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International Travel

English

Country Information

Peru

Country Information

Peru
Republic of Peru
Last Updated: March 20, 2017
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Embassy Messages

Lima

 

Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Must be valid at time of entry

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required for entry stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Free, issued at the port of entry

VACCINATIONS:

Yellow fever vaccination is recommended

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

USD 30,000. More than USD 10,000 must be declared upon entry

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

Same as entry

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Lima

Avenida La Encalada cdra. 17 s/n
Surco, Lima 33
Peru
Telephone: +(51)(1) 618-2000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(51)(1) 618-2000
Fax: +(51)(1) 618-2724

Consulates

U.S. Consular Agency - Cusco
Av. El Sol 449, Suite #201
Cusco, Peru
Telephone: +(51)(84) 231-474
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(51) 984-621-369
Fax: +(51)(84) 245-102

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Peru for information on U.S. - Peru relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Requirements for Entry:

A valid passport is required to enter and depart Peru. Migraciones (Immigration) authorities may also require evidence of return/onward travel. Be sure your date and place of entry is officially documented by Migraciones, whether you arrive at a port, airport or land border. Retain the record of your entry, as you will need it when you depart.

Your length of approved stay will be set by border officials at the time of entry, and can range from 30 to 183 days. Extensions are not usually available, and overstays result in fines.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Peru.

Requirements for Exit:

If you do not have an entry record, you are not allowed to exit the country until immigration authorities confirm the time and place of your entry in to the country. Depending on the circumstances, this can be a difficult process, costing considerable time and money to resolve. Make sure Migraciones records your entry, and then save the record for your exit. This is particularly important when entering through remote border crossings, where often the proper officials are not present. 

Immediately report lost/stolen passports to local police and keep the report. You must apply for a new passport at the Embassy and obtain a replacement entry record from Immigration prior to exiting Peru.

Travel with Minors:

Minor children with Peruvian citizenship who are not accompanied by their legal parent/guardian (or by only one parent/guardian, who does not have sole legal custody) are required to have official authorization from the non-traveling parent(s)/guardian(s). This policy also applies to children with dual U.S./Peruvian citizenship. It does not apply to minors with only U.S. citizenship.

In the United States, authorizations for minor travel can be notarized at the nearest Peruvian Consulate by requesting a “Permiso Notarial de Viaje.” Please be aware that these authorizations are valid for 30 days and one trip only. If the minor child has only one legal parent or guardian, the traveling parent/guardian must have evidence of sole custody.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

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Safety and Security

SECURITY: Narcotics traffickers, terrorist groups and other organized, armed bands still operate in some remote parts of Peru. U.S. Embassy Lima enforces a Restricted Travel Policy for Embassy personnel, which is based on its assessment of conditions and developments throughout the country. For more detailed information, see the Overseas Security and Advisory Council’s Crime and Safety Report for Peru.

CRIME: Armed robberies, express kidnappings, carjacking's, and petty theft occur frequently.  redit card fraud is also common in Peru. “Smash-and-grab” style robberies are most often reported on main tourist corridors immediately following arrival at Lima’s airport. Use only official airport taxi services. Do not hail taxis on the street. 

While violence committed against foreigners is infrequent, robberies involving violence have been on the rise. Do not resist a robbery attempt.  Victims who do not resist generally do not suffer serious physical harm. Some criminals with a motive of robbery or sexual assault may target victims by drugging them in bars and other areas frequented by tourists. Remain alert and aware of your surroundings.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on various types of scams.

VICTIMS OF CRIME: If you or someone you know becomes the victim of a crime abroad, contact the local police and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. Report crimes to the local police at 105 (National Police) or 0800-22221 (Tourist Police). Another useful resource with offices around the country is iPeru, a tourist information service which has English-speaking personnel and can assist you in obtaining local assistance.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide information on victim’s compensation programs in the United States
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy’s duty officer for assistance at any hour, 51+1+618-2000.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be arrested, formally expelled from the country or prosecuted and imprisoned within Peru.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

In Peru you may find products made with wild plants and animals. Many of these products are of illegal origin and could involve protected or endangered species, whose sale and export are illegal. Any protected species that is sold or transported, either live or transformed into food, medicinal beverages, leather, handcrafts, garments, etc. could be seized by Peruvian authorities. Some products, including live animals, require special permits when leaving Peru. Knowingly importing into the U.S. wildlife or plants that were taken from the wild or sold in violation of the laws of Peru (or any other country) is a violation of the Lacey Act (16 USC § 3371).  

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: Many popular destinations in Peru are quite remote. These areas have few facilities able to provide advanced or emergent medical care. In addition, be aware:

  • Local rescue capabilities are severely limited. Many mountain areas are too high for helicopters to fly safely. Accidents or injuries while hiking or climbing are common; crisis responders may take hours or even days to reach you if they are traveling over great distances and/or rough terrain.
  • Altitude-related illness  affects many people who are in otherwise good health, sometimes severely. Its onset can be rapid, and may be life-threatening if untreated. Do not underestimate its potential effects. Learn about it before you go, and ask your doctor whether any pre-existing condition may be adversely affected at high altitude.
  • Ayahuasca tourism is increasingly popular in Peru, but poorly regulated. Be aware of the risks involved. While popular media highlights its use as a spiritually liberating or medically beneficial agent, many users have reported severe/negative physical and psychological effects from using this powerful hallucinogen. Participants in ayahuasca tours have reported being physically or sexually assaulted, or robbed.
  • Always check with local authorities before traveling about local geographic, climatic, health, and security conditions that may impact your safety.  
  • Be aware that you may not have access to phone or internet for days at a time. Leave detailed written plans and timetables with a friend or family member before traveling to remote areas.

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Peru.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Peruvian law prohibits discrimination against persons with physical and mental disabilities and mandates that public spaces be free of barriers and accessible to persons with disabilities. However, the government of Peru has devoted limited resources to enforcement and training, and little effort has been made to ensure access to public buildings and areas. In general, access to buildings, pedestrian paths, and transportation is difficult for persons with disabilities.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

Medical care is generally good in Lima and usually adequate in major cities, but less so elsewhere in Peru. Private, urban health care facilities are often better staffed and equipped than public or rural ones. Public facilities in Cusco are generally inadequate for serious medical conditions.

Visitors to popular Andean destinations, such as Cusco/Machu Picchu, Arequipa/Colca Canyon, or Puno/Lake Titicaca often suffer from Altitude-related illness (see “Special Circumstances” section).

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides comprehensive coverage overseas. Many hospitals only accept cash payments.   See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Peru to ensure the medication is legal in Peru. Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

The following diseases are prevalent in some parts of Peru:

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:

Driving conditions in Peru are very different from those found in the United States and can be considerably more dangerous. Visitors are strongly encouraged to familiarize themselves with local law and driving customs before attempting to operate vehicles.

Road travel at night is particularly dangerous due to poor road markings and frequent unmarked road hazards. Due to safety concerns, U.S. Embassy personnel are prohibited from traveling by road outside of Lima at night, including inter-city bus travel.

Inter-city bus travel can be dangerous. Armed robbers, who force passengers off buses and steal their belongings, have held up inter-city buses at night. Bus accidents resulting in multiple deaths and injuries are common. Accidents are frequently attributed to excessive speed, poor bus maintenance, poor road conditions, poorly marked hazards at night, and driver fatigue.

Do not travel alone on rural roads, even in daylight. Convoy travel is preferable. Spare tires, parts, and fuel are needed when traveling in remote areas, where distances between service areas are long.

Fog is common on coastal and mountain highways, and the resulting poor visibility frequently causes accidents.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. You may also wish to consult Peru’s Ministry of Transportation site (Spanish and English), which has more detailed information on road safety, regulations, and standards.

Traffic Laws:

Always carry your driver's license, a copy of your passport and the rental agreement when you drive a rental car. International driver's licenses are valid for one year, while driver's licenses from other countries are generally valid for 30 days.


To obtain a Peruvian license, you’ll need to pass a written exam, a practical driving test and a medical exam. More information about this process, as well as how to obtain an international driving license in Peru, can be found at the Touring y Automovil Club del Peru website (Spanish only).

If a traffic officer signals you to stop, you must stop. Traffic officers must wear uniforms and identification cards that include their last name on their chest. Traffic officers are not allowed to retain your personal identification or vehicle documents. Under no circumstances should you offer or agree to pay money to traffic officers.

In case of an accident or collision, contact local police. If your car is a rental, call the agency or representative of the insurance company provided by the rental agency. Do not drive away from the scene of an accident.

Aviation Safety Oversight:

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Peru’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Peru’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Lima

Avenida La Encalada cdra. 17 s/n
Surco, Lima 33
Peru
Telephone: +(51)(1) 618-2000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(51)(1) 618-2000
Fax: +(51)(1) 618-2724

Consulates

U.S. Consular Agency - Cusco
Av. El Sol 449, Suite #201
Cusco, Peru
Telephone: +(51)(84) 231-474
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(51) 984-621-369
Fax: +(51)(84) 245-102

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General Information

Peru and the United States have been treaty partners under the Hague Abduction Convention since June 1, 2007.

For information concerning travel to Peru, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, health conditions, currency and entry regulations, and crime and security, please see country-specific information for Peru.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA). The report is located here.

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children's Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Peru.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State 
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website

The Peruvian Central Authority for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Ministry for Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP).  The MIMP's role is to perform the duties given to central authorities under the Hague Abduction Convention, including processing Hague Abduction Convention applications for return of, or access to, children.  They can be reached at:

Ministerio de la Mujer y Poblaciones Vulnerables (MIMP)
Jr. Caman 616 - Lima Peru
Telf. (511) 626 - 1600
postmaster@mimp.gob.pe

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to a child in Peru, the left-behind parent must submit a Hague application to the Peruvian Central Authority either directly or through the USCA.  The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to MIMP, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the United States or Peruvian central authorities.  Attorney fees, if necessary, are the sole responsibility of the person hiring the attorney.  Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.  Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained,  in Peru.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Peru.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Retaining an Attorney

Parents are not required to retain an attorney to represent them in a Hague Convention case. However, parents who wish to be represented by an attorney may choose either to hire a private attorney or request that the MIMP provide legal representation. The MIMP provides this representation free of charge through a MIMP legal office that retains public defenders paid by the Peruvian Government regardless of nationality or economic situation. A privately-hired attorney should contact the Peruvian Central Authority as soon as possible after the Hague Abduction Convention application has been filed with the Peruvian Central Authority. 

The U.S. Embassy in Lima, Peru posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The MIMP promotes mediation in abduction cases and they will first attempt to mediate between the parties in Hague Abduction Convention cases before a case is forwarded to a court. MIMP provides mediation services for abduction dispute resolution at no cost to participants.

Information about mediation is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of the information or services contained therein. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms contained on this list.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Peru is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention).  Intercountry adoption processing in Hague countries is done in accordance with the requirements of the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations, as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Peru.

All adoptions between Peru and the United States must meet the requirements of the Convention and U.S. immigration law.

Peru’s Central Authority for Adoptions is the Dirección General de Adopciones (DGA) in the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP). Only DGA can certify cases as Convention compliant. “Direct” adoptions in which a birth parent places a child directly (or via an intermediary) to specific prospective parents for adoption cannot be certified as complying with the Convention per Peruvian law, and therefore prospective adoptive parents may not search on their own for children to adopt.

