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International Travel

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Country Information

Canada

Country Information

Canada
Canada
Last Updated: August 28, 2017
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Valid at time of entry. If you are transiting Canada en route to Europe, your passport must be valid for at least 3 months beyond your planned date of departure from the Schengen area.

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required 

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Not required for stays under 180 days

VACCINATIONS:

None 

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

None 

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

None

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Ottawa

490 Sussex Drive
Ottawa,
Ontario, K1N 1G8
Canada
Telephone: +(613) 688-5335
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(613) 238-5335
Fax: +(613) 688-3082
OttawaCONS@state.gov

The Ottawa consular district includes the counties of Kingston, Lanark, Leeds, Prescott, Refrew, Russell, and Stormont in Eastern Ontario, and those parts of the Québec regions of Outaouais and Abitibi-Témiscamingue near Ottawa.

CONSULATES

U.S. Consulate General Montreal
1155 rue St. Alexandre
Montréal, Quebec H3B 3Z1
Canada
Telephone: + (514) 398-9695
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(514) 981-5059
Fax: +(514) 398-9748

The Montreal consular district includes Greater Montreal and the regions of Southern Quebec Province (Laurentides, Lanaudiere, Laval, Montreal, Montregie, Estrie, and the southern parts of Centre-du-Quebec), including Joliete, Drummondville, and Sherbrooke.

montreal-ACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Toronto
360 University Ave
Toronto, Ontario M5G 1S4
Canada
Telephone: +(416) 595-1700
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(416) 595-6506
Fax: +(416) 595-5466

The consular district includes the province of Ontario except for the counties of Kingston, Lanark, Leeds, Prescott, Refrew, Russell, and Stormont, which are served by the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa.

TorontoPassport@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Vancouver
1075 West Pender Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6E 2M6
Canada
Telephone: +(604) 685-4311
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(604) 685-4311
Fax: +(604) 685-7175

The consular district includes British Columbia and the Yukon Territory.

vancouverACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Halifax
Purdy's Wharf Tower II
1969 Upper Water Street, Suite 904
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 3R7
Canada
Telephone: +(902) 429-2480
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(902) 429-2480
Fax: +(902) 423-6861

The Halifax consular district includes New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and the French islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon.

Halifax-ACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate Winnipeg
201 Portage Avenue, Suite 860
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 3K6
Canada
Telephone: +(204) 940-1800
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: 403-266-8962 and press "0" for assistance (Consulate General Calgary)
Fax: +(204) 940-1809

The Consulate in Winnipeg provides only emergency services for U.S. citizens. Routine services such as visas, passports and notarials are handled at other U.S. Consulates General, primarily Calgary.

U.S. Consulate General Quebec 
2, rue de la Terrasse Dufferin
(Vieux Quebec, behind Chateau Frontenac)
Quebec, Quebec G1R 4T9
Canada
Telephone: +(418) 692-2095
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(418) 692-2096
Fax: +(418) 692-4640

The consular district includes Quebec City and those regions of Quebec Province to the North and East of the Montreal and Ottawa Districts (indicated above), plus the Territory of Nunavut.

quebecacs@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Calgary 
615 Macleod Trail S.E.,
10th Floor
Calgary, Alberta, T2G 4T8
Canada
Telephone: +(403) 266-8962
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(403) 266-8962 then press '0'
Fax: +(403) 263-2241

The consular district includes Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and the Northwest Territories, excluding Nunavut.

Calgary-ACS@state.gov

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Canada for additional information on U.S.-Canada relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

For tourist visits to Canada of less than 180 days, U.S. citizens do not need visas. Other types of travel (e.g., to work, study, or immigrate) generally requires visas. For complete information on visa categories and requirements, consult the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) website.

Anyone with a criminal record (including misdemeanors or alcohol-related driving offenses) may not be able to enter Canada without first obtaining an approval for rehabilitation well in advance of any planned travel. To determine whether you may be inadmissible and how to overcome this finding, please refer to the CIC website.

Entry into Canada is solely determined by Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officials in accordance with Canadian law. Please see the CBSA’s website for full details.

Travel Programs: Both the U.S. and Canadian governments urge frequent travelers to join the NEXUS trusted traveler program.

Entry into Canada: Canadian law requires that all persons entering Canada carry both proof of citizenship and proof of identity. A valid U.S. passport, passport card, or NEXUS card satisfies these requirements for U.S. citizens.

Children under 16 need only present proof of U.S. citizenship.

Entry into the United States: When traveling by air from Canada, U.S. citizens are required by U.S. law to present a U.S. passport book. A few exceptions to this rule and a full list of documents that can be used at land and sea borders are provided on the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) website.

Travel with Minors: If you plan to travel to Canada with a minor who is not your own child or for whom you do not have full legal custody, CBSA may require you to present a notarized affidavit of consent from the minor’s parents. Please refer to the CBSA websitefor more details.

Travel for Private Boaters and Recreational Vessels: Canadian law requires all foreign private boaters, including recreational vessels, to present themselves upon their arrival in Canada to the CBSA. See the CBSA website for information regarding reporting requirements upon entry to Canada by boat. For procedures to report arrivals in the United States, please refer to the Small Vessel Reporting System and Pleasure Boat Reporting Requirements.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Canada.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international parental child abduction, and customs information on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Crime: Although Canada generally has a lower crime rate than the United States, violent crimes do occur throughout the country, especially in urban areas. Visitors to large cities should be aware that parked cars are regularly targeted for opportunistic smash-and-grab thefts, and they are cautioned to avