U.S. Visas

English

U.S. Visa: Reciprocity and Civil Documents by Country

Peru

Peru
Republic of Peru

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8

Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

ALL /

Visa Category Footnotes

  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

ALL / ALL /

General Documents

General Issuing Government Authority Information: The Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC) is the national civil records registry in Peru.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth and Death Certificates

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees:  S/ 15 Nuevos Soles (approximately $5 dollars).
  • Document Name:  Birth certificate (Partida de Nacimiento), and Death Certificate (Acta de Defunción).
  • Issuing Government Authority:  Certificates are issued by the Provincial Council (Concejo Provincial) or the District Council (Concejo Distrital) of the district or province in which the event occurred and was registered.  Registrations have been obligatory under the civil code since 1936.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Certificates vary in form and can be transcriptions in long hand, typewritten on a template, or microfilm photocopies of the original record.  
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  All certificates bear the seal of either the Provincial or District Council and are certified by the Chief of the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC).
  • Registration Criteria:  The Civil Code of Peru requires the parents of a child born in Peru to enter a new child’s birth in the civil registry (Registro de Estado Civil) of the District or Provincial Council within 30 days of the date of the child's birth.  In addition to the above, an individual's birth may be recorded after the 30 day deadline through a judicial or administrative process in the municipality where the individual was born, or through RENIEC.  Those entering a late registration must submit supporting evidence such as records of live birth, baptism certificates, school and medical records, two witnesses, and evidence that the individual was never registered before.
  • Procedure for Obtaining:  The procedure for obtaining a birth certificate depends on the municipality where the birth was registered.  If the municipality’s records have been incorporated into RENIEC, then the document can be requested in any RENIEC office.  If the municipality’s records have not been incorporated into RENIEC, then the certificate must be requested at the municipality where it was registered. 
  • Certified Copies:  The Consular Section requires that birth, and death certificates that establish the relationship between the petitioner and beneficiary be certified by RENIEC.  For non-incorporated districts (most locations outside of Lima), the RENIEC certification only verifies the signature of the signing official.  Evidence of RENIEC certification consists of a seal placed on the document.  RENIEC offices are also the issuing authority for original birth certificates for many areas in Lima.  
  • Alternate Documents:  In rare and verifiable instances, documents have been destroyed by natural disaster or other calamities.  In the event a birth certificate is not available, baptismal certificates issued by the parochial authorities of the Roman Catholic Church and notarized by an ecclesiastical notary are generally acceptable for legal purposes in Peru.  If an unusually long time has elapsed between the dates of birth and baptism, the value of the certificate is impaired.
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments:  RENIEC has been incorporating more Civil Registries of District or Provincial Councils during the past few years.  As of May2015, it had incorporated 47 in Lima and Callao, and 18 in other provinces.  Because of this centralized control, RENIEC is issuing more birth, marriage and death certificates directly - increasing the reliability of those documents and making them easily verifiable through the Fraud Prevention Unit of our Consular Section.  Post regularly receives updates from RENIEC regarding newly incorporated councils.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees:  S/ 15 Nuevos Soles (approximately $5 dollars).
  • Document Name:  Marriage Certificate (Partida de Matrimonio)
  • Issuing Government Authority:  Certificates are issued by the Provincial Council (Concejo Provincial) or the District Council (Concejo Distrital) of the district or province in which the event occurred and was registered or by RENIEC when the civil registries of the council have been incorporated into this bureau.  Registrations have been obligatory under the civil code since 1936.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Certificates vary in form and can be transcriptions in long hand, typewritten on a template, or microfilm photocopies of the original record.  
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  All certificates bear the seal of either the Provincial or District Council and are certified by the Chief of the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC) and/or from a RENIEC official for those civil registries incorporated into this bureau.
  • Registration Criteria:  It is important to highlight that whether the council’s civil registries have been incorporated into RENIEC or not, marriages still take place at the councils and are celebrated by Majors or a council’s authorized officer. For those cases in which the council’s civil registries have been incorporated into RENIEC, the council sends all of the marriage file to RENIEC who will be in charge of officially registering  the marriage (in their books and database).
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The procedure for obtaining a marriage certificate depends on the municipality where the marriage was registered.  If the municipality’s records have been incorporated into RENIEC, then the document can be requested in any RENIEC office.  If the municipality’s records have not been incorporated into RENIEC, then the certificate must be requested at the municipality where it was registered. 
  • Certified Copies:  The Consular Section requires that marriage certificates that establish the relationship between the petitioner and beneficiary be certified by RENIEC.  For non-incorporated districts (most locations outside of Lima), the RENIEC certification only verifies the signature of the signing official.  Evidence of RENIEC certification consists of a seal placed on the document.  RENIEC offices are also the issuing authority for many areas in Lima.  
  • Alternate Documents: There aren’t any valid alternate certificates, but nowadays there are still some rural councils that may sometimes transcribe the information from the marriage books into a special pre-printed format since they may have no electricity and/or copier machines. Those certificates are sealed and signed by the Civil Registry Chief and sometimes by the Major as well.  As it happens with the certificates issued by councils not incorporated into RENIEC, the Consular Section requires a RENIEC certification.  
  • Exceptions: Before 1936, religious marriages were considered legal if reported to the civil authorities.  Marriage certificates issued by church authorities after that date have no legal value.
  • Comments:
    • RENIEC has been incorporating more Civil Registries of District or Provincial Councils during the past few years.  As of July 2016, it had incorporated a total of 68 civil registries, 50 in Lima and Callao, and 18 in other provinces. Because of this centralized control, RENIEC is issuing more birth, marriage and death certificates directly - increasing the reliability of those documents and making them easily verifiable through the Fraud Prevention Unit of our Consular Section.  Post regularly receives updates from RENIEC regarding newly incorporated councils.
    • Same-sex marriage is not legally recognized in Peru. 
 