Instead children must have been declared legally abandoned and wards of the state, and the adoption must be processed through DGA in order for it to be certified by DGA. Adoptions processed through the Peruvian judiciary, while legal in Peru, cannot be Hague certified. As a result, children adopted through the Peruvian judiciary/family court system rather than DGA cannot be issued Hague Convention visas and generally will be unable to immigrate to the United States. Prospective adoptive parents seeking to adopt a blood relative in Peru should contact DGA prior to beginning the adoption process. 

Note: Special transition provisions apply to adoptions initiated before April 1, 2008. Read about Transition Cases.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Peru, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee under U.S. law in order to immigrate to the United States on an IH-3 or IH-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

Adoption between the United States and Peru is governed by the Hague Convention on Adoptions. Therefore to adopt from Peru, you must first be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn more.
In addition to these U.S. requirements for prospective adoptive parents, parents need to meet Peru’s requirements to adopt a child from there:

  • Residency: There are no minimum residency requirements to adopt in Peru. However both prospective adoptive parents, if applicable, must be present to complete the adoption in Peru, including obtaining provisional custody of the child, completing an evaluation with a social worker, and finalizing the adoption in Peruvian court. This process typically takes 4-6 weeks.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: The minimum age of applicants is 25 and the maximum is 52.   
  • Marriage: Single persons and married couples may apply to adopt.  Peruvian law only recognizes opposite sex marriages. Thus, there is no provision for same sex spouses to adopt jointly. Single lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgendered, or intersex individuals may also be unable to adopt in Peru.
  • Income: Prospective adoptive parents must demonstrate the means to support the physical and emotional needs of the child.

Because Peru is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, children from Peru must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. For example, the adoption may take place only if the competent authorities of Peru have determined that placement of the child within Peru has been given due consideration and that an intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interests. In addition to Peru’s requirements, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee to be eligible for an immigrant visa that will allow you to bring him or her to the United States.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Abandonment: Only children who have been declared abandoned by a judge are eligible for an intercountry adoption.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: DGA matches children of all ages. However, DGA prioritizes the adoption of children older than 9 years. The DGA team evaluates the application and expectations of the prospective parents to maximize the well-being of each child. 
  • Sibling Adoptions: DGA prioritizes the adoption of sibling groups.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: DGA prioritizes the adoption of children with special needs or medical conditions.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Matching could take several months and sometimes years.  
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Who Can Be Adopted

Because Peru is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, children from Peru must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. For example, the adoption may take place only if the competent authorities of Peru have determined that placement of the child within Peru has been given due consideration and that an intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interests. In addition to Peru’s requirements, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee to be eligible for an immigrant visa that will allow you to bring him or her to the United States.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Abandonment: Only children who have been declared abandoned by a judge are eligible for an intercountry adoption.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: DGA matches children of all ages. However, DGA prioritizes the adoption of children older than 9 years. The DGA team evaluates the application and expectations of the prospective parents to maximize the well-being of each child. 
  • Sibling Adoptions: DGA prioritizes the adoption of sibling groups.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: DGA prioritizes the adoption of children with special needs or medical conditions.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Matching could take several months and sometimes years.  
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How to Adopt

WARNING: Peru is party to the Hague Adoption Convention. Do not adopt or obtain legal custody of a child in Peru before U.S. consular officer issues an “Article 5/17 Letter” in the case.  Read on for more information.

Peru's Adoption Authority

Peru’s Central Authority for Adoptions is the Dirección General de Adopciones (DGA) within the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP). Only DGA can certify cases as Convention compliant.

Note: If any of the following occurred prior to April 1, 2008 (the date on which the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force with respect to the United States), the Hague Adoption Convention may not apply to your adoption: 1) you filed a Form I-600A identifying Peru as the country where you intended to adopt; 2) you filed a Form I-600; or; 3) the adoption was completed. Under these circumstances, your adopted child’s visa application could continue to be processed in accordance with the immigration regulations for non-Convention adoptions. For more information, read about Transition Cases

The Process

Because Peru is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adopting from Peru must follow a specific process designed to meet the Convention’s requirements. A brief summary of the Convention adoption process is given below. You must complete these steps in the following order to meet all necessary legal requirements. Adoptions completed out of order may result in the child not being eligible for an immigrant visa to the United States.

  1. Choose an Accredited Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be matched with a Child
  4. Apply for the child to be found eligible for adoption
  5. Adopt (or Obtain Legal Custody) of the child in Peru
  6. Bring your child home

1.  Choose an Accredited Adoption Service Provider:   

The first step in adopting a child from Peru is to select an accredited or approved adoption service provider in the United States. Only these agencies and attorneys can provide adoption services between the United States and Peru. Please note that in order to provide services in Peru, adoption service providers must further be authorized to work in Peru by the DGA. To obtain updated information regarding which U.S. adoption service providers are authorized by DGA, prospective adoption parents should contact DGA directly. DGA also publishes the list of authorized providers through the “Organismos Acreditados”.

2.  Apply to USCIS to be Found Eligible to Adopt    

After you choose an accredited or approved adoption service provider, you must apply to be found suitable and eligible to adopt by the responsible U.S. government agency, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), by submitting Form I-800A. Read more about Suitability and Eligibility Requirements.

Once USCIS determines that you are “suitable” and “eligible” to adopt by approving the Form I-800A, your adoption service provider will provide your approval notice, home study, and any other required information to the DGA in Peru as part of your adoption dossier. The DGA’s Board of Directors will review your application to determine whether you are also eligible to adopt under Peru’s law.

Note: Peru has stringent requirements for the psychological and social history information that must be provided as part of your dossier. If the information supplied is not detailed enough, DGA will ask for additional information, and this will delay the review process by several months. 

3.  Be matched with a Child 

If both the United States and Peru determine that you are eligible to adopt, and the DGA has determined that a child is available for adoption and that intercountry adoption is in that child’s best interests, the DGA may provide you with a referral for a child. The referral is a proposed match between you and a specific child based on a review of your dossier and the needs of a specific child in Peru. DGA will provide a background study and other information, if available, about the child to help you decide whether to accept the referral or not. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs and provide a permanent home for a particular child. If you accept the referral, the adoption service provider communicates that decision to the DGA. Learn more about this critical decision.

4.  Apply for the child to be found eligible for adoption

After you accept a referral, you will apply to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for provisional approval for the child to immigrate to the United States (Form I-800). USCIS will make a provisional determination as to whether the child meets the definition of a Convention Adoptee and will be eligible to enter the United States and reside permanently as an immigrant.

After provisional approval of Form I-800, your adoption service provider or you will submit a visa application to the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Lima which is responsible for issuing immigrant visas to children from Peru. A consular officer will review the Form I-800 and the visa application for possible visa ineligibilities and advise you of options for the waiver of any noted ineligibilities.

Note: For both petition and visa processing, all documents in Spanish must be submitted both in original form and with an official English translation. 

WARNING: The consular officer will send a letter (referred to as an “Article 5 Letter”) to Peru’s Central Authority in any intercountry adoption involving U.S. citizen parents and a child from Peru where all Convention requirements are met and the consular officer determines that the child appears eligible to immigrate to the United States. This letter will inform Peru’s Central Authority that the parents are eligible and suited to adopt, that all indications are that the child may enter and reside permanently in the United States, and that the U.S. Central Authority agrees that the adoption may proceed.

Do not attempt to adopt or obtain custody of a child in Peru before a U.S. consular officer issues the Article 5 Letter in any adoption case.

Remember: The consular officer will make a final decision about a child’s eligibility for an immigrant visa later in the adoption process.

5.  Adopt (or Obtain Legal Custody) of Child in Peru

Remember: Before you adopt a child in Peru, you must have completed the above four steps. Only after completing these steps can you proceed to finalize the adoption or grant of custody for the purposes of adoption in Peru.
The process for finalizing the adoption (or obtaining legal custody) in Peru generally includes the following:

  • Role of Adoption Authority: Only DGA can certify adoptions as Convention compliant. DGA has jurisdiction over intercountry adoptions for children who have been declared legally abandoned by the court and are wards of the state. 
  • Role of the Court: Provisional custody is awarded to the prospective adoptive parents shortly after their arrival in Peru. After 10-15 days, a designated social worker will issue a report attesting to the compatibility and bonding of the child and the prospective adoptive parents. The prospective adoptive parents will then appear in court to finalize the adoption, and a judge will issue the final adoption decree. 

Note: Peruvian law mandates that both prospective adoptive parents, if applicable, must be physically present to obtain provisional custody of the child and complete an evaluation with a social worker for ratification of the adoption in court.

  • Role of Adoption Agencies: Because Peru is a Convention country, adoption services must be provided by a Hague accredited agency or provider.
  • Time Frame: Once in country following the issuance of the Article 5 letter, the process generally takes 4-6 weeks. Prospective adoptive parents are awarded provisional custody shortly after arrival in Peru. After 10-15 days, a designated social worker issues a report attesting to the compatibility and bonding of the child and the prospective adoptive parents.  The prospective adoptive parents then appear in court to finalize the adoption. 
  • Adoption Fees: In the adoption services contract that you sign at the beginning of the adoption process, your agency will itemize the fees and estimated expenses related to your adoption process. 

Some of the fees specifically associated with adopting from Peru include: lodging expenses, translations, court fees, and fees for getting new birth certificate, national ID card, and passport, which can add up to $2000-$4000. Please note that once the adoption is finalized, the new birth certificate listing the adoptive parents can only be issued in the place where the child was originally registered. This may be in a remote location, which may entail additional time and expenses.

Note: Prospective parents are advised to obtain detailed receipts for all fees and donations paid, either by the parents directly or through their U.S. adoption agencies and to take appropriate measures to verify that the payments are not contrary to the Convention, U.S. law, or the law of Peru. Improper payments may have the appearance of buying a baby, violate applicable law, and may put all future adoptions in Peru at risk. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, for instance, makes it unlawful to bribe foreign government officials to obtain or retain business. Further, the IAA makes it unlawful to improperly influence relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing Central Authority functions.

  • Documents Required: The following documents are required by DGA to adopt in Peru:
    • Original birth certificates for parent(s) and other children in the family;
    • Marriage certificate, if applicable;
    • Divorce certificate(s), if applicable;
    • Death certificate if the prospective adoptive parent is a widow or widower;
    • Legalized copy of the passport(s) of the prospective adoptive parent(s);
    • Police reports from the place of residence of the prospective adoptive parent(s);
    • Medical exam results;
    • Photographs;
    • Job letters; and
    • Tax returns.

Note:  Additional documents may be requested.  or more details on the required documentation, you may visit the DGA’s website

  • Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic. If so, the Department of State’s Authentications Office may be able to assist. Read more about Authenticating U.S. Documents

Note: The United States and Peru are parties to the Hague Apostille Convention. U.S. public documents may be authenticated with Apostilles by the appropriate U.S. Competent Authority.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport
U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Peru

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit.  Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Peru, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability. 

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there’s a family emergency in the United States, or a crisis in Peru, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

Post-Adoption/Post-Placement Reporting Requirements
Peru requires post-adoption reports every six months for four years after the adoption. This requirement applies even if the child turns 18 during the four year period. Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to the country’s history of positive experiences with American parents. Peru takes reporting requirements very seriously and has withdrawn accreditation of adoption agencies due to missing reports. We urge you to complete all post-adoption reports in a timely manner.

Post-Adoption Resources
Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

COMPLAINTS

If you have concerns about your adoption, we ask that you share this information with the U.S. Embassy in Peru, particularly if it involves possible fraud or misconduct specific to your child’s case. The Department of States takes all allegations of fraud or misconduct seriously. Our Adoption Comment Page provides several points of contact adoptive families may use to comment on their adoption service provider, their experience applying for their child’s visa, or about the Form I-600 petition process.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Peru
Consular Section- Immigrant Visas
Avenida La Encalada, Cuadra 17 s/n
Monterrico, Surco, Lima 33 Peru
Website:  https://pe.usembassy.gov/
Email: LimaIV@state.gov

Peru’s Adoption Authority
Ministerio de la Mujer y Poblaciones Vulnerables (MIMP)
Dirección General de Adopciones (DGA)
Av. Benavides 1155
Miraflores, Lima 18 Peru
Tel: (51) (1) 416-5431
Website: http://www.mimp.gob.pe

Embassy of Peru
Consular Section
1700 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036
Tel: (202) 833-9860 to 9869
Fax: (202) 659-8124
Website: www.peruvianembassy.us
Email: webadmin@embassyofperu.us

Note: PERU has consulates in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Hartford, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Paterson, New York City, and San Francisco.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
SA-17A
2201 C Street, NW
Washington, DC 20520
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Website:  http://adoption.state.gov
Email:  AskCI@state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures, contact the National Customer Service Center (NCSC) at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

General Issuing Government Authority Information: The Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC) is the national civil records registry in Peru.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth and Death Certificates

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees:  S/ 15 Nuevos Soles (approximately $5 dollars).
  • Document Name:  Birth certificate (Partida de Nacimiento), and Death Certificate (Acta de Defunción).
  • Issuing Government Authority:  Certificates are issued by the Provincial Council (Concejo Provincial) or the District Council (Concejo Distrital) of the district or province in which the event occurred and was registered.  Registrations have been obligatory under the civil code since 1936.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Certificates vary in form and can be transcriptions in long hand, typewritten on a template, or microfilm photocopies of the original record.  
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  All certificates bear the seal of either the Provincial or District Council and are certified by the Chief of the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC).
  • Registration Criteria:  The Civil Code of Peru requires the parents of a child born in Peru to enter a new child’s birth in the civil registry (Registro de Estado Civil) of the District or Provincial Council within 30 days of the date of the child's birth.  In addition to the above, an individual's birth may be recorded after the 30 day deadline through a judicial or administrative process in the municipality where the individual was born, or through RENIEC.  Those entering a late registration must submit supporting evidence such as records of live birth, baptism certificates, school and medical records, two witnesses, and evidence that the individual was never registered before.
  • Procedure for Obtaining:  The procedure for obtaining a birth certificate depends on the municipality where the birth was registered.  If the municipality’s records have been incorporated into RENIEC, then the document can be requested in any RENIEC office.  If the municipality’s records have not been incorporated into RENIEC, then the certificate must be requested at the municipality where it was registered. 
  • Certified Copies:  The Consular Section requires that birth, and death certificates that establish the relationship between the petitioner and beneficiary be certified by RENIEC.  For non-incorporated districts (most locations outside of Lima), the RENIEC certification only verifies the signature of the signing official.  Evidence of RENIEC certification consists of a seal placed on the document.  RENIEC offices are also the issuing authority for original birth certificates for many areas in Lima.  
  • Alternate Documents:  In rare and verifiable instances, documents have been destroyed by natural disaster or other calamities.  In the event a birth certificate is not available, baptismal certificates issued by the parochial authorities of the Roman Catholic Church and notarized by an ecclesiastical notary are generally acceptable for legal purposes in Peru.  If an unusually long time has elapsed between the dates of birth and baptism, the value of the certificate is impaired.
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments:  RENIEC has been incorporating more Civil Registries of District or Provincial Councils during the past few years.  As of May2015, it had incorporated 47 in Lima and Callao, and 18 in other provinces.  Because of this centralized control, RENIEC is issuing more birth, marriage and death certificates directly - increasing the reliability of those documents and making them easily verifiable through the Fraud Prevention Unit of our Consular Section.  Post regularly receives updates from RENIEC regarding newly incorporated councils.
Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees:  S/ 15 Nuevos Soles (approximately $5 dollars).
  • Document Name:  Marriage Certificate (Partida de Matrimonio)
  • Issuing Government Authority:  Certificates are issued by the Provincial Council (Concejo Provincial) or the District Council (Concejo Distrital) of the district or province in which the event occurred and was registered or by RENIEC when the civil registries of the council have been incorporated into this bureau.  Registrations have been obligatory under the civil code since 1936.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Certificates vary in form and can be transcriptions in long hand, typewritten on a template, or microfilm photocopies of the original record.  
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  All certificates bear the seal of either the Provincial or District Council and are certified by the Chief of the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC) and/or from a RENIEC official for those civil registries incorporated into this bureau.
  • Registration Criteria:  It is important to highlight that whether the council’s civil registries have been incorporated into RENIEC or not, marriages still take place at the councils and are celebrated by Majors or a council’s authorized officer. For those cases in which the council’s civil registries have been incorporated into RENIEC, the council sends all of the marriage file to RENIEC who will be in charge of officially registering  the marriage (in their books and database).
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The procedure for obtaining a marriage certificate depends on the municipality where the marriage was registered.  If the municipality’s records have been incorporated into RENIEC, then the document can be requested in any RENIEC office.  If the municipality’s records have not been incorporated into RENIEC, then the certificate must be requested at the municipality where it was registered. 
  • Certified Copies:  The Consular Section requires that marriage certificates that establish the relationship between the petitioner and beneficiary be certified by RENIEC.  For non-incorporated districts (most locations outside of Lima), the RENIEC certification only verifies the signature of the signing official.  Evidence of RENIEC certification consists of a seal placed on the document.  RENIEC offices are also the issuing authority for many areas in Lima.  
  • Alternate Documents: There aren’t any valid alternate certificates, but nowadays there are still some rural councils that may sometimes transcribe the information from the marriage books into a special pre-printed format since they may have no electricity and/or copier machines. Those certificates are sealed and signed by the Civil Registry Chief and sometimes by the Major as well.  As it happens with the certificates issued by councils not incorporated into RENIEC, the Consular Section requires a RENIEC certification.  
  • Exceptions: Before 1936, religious marriages were considered legal if reported to the civil authorities.  Marriage certificates issued by church authorities after that date have no legal value.
  • Comments:
    • RENIEC has been incorporating more Civil Registries of District or Provincial Councils during the past few years.  As of July 2016, it had incorporated a total of 68 civil registries, 50 in Lima and Callao, and 18 in other provinces. Because of this centralized control, RENIEC is issuing more birth, marriage and death certificates directly - increasing the reliability of those documents and making them easily verifiable through the Fraud Prevention Unit of our Consular Section.  Post regularly receives updates from RENIEC regarding newly incorporated councils.
    • Same-sex marriage is not legally recognized in Peru. 
 

Divorce Certificates

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: S/3.70 Nuevos Soles (approximately $1.20 dollars) per page, if issued by the court. Price may vary depending on the issuing authority.
  • Document Name: Sentencia de Divorcio (Divorce Decree)
  • Issuing Government Authority: Judicial Divorces are issued by the Family Court.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The format varies depending on the issuing office.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The document is issued by judges in the Family Court.
  • Registration Criteria: A divorce is noted on the left margin or back of the marriage certificate and makes reference to the resolution of the civil court dissolving the marriage.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The procedure for obtaining the document varies. Subject must approach to the entity that processed the divorce to request it.
  • Certified Copies: A certified copy of the resolution may be obtained from the clerk (secretario) of the lower court that ordered the divorce.
  • Alternate Documents: Divorces may also be processed in a Municipality or in a Notary's office (Administrative Divorce). In these cases, the issuing authority is the Mayor of the Municipality or the Notary respectively, and the document may be called Resolucion de Alcaldia (Municipal Resolution) or Testimonio. Law N.29227 authorizing these divorces went into effect July 14, 2008. As part of the divorce proceedings, divorces processed by a Municipality or Notary must be registered by the Civil Registry Chief (for those municipalities not yet incorporated in RENIEC or by RENIEC for those incorporated). An annotation would then be placed in the original marriage certificate indicating both the date of the legal separation as well as the final divorce date. For these divorces, the following could be presented as proof of divorce:

    • Resolucion de Alcaldia plus copy of the marriage certificate with the divorce annotation on the back of the certificate.
    • Resolucion Jefatural de RENIEC plus copy of the marriage certificate with the divorce annotation on the back of the certificate.
    • Notary Deed of Arrangement (Testimonio) or Minute plus copy of the marriage certificate with the divorce annotation on the back of the certificate.

    Please note that in Peru, divorce is a two-step process. First, the couple has to request the legal separation "municipal resolution of separation or "Acta Notarial" (Notary Minute). Two months later either party can request the final divorce resolution. This final divorce resolution is necessary for the divorce to be legal.

  • Exceptions: None.
  • Comments: In the event that an individual marries in Peru and dissolves that marriage outside of Peru, the foreign divorce must be formally recognized in Peru by the Superior Court through an "exequatur" process prior to either party entering into another marriage in Peru. When the exequatur is finalized, the court issues a decree that should be annotated on the marriage certificate. The decree is valid as of the date of the foreign divorce. If the foreign divorce is not registered through the exequatur process and the individual enters into another marriage in Peru, the second marriage will not be legally recognized until the exequatur process is completed.
  • Note: Immigrant visa processing, the U.S. Embassy in Lima requires the Sentencia de Divorcio/Resolucion de Alcaldia. The annotation on the marriage certificate is not sufficient.
Adoption Certificates
  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: No fee
  • Document Name: Resolucion Directorial de Adopcion (Directorial Resolution of Adoption). This is the final adoption decree.
  • Issuing Government Authority: The General Bureau of Adoptions from the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP) is the government issuing authority.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The document is issued on A4 sized paper with a Peruvian coat of arms on top of the first page, seals, and a signature on every page, as well as a seal from the Adoption General Director at the bottom of the last page.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The Adoption General Director from the General Bureau of Adoptions of the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP) is the one authorized to sign the document.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The General Bureau of Adoptions from the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP) grants adoption documents after the adoption process has been completed in cases where the adoption has been executed under the administrative process complying with the provisions of the Hague Adoption Convention on the Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Inter-Country Adoption. The issued document reflects the new name of the child.
  • Certified Copies Available: Yes, from the General Bureau of Adoptions.
  • Alternate Documents: In the case of adoptions conducted in a family or civil court, adoption certificates may be obtained from the court where the adoption process took place. The document will be a final adoption decree with the seals on each page from the court where the adoption process took place with the last page containing the signature of the judge.
  • Exceptions: None.
  • Comments: Visit this web site for more information.
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Identity Card
  • Available: Yes.
  • Fees: For minors (under 17 years old) the cost is S/16 Nuevos Soles (approximately $5.30 dollars); for applicants age 17 and over, the cost is S/29 Nuevos Soles (approximately $10 dollars).
  • Document Name: Documento Nacional de Identidad (National ID Card)
  • Issuing Government Authority: Peruvian ID cards are issued by the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC).
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: ID cards for adults are light blue in color and contain the picture and biographical information of the subject. ID cards for minors are yellow and also contain information about the parents.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The card is signed by a RENIEC authorized issuing officer. Registration Criteria: The ID card is the only identity document issued to Peruvian citizens, adults or minors. The ID card is mandatory for all Peruvian citizens aged 18 years or older.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Applicant must submit the fee receipt, a certified copy of Birth Certificate issued by a civil register, utility receipts, and a passport picture at any RENIEC issuing office.
  • Certified Copies: Not Available
  • Alternate Documents: A Birth Certificate may still accepted as an identity document for minors.
  • Exceptions: None
  • Comments: ID cards for children are not mandatory. However, they are necessary for children because they are a requirement for them to access to health services, social programs, and for regional travel. As a matter of practice, ID cards are issued to children immediately after birth. Click here for more information.
Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

  • Available: Yes. To those 18 and older.
  • Fees: S/17 Nuevos Soles (approximately $6 dollars)
  • Document Name: Certificado de Antecedentes Policiales (Certificate of Police Record)
  • Issuing Government Authority: Records are issued by the Peruvian National Police (Policia Nacional del Peru) at local police stations.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Police Records are issued on green paper with the heading "Policia Nacional del Peru, Division de Identificacion, Certificado de Antecedentes Policiales." A scanned copy of the applicant's photo also appears on the certificate.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Police Commanderor Commissar.
  • Registration Criteria: Applicants without criminal records will have "No Registra Antecedentes" (does not have records) printed on the form.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Police records are available for applicants age 18 and over. The applicant must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de La Nacion branch and then complete the process in an authorized police station.
  • Certified Copies: Not Available.
  • Alternate Documents: A police record may be issued to residents or non-residents upon application to "Policia de Investigaciones del Peru, Division de Identificacion Criminalistica de Lima," Av. Aramburu No. 550, Lima 34. The applicant must first request a fingerprint chart (ficha de canje internacional) and provide one photo. Processing time is normally three days. There is a small fee.
  • Exceptions: None
  • Comments: This document may not contain an accurate listing of all police records since there is no national database and each precinct maintains its own record. Therefore, for immigrant visa processing, the Consular Section in Lima requires 1) Certificado de Antecedentes Policiales, 2) Certificado Judicial de Antecedentes Penales, and 3) Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales a Nivel Nacional.

Imprisonment Records

  • Available: Yes. To those 18 and older.
  • Fees: S/ 34.50 Nuevos Soles (approximately $12 dollars)
  • Document Name: Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales a Nivel Nacional (Certificate of National Judicial Records).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Judicial Records are issued in Lima by the Instituto Nacional Penitenciario (INPE), Dirección de Registro Penitenciario, located at Avenida Alberto del Campo Nº 1050, Magdalena del Mar, Edificio de la Superintendencia Nacional de Control de Servicios de Seguridad, Control de Armas, Munición y Explosivos de Uso Civil (SUCAMEC ex-DICSCAMEC). Reference: Av. Salaverry, block 31. This document can also be obtained in other offices in Lima and the provinces as listed here.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Imprisonment records are issued on green paper with the heading "Ministerio de Justicia, Instituto Nacional Penitenciario, Direccion de Registro Penitenciario" on the top of the page. The shield of the institute is placed at the top right corner of the document and a thermo chromic ink stamp at the left bottom. The applicant's photo is scanned and printed on the certificate.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The Director of the Imprisonment Record Office.
  • Registration Criteria: This document details entrances, exits, convictions, and other records of those who were detained in a penitentiary in Peru.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Imprisonment records are available to Peruvians and residents age 18 and over. Applicant must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion branch and then complete the process at the Instituto Nacional Penitenciario. The process may be done in one day if applicant does not have judicial records or require further investigation. In some instances, the processing time may be as long as two weeks.
  • Certified Copies: Not Available.
  • Alternate Documents: None.
  • Exceptions: This document may not contain an accurate listing of all past incarcerations since any detainee may have his or her record expunged after serving the full sentence.
  • Comments: Applicants who are not resident in Peru may send a representative to obtain the court records but must first go to the Peruvian Consulate to sign a power of attorney authorizing their representative to obtain the records on their behalf. The power of attorney must also be certified by the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs before the representative can request the imprisonment records.

Court Records

  • Available: Available to Peruvians and residents age 18 and over.
  • Fees: S/ 80 Nuevos Soles (approximately $20 dollars)
  • Document Name: Certificado Judicial de Antecedentes Penales (Certificate of Penal Records).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Court records are issued by "Registro Nacional de Condenas" Av. Abancay cdra. 5, Edificio del Ministerio Publico, 1er piso, Lima 1. They are also issued by Peruvian consular offices worldwide.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Court Records are issued on blue/orange paper with the heading "Republica de Peru, Poder Judicial, Certificado Judicial de Antecedentes Penales." The Judiciary's logo is found at the left top corner of the document, and Peruvian coat of arms with the text "REPUBLICA DEL PERU" at the center. A hologram with the Judiciary's logo is placed at the right side of the thermo chromic ink stamp in the lower part of the document. A scanned copy of the applicant's photo is also printed on the certificate.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Document has the scanned signature of "Jefe de Registro Nacional de Condenas."
  • Registration Criteria: Court Records certify if a person was convicted of any crime.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Applicants must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion or Interbank branch, complete the application form (form is available free of charge), and present his or her ID card (original and copy).
  • Certified Copies: Not Available.
  • Alternate Documents: Now court records can be requested online at www.pj.gob.peafter the payment of a fee and can be picked up at an office chosen by the client (the list of these offices may be found in the same webpage). In order to request this document online, the applicant must be 18 years old, have a valid Peruvian ID card, and have paid the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion or Interbank branch.
  • Exceptions: None.
  • Comments: Applicants who are not resident in Peru may send a representative to obtain the court records but must first go to a Peruvian Consulate to sign a power of attorney authorizing their representative to obtain the records on their behalf. The Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs must certify the power of attorney before the representative can request the court records.

When issuing the court records, the "Registro Nacional de Condenas" uses pictures from RENIEC's database. They only paste a photo when the person requesting the certificate is a minor, a foreign national, or a Peruvian citizen who lives in other country and his/her information is not available in RENIEC.

Military Records
  • Available: Military records are available to all who have served in the military (career military), except for those who served only the two year obligatory military service.
  • Fees: S/38.5 Nuevos Soles (approximately $13 dollars).
  • Document Name: Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales y/o Penales (Certificate of Judicial and Criminal Records).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Military records are issued by "Fuero Militar Policial," formerly known as "Consejo Supremo de Justicia Militar." Documents are issued in Av. Arequipa #310, Lima. For more information visit www.fmp.gob.pe.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Military Records are issued on blue paper with the heading "Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales y/o Penales." The Peruvian coat of arms is found at the left top corner of the document, and the shield of the institute is in the center. A scanned copy of the applicant's photo is printed on the document.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Documents are signed by the Jefe del Registro Central de Condenas.
  • Registration Criteria: This document shows the offenses incurred by military and police personnel while on duty.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Applicant must first pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion branch. They must then complete the application form and provide a copy of their identification card.
  • Certified Copies: Available
  • Alternate Documents: None.
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: Applicants who have not served in the military or police are not required to submit this document for immigrant visa processing at the U.S. Embassy in Lima.
Passports & Other Travel Documents
  • Types Available: Regular, Diplomatic (Pasaporte Diplomatico), Official (Pasaporte Especial)
  • Fees: The cost for obtaining a regular passport is S/39.30 Nuevos Soles (approximately $13 dollars). To revalidate, the cost is S/33.40 Nuevos Soles (approximately $11 dollars).
  • Document Name: Pasaporte de la Comunidad Andina de la Republica del Peru (Passport of the Andean Community of the Republic of Peru).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Regular passports are issued by Superintendencia Nacional de Migraciones / Migraciones Peru.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Peruvian immigration authorities began issuing photo digitized machine readable passports in September 1998. Regular passports have a maroon cover with the heading "Comunidad Andina, Republica del Peru" and the shield of Peru printed in gold ink. The machine readable passports feature many security features including microprinting, UV holograms, and optically variable inks. They are also sensitive to manipulation by solvents or chemicals.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: In Lima, passports bear the seal and signature of the Passport Coordinator. In the provinces, passports bear the signature and seal of the chief of the immigration office where the passport was issued.
  • Registration Criteria: Eligibility is determined by checking the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC)'s records and the immigrations database.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The applicant must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion branch and then submit his or her identity document and the passport application form. For more information about the process please visit this web site.
  • Alternate Documents: Not available
  • Exceptions: All applicants must submit a passport in order to process a visa.
  • Comments: Peruvian passports are valid for five years and may be renewed for one additional five-year period. Peruvian immigration authorities revalidate laminated machine-readable Peruvian passports on the last page. The revalidation foil resembles a digital printed passport bio data page with a color photo. The foil is affixed to the passport page with heat. As a result of the passport revalidation process, the Government of Peru has requested that the last two pages of the Peruvian passport (pages 31 and 32) remain clear of any stickers, stamps, or writing. Revalidations done in the main offices in Lima are machine readable. Peruvian consulates abroad will continue to issue non-machine readable passports using seals and stamps.
  • Other Documents Available:
    • Laisez-passer (Salvoconducto). This documentis issued to Foreign Nationals who do not have a Diplomatic Representation in the Country. It is valid for 30 days after issuance.
    • Travel document (Documento de Viaje). Issued to refugees and asylees.
    • Travel Record Certificate (Certificado de Movimiento Migratorio). Migraciones Peru keeps records of entries and exits of all Peruvian nationals and foreigners (residents and visitors). Applicant must pay a fee of S/20.10 Nuevos Soles ($6.70 dollars) at Banco de La Nacion and request the certificate at any Migraciones office.  Applicant must submit his/her DNI. 
Other Records

Not applicable

Visa Issuing Posts

Lima, Peru (Embassy)

Address: Avenida Encalada
Cuadra 17 s/n, Monterrico
Lima 33

Mailing address: Embajada de los Estados Unidos de America
Apartado Postal 41-127
Lima 41

Phone Number: (51-1) 618-2000. Fax: (51-1) 618-2722

Email: Embassy's Fraud Prevention Unit: LimaFPM@state.gov

Visa Services: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Peru.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 774-5450 (202) 833-9860 (202) 354-4711

Atlanta, GA (678) 336-7010 (678) 990-1920

Boston, MA (617) 338-2227 (617) 338-2742

Chicago, IL (312) 782-1599 (312) 704-6969

Dallas, TX (972) 234-0005 (972) 498-1086

Denver, CO (303) 355-8555 (303) 355-8003

Hartford, CT (860) 548-0266/0337 (860) 760-1089

Houston, TX (713) 355-9517 (713) 355-9377

Los Angeles, CA (213) 252-5910 (213) 252-9795 (213) 252-8599 (213) 252-8130

Miami, FL (786) 347-2420 (305) 677-0089

New York, NY (646) 735-3901 (646) 735-3866

Patterson, NJ (973) 278-3324 (973) 278-0254

San Francisco, CA (415) 362-5185 (415) 362-5647 (415) 362-7136 (415) 362-2836

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Lima
Avenida La Encalada cdra. 17 s/n
Surco, Lima 33
Peru
Telephone
+(51)(1) 618-2000
Emergency
+(51)(1) 618-2000
Fax
+(51)(1) 618-2724
Peru Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Peru
Republic of Peru
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Embassy Messages

Lima

 

Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Must be valid at time of entry

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required for entry stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Free, issued at the port of entry

VACCINATIONS:

Yellow fever vaccination is recommended

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

USD 30,000. More than USD 10,000 must be declared upon entry

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

Same as entry

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Lima

Avenida La Encalada cdra. 17 s/n
Surco, Lima 33
Peru
Telephone: +(51)(1) 618-2000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(51)(1) 618-2000
Fax: +(51)(1) 618-2724

Consulates

U.S. Consular Agency - Cusco
Av. El Sol 449, Suite #201
Cusco, Peru
Telephone: +(51)(84) 231-474
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(51) 984-621-369
Fax: +(51)(84) 245-102

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Peru for information on U.S. - Peru relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Requirements for Entry:

A valid passport is required to enter and depart Peru. Migraciones (Immigration) authorities may also require evidence of return/onward travel. Be sure your date and place of entry is officially documented by Migraciones, whether you arrive at a port, airport or land border. Retain the record of your entry, as you will need it when you depart.

Your length of approved stay will be set by border officials at the time of entry, and can range from 30 to 183 days. Extensions are not usually available, and overstays result in fines.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Peru.

Requirements for Exit:

If you do not have an entry record, you are not allowed to exit the country until immigration authorities confirm the time and place of your entry in to the country. Depending on the circumstances, this can be a difficult process, costing considerable time and money to resolve. Make sure Migraciones records your entry, and then save the record for your exit. This is particularly important when entering through remote border crossings, where often the proper officials are not present. 

Immediately report lost/stolen passports to local police and keep the report. You must apply for a new passport at the Embassy and obtain a replacement entry record from Immigration prior to exiting Peru.

Travel with Minors:

Minor children with Peruvian citizenship who are not accompanied by their legal parent/guardian (or by only one parent/guardian, who does not have sole legal custody) are required to have official authorization from the non-traveling parent(s)/guardian(s). This policy also applies to children with dual U.S./Peruvian citizenship. It does not apply to minors with only U.S. citizenship.

In the United States, authorizations for minor travel can be notarized at the nearest Peruvian Consulate by requesting a “Permiso Notarial de Viaje.” Please be aware that these authorizations are valid for 30 days and one trip only. If the minor child has only one legal parent or guardian, the traveling parent/guardian must have evidence of sole custody.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

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Safety and Security

SECURITY: Narcotics traffickers, terrorist groups and other organized, armed bands still operate in some remote parts of Peru. U.S. Embassy Lima enforces a Restricted Travel Policy for Embassy personnel, which is based on its assessment of conditions and developments throughout the country. For more detailed information, see the Overseas Security and Advisory Council’s Crime and Safety Report for Peru.

CRIME: Armed robberies, express kidnappings, carjacking's, and petty theft occur frequently.  redit card fraud is also common in Peru. “Smash-and-grab” style robberies are most often reported on main tourist corridors immediately following arrival at Lima’s airport. Use only official airport taxi services. Do not hail taxis on the street. 

While violence committed against foreigners is infrequent, robberies involving violence have been on the rise. Do not resist a robbery attempt.  Victims who do not resist generally do not suffer serious physical harm. Some criminals with a motive of robbery or sexual assault may target victims by drugging them in bars and other areas frequented by tourists. Remain alert and aware of your surroundings.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on various types of scams.

VICTIMS OF CRIME: If you or someone you know becomes the victim of a crime abroad, contact the local police and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. Report crimes to the local police at 105 (National Police) or 0800-22221 (Tourist Police). Another useful resource with offices around the country is iPeru, a tourist information service which has English-speaking personnel and can assist you in obtaining local assistance.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide information on victim’s compensation programs in the United States
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy’s duty officer for assistance at any hour, 51+1+618-2000.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be arrested, formally expelled from the country or prosecuted and imprisoned within Peru.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

In Peru you may find products made with wild plants and animals. Many of these products are of illegal origin and could involve protected or endangered species, whose sale and export are illegal. Any protected species that is sold or transported, either live or transformed into food, medicinal beverages, leather, handcrafts, garments, etc. could be seized by Peruvian authorities. Some products, including live animals, require special permits when leaving Peru. Knowingly importing into the U.S. wildlife or plants that were taken from the wild or sold in violation of the laws of Peru (or any other country) is a violation of the Lacey Act (16 USC § 3371).  

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: Many popular destinations in Peru are quite remote. These areas have few facilities able to provide advanced or emergent medical care. In addition, be aware:

  • Local rescue capabilities are severely limited. Many mountain areas are too high for helicopters to fly safely. Accidents or injuries while hiking or climbing are common; crisis responders may take hours or even days to reach you if they are traveling over great distances and/or rough terrain.
  • Altitude-related illness  affects many people who are in otherwise good health, sometimes severely. Its onset can be rapid, and may be life-threatening if untreated. Do not underestimate its potential effects. Learn about it before you go, and ask your doctor whether any pre-existing condition may be adversely affected at high altitude.
  • Ayahuasca tourism is increasingly popular in Peru, but poorly regulated. Be aware of the risks involved. While popular media highlights its use as a spiritually liberating or medically beneficial agent, many users have reported severe/negative physical and psychological effects from using this powerful hallucinogen. Participants in ayahuasca tours have reported being physically or sexually assaulted, or robbed.
  • Always check with local authorities before traveling about local geographic, climatic, health, and security conditions that may impact your safety.  
  • Be aware that you may not have access to phone or internet for days at a time. Leave detailed written plans and timetables with a friend or family member before traveling to remote areas.

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Peru.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Peruvian law prohibits discrimination against persons with physical and mental disabilities and mandates that public spaces be free of barriers and accessible to persons with disabilities. However, the government of Peru has devoted limited resources to enforcement and training, and little effort has been made to ensure access to public buildings and areas. In general, access to buildings, pedestrian paths, and transportation is difficult for persons with disabilities.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

Medical care is generally good in Lima and usually adequate in major cities, but less so elsewhere in Peru. Private, urban health care facilities are often better staffed and equipped than public or rural ones. Public facilities in Cusco are generally inadequate for serious medical conditions.

Visitors to popular Andean destinations, such as Cusco/Machu Picchu, Arequipa/Colca Canyon, or Puno/Lake Titicaca often suffer from Altitude-related illness (see “Special Circumstances” section).

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides comprehensive coverage overseas. Many hospitals only accept cash payments.   See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Peru to ensure the medication is legal in Peru. Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

The following diseases are prevalent in some parts of Peru:

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:

Driving conditions in Peru are very different from those found in the United States and can be considerably more dangerous. Visitors are strongly encouraged to familiarize themselves with local law and driving customs before attempting to operate vehicles.

Road travel at night is particularly dangerous due to poor road markings and frequent unmarked road hazards. Due to safety concerns, U.S. Embassy personnel are prohibited from traveling by road outside of Lima at night, including inter-city bus travel.

Inter-city bus travel can be dangerous. Armed robbers, who force passengers off buses and steal their belongings, have held up inter-city buses at night. Bus accidents resulting in multiple deaths and injuries are common. Accidents are frequently attributed to excessive speed, poor bus maintenance, poor road conditions, poorly marked hazards at night, and driver fatigue.

Do not travel alone on rural roads, even in daylight. Convoy travel is preferable. Spare tires, parts, and fuel are needed when traveling in remote areas, where distances between service areas are long.

Fog is common on coastal and mountain highways, and the resulting poor visibility frequently causes accidents.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. You may also wish to consult Peru’s Ministry of Transportation site (Spanish and English), which has more detailed information on road safety, regulations, and standards.

Traffic Laws:

Always carry your driver's license, a copy of your passport and the rental agreement when you drive a rental car. International driver's licenses are valid for one year, while driver's licenses from other countries are generally valid for 30 days.


To obtain a Peruvian license, you’ll need to pass a written exam, a practical driving test and a medical exam. More information about this process, as well as how to obtain an international driving license in Peru, can be found at the Touring y Automovil Club del Peru website (Spanish only).

If a traffic officer signals you to stop, you must stop. Traffic officers must wear uniforms and identification cards that include their last name on their chest. Traffic officers are not allowed to retain your personal identification or vehicle documents. Under no circumstances should you offer or agree to pay money to traffic officers.

In case of an accident or collision, contact local police. If your car is a rental, call the agency or representative of the insurance company provided by the rental agency. Do not drive away from the scene of an accident.

Aviation Safety Oversight:

The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Peru’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Peru’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Lima

Avenida La Encalada cdra. 17 s/n
Surco, Lima 33
Peru
Telephone: +(51)(1) 618-2000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(51)(1) 618-2000
Fax: +(51)(1) 618-2724

Consulates

U.S. Consular Agency - Cusco
Av. El Sol 449, Suite #201
Cusco, Peru
Telephone: +(51)(84) 231-474
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(51) 984-621-369
Fax: +(51)(84) 245-102

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General Information

Peru and the United States have been treaty partners under the Hague Abduction Convention since June 1, 2007.

For information concerning travel to Peru, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, health conditions, currency and entry regulations, and crime and security, please see country-specific information for Peru.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA). The report is located here.

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children's Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Peru.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State 
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website

The Peruvian Central Authority for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Ministry for Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP).  The MIMP's role is to perform the duties given to central authorities under the Hague Abduction Convention, including processing Hague Abduction Convention applications for return of, or access to, children.  They can be reached at:

Ministerio de la Mujer y Poblaciones Vulnerables (MIMP)
Jr. Caman 616 - Lima Peru
Telf. (511) 626 - 1600
postmaster@mimp.gob.pe

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to a child in Peru, the left-behind parent must submit a Hague application to the Peruvian Central Authority either directly or through the USCA.  The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to MIMP, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the United States or Peruvian central authorities.  Attorney fees, if necessary, are the sole responsibility of the person hiring the attorney.  Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.  Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained,  in Peru.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Peru.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Retaining an Attorney

Parents are not required to retain an attorney to represent them in a Hague Convention case. However, parents who wish to be represented by an attorney may choose either to hire a private attorney or request that the MIMP provide legal representation. The MIMP provides this representation free of charge through a MIMP legal office that retains public defenders paid by the Peruvian Government regardless of nationality or economic situation. A privately-hired attorney should contact the Peruvian Central Authority as soon as possible after the Hague Abduction Convention application has been filed with the Peruvian Central Authority. 

The U.S. Embassy in Lima, Peru posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The MIMP promotes mediation in abduction cases and they will first attempt to mediate between the parties in Hague Abduction Convention cases before a case is forwarded to a court. MIMP provides mediation services for abduction dispute resolution at no cost to participants.

Information about mediation is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of the information or services contained therein. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms contained on this list.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Peru is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention).  Intercountry adoption processing in Hague countries is done in accordance with the requirements of the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations, as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Peru.

All adoptions between Peru and the United States must meet the requirements of the Convention and U.S. immigration law.

Peru’s Central Authority for Adoptions is the Dirección General de Adopciones (DGA) in the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP). Only DGA can certify cases as Convention compliant. “Direct” adoptions in which a birth parent places a child directly (or via an intermediary) to specific prospective parents for adoption cannot be certified as complying with the Convention per Peruvian law, and therefore prospective adoptive parents may not search on their own for children to adopt.

Instead children must have been declared legally abandoned and wards of the state, and the adoption must be processed through DGA in order for it to be certified by DGA. Adoptions processed through the Peruvian judiciary, while legal in Peru, cannot be Hague certified. As a result, children adopted through the Peruvian judiciary/family court system rather than DGA cannot be issued Hague Convention visas and generally will be unable to immigrate to the United States. Prospective adoptive parents seeking to adopt a blood relative in Peru should contact DGA prior to beginning the adoption process. 

Note: Special transition provisions apply to adoptions initiated before April 1, 2008. Read about Transition Cases.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Peru, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee under U.S. law in order to immigrate to the United States on an IH-3 or IH-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

Adoption between the United States and Peru is governed by the Hague Convention on Adoptions. Therefore to adopt from Peru, you must first be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn more.
In addition to these U.S. requirements for prospective adoptive parents, parents need to meet Peru’s requirements to adopt a child from there:

  • Residency: There are no minimum residency requirements to adopt in Peru. However both prospective adoptive parents, if applicable, must be present to complete the adoption in Peru, including obtaining provisional custody of the child, completing an evaluation with a social worker, and finalizing the adoption in Peruvian court. This process typically takes 4-6 weeks.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: The minimum age of applicants is 25 and the maximum is 52.   
  • Marriage: Single persons and married couples may apply to adopt.  Peruvian law only recognizes opposite sex marriages. Thus, there is no provision for same sex spouses to adopt jointly. Single lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, transgendered, or intersex individuals may also be unable to adopt in Peru.
  • Income: Prospective adoptive parents must demonstrate the means to support the physical and emotional needs of the child.

Because Peru is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, children from Peru must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. For example, the adoption may take place only if the competent authorities of Peru have determined that placement of the child within Peru has been given due consideration and that an intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interests. In addition to Peru’s requirements, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee to be eligible for an immigrant visa that will allow you to bring him or her to the United States.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Abandonment: Only children who have been declared abandoned by a judge are eligible for an intercountry adoption.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: DGA matches children of all ages. However, DGA prioritizes the adoption of children older than 9 years. The DGA team evaluates the application and expectations of the prospective parents to maximize the well-being of each child. 
  • Sibling Adoptions: DGA prioritizes the adoption of sibling groups.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: DGA prioritizes the adoption of children with special needs or medical conditions.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Matching could take several months and sometimes years.  
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Who Can Be Adopted

Because Peru is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, children from Peru must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. For example, the adoption may take place only if the competent authorities of Peru have determined that placement of the child within Peru has been given due consideration and that an intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interests. In addition to Peru’s requirements, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee to be eligible for an immigrant visa that will allow you to bring him or her to the United States.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Abandonment: Only children who have been declared abandoned by a judge are eligible for an intercountry adoption.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: DGA matches children of all ages. However, DGA prioritizes the adoption of children older than 9 years. The DGA team evaluates the application and expectations of the prospective parents to maximize the well-being of each child. 
  • Sibling Adoptions: DGA prioritizes the adoption of sibling groups.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: DGA prioritizes the adoption of children with special needs or medical conditions.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Matching could take several months and sometimes years.  
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How to Adopt

WARNING: Peru is party to the Hague Adoption Convention. Do not adopt or obtain legal custody of a child in Peru before U.S. consular officer issues an “Article 5/17 Letter” in the case.  Read on for more information.

Peru's Adoption Authority

Peru’s Central Authority for Adoptions is the Dirección General de Adopciones (DGA) within the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP). Only DGA can certify cases as Convention compliant.

Note: If any of the following occurred prior to April 1, 2008 (the date on which the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force with respect to the United States), the Hague Adoption Convention may not apply to your adoption: 1) you filed a Form I-600A identifying Peru as the country where you intended to adopt; 2) you filed a Form I-600; or; 3) the adoption was completed. Under these circumstances, your adopted child’s visa application could continue to be processed in accordance with the immigration regulations for non-Convention adoptions. For more information, read about Transition Cases

The Process

Because Peru is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adopting from Peru must follow a specific process designed to meet the Convention’s requirements. A brief summary of the Convention adoption process is given below. You must complete these steps in the following order to meet all necessary legal requirements. Adoptions completed out of order may result in the child not being eligible for an immigrant visa to the United States.

  1. Choose an Accredited Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be matched with a Child
  4. Apply for the child to be found eligible for adoption
  5. Adopt (or Obtain Legal Custody) of the child in Peru
  6. Bring your child home

1.  Choose an Accredited Adoption Service Provider:   

The first step in adopting a child from Peru is to select an accredited or approved adoption service provider in the United States. Only these agencies and attorneys can provide adoption services between the United States and Peru. Please note that in order to provide services in Peru, adoption service providers must further be authorized to work in Peru by the DGA. To obtain updated information regarding which U.S. adoption service providers are authorized by DGA, prospective adoption parents should contact DGA directly. DGA also publishes the list of authorized providers through the “Organismos Acreditados”.

2.  Apply to USCIS to be Found Eligible to Adopt    

After you choose an accredited or approved adoption service provider, you must apply to be found suitable and eligible to adopt by the responsible U.S. government agency, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), by submitting Form I-800A. Read more about Suitability and Eligibility Requirements.

Once USCIS determines that you are “suitable” and “eligible” to adopt by approving the Form I-800A, your adoption service provider will provide your approval notice, home study, and any other required information to the DGA in Peru as part of your adoption dossier. The DGA’s Board of Directors will review your application to determine whether you are also eligible to adopt under Peru’s law.

Note: Peru has stringent requirements for the psychological and social history information that must be provided as part of your dossier. If the information supplied is not detailed enough, DGA will ask for additional information, and this will delay the review process by several months. 

3.  Be matched with a Child 

If both the United States and Peru determine that you are eligible to adopt, and the DGA has determined that a child is available for adoption and that intercountry adoption is in that child’s best interests, the DGA may provide you with a referral for a child. The referral is a proposed match between you and a specific child based on a review of your dossier and the needs of a specific child in Peru. DGA will provide a background study and other information, if available, about the child to help you decide whether to accept the referral or not. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs and provide a permanent home for a particular child. If you accept the referral, the adoption service provider communicates that decision to the DGA. Learn more about this critical decision.

4.  Apply for the child to be found eligible for adoption

After you accept a referral, you will apply to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for provisional approval for the child to immigrate to the United States (Form I-800). USCIS will make a provisional determination as to whether the child meets the definition of a Convention Adoptee and will be eligible to enter the United States and reside permanently as an immigrant.

After provisional approval of Form I-800, your adoption service provider or you will submit a visa application to the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Lima which is responsible for issuing immigrant visas to children from Peru. A consular officer will review the Form I-800 and the visa application for possible visa ineligibilities and advise you of options for the waiver of any noted ineligibilities.

Note: For both petition and visa processing, all documents in Spanish must be submitted both in original form and with an official English translation. 

WARNING: The consular officer will send a letter (referred to as an “Article 5 Letter”) to Peru’s Central Authority in any intercountry adoption involving U.S. citizen parents and a child from Peru where all Convention requirements are met and the consular officer determines that the child appears eligible to immigrate to the United States. This letter will inform Peru’s Central Authority that the parents are eligible and suited to adopt, that all indications are that the child may enter and reside permanently in the United States, and that the U.S. Central Authority agrees that the adoption may proceed.

Do not attempt to adopt or obtain custody of a child in Peru before a U.S. consular officer issues the Article 5 Letter in any adoption case.

Remember: The consular officer will make a final decision about a child’s eligibility for an immigrant visa later in the adoption process.

5.  Adopt (or Obtain Legal Custody) of Child in Peru

Remember: Before you adopt a child in Peru, you must have completed the above four steps. Only after completing these steps can you proceed to finalize the adoption or grant of custody for the purposes of adoption in Peru.
The process for finalizing the adoption (or obtaining legal custody) in Peru generally includes the following:

  • Role of Adoption Authority: Only DGA can certify adoptions as Convention compliant. DGA has jurisdiction over intercountry adoptions for children who have been declared legally abandoned by the court and are wards of the state. 
  • Role of the Court: Provisional custody is awarded to the prospective adoptive parents shortly after their arrival in Peru. After 10-15 days, a designated social worker will issue a report attesting to the compatibility and bonding of the child and the prospective adoptive parents. The prospective adoptive parents will then appear in court to finalize the adoption, and a judge will issue the final adoption decree. 

Note: Peruvian law mandates that both prospective adoptive parents, if applicable, must be physically present to obtain provisional custody of the child and complete an evaluation with a social worker for ratification of the adoption in court.

  • Role of Adoption Agencies: Because Peru is a Convention country, adoption services must be provided by a Hague accredited agency or provider.
  • Time Frame: Once in country following the issuance of the Article 5 letter, the process generally takes 4-6 weeks. Prospective adoptive parents are awarded provisional custody shortly after arrival in Peru. After 10-15 days, a designated social worker issues a report attesting to the compatibility and bonding of the child and the prospective adoptive parents.  The prospective adoptive parents then appear in court to finalize the adoption. 
  • Adoption Fees: In the adoption services contract that you sign at the beginning of the adoption process, your agency will itemize the fees and estimated expenses related to your adoption process. 

Some of the fees specifically associated with adopting from Peru include: lodging expenses, translations, court fees, and fees for getting new birth certificate, national ID card, and passport, which can add up to $2000-$4000. Please note that once the adoption is finalized, the new birth certificate listing the adoptive parents can only be issued in the place where the child was originally registered. This may be in a remote location, which may entail additional time and expenses.

Note: Prospective parents are advised to obtain detailed receipts for all fees and donations paid, either by the parents directly or through their U.S. adoption agencies and to take appropriate measures to verify that the payments are not contrary to the Convention, U.S. law, or the law of Peru. Improper payments may have the appearance of buying a baby, violate applicable law, and may put all future adoptions in Peru at risk. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, for instance, makes it unlawful to bribe foreign government officials to obtain or retain business. Further, the IAA makes it unlawful to improperly influence relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing Central Authority functions.

  • Documents Required: The following documents are required by DGA to adopt in Peru:
    • Original birth certificates for parent(s) and other children in the family;
    • Marriage certificate, if applicable;
    • Divorce certificate(s), if applicable;
    • Death certificate if the prospective adoptive parent is a widow or widower;
    • Legalized copy of the passport(s) of the prospective adoptive parent(s);
    • Police reports from the place of residence of the prospective adoptive parent(s);
    • Medical exam results;
    • Photographs;
    • Job letters; and
    • Tax returns.

Note:  Additional documents may be requested.  or more details on the required documentation, you may visit the DGA’s website

  • Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic. If so, the Department of State’s Authentications Office may be able to assist. Read more about Authenticating U.S. Documents

Note: The United States and Peru are parties to the Hague Apostille Convention. U.S. public documents may be authenticated with Apostilles by the appropriate U.S. Competent Authority.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport
U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Peru

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit.  Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Peru, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability. 

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there’s a family emergency in the United States, or a crisis in Peru, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

Post-Adoption/Post-Placement Reporting Requirements
Peru requires post-adoption reports every six months for four years after the adoption. This requirement applies even if the child turns 18 during the four year period. Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to the country’s history of positive experiences with American parents. Peru takes reporting requirements very seriously and has withdrawn accreditation of adoption agencies due to missing reports. We urge you to complete all post-adoption reports in a timely manner.

Post-Adoption Resources
Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

COMPLAINTS

If you have concerns about your adoption, we ask that you share this information with the U.S. Embassy in Peru, particularly if it involves possible fraud or misconduct specific to your child’s case. The Department of States takes all allegations of fraud or misconduct seriously. Our Adoption Comment Page provides several points of contact adoptive families may use to comment on their adoption service provider, their experience applying for their child’s visa, or about the Form I-600 petition process.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Peru
Consular Section- Immigrant Visas
Avenida La Encalada, Cuadra 17 s/n
Monterrico, Surco, Lima 33 Peru
Website:  https://pe.usembassy.gov/
Email: LimaIV@state.gov

Peru’s Adoption Authority
Ministerio de la Mujer y Poblaciones Vulnerables (MIMP)
Dirección General de Adopciones (DGA)
Av. Benavides 1155
Miraflores, Lima 18 Peru
Tel: (51) (1) 416-5431
Website: http://www.mimp.gob.pe

Embassy of Peru
Consular Section
1700 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036
Tel: (202) 833-9860 to 9869
Fax: (202) 659-8124
Website: www.peruvianembassy.us
Email: webadmin@embassyofperu.us

Note: PERU has consulates in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Hartford, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Paterson, New York City, and San Francisco.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
SA-17A
2201 C Street, NW
Washington, DC 20520
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Website:  http://adoption.state.gov
Email:  AskCI@state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures, contact the National Customer Service Center (NCSC) at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

General Issuing Government Authority Information: The Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC) is the national civil records registry in Peru.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth and Death Certificates

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees:  S/ 15 Nuevos Soles (approximately $5 dollars).
  • Document Name:  Birth certificate (Partida de Nacimiento), and Death Certificate (Acta de Defunción).
  • Issuing Government Authority:  Certificates are issued by the Provincial Council (Concejo Provincial) or the District Council (Concejo Distrital) of the district or province in which the event occurred and was registered.  Registrations have been obligatory under the civil code since 1936.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Certificates vary in form and can be transcriptions in long hand, typewritten on a template, or microfilm photocopies of the original record.  
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  All certificates bear the seal of either the Provincial or District Council and are certified by the Chief of the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC).
  • Registration Criteria:  The Civil Code of Peru requires the parents of a child born in Peru to enter a new child’s birth in the civil registry (Registro de Estado Civil) of the District or Provincial Council within 30 days of the date of the child's birth.  In addition to the above, an individual's birth may be recorded after the 30 day deadline through a judicial or administrative process in the municipality where the individual was born, or through RENIEC.  Those entering a late registration must submit supporting evidence such as records of live birth, baptism certificates, school and medical records, two witnesses, and evidence that the individual was never registered before.
  • Procedure for Obtaining:  The procedure for obtaining a birth certificate depends on the municipality where the birth was registered.  If the municipality’s records have been incorporated into RENIEC, then the document can be requested in any RENIEC office.  If the municipality’s records have not been incorporated into RENIEC, then the certificate must be requested at the municipality where it was registered. 
  • Certified Copies:  The Consular Section requires that birth, and death certificates that establish the relationship between the petitioner and beneficiary be certified by RENIEC.  For non-incorporated districts (most locations outside of Lima), the RENIEC certification only verifies the signature of the signing official.  Evidence of RENIEC certification consists of a seal placed on the document.  RENIEC offices are also the issuing authority for original birth certificates for many areas in Lima.  
  • Alternate Documents:  In rare and verifiable instances, documents have been destroyed by natural disaster or other calamities.  In the event a birth certificate is not available, baptismal certificates issued by the parochial authorities of the Roman Catholic Church and notarized by an ecclesiastical notary are generally acceptable for legal purposes in Peru.  If an unusually long time has elapsed between the dates of birth and baptism, the value of the certificate is impaired.
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments:  RENIEC has been incorporating more Civil Registries of District or Provincial Councils during the past few years.  As of May2015, it had incorporated 47 in Lima and Callao, and 18 in other provinces.  Because of this centralized control, RENIEC is issuing more birth, marriage and death certificates directly - increasing the reliability of those documents and making them easily verifiable through the Fraud Prevention Unit of our Consular Section.  Post regularly receives updates from RENIEC regarding newly incorporated councils.
Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

  • Available:  Yes
  • Fees:  S/ 15 Nuevos Soles (approximately $5 dollars).
  • Document Name:  Marriage Certificate (Partida de Matrimonio)
  • Issuing Government Authority:  Certificates are issued by the Provincial Council (Concejo Provincial) or the District Council (Concejo Distrital) of the district or province in which the event occurred and was registered or by RENIEC when the civil registries of the council have been incorporated into this bureau.  Registrations have been obligatory under the civil code since 1936.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Certificates vary in form and can be transcriptions in long hand, typewritten on a template, or microfilm photocopies of the original record.  
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  All certificates bear the seal of either the Provincial or District Council and are certified by the Chief of the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC) and/or from a RENIEC official for those civil registries incorporated into this bureau.
  • Registration Criteria:  It is important to highlight that whether the council’s civil registries have been incorporated into RENIEC or not, marriages still take place at the councils and are celebrated by Majors or a council’s authorized officer. For those cases in which the council’s civil registries have been incorporated into RENIEC, the council sends all of the marriage file to RENIEC who will be in charge of officially registering  the marriage (in their books and database).
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The procedure for obtaining a marriage certificate depends on the municipality where the marriage was registered.  If the municipality’s records have been incorporated into RENIEC, then the document can be requested in any RENIEC office.  If the municipality’s records have not been incorporated into RENIEC, then the certificate must be requested at the municipality where it was registered. 
  • Certified Copies:  The Consular Section requires that marriage certificates that establish the relationship between the petitioner and beneficiary be certified by RENIEC.  For non-incorporated districts (most locations outside of Lima), the RENIEC certification only verifies the signature of the signing official.  Evidence of RENIEC certification consists of a seal placed on the document.  RENIEC offices are also the issuing authority for many areas in Lima.  
  • Alternate Documents: There aren’t any valid alternate certificates, but nowadays there are still some rural councils that may sometimes transcribe the information from the marriage books into a special pre-printed format since they may have no electricity and/or copier machines. Those certificates are sealed and signed by the Civil Registry Chief and sometimes by the Major as well.  As it happens with the certificates issued by councils not incorporated into RENIEC, the Consular Section requires a RENIEC certification.  
  • Exceptions: Before 1936, religious marriages were considered legal if reported to the civil authorities.  Marriage certificates issued by church authorities after that date have no legal value.
  • Comments:
    • RENIEC has been incorporating more Civil Registries of District or Provincial Councils during the past few years.  As of July 2016, it had incorporated a total of 68 civil registries, 50 in Lima and Callao, and 18 in other provinces. Because of this centralized control, RENIEC is issuing more birth, marriage and death certificates directly - increasing the reliability of those documents and making them easily verifiable through the Fraud Prevention Unit of our Consular Section.  Post regularly receives updates from RENIEC regarding newly incorporated councils.
    • Same-sex marriage is not legally recognized in Peru. 
 

Divorce Certificates

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: S/3.70 Nuevos Soles (approximately $1.20 dollars) per page, if issued by the court. Price may vary depending on the issuing authority.
  • Document Name: Sentencia de Divorcio (Divorce Decree)
  • Issuing Government Authority: Judicial Divorces are issued by the Family Court.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The format varies depending on the issuing office.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The document is issued by judges in the Family Court.
  • Registration Criteria: A divorce is noted on the left margin or back of the marriage certificate and makes reference to the resolution of the civil court dissolving the marriage.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The procedure for obtaining the document varies. Subject must approach to the entity that processed the divorce to request it.
  • Certified Copies: A certified copy of the resolution may be obtained from the clerk (secretario) of the lower court that ordered the divorce.
  • Alternate Documents: Divorces may also be processed in a Municipality or in a Notary's office (Administrative Divorce). In these cases, the issuing authority is the Mayor of the Municipality or the Notary respectively, and the document may be called Resolucion de Alcaldia (Municipal Resolution) or Testimonio. Law N.29227 authorizing these divorces went into effect July 14, 2008. As part of the divorce proceedings, divorces processed by a Municipality or Notary must be registered by the Civil Registry Chief (for those municipalities not yet incorporated in RENIEC or by RENIEC for those incorporated). An annotation would then be placed in the original marriage certificate indicating both the date of the legal separation as well as the final divorce date. For these divorces, the following could be presented as proof of divorce:

    • Resolucion de Alcaldia plus copy of the marriage certificate with the divorce annotation on the back of the certificate.
    • Resolucion Jefatural de RENIEC plus copy of the marriage certificate with the divorce annotation on the back of the certificate.
    • Notary Deed of Arrangement (Testimonio) or Minute plus copy of the marriage certificate with the divorce annotation on the back of the certificate.

    Please note that in Peru, divorce is a two-step process. First, the couple has to request the legal separation "municipal resolution of separation or "Acta Notarial" (Notary Minute). Two months later either party can request the final divorce resolution. This final divorce resolution is necessary for the divorce to be legal.

  • Exceptions: None.
  • Comments: In the event that an individual marries in Peru and dissolves that marriage outside of Peru, the foreign divorce must be formally recognized in Peru by the Superior Court through an "exequatur" process prior to either party entering into another marriage in Peru. When the exequatur is finalized, the court issues a decree that should be annotated on the marriage certificate. The decree is valid as of the date of the foreign divorce. If the foreign divorce is not registered through the exequatur process and the individual enters into another marriage in Peru, the second marriage will not be legally recognized until the exequatur process is completed.
  • Note: Immigrant visa processing, the U.S. Embassy in Lima requires the Sentencia de Divorcio/Resolucion de Alcaldia. The annotation on the marriage certificate is not sufficient.
Adoption Certificates
  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: No fee
  • Document Name: Resolucion Directorial de Adopcion (Directorial Resolution of Adoption). This is the final adoption decree.
  • Issuing Government Authority: The General Bureau of Adoptions from the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP) is the government issuing authority.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The document is issued on A4 sized paper with a Peruvian coat of arms on top of the first page, seals, and a signature on every page, as well as a seal from the Adoption General Director at the bottom of the last page.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The Adoption General Director from the General Bureau of Adoptions of the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP) is the one authorized to sign the document.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The General Bureau of Adoptions from the Ministry of Women and Vulnerable Populations (MIMP) grants adoption documents after the adoption process has been completed in cases where the adoption has been executed under the administrative process complying with the provisions of the Hague Adoption Convention on the Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Inter-Country Adoption. The issued document reflects the new name of the child.
  • Certified Copies Available: Yes, from the General Bureau of Adoptions.
  • Alternate Documents: In the case of adoptions conducted in a family or civil court, adoption certificates may be obtained from the court where the adoption process took place. The document will be a final adoption decree with the seals on each page from the court where the adoption process took place with the last page containing the signature of the judge.
  • Exceptions: None.
  • Comments: Visit this web site for more information.
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Identity Card
  • Available: Yes.
  • Fees: For minors (under 17 years old) the cost is S/16 Nuevos Soles (approximately $5.30 dollars); for applicants age 17 and over, the cost is S/29 Nuevos Soles (approximately $10 dollars).
  • Document Name: Documento Nacional de Identidad (National ID Card)
  • Issuing Government Authority: Peruvian ID cards are issued by the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC).
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: ID cards for adults are light blue in color and contain the picture and biographical information of the subject. ID cards for minors are yellow and also contain information about the parents.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The card is signed by a RENIEC authorized issuing officer. Registration Criteria: The ID card is the only identity document issued to Peruvian citizens, adults or minors. The ID card is mandatory for all Peruvian citizens aged 18 years or older.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Applicant must submit the fee receipt, a certified copy of Birth Certificate issued by a civil register, utility receipts, and a passport picture at any RENIEC issuing office.
  • Certified Copies: Not Available
  • Alternate Documents: A Birth Certificate may still accepted as an identity document for minors.
  • Exceptions: None
  • Comments: ID cards for children are not mandatory. However, they are necessary for children because they are a requirement for them to access to health services, social programs, and for regional travel. As a matter of practice, ID cards are issued to children immediately after birth. Click here for more information.
Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

  • Available: Yes. To those 18 and older.
  • Fees: S/17 Nuevos Soles (approximately $6 dollars)
  • Document Name: Certificado de Antecedentes Policiales (Certificate of Police Record)
  • Issuing Government Authority: Records are issued by the Peruvian National Police (Policia Nacional del Peru) at local police stations.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Police Records are issued on green paper with the heading "Policia Nacional del Peru, Division de Identificacion, Certificado de Antecedentes Policiales." A scanned copy of the applicant's photo also appears on the certificate.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Police Commanderor Commissar.
  • Registration Criteria: Applicants without criminal records will have "No Registra Antecedentes" (does not have records) printed on the form.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Police records are available for applicants age 18 and over. The applicant must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de La Nacion branch and then complete the process in an authorized police station.
  • Certified Copies: Not Available.
  • Alternate Documents: A police record may be issued to residents or non-residents upon application to "Policia de Investigaciones del Peru, Division de Identificacion Criminalistica de Lima," Av. Aramburu No. 550, Lima 34. The applicant must first request a fingerprint chart (ficha de canje internacional) and provide one photo. Processing time is normally three days. There is a small fee.
  • Exceptions: None
  • Comments: This document may not contain an accurate listing of all police records since there is no national database and each precinct maintains its own record. Therefore, for immigrant visa processing, the Consular Section in Lima requires 1) Certificado de Antecedentes Policiales, 2) Certificado Judicial de Antecedentes Penales, and 3) Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales a Nivel Nacional.

Imprisonment Records

  • Available: Yes. To those 18 and older.
  • Fees: S/ 34.50 Nuevos Soles (approximately $12 dollars)
  • Document Name: Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales a Nivel Nacional (Certificate of National Judicial Records).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Judicial Records are issued in Lima by the Instituto Nacional Penitenciario (INPE), Dirección de Registro Penitenciario, located at Avenida Alberto del Campo Nº 1050, Magdalena del Mar, Edificio de la Superintendencia Nacional de Control de Servicios de Seguridad, Control de Armas, Munición y Explosivos de Uso Civil (SUCAMEC ex-DICSCAMEC). Reference: Av. Salaverry, block 31. This document can also be obtained in other offices in Lima and the provinces as listed here.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Imprisonment records are issued on green paper with the heading "Ministerio de Justicia, Instituto Nacional Penitenciario, Direccion de Registro Penitenciario" on the top of the page. The shield of the institute is placed at the top right corner of the document and a thermo chromic ink stamp at the left bottom. The applicant's photo is scanned and printed on the certificate.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The Director of the Imprisonment Record Office.
  • Registration Criteria: This document details entrances, exits, convictions, and other records of those who were detained in a penitentiary in Peru.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Imprisonment records are available to Peruvians and residents age 18 and over. Applicant must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion branch and then complete the process at the Instituto Nacional Penitenciario. The process may be done in one day if applicant does not have judicial records or require further investigation. In some instances, the processing time may be as long as two weeks.
  • Certified Copies: Not Available.
  • Alternate Documents: None.
  • Exceptions: This document may not contain an accurate listing of all past incarcerations since any detainee may have his or her record expunged after serving the full sentence.
  • Comments: Applicants who are not resident in Peru may send a representative to obtain the court records but must first go to the Peruvian Consulate to sign a power of attorney authorizing their representative to obtain the records on their behalf. The power of attorney must also be certified by the Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs before the representative can request the imprisonment records.

Court Records

  • Available: Available to Peruvians and residents age 18 and over.
  • Fees: S/ 80 Nuevos Soles (approximately $20 dollars)
  • Document Name: Certificado Judicial de Antecedentes Penales (Certificate of Penal Records).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Court records are issued by "Registro Nacional de Condenas" Av. Abancay cdra. 5, Edificio del Ministerio Publico, 1er piso, Lima 1. They are also issued by Peruvian consular offices worldwide.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Court Records are issued on blue/orange paper with the heading "Republica de Peru, Poder Judicial, Certificado Judicial de Antecedentes Penales." The Judiciary's logo is found at the left top corner of the document, and Peruvian coat of arms with the text "REPUBLICA DEL PERU" at the center. A hologram with the Judiciary's logo is placed at the right side of the thermo chromic ink stamp in the lower part of the document. A scanned copy of the applicant's photo is also printed on the certificate.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Document has the scanned signature of "Jefe de Registro Nacional de Condenas."
  • Registration Criteria: Court Records certify if a person was convicted of any crime.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Applicants must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion or Interbank branch, complete the application form (form is available free of charge), and present his or her ID card (original and copy).
  • Certified Copies: Not Available.
  • Alternate Documents: Now court records can be requested online at www.pj.gob.peafter the payment of a fee and can be picked up at an office chosen by the client (the list of these offices may be found in the same webpage). In order to request this document online, the applicant must be 18 years old, have a valid Peruvian ID card, and have paid the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion or Interbank branch.
  • Exceptions: None.
  • Comments: Applicants who are not resident in Peru may send a representative to obtain the court records but must first go to a Peruvian Consulate to sign a power of attorney authorizing their representative to obtain the records on their behalf. The Peruvian Ministry of Foreign Affairs must certify the power of attorney before the representative can request the court records.

When issuing the court records, the "Registro Nacional de Condenas" uses pictures from RENIEC's database. They only paste a photo when the person requesting the certificate is a minor, a foreign national, or a Peruvian citizen who lives in other country and his/her information is not available in RENIEC.

Military Records
  • Available: Military records are available to all who have served in the military (career military), except for those who served only the two year obligatory military service.
  • Fees: S/38.5 Nuevos Soles (approximately $13 dollars).
  • Document Name: Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales y/o Penales (Certificate of Judicial and Criminal Records).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Military records are issued by "Fuero Militar Policial," formerly known as "Consejo Supremo de Justicia Militar." Documents are issued in Av. Arequipa #310, Lima. For more information visit www.fmp.gob.pe.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Military Records are issued on blue paper with the heading "Certificado de Antecedentes Judiciales y/o Penales." The Peruvian coat of arms is found at the left top corner of the document, and the shield of the institute is in the center. A scanned copy of the applicant's photo is printed on the document.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Documents are signed by the Jefe del Registro Central de Condenas.
  • Registration Criteria: This document shows the offenses incurred by military and police personnel while on duty.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Applicant must first pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion branch. They must then complete the application form and provide a copy of their identification card.
  • Certified Copies: Available
  • Alternate Documents: None.
  • Exceptions: N/A
  • Comments: Applicants who have not served in the military or police are not required to submit this document for immigrant visa processing at the U.S. Embassy in Lima.
Passports & Other Travel Documents
  • Types Available: Regular, Diplomatic (Pasaporte Diplomatico), Official (Pasaporte Especial)
  • Fees: The cost for obtaining a regular passport is S/39.30 Nuevos Soles (approximately $13 dollars). To revalidate, the cost is S/33.40 Nuevos Soles (approximately $11 dollars).
  • Document Name: Pasaporte de la Comunidad Andina de la Republica del Peru (Passport of the Andean Community of the Republic of Peru).
  • Issuing Government Authority: Regular passports are issued by Superintendencia Nacional de Migraciones / Migraciones Peru.
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Peruvian immigration authorities began issuing photo digitized machine readable passports in September 1998. Regular passports have a maroon cover with the heading "Comunidad Andina, Republica del Peru" and the shield of Peru printed in gold ink. The machine readable passports feature many security features including microprinting, UV holograms, and optically variable inks. They are also sensitive to manipulation by solvents or chemicals.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: In Lima, passports bear the seal and signature of the Passport Coordinator. In the provinces, passports bear the signature and seal of the chief of the immigration office where the passport was issued.
  • Registration Criteria: Eligibility is determined by checking the Registro Nacional de Identificacion Y Estado Civil (RENIEC)'s records and the immigrations database.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The applicant must pay the appropriate fee at any Banco de la Nacion branch and then submit his or her identity document and the passport application form. For more information about the process please visit this web site.
  • Alternate Documents: Not available
  • Exceptions: All applicants must submit a passport in order to process a visa.
  • Comments: Peruvian passports are valid for five years and may be renewed for one additional five-year period. Peruvian immigration authorities revalidate laminated machine-readable Peruvian passports on the last page. The revalidation foil resembles a digital printed passport bio data page with a color photo. The foil is affixed to the passport page with heat. As a result of the passport revalidation process, the Government of Peru has requested that the last two pages of the Peruvian passport (pages 31 and 32) remain clear of any stickers, stamps, or writing. Revalidations done in the main offices in Lima are machine readable. Peruvian consulates abroad will continue to issue non-machine readable passports using seals and stamps.
  • Other Documents Available:
    • Laisez-passer (Salvoconducto). This documentis issued to Foreign Nationals who do not have a Diplomatic Representation in the Country. It is valid for 30 days after issuance.
    • Travel document (Documento de Viaje). Issued to refugees and asylees.
    • Travel Record Certificate (Certificado de Movimiento Migratorio). Migraciones Peru keeps records of entries and exits of all Peruvian nationals and foreigners (residents and visitors). Applicant must pay a fee of S/20.10 Nuevos Soles ($6.70 dollars) at Banco de La Nacion and request the certificate at any Migraciones office.  Applicant must submit his/her DNI. 
Other Records

Not applicable

Visa Issuing Posts

Lima, Peru (Embassy)

Address: Avenida Encalada
Cuadra 17 s/n, Monterrico
Lima 33

Mailing address: Embajada de los Estados Unidos de America
Apartado Postal 41-127
Lima 41

Phone Number: (51-1) 618-2000. Fax: (51-1) 618-2722

Email: Embassy's Fraud Prevention Unit: LimaFPM@state.gov

Visa Services: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Peru.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 774-5450 (202) 833-9860 (202) 354-4711

Atlanta, GA (678) 336-7010 (678) 990-1920

Boston, MA (617) 338-2227 (617) 338-2742

Chicago, IL (312) 782-1599 (312) 704-6969

Dallas, TX (972) 234-0005 (972) 498-1086

Denver, CO (303) 355-8555 (303) 355-8003

Hartford, CT (860) 548-0266/0337 (860) 760-1089

Houston, TX (713) 355-9517 (713) 355-9377

Los Angeles, CA (213) 252-5910 (213) 252-9795 (213) 252-8599 (213) 252-8130

Miami, FL (786) 347-2420 (305) 677-0089

New York, NY (646) 735-3901 (646) 735-3866

Patterson, NJ (973) 278-3324 (973) 278-0254

San Francisco, CA (415) 362-5185 (415) 362-5647 (415) 362-7136 (415) 362-2836

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Lima
Avenida La Encalada cdra. 17 s/n
Surco, Lima 33
Peru
Telephone
+(51)(1) 618-2000
Emergency
+(51)(1) 618-2000
Fax
+(51)(1) 618-2724
Peru Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.