with the U.S. Embassy in Port Moresby before making final travel arrangements.

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States: A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States: An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible.  Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

ALL /
ALL /
Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Papua New Guinea

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Papua New Guinea, see the Department of State’s Country-Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country-Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Papua New Guinea, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

ALL /
ALL /
After Adoption

Post-Adoption/Post-Placement Reporting Requirements

Papua New Guinea does not have any post-adopting reporting requirements.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

ALL /
ALL /
Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Papua New Guinea
Embassy of the United States of America
P.O. Box 1492
Port Moresby, N.C.D. 121
Papua New Guinea
Tel: +(675) 321-1455
Fax: +(675) 320-0637
E-mail: consularportmoresby@state.gov
Internet: pg.usembassy.gov/

Papua New Guinea’s Adoption Authority
Office of Lukautim Pikinin (Child Welfare)
Department for Community Development and Religion
P.O. Box 7354
Boroko, NCD
Papua New Guinea
Tel: +(675) 325-9893
Fax: none
Email: none
Internet: none  

Embassy of Papua New Guinea
1779 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W.
Suite 805
Washington, D.C.  20036
Tel: (202) 745-3680
Fax: (202) 745-3679
E-mail: info@pngembassy.org
Internet: pngembassy.org

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI, SA-17A, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
Email: Adoption@state.gov
Internet: adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-600A or I-600 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email: NBC.Adoptions@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 12 Months
A-2 None Multiple 12 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 $15.00 A Multiple A 12 Months A
B-2 $15.00 A Multiple A 12 Months A
B-1/B-2 $15.00 A Multiple A 12 Months A
C-1 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1/D N/A N/A N/A
C-2 None Multiple 60 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 36 Months
F-1 None Multiple 12 Months
F-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-1 None Multiple 12 Months
G-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-3 None Multiple 12 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 36 Months 3
I None One 3 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 36 Months
L-2 None Multiple 36 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None One 3 Months 3
O-2 None One 3 Months 3
O-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-1 None One 3 Months 3
P-2 None One 3 Months 3
P-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-4 None One 3 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 3 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 36 Months
R-2 None Multiple 36 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
ALL /
ALL /
Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

ALL /
ALL /
Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

ALL /
ALL /
General Documents

Please check back for update

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available from the Registrar General's Office, P.O. Box 470, Waigani, N.C.D. 131, Papua New Guinea; Phone:(675) 327-1732; Fax: (675) 327-1523. Most foreign nationals and residents of towns register births with this office. Births in rural areas are frequently not registered. A fee may be charged for this service.

Death Certificates

Available from the Registrar General's Office, P.O. Box 470, Waigani, N.C.D. 131, Papua New Guinea; Phone: (675) 327-1732; Fax: (675) 327-1523. The deaths of some foreign nationals and residents of towns are registered with this office. Deaths occurring in isolated or rural areas are frequently not registered with the Registrar General's Office. In these cases a medical certificate of death will normally be issued by the hospital where the death occurred or by the attending physician.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available for church and civil marriages (known as statutory marriages, to distinguish them from customary marriages) from the Registrar General's Office, P.O. Box 470, Waigani, N.C.D. 131, Papua New Guinea; Phone (675) 327-1732; Fax: (675) 327-1523. A fee may be charged for this service.

Customary marriages between Papua New Guineans are legal provided they are carried out in accordance with the custom or customs of the tribes involved, but they are not registered and no certificates are issued. It is not clear from Papua New Guinea marriage law whether expatriates or naturalized citizens may legally enter into customary marriages in Papua New Guinea.

Divorce Certificates

Available. A certified copy of a final divorce decree can be obtained from the Registrar of the National Court, P.O. Box 7018, Boroko, N.C.D.111, Papua New Guinea; Phone: (675) 325-709. A fee may be charged for this service.

Adoption Certificates

Available. A certified copy of a final adoption decree can be obtained from the Registrar of the National Court, P.O. Box 7018, Boroko, N.C.D 111, Papua New Guinea; Phone (675) 325-7099. A fee may be charged for this service.

ALL /
ALL /
Identity Card

Please check back for update

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

 

Clients in the National Capital District:  To obtain your police record; submit the following to the National Criminal Records Office, Police Headquarters, P.O. Box 85, Konedobu, N.C.D 125, Papua New Guinea: 1) a Character Check Application, 2) an official service fee receipt of PGK10.00, and 3) a copy of your current passport, visa and work permit. The Character Check Application Form can only be obtained at National Criminal Records Office at Police Headquarters, Konedobu, Telephone: (675) 325-4188 / 325- 4472 ; Fax: (675) 325-5365. The Service Fee Receipt can be obtained at the Public Accounts Finance Haus Valupindi, Waigani, at the Firearms Registry Office at Boroko Police Station, or at the Central Provincial Government Cash Office at Konedobu. You must apply in person. Your fingerprints will be taken to verify identity.                                                                          

Clients in other Provinces (Papua New Guinea): To obtain your police record; submit the following to the National Criminal Records Office, Police Headquarters, P.O. Box 85, Konedobu, N.C.D 125, Papua New Guinea: 1) a Character Check Application, 2) an official service fee receipt of PGK10.00, and 3) a copy of your current passport, visa and work permit. The Character Check Application Form can only be obtained at National Criminal Records Office at Police Headquarters, Konedobu, Telephone: (675) 325-4188 / 325-4472; Fax: (675) 325-5365. The Service Fee Receipt can be obtained at the Provincial Treasury Office (BMS) in the province where you reside. You must also submit a set of fingerprints taken on Form FD-258 from the Provincial Police Station where you reside.        

Clients in other countries: To obtain your police record; submit the following to the National Criminal Records Office, Police Headquarters, P.O. Box 85, Konedobu, N.C.D 125, Papua New Guinea: 1) a Character Check Application, 2) an official service fee receipt of PGK10.00, and 3) a copy of your current passport, visa and work permit. The Character Check Application Form can only be obtained at National Criminal Records Office at Police Headquarters, Konedobu, Telephone: (675) 325-4188 / 325-4472; Fax: (675) 325-5365. You must also submit your fingerprints on Form FD-258. To obtain this form from the National Criminal Records Office, call or send an e-mail request to, kwumber@rpngc.gov.pg. Send the USD equivalent of the PGK 10.00 fee through “WESTERN UNION” Bank South Pacific (BSP). Send an e-mail to the abovementioned addresses to notify the National Criminal Records Office that you have sent the fee.

NOTE: The Police Clearance Certificate will be processed and mailed to you within appropriately two weeks. For the quickest turnaround, send the completed form by DHL or FEDEX and include a Pre-paid Return envelope for the return of the certificate when issued. Otherwise, certificates will be returned through the domestic mailing service, and the certificate may take 3-6 weeks to reach the applicant.

Prison Records

Available. The police clearance certificate will contain a complete record of any criminal convictions and imprisonment.

Military Records

Available. All members of the Papua New Guinea Defense Force receive a discharge card at the time they leave the service. If they have misplaced this card, they may request another copy by writing the Director of Manpower, Murray Barracks, Free Mail.

Bag, Boroko, N.C.D. 111, Papua New Guinea; Phones: (675-325-6166 or 324-2480; Fax: (675) 325-6117. Applicants should provide regimental numbers and dates of service.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

The Papua New Guinea Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade issues Certificates of Identity to Papua New Guineans, foreign nationals who must travel when a passport is not available, and refugees. These documents are passport-like documents with a gray cover and can be valid up to 24 months. Papua New Guinea's embassies and consulates overseas issue Documents of Identity to Papua New Guinea citizens under emergency conditions which are valid only for the return trip to Papua New Guinea and must be surrendered to the immigration officials upon entering the country. This document meets the requirements of section 101(A)(30) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Other Records

Not applicable

Visa Issuing Posts

Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea (Embassy)

Street Address:
Douglas Street (adjacent to the Bank of Papua, New Guinea)

Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 1492
Port Moresby, NCD 121
Papua, New Guinea

Tel: (675) 321-1455

Fax: (675) 321-1593

E-Mail: ConsularPortMoresby@state.gov

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 745-3680 (202) 745-3679

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Port Moresby
Douglas Street, adjacent to the Bank of Papua New Guinea,
P.O. Box 1492
Port Moresby, NCD 121
Papua New Guinea
Telephone
+(675) 321-1455
Emergency
+(675) 7200-9439
Fax
No Fax
Papua New Guinea Country Map

Learn about a country
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.