Divorce Certificates

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: S/3.70 Nuevos Soles (approximately $1.20 dollars) per page, if issued by the court. Price may vary depending on the issuing authority.
  • Document Name: Sentencia de Divorcio (Divorce Decree)
  • Issuing Government Authority: Judicial Divorces are issued by the Family Court.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The format varies depending on the issuing office.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The document is issued by judges in the Family Court.
  • Registration Criteria: A divorce is noted on the left margin or back of the marriage certificate and makes reference to the resolution of the civil court dissolving the marriage.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The procedure for obtaining the document varies. Subject must approach to the entity that processed the divorce to request it.
  • Certified Copies: A certified copy of the resolution may be obtained from the clerk (secretario) of the lower court that ordered the divorce.
  • Alternate Documents: Divorces may also be processed in a Municipality or in a Notary's office (Administrative Divorce). In these cases, the issuing authority is the Mayor of the Municipality or the Notary respectively, and the document may be called Resolucion de Alcaldia (Municipal Resolution) or Testimonio. Law N.29227 authorizing these divorces went into effect July 14, 2008. As part of the divorce proceedings, divorces processed by a Municipality or Notary must be registered by the Civil Registry Chief (for those municipalities not yet incorporated in RENIEC or by RENIEC for those incorporated). An annotation would then be placed in the original marriage certificate indicating both the date of the legal separation as well as the final divorce date. For these divorces, the following could be presented as proof of divorce:

    • Resolucion de Alcaldia plus copy of the marriage certificate with the divorce annotation on the back of the certificate.
    • Resolucion Jefatural de RENIEC plus copy of the marriage certificate with the divorce annotation on the back of the certificate.
    • Notary Deed of Arrangement (Testimonio) or Minute plus copy of the marriage certificate with the divorce annotation on the back of the certificate.

    Please note that in Peru, divorce is a two-step process. First, the couple has to request the legal separation "municipal resolution of separation or "Acta Notarial" (Notary Minute). Two months later either party can request the final divorce resolution. This final divorce resolution is necessary for the divorce to be legal.

  • Exceptions: None.
  • Comments: In the event that an individual marries in Peru and dissolves that marriage outside of Peru, the foreign divorce must be formally recognized in Peru by the Superior Court through an "exequatur" process prior to either party entering into another marriage in Peru. When the exequatur is finalized, the court issues a decree that should be annotated on the marriage certificate. The decree is valid as of the date of the foreign divorce. If the foreign divorce is not registered through the exequatur process and the individual enters into another marriage in Peru, the second marriage will not be legally recognized until the exequatur process is completed.
  • Note: Immigrant visa processing, the U.S. Embassy in Lima requires the Sentencia de Divorcio/Resolucion de Alcaldia. The annotation on the marriage certificate is not sufficient.

Adoption Certificates

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: No fee
  • Document Name: Resolucion Directorial de Adopcion (Directorial Resolution of Adoption). This is the final adoption decree.
  • Issuing Government Authority: The General Bureau of Adoptions from the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP) is the government issuing authority.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The document is issued on A4 sized paper with a Peruvian coat of arms on top of the first page, seals, and a signature on every page, as well as a seal from the Adoption General Director at the bottom of the last page.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The Adoption General Director from the General Bureau of Adoptions of the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP) is the one authorized to sign the document.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The General Bureau of Adoptions from the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP) grants adoption documents after the adoption process has been completed in cases where the adoption has been executed under the administrative process complying with the provisions of the Hague Adoption Convention on the Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Inter-Country Adoption. The issued document reflects the new name of the child.
  • Certified Copies Available: Yes, from the General Bureau of Adoptions.
  • Alternate Documents: In the case of adoptions conducted in a family or civil court, adoption certificates may be obtained from the court where the adoption process took place. The document will be a final adoption decree with the seals on each page from the court where the adoption process took place with the last page containing the signature of the judge.
  • Exceptions: None.
  • Comments: Visit this web site for more information.

Identity Card

  • Available: Yes.
  • Fees: For minors (under 17 years old) the cost is S/16 Nuevos Soles (approximately $5.30 dollars); for applicants age 17 and over, the cost is S/29 Nuevos Soles (approximately $10 dollars).
  • Document Name: Documento Nacional de Identidad (National ID Card)
  • Issuing Government Authority: Peruvian ID cards are issued by the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC).
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: ID cards for adults are light blue in color and contain the picture and biographical information of the subject. ID cards for minors are yellow and also contain information about the parents.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The card is signed by a RENIEC authorized issuing officer. Registration Criteria: The ID card is the only identity document issued to Peruvian citizens, adults or minors. The ID card is mandatory for all Peruvian citizens aged 18 years or older.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Applicant must submit the fee receipt, a certified copy of Birth Certificate issued by a civil register, utility receipts, and a passport picture at any RENIEC issuing office.
  • Certified Copies: Not Available
  • Alternate Documents: A Birth Certificate may still accepted as an identity document for minors.
  • Exceptions: None
  • Comments: ID cards for children are not mandatory. However, they are necessary for children because they are a requirement for them to access to health services, social programs, and for regional travel. As a matter of practice, ID cards are issued to children immediately after birth. Click here for more information.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

  • Available: Yes. To those 18 and older.
  • Fees: S/17 Nuevos Soles (approximately $6 dollars)
  • Document Name: Certificado de Antecedentes Policiales (Certificate of Police Record)
  • Issuing Government Authority: Records are issued by the Peruvian National Police (Policia Nacional del Peru) at local police stations.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Police Records are issued on green paper with the heading "Policia Nacional del Peru, Division de Identificacion, Certificado de Antecedentes Policiales." A scanned copy of the applicant's photo also appears on the certificate.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Police Commanderor Commissar.
  • Registration Criteria: Applicants without criminal records will have "No Registra Antecedentes" (does not have records) printed on the form.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Police records are available for applicants age 18 and over. The applicant must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de La Nacion branch and then complete the process in an authorized police station.
  • Certified Copies: Not Available.
  • Alternate Documents: A police record may be issued to residents or non-residents upon application to "Policia de Investigaciones del Peru, Division de Identificacion Criminalistica de Lima," Av. Aramburu No. 550, Lima 34. The applicant must first request a fingerprint chart (ficha de canje internacional) and provide one photo. Processing time is normally three days. There is a small fee.
  • Exceptions: None
  • Comments: This document may not contain an accurate listing of all police records since there is no national database and each precinct maintains its own record. Therefore, for immigrant visa processing, the Consular Section in Lima requires 1) Certificado de Antecedentes Policiales, 2) Certificado Judicial de Antecedentes Penales, and 3) Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales a Nivel Nacional.

 

Imprisonment Records

  • Available: Yes. To those 18 and older.
  • Fees: 34.50 Nuevos Soles (Approx.$12 USD)
  • Document Name: Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales a Nivel Nacional (Certificate of National Judicial Records).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Judicial records are issued in Lima by the Instituto Nacional Penitenciario (INPE), Dirección de Registro Penitenciario. Please view the following link for information on where to obtain these records:   https://www.inpe.gob.pe/informaci%C3%B3n.html.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Imprisonment records are issued on green paper with the heading "Ministerio de Justicia, Instituto Nacional Penitenciario, Dirección de Registro Penitenciario" on the top of the page. The shield of the institute is placed at the top right corner of the document and a thermo chromic ink stamp at the left bottom. The applicant's photo is scanned and printed on the certificate.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The Director of the Imprisonment Record Office.
  • Registration Criteria: This document details entrances, exits, convictions, and other records of those who were detained in a penitentiary in Peru.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Imprisonment records are available to Peruvians and residents age 18 and over. Applicant must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion branch and then complete the process at the Instituto Nacional Penitenciario. The process may be done in one day if applicant does not have judicial records or require further investigation. In some instances, the processing time may be as long as two weeks.
  • Certified Copies: Certified copies are not available.
  • Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents.
  • Exceptions: This document may not contain an accurate listing of all past incarcerations since any detainee may have his or her record expunged after serving the full sentence.
  • Comments: Applicants who are not resident in Peru may send a representative to obtain the court records but must first go to the Peruvian Consulate to sign a power of attorney authorizing their representative to obtain the records on their behalf. The power of attorney must also be certified by the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs before the representative can request the imprisonment records.

 

Court Records

  • Available: Available to Peruvians and residents age 18 and over.
  • Fees: S/ 80 Nuevos Soles (approximately $20 dollars)
  • Document Name: Certificado Judicial de Antecedentes Penales (Certificate of Penal Records).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Court records are issued by "Registro Nacional de Condenas" Av. Abancay cdra. 5, Edificio del Ministerio Publico, 1er piso, Lima 1. They are also issued by Peruvian consular offices worldwide.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Court Records are issued on blue/orange paper with the heading "Republica de Peru, Poder Judicial, Certificado Judicial de Antecedentes Penales." The Judiciary's logo is found at the left top corner of the document, and Peruvian coat of arms with the text "REPUBLICA DEL PERU" at the center. A hologram with the Judiciary's logo is placed at the right side of the thermo chromic ink stamp in the lower part of the document. A scanned copy of the applicant's photo is also printed on the certificate.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Document has the scanned signature of "Jefe de Registro Nacional de Condenas."
  • Registration Criteria: Court Records certify if a person was convicted of any crime.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Applicants must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion or Interbank branch, complete the application form (form is available free of charge), and present his or her ID card (original and copy).
  • Certified Copies: Not Available.
  • Alternate Documents: Now court records can be requested online at www.pj.gob.peafter the payment of a fee and can be picked up at an office chosen by the client (the list of these offices may be found in the same webpage). In order to request this document online, the applicant must be 18 years old, have a valid Peruvian ID card, and have paid the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion or Interbank branch.
  • Exceptions: None.
  • Comments: Applicants who are not resident in Peru may send a representative to obtain the court records but must first go to a Peruvian Consulate to sign a power of attorney authorizing their representative to obtain the records on their behalf. The Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs must certify the power of attorney before the representative can request the court records.

 

When issuing the court records, the "Registro Nacional de Condenas" uses pictures from RENIEC's database. They only paste a photo when the person requesting the certificate is a minor, a foreign national, or a Peruvian citizen who lives in other country and his/her information is not available in RENIEC.

Military Records

  • Available: Military records are available to all who have served in the military (career military), except for those who served only the two year obligatory military service.
  • Fees: S/38.5 Nuevos Soles (approximately $13 dollars).
  • Document Name: Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales y/o Penales (Certificate of Judicial and Criminal Records).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Military records are issued by "Fuero Militar Policial," formerly known as "Consejo Supremo de Justicia Militar." Documents are issued in Av. Arequipa #310, Lima. For more information visit www.fmp.gob.pe.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Military Records are issued on blue paper with the heading "Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales y/o Penales." The Peruvian coat of arms is found at the left top corner of the document, and the shield of the institute is in the center. A scanned copy of the applicant's photo is printed on the document.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Documents are signed by the Jefe del Registro Central de Condenas.
  • Registration Criteria: This document shows the offenses incurred by military and police personnel while on duty.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Applicant must first pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion branch. They must then complete the application form and provide a copy of their identification card.
  • Certified Copies: Available
  • Alternate Documents: None.
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: Applicants who have not served in the military or police are not required to submit this document for immigrant visa processing at the U.S. Embassy in Lima.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

  • Types Available: Regular, Diplomatic (Pasaporte Diplomatico), Official (Pasaporte Especial)
  • Fees: The cost for obtaining a regular passport is S/39.30 Nuevos Soles (approximately $13 dollars). To revalidate, the cost is S/33.40 Nuevos Soles (approximately $11 dollars).
  • Document Name: Pasaporte de la Comunidad Andina de la Republica del Peru (Passport of the Andean Community of the Republic of Peru).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Regular passports are issued by Superintendencia Nacional de Migraciones / Migraciones Peru.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Peruvian immigration authorities began issuing photo digitized machine readable passports in September 1998. Regular passports have a maroon cover with the heading "Comunidad Andina, Republica del Peru" and the shield of Peru printed in gold ink. The machine readable passports feature many security features including microprinting, UV holograms, and optically variable inks. They are also sensitive to manipulation by solvents or chemicals.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: In Lima, passports bear the seal and signature of the Passport Coordinator. In the provinces, passports bear the signature and seal of the chief of the immigration office where the passport was issued.
  • Registration Criteria: Eligibility is determined by checking the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC)'s records and the immigrations database.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The applicant must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion branch and then submit his or her identity document and the passport application form. For more information about the process please visit this web site.
  • Alternate Documents: Not available
  • Exceptions: All applicants must submit a passport in order to process a visa.
  • Comments: Peruvian passports are valid for five years and may be renewed for one additional five-year period. Peruvian immigration authorities revalidate laminated machine-readable Peruvian passports on the last page. The revalidation foil resembles a digital printed passport bio data page with a color photo. The foil is affixed to the passport page with heat. As a result of the passport revalidation process, the Government of Peru has requested that the last two pages of the Peruvian passport (pages 31 and 32) remain clear of any stickers, stamps, or writing. Revalidations done in the main offices in Lima are machine readable. Peruvian consulates abroad will continue to issue non-machine readable passports using seals and stamps.
  • Other Documents Available:
    • Laisez-passer (Salvoconducto). This documentis issued to Foreign Nationals who do not have a Diplomatic Representation in the Country. It is valid for 30 days after issuance.
    • Travel document (Documento de Viaje). Issued to refugees and asylees.
    • Travel Record Certificate (Certificado de Movimiento Migratorio). Migraciones Peru keeps records of entries and exits of all Peruvian nationals and foreigners (residents and visitors). Applicant must pay a fee of S/20.10 Nuevos Soles ($6.70 dollars) at Banco de La Nacion and request the certificate at any Migraciones office.  Applicant must submit his/her DNI. 

Other Records

Not applicable

Visa Issuing Posts

Lima, Peru (Embassy)

Address: Avenida Encalada
Cuadra 17 s/n, Monterrico
Lima 33

Mailing address: Embajada de los Estados Unidos de America
Apartado Postal 41-127
Lima 41

Phone Number: (51-1) 618-2000. Fax: (51-1) 618-2722

Email: Embassy's Fraud Prevention Unit: LimaFPM@state.gov

Visa Services: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Peru.