U.S. Visas

English

U.S. Visa: Reciprocity and Civil Documents by Country

Canada

Canada
Canada

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V
 
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 $40.00 Multiple 60 Months
E-2 2 $40.00 Multiple 60 Months
E-2C 12   Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-6 10 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO-7 None Multiple 24 Months
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 None Multiple 36 Months
TN 5 None Multiple 36 Months
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8

Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

ALL /

Visa Category Footnotes

  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

ALL / ALL /

General Documents

Note: Aliens who have "landed immigrant" (permanent residency) or "refugee" (asylee) status in Canada may be accorded Canadian reciprocity per 97 STATE 214113, but only if they apply in Canada and are not undergoing administrative processing. Such applicants who apply outside of Canada must be accorded the reciprocity of their country of nationality. Such applicants who require administrative processing must be accorded the reciprocity of their country of nationality per 06 STATE 80485.

 

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth

Births are registered in the Canadian provinces or territory in which they took place. Though each province or territory issues its own certificates for these events, there are a few basic formats for them across Canada:

  • The "small" or "short form" certificate is a computer-printed, limited extract of information from provincial records. It is a wallet-sized card, 9.5 x 6.4 cm or 2.5 x 3.75in (Specimen from British Columbia). Short-form or small certificates are not acceptable for visa purposes because they do not contain enough identification information, such as parents' names.
  • The "large" or "full-size" certificate is a computer-printed extract of information from provincial records. It is printed on currency-style paper stock, 21.6 x 17.8 cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border (Specimen from British Columbia).
  • A "certified copy of a record" is an exact or near-exact copy of the actual paper record in the provincial archives. It is printed on safety paper, usually 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14in., and bears the province or territory's raised seal. This type of certificate, being a complete record rather than an extract, contains the most information about the event.
  • A "commemorative" certificate is a decorative document intended for display (Specimen from Manitoba). Commemorative certificates are not considered legal documents in Canada and are not acceptable for visa purposes.

Note: For cases in which the subject of a birth record was adopted, see "Adoption Records" below.

Not all provinces and territories issue all of the formats noted above. Province-and-territory specific information on obtaining acceptable birth, marriage, death, and name change certificates is as follows:

  • Alberta: Applicants should obtain "large sized" certificates or certified photocopies of a registration from Alberta Vital Statistics through a private Alberta Registry Agent. Further information, including names and locations of Registry Agents, is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Alberta, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal documents. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from Alberta Vital Statistics.
  • British Columbia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copes of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency, which has offices in Vancouver (605 Robson Street, Room 250, tel: 604-660-2937) and Victoria (818 Fort Street, tel: 250-952-2681). Large certificates are also available through Government Agents located across the province. Further information, including locations of other Vital Statistics offices, names and located of Government Agents, and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Manitoba: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies from the Vital Statistics Agency in Winnipeg (254 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, 204-945-3701). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • New Brunswick: Applicants should obtain "long-form certified copies" of records from the Vital Statistics Office in Fredericton (435 King Street, Suite 203, tel: 506-453-2385). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Applicants should obtain "long-form certificates" from the Vital Statistics Division in St. John's (5 Mews Place, tel: 709-729-3308) or at Government Service Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Northwest Territories: Applicants should obtain "framing" or "restricted photocopy" certificates from the Registrar General of Vital Statistics in Inuvik Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel: 867-777-7420). Applicants may also write to: Registrar General of Vital Statistics, Government of the NWT, Bag 9 (107 MacKenzie Road/IDC Building, second floor), Inuvik, NT, X0A 0T0 (fax: 867-777-3197).
  • Nova Scotia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from Vital Statistics Office in Halifax (Joseph Howe Building, 1690 Hollis Street., ground floor, tel:902-424-4381). Further information, including instructions for ordering online or by mail, is available online.
  • Nunavut: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Division, which is based out of the Kivalliq Regional Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel:867-645-2171). Applicants may also write to: Social Services, Bag 3 RSO Building, Rankin Inlet, NU, X0C 0G0 (fax: 867-645-2580).
    Note: Nunavut was part of the Northwest Territories until April 1, 1999. Before that, all births, marriages, deaths, and name changes that occurred in the present Nunavut region would have been registered with the Northwest Territories Registrar General of Vital Statistics.
  • Ontario: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Office of the Registrar General in Toronto (Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street, second floor, tel: 416-325-8305) or at Ontario Land Registry Offices and Government Information Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Ontario, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal document. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from the Office of the Registrar General.
  • Prince Edward Island: Applicants should obtain "framing size" certificates from the Office of Vital Statistics in Montague (126 Douses Road, tel:902-838-0080) or Charlottetown (16 Garfield Street, tel:902-368-6185). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Quebec: Applicants should obtain "certified copies of an act" from the Direction de l' Etat Civil in Montreal (2050, rue de Bleury, sixth floor, tel:514-864-3900) or the Directeur de l'Etat Civil in Quebec City (2535, boulevard Laurier, Ground Floor, Sainte-Foy, tel:418-643-3900; fax:418-646-3255). Further information, including other locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
  • Saskatchewan: Applicants should obtain "frame" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Office in Regina (1942 Hamilton Street, tel:306-787-3251).
  • Yukon Territory: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency in Whitehorse (204 Lambert Street, fourth floor, tel: 867-667-5207) or a Yukon Territorial Agent. Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.

Death/Burial

Deaths are registered in the Canadian provinces or territory in which they took place. Though each province or territory issues its own certificates for these events, there are a few basic formats for them across Canada:

  • The "small" or "short form" certificate is a computer-printed, limited extract of information from provincial records. It is a wallet-sized card, 9.5 x 6.4 cm or 2.5 x 3.75in (Specimen from British Columbia). Short-form or small certificates are not acceptable for visa purposes because they do not contain enough identification information, such as parents' names.
  • The "large" or "full-size" certificate is a computer-printed extract of information from provincial records. It is printed on currency-style paper stock, 21.6 x 17.8 cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border (Specimen from British Columbia).
  • A "certified copy of a record" is an exact or near-exact copy of the actual paper record in the provincial archives. It is printed on safety paper, usually 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14in., and bears the province or territory's raised seal. This type of certificate, being a complete record rather than an extract, contains the most information about the event.
  • A "commemorative" certificate is a decorative document intended for display (Specimen from Manitoba). Commemorative certificates are not considered legal documents in Canada and are not acceptable for visa purposes.

Note: For cases in which the subject of a birth record was adopted, see "Adoption Records" below.

Not all provinces and territories issue all of the formats noted above. Province-and-territory specific information on obtaining acceptable birth, marriage, death, and name change certificates is as follows:

  • Alberta: Applicants should obtain "large sized" certificates or certified photocopies of a registration from Alberta Vital Statistics through a private Alberta Registry Agent. Further information, including names and locations of Registry Agents, is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Alberta, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal documents. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from Alberta Vital Statistics.
  • British Columbia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copes of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency, which has offices in Vancouver (605 Robson Street, Room 250, tel: 604-660-2937) and Victoria (818 Fort Street, tel: 250-952-2681). Large certificates are also available through Government Agents located across the province. Further information, including locations of other Vital Statistics offices, names and located of Government Agents, and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Manitoba: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies from the Vital Statistics Agency in Winnipeg (254 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, 204-945-3701). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • New Brunswick: Applicants should obtain "long-form certified copies" of records from the Vital Statistics Office in Fredericton (435 King Street, Suite 203, tel: 506-453-2385). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Applicants should obtain "long-form certificates" from the Vital Statistics Division in St. John's (5 Mews Place, tel: 709-729-3308) or at Government Service Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Northwest Territories: Applicants should obtain "framing" or "restricted photocopy" certificates from the Registrar General of Vital Statistics in Inuvik Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel: 867-777-7420). Applicants may also write to: Registrar General of Vital Statistics, Government of the NWT, Bag 9 (107 MacKenzie Road/IDC Building, second floor), Inuvik, NT, X0A 0T0 (fax: 867-777-3197).
  • Nova Scotia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from Vital Statistics Office in Halifax (Joseph Howe Building, 1690 Hollis Street., ground floor, tel:902-424-4381). Further information, including instructions for ordering online or by mail, is available online.
  • Nunavut: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Division, which is based out of the Kivalliq Regional Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel:867-645-2171). Applicants may also write to: Social Services, Bag 3 RSO Building, Rankin Inlet, NU, X0C 0G0 (fax: 867-645-2580).
    Note: Nunavut was part of the Northwest Territories until April 1, 1999. Before that, all births, marriages, deaths, and name changes that occurred in the present Nunavut region would have been registered with the Northwest Territories Registrar General of Vital Statistics.
  • Ontario: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Office of the Registrar General in Toronto (Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street, second floor, tel: 416-325-8305) or at Ontario Land Registry Offices and Government Information Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Ontario, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal document. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from the Office of the Registrar General.
  • Prince Edward Island: Applicants should obtain "framing size" certificates from the Office of Vital Statistics in Montague (126 Douses Road, tel:902-838-0080) or Charlottetown (16 Garfield Street, tel:902-368-6185). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Quebec: Applicants should obtain "certified copies of an act" from the Direction de l' Etat Civil in Montreal (2050, rue de Bleury, sixth floor, tel:514-864-3900) or the Directeur de l'Etat Civil in Quebec City (2535, boulevard Laurier, Ground Floor, Sainte-Foy, tel:418-643-3900; fax:418-646-3255). Further information, including other locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
  • Saskatchewan: Applicants should obtain "frame" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Office in Regina (1942 Hamilton Street, tel:306-787-3251). 
  • Yukon Territory: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency in Whitehorse (204 Lambert Street, fourth floor, tel: 867-667-5207) or a Yukon Territorial Agent. Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage

Marriages are registered in the Canadian provinces or territory in which they took place. Though each province or territory issues its own certificates for these events, there are a few basic formats for them across Canada:

  • The "small" or "short form" certificate is a computer-printed, limited extract of information from provincial records. It is a wallet-sized card, 9.5 x 6.4 cm or 2.5 x 3.75in (Specimen from British Columbia). Short-form or small certificates are not acceptable for visa purposes because they do not contain enough identification information, such as parents' names.
  • The "large" or "full-size" certificate is a computer-printed extract of information from provincial records. It is printed on currency-style paper stock, 21.6 x 17.8 cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border (Specimen from British Columbia).
  • A "certified copy of a record" is an exact or near-exact copy of the actual paper record in the provincial archives. It is printed on safety paper, usually 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14in., and bears the province or territory's raised seal. This type of certificate, being a complete record rather than an extract, contains the most information about the event.
  • A "commemorative" certificate is a decorative document intended for display (Specimen from Manitoba). Commemorative certificates are not considered legal documents in Canada and are not acceptable for visa purposes.

Note: For cases in which the subject of a birth record was adopted, see "Adoption Records" below.

Not all provinces and territories issue all of the formats noted above. Province-and-territory specific information on obtaining acceptable birth, marriage, death, and name change certificates is as follows:

  • Alberta: Applicants should obtain "large sized" certificates or certified photocopies of a registration from Alberta Vital Statistics through a private Alberta Registry Agent. Further information, including names and locations of Registry Agents, is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Alberta, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal documents. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from Alberta Vital Statistics.
  • British Columbia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copes of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency, which has offices in Vancouver (605 Robson Street, Room 250, tel: 604-660-2937) and Victoria (818 Fort Street, tel: 250-952-2681). Large certificates are also available through Government Agents located across the province. Further information, including locations of other Vital Statistics offices, names and located of Government Agents, and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Manitoba: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies from the Vital Statistics Agency in Winnipeg (254 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, 204-945-3701). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • New Brunswick: Applicants should obtain "long-form certified copies" of records from the Vital Statistics Office in Fredericton (435 King Street, Suite 203, tel: 506-453-2385). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Applicants should obtain "long-form certificates" from the Vital Statistics Division in St. John's (5 Mews Place, tel: 709-729-3308) or at Government Service Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Northwest Territories: Applicants should obtain "framing" or "restricted photocopy" certificates from the Registrar General of Vital Statistics in Inuvik Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel: 867-777-7420). Applicants may also write to: Registrar General of Vital Statistics, Government of the NWT, Bag 9 (107 MacKenzie Road/IDC Building, second floor), Inuvik, NT, X0A 0T0 (fax: 867-777-3197).
  • Nova Scotia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from Vital Statistics Office in Halifax (Joseph Howe Building, 1690 Hollis Street., ground floor, tel:902-424-4381). Further information, including instructions for ordering online or by mail, is available online.
  • Nunavut: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Division, which is based out of the Kivalliq Regional Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel:867-645-2171). Applicants may also write to: Social Services, Bag 3 RSO Building, Rankin Inlet, NU, X0C 0G0 (fax: 867-645-2580).
    Note: Nunavut was part of the Northwest Territories until April 1, 1999. Before that, all births, marriages, deaths, and name changes that occurred in the present Nunavut region would have been registered with the Northwest Territories Registrar General of Vital Statistics.
  • Ontario: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Office of the Registrar General in Toronto (Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street, second floor, tel: 416-325-8305) or at Ontario Land Registry Offices and Government Information Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Ontario, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal document. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from the Office of the Registrar General.
  • Prince Edward Island: Applicants should obtain "framing size" certificates from the Office of Vital Statistics in Montague (126 Douses Road, tel:902-838-0080) or Charlottetown (16 Garfield Street, tel:902-368-6185). Further information, including mail-order instructions, isavailable online.
  • Quebec: Applicants should obtain "certified copies of an act" from the Direction de l' Etat Civil in Montreal (2050, rue de Bleury, sixth floor, tel:514-864-3900) or the Directeur de l'Etat Civil in Quebec City (2535, boulevard Laurier, Ground Floor, Sainte-Foy, tel:418-643-3900; fax:418-646-3255). Further information, including other locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
  • Saskatchewan: Applicants should obtain "frame" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Office in Regina (1942 Hamilton Street, tel:306-787-3251).
  • Yukon Territory: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency in Whitehorse (204 Lambert Street, fourth floor, tel: 867-667-5207) or a Yukon Territorial Agent. Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.

Divorce

Canadian divorce records are maintained by provincial and territorial courts. Primary evidence of divorce is the original or court-certified copy of the final divorce decree from the court where the divorce took place. Some provinces also issue a "Certificate of Divorce" similar to a large or full-size marriage certificate (a computer-printed extract of information on currency style stock paper, 21.6 x 17.8cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border). The Certificate of Divorce is also acceptable evidence of divorce, though it has no information about child custody.

To obtain a court-certified copy of a divorce decree or a Certificate of Divorce, applicants should contact the clerk or registrar of the court where the divorce was granted. Applicants unsure of the court in which their divorce proceedings took place may write to the Central Registry of Divorce Proceedings, P.O. Box 2730, Station D, Ottawa, ON, K1P 5W7. The Central Registry cannot issue a divorce certificate, but will be able to confirm at which registry the divorce was granted.

To prevent international child custody disputes, in cases where a divorced parent wishes to have his minor child immigrate to the United States, U.S. diplomatic offices in Canada will request original or court-certified copies of court orders regarding child custody arrangements. Such documents should specify that the parent has "sole custody" of the child. If a divorced parent does not have court-granted sole custody, U.S. diplomatic offices in Canada will request written, notarized consent to the child's immigration from the other parent.

Adoption Certificates

For adoptions in Canada, provincial and territorial vital statistics authorities usually alter original records to obscure the names of birth parents. Therefore, birth certificates issued to applicants who were adopted likely will not accurately reflect the circumstances of their birth.

Access to pre-adoption birth records and adoption orders is restricted by provincial law, and the availability of such records varies by province or territory. In general, provinces and territories will release adoption records to adopted children if the birth parents do not object. However, there may be lengthy delays as the province or territory attempts to contact the birth parents or gives them an opportunity to object to the release of information.

Due to the difficulty in obtaining adoption records, U.S. diplomatic posts in Canada usually do not require adopted applicants to obtain their adoption records for visa purposes unless the adoption record is essential to demonstrating the relationship through which a benefit is claimed. However, U.S. posts reserve the right to request them if the circumstances of the case require it. Applicants who need to obtain pre-adoption birth records and adoption orders should use the contacts listed below.

  • Alberta: Alberta Post Adoption Registry, 11th Floor, Sterling Place, 9940-106 Street, Edmonton, AB, T5K 2N2, Tel: 780-427-6387.
  • British Columbia: Vital Statistics Agency, Confidential Services, P.O. Box 9657, STN PROV GOVT, Victoria, BC, V8W 9P3, tel: 250-952-2236.
  • Manitoba: Manitoba Post-Adoption Registry, 201-114 Garry Street, Winnipeg, MB, R3C 4V5, tel: 204-945-6964.
  • New Brunswick: Post Adoption Disclosure Services, Department of Family and Community Services, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1, tel: (506) 453-2949.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Confidential Services, Vital Statistics Division, Department Of Government Services, P.O. Box 8700, St. John's, NL, A1B 4J6, tel: 709-729-3308.
  • Northwest Territories: Registrar -- Adoptions, Department of Health and Social Services, GNWT, Box 1320 - CST 6, Yellowknife, NT, X1A 2L9, tel: 867-873-7943.
  • Nova Scotia: Adoption Disclosure Service Program, Department of Community Services, P.O. Box 696 Halifax, NS, B3J 2T7, tel: 902-424-2755.
  • Nunavut: Department of Health and Social Services, Director of Adoptions, P.O. Box 1000, Station 1000, Iquluit, NU, X0A 0H0, tel: 867-975-5781.
  • Ontario: Adoption Disclosure Unit, Ministry of Community and Social Services, 2 Bloor Street West, 24th Floor, Toronto, ON, M7A 1E9, tel: 416-327-4730.
  • Prince Edward Island: Department of Health and Social Services, Post-Adoption Service, 161 St. Peters Road, P.O. Box 2000, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 5P7, tel: 902-368-6511.
  • Quebec: Youth court (Chambre de la jeunesse) in the judicial district where the adoption took place. Additional information is available through the Quebec Ministry of Justice, tel: 418-643-5140.
  • Saskatchewan: Adoption Registry and Post Adoption Services, Saskatchewan Community Resources and Employment, 11th Floor, 1920 Broad Street, Regina, SK, S4P 3V6, tel: 306-787-3654.
  • Yukon Territory: Children's Services, Health and Social Services, Box 2703, Whitehorse, YU, Y1A 2C6, tel: 867-667-8689.

Note on Aboriginal Custom Adoption: In some provinces and territories, aboriginal children may be adopted by a process called "Aboriginal Custom Adoption," a privately-arranged adoption between two aboriginal families. Such adoptions have a similar legal effect in Canada to traditional adoptions. However, it is unclear whether such adoptions qualify for U.S. visa purposes under Section 101(b)(1)(E) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Identity Card

The current Certificate of Canadian Citizenship is a laminated, wallet-sized card with a color photograph of the bearer. It has minimal security features. It is evidence of Canadian citizenship and may be used to re-enter Canada. The Commemorative Certificate of Canadian Citizenship is a 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14 inch certificate, printed in both French and English, with a print of the Canadian Parliament on the right-hand side. It is an insecure document and is not evidence of Canadian citizenship.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police 

Available

Fees: Varies by Province.

Document Name:  Certified Criminal Record Check.

Issuing Authority: Royal Canadian Mounted Police

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The Certified Criminal Record Check requested under the Privacy Act is fingerprint-based, but the report does not include an image of the applicant’s fingerprints.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: There is no issuing authority personnel title.

Registration Criteria: There is no registration criteria.

Procedure for Obtaining: To obtain this document, you must submit your fingerprints to a local police service or RCMP-approved partner agency.  YOU MUST STATE THAT YOU ARE REQUESTING THE RECORD UNDER THE PRIVACY ACT.  Do not select “Visa/Border Crossing” as the purpose of the request. You must also specifically request the record which includes the “RCMP National Repository entire holdings.”  

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are not available.

Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions: None

Comments: As of September 10, 2018 a fingerprint-based, certified criminal record check REQUESTED UNDER THE CANADIAN PRIVACY ACT from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police is required by U.S. Consular posts in Canada. 

For more information on how to request this document, visit http://www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/en/steps-getting-a-certified-criminal-record-check

 

Court Records

Applicants who have been convicted of a crime in Canada should obtain a certified copy of court records from the clerk or registrar of the court in which they were convicted. Court records should state the section of the Canadian Criminal Code under which the applicant was convicted, the disposition of the case, and the penalty imposed, if any. Court records must also indicate whether the case was handled as a summary or indictable offense.

Canadian pardons have no effect under U.S. law. Applicants who have been convicted of a crime in Canada that was subsequently pardoned must contact an RCMP office to obtain both a Certified Criminal Record Check and copies of their pardoned criminal record. See "Police Records" above.

In cases of controlled substance violations (such as drug possession, sales, or trafficking), court records should indicate the type and quantity of substance involved. If court records do not include this information, applicants should seek to obtain it from the records of the police service that investigated the case or the Crown prosecutor's office that prosecuted it.

Prison Records

Unavailable.

Military Records

Applicants who are currently members of the Canadian Forces or who were released less than five years ago should send their requests to Director, Access to Information and Privacy (DAIP), National Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0K2.

Library and Archives Canada maintains service records for ex-Canadian Forces members released more than five years. Applicants should write with their surname, full given name(s), date of birth, and service number or social insurance number to the Personnel Records Unit, Library and Archives Canada, 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0N3. Additional information is available online.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

The current Canadian passport is a photodigitized document similar to the current U.S. passport and is evidence of Canadian citizenship. Unlike the U.S. passport, the current Canadian passport is valid only five years.

Canadian landed immigrants (also known as permanent residents) may present their national passports in conjunction with their Canadian Permanent Residence Cards. Consult the appropriate country's Reciprocity and Country Documents page for information about its passport. The Canadian permanent resident card is a durable, wallet-sized plastic card with a black-and-white photodigitized image of the bearer. It replaced the computer-generated IMM-1000 "Record of Landing" form in June 2002. Since January 1, 2004, Canadian permanent residents may no longer use the IMM-1000 to re-enter Canada by common carrier.

The current Certificate of Identity/Certificat d' identite is a photodigitized passport-style document with a light grey cover (though older, light brown, non-photodigitized versions remain in circulation). It is issued to persons who cannot obtain passports from their countries of nationality.

The current Travel Document/Titre de voyage is a photodigitized passport-style document with a blue cover (though older, non-photodigitized versions remain in circulation). It is issued to refugees in Canada (asylees in U.S terminology) who cannot obtain passports from their countries of nationality. It is analogous to a U.S. refugee travel document.

Other Records

Name Change Records

Change of name records are maintained by provinces and territories. Applicants who have legally changed their name other than by getting married (for example, after Canadian naturalization or after a divorce) should obtain a "Change of Name" certificate from the province or territory in which the name was changed. See "Birth, Marriage, and Death Records," above, for information on formats and obtaining such certificates.

Visa Issuing Posts

Ottawa (Embassy) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Address:
490 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 1G8

Tel: (613) 238-5335

Calgary (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Halifax (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Montreal (Consulate General) -- Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Visas

Quebec (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Toronto (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Vancouver (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

 

Visa Services

As noted above, Immigrant Visas are only available at the Montreal Consulate General. Nonimmigrant Visas are available in Montreal as well as the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa and the Consulates General in Calgary, Halifax, Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, and Vancouver.

Area Post
Abitibi Quebec
Alberta (Province) Calgary
Angoma (District) Toronto
Argenteuil Montreal
Arthabaska Quebec
Bagot Montreal
Beauc Quebec
Beauharnois Montreal
Bellehasse Quebec
Berther Montreal
Bonaventure Quebec
Brant Toronto
British Columbia (Province) Vancouver
Brome Montreal
Bruce Toronto
Carleton Ottawa
Chambly Montreal
Champlain Quebec
Charlevoix Quebec
Chateauguay Montreal
Chicoutimi Quebec
Cochrane (District) Toronto
Compton Montreal
Deux-Montagnes Montreal
Dorchester Quebec
Drummond Quebec
Dufferin Toronto
Durham Toronto
Dundas Ottawa
Elgin Toronto
Essex Toronto
Franklin (District) (Northwest Territories) Montreal
Frontenac, Ontario Ottawa
Frontenac, Quebec Quebec
Gaspe (East and West) Quebec
Gatineau Ottawa
Glengarry Ottawa
Grenville Ottawa
Grey Toronto
Haldimand Toronto
Haliburton Toronto
Halton Toronto
Hastings Toronto
Hochelaga Montreal
Hull Ottawa
Huntingdon Montreal
Huron Toronto
Iberville Montreal
Jacques Cartier Montreal
Joliette Montreal
Kamouraska Quebec
Keewatin (District) (Northwest Territories) Calgary
Kenora (District) Toronto
Kent Toronto
Labelle Ottawa
Lambton Toronto
Lanark Ottawa
Laprairie Montreal
L'Assomption Montreal
Laval Montreal
Leeds Ottawa
Lennox and Addington Toronto
Levis Quebec
Lincoln Toronto
L'Islet Quebec
Lotbiniere Quebec
Mackenzie (District)
Manitoba (Province) Calgary
Manitoulin (District) Toronto
Maskinonge Montreal
Matane Quebec
Megantic Quebec
Middlesex Toronto
Missisquoi Montreal
Montcalm Montreal
Montmagny Quebec
Montmorency Quebec
Muskoka (District) Toronto
Napierville Montreal
New Brunswick (Province) Halifax
Newfoundland (Province) Halifax
Nicolet Quebec
Nipissing (District) Toronto
Norfolk Toronto
Northumberland Toronto
Northwest Territories [Refer to Listed District]
Nova Scotia (Province) Halifax
Ontario (Province) [Refer to Listed District]
Ontario (County) Toronto
Oxford Toronto
Papineau Ottawa
Parry Sound Toronto
Peel Toronto
Perth Toronto
Peterborough Toronto
Pontiac Ottawa
Portneuf Quebec
Prescott Ottawa
Prince Edward (County) Toronto
Prince Edward Island (Province) Halifax
Quebec (Province) [Refer to Listed County or District]
Quebec (County) Quebec
Rainy River (District) Toronto
Renfrew Ottawa
Richelieu Montreal
Richmond Montreal
Rimouski Quebec
Rouville Montreal
Russell Ottawa
Saguenay Quebec
Saskatchewan (Province) Calgary
Saint-Hyacinthe Montreal
Saint-Jean Montreal
Saint Maurice Quebec
Saint Pierre et Miquelon (French Overseas Territory) Halifax
Shefford Montreal
Sherbrooke Montreal
Simcoe Toronto
Soulanges Montreal
Stanstead Montreal
Stormont Ottawa
Sudbury (District) Toronto
Temiscamingue Ottawa
Temiscouata Quebec
Terrebonne Montreal
Thunder Bay (District) Toronto
Timiskaming (District) Toronto
Vaudreuil Montreal
Vercheres Montreal
Victoria Toronto
Waterloo Toronto
Welland Toronto
Wellington Toronto
Wentworth Toronto
Western Ontario Province Toronto
Windsor Toronto
Winnipeg (See Western Ontario) Calgary
Wolfe Quebec
Yamaska Montreal
York Toronto
Yukon Territory Vancouver