U.S. Visas

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U.S. Visa: Reciprocity and Civil Documents by Country

Brazil

Brazil
Federative Republic of Brazil

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
 
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 36 Months
A-2 None Multiple 24 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None One 3 Months
C-3 None Multiple 24 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 48 Months
F-2 None Multiple 48 Months
G-1 None Multiple 36 Months
G-2 None Multiple 24 Months
G-3 None Multiple 12 Months
G-4 None Multiple 36 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B $100.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-1C $100.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-2A $100.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-2B $100.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-2R $100.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-3 $100.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-4 $100.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
I $20.00 Multiple 48 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 $100.00 Multiple 24 Months
L-2 $100.00 Multiple 24 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 $40.00 Multiple 3 Months 3
O-2 $40.00 Multiple 3 Months 3
O-3 $40.00 Multiple 3 Months 3
P-1 $40.00 Multiple 3 Months 3
P-2 $40.00 Multiple 3 Months 3
P-3 $40.00 Multiple 3 Months 3
P-4 $40.00 Multiple 3 Months 3
Q-1 6 $40.00 Multiple 3 Months 3
R-1 $70.00 Multiple 12 Months
R-2 $70.00 Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth/Death/Burial

Civil Records are available in all 26 states and the Federal District of Brasilia. Birth and marriage certificates may include  annotations regarding previous marriages, divorces, and deaths of former spouses.  In order to have an annotated certificate, an applicant needs to go to a notary (cartorio) and request a second copy – recently issued - of the birth and/or marriage certificate. If the birth or civil document does not have an annotation, it does not necessarily mean that there have been no births, divorces, or deaths.

Divorce certificates are available as an amendment that is annotated on the previous marriage certificate. Also, available is the Certidão de Sentença or Sentença de Divórcio

For examples of Brazilian civil documents click here.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage/Divorce

Civil Records are available in all 26 states and the Federal District of Brasilia. Birth and marriage certificates may include  annotations regarding previous marriages, divorces, and deaths of former spouses.  In order to have an annotated certificate, an applicant needs to go to a notary (cartorio) and request a second copy – recently issued - of the birth and/or marriage certificate. If the birth or civil document does not have an annotation, it does not necessarily mean that there have been no births, divorces, or deaths.

Divorce certificates are available as an amendment that is annotated on the previous marriage certificate. Also, available is the Certidão de Sentença or Sentença de Divórcio

For examples of Brazilian civil documents click here.

Adoption Certificates

Available. An adoption certificate (decreto de adocao) may be obtained by an applicant or his or her agent at the Civil Registry where the adoption was registered. The request must include the child's name and year of the adoption or registration and the book and page number where the adoption was recorded. Adoption certificates are not available by mail. Fee: Varies.

Identity Card

See Passport & Other Travel Documents

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Police records (Atestado de Antecedentes Policiais) are available through both the Federal Police and each of the 26 States and the Federal District of Brasilia. No central tracking system exists that maintains records indefinitely.  Each state’s police record is unique.

Federal regulations require that an applicant 16 or older must present a police certificate, if obtainable, from his or her country of current residence, if residence exceeds six months.  The applicant must also present a police certificate, if obtainable, from his or her country of nationality, if different from the country of current residence and if residence in the country of nationality exceeds six months.  In Brazil, state and federal police records are only available for individuals over the age of 18.  The consular section is aware that police certificates are not obtainable or available in Brazil for individuals under 18 and considers police certificates under that age as unobtainable.  Applicants in Brazil will need to provide a police certificate from each state in which they have lived for over six months during the last five years as well as a federal police certificate. State police certificates are not required for time residing in the Federal District of Brasilia. 

State Police Records (Atestado de Antecedentes Policiais Estaduais) are available from the Department of Public Safety (Secretaria de Segurança Pública).  The records can be obtained from the Civil Police (Policia Civil) -- specifically the Scientific Technical Police department  (Policia Tecnico Cientifica) of the Personal Identification Institute (Instituto de Identificacao, depending on the state. Go here for a list of Public Security Secretariats. Police certificates from the Judicial Courts (Poder Judiciarios) are not acceptable. Records are expunged after five years.

Immigrant visa applicants residing outside Brazil are unlikely to be able to obtain a State Police certificate unless the individual has representative with a power of attorney apply on his/her behalf and if the applicant's Brazilian ID card was issued by the specific state from which the certificate is being requested.

Federal Police Records (Atestado de Antecedents da Policia Federal) are available from the Federal Police (Policia Federal) for adults 18 years of age and older. Go here for a list of Federal Police Offices. Records are expunged after five years.

Please note that some states and the federal police provide on-line certificates.  These certificates are accepted at Post.

For examples of Brazilian civil documents click here.

Court Records

State Court Proceedings  (Processo Criminal Estadual ) – The records (Registros) are available from the respective court districts (Tribunal de Justiça) throughout all 26 states and the Federal District of Brasilia for adults 18 years of age and older. Records are never expunged. Approximately 2,700 court districts exist in Brazil.

Federal Court Proceedings (Processo Criminal Federal )- The records (Registros) are available for adults 18 years of age and older. Records can be obtained at the Federal Justice Court (Tribunal de Justiça Federal).  Records are never expunged.  

For examples of Brazilian civil documents click here.

Prison Records

State Prison Records (Processo de Condenacao Estadual) - Available in all 26 states and the Federal District of Brasilia for adults 18 years of age and older. Records can be obtained at the State Justice court (Tribunal de Justiça Estadual).

Federal Prison Records  (Processo de Condenacao Federal )– Available for adults 18 years and older. Records can be obtained at the Federal Justice Court (Tribunal de Justiça Federal). Records are never expunged.  

For examples of Brazilian civil documents click here.

Military Records

Military enlistment is mandatory for all male Brazilian citizens when they turn 18.Enrollment should be made between January 1 and April 30 during the year of their 18th birthday and the obligation ends when they turn 45. Military records are always available whether or not a person has served. A Certificado de Alistamento Militar (Certificate of Military Service) is available to Brazilians 18 years of age or older and indicates that the bearer is registered as being eligible for military service. A Certificado de Reservista is evidence for reserve status after having served in the Armed Forces. A Certificado de Dispensa de Incorporação indicates that the citizen has been discharged from serving in the military. A Certificado de Isenção (Exemption certificate) is issued for Brazilians who are incapable of serving.

Passports & Other Travel Documents
  • Service Passport. Passaporte de serviço. Green cover. This document is usually valid for a period of one year, however, it may be limited to the duration of the proposed mission or training. Issued to Brazilian civilian and military government employees traveling abroad on official business or training. Issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Brazilian diplomatic missions abroad. Validity: For proposed duration of mission or training. Renewable for additional periods.
  • Regular Brazilian Passport. Blue cover. Issued to Brazilian nationals who hold citizenship through birth or naturalization. Issued by Department of Federal Police in Brazil and by Brazilian embassies or consulates abroad. Validity: Not renewable. Most passports issued on/after July 10, 2015 are valid for 10 years. Before that date, passports were valid for 5 years.
    • Changes in Regular Brazilian Passports: Prior to December of 2010, regular Brazilian passports had green covers and were slightly larger than the current blue passport. Many regular green passports are still in use and will be phased out as they expire.
    • Changes in Name Display on Brazilian Passports: Brazilian names generally are longer than typical American names. The pre-December 2010 convention had been to list the entire name on a single line, with no breakdown by Surname/Given Name. For visa purposes, Mission Brazil's convention was to use the very last name as Surname and the rest of the name, however long, as Given Name. Current Brazilian passports break names down by Surname/Given Name. As a result, visas issued pre-December 2010 may display the applicant's Surname/Given Name differently than in their new passports. This is not an error. For visa issuance purposes, names must match the breakdown as it appears in the current passport, even if Given Name and Surname were broken down differently in prior visa(s) for the same person. When issuing visas to Brazilians, an alias must be entered into the NIV record, with the applicant's very last name listed as Surname, and the rest of their name in the Given Name field.
  • Diplomatic Passport. Passaporte diplomático. Red cover. Issued to Brazilian diplomats and high level public officials traveling abroad on missions of diplomatic nature. Issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Brazilian diplomatic missions abroad. Validity: Normally valid for four years but may be limited to the duration of a specific mission.
  • Passport for Stateless Persons. Passaporte para estrangeiros. Yellow cover. Issued to aliens who no longer hold citizenship of their country of origin. Issued by the Department of Federal Police. Validity: Valid for a period to be determined by the Federal police at time of application and according to the specific circumstances of the case.
    • Note: Nonimmigrants visas issued in passports for Stateless Persons must be limited to a single entry and valid only for the life of the passport.
  • Laissez-Passer. Travel document issued by the Department of Federal Police to persons who for whatever reason are unable to document citizenship in the country of their birth.
  • Brazilian ID Card. Carteira de identidade. Issued by each State's Department of Public Security (Secretaria de Seguranca Pública) to Brazilian citizens. Validity is for life. May be used as travel document with some restrictions for travels to some countries in Latin America (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay).
  • Resident Alien ID Card. Carteira de identidade para estrangeiros or Registro Nacional de Estrangeiros (RNE). Issued to alien lawful residents in Brazil. Not a travel document. An alien resident is authorized to remain outside Brazil for a period not to exceed two years without losing resident status. In order to re-enter, the alien presents his foreign passport and the carteira modelo 19.
 
Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Brasilia (Embassy) -- NIV Only

Address:
APO AA 34030
(For all posts. Identify post, e.g., c/o AmConsulate Recife.)

Embassy Street Address:
Avenida das Nacoes, Quadra 801 Lote 3
Telephone: (55) (61) 312-7000

Recife (Consulate) -- NIV Only

Rio de Janeiro (Consulate General) -- All Categories

Sao Paulo (Consulate General) -- NIV Only

Porto Alegre

Address:
3070 PORTO ALEGRE PLACE
WASHINGTON D.C. 20521-3070

Consulate Street Address:
Avenida Assis Brasil 1889
Passo d'Areia
Telephone: (55) (51) 3345-6000

Visa Services

Immigrant visas for all of Brazil are processed by Rio de Janeiro. There are no consular districts for non-immigrant visas in Brazil. Applicants may apply at any post.

Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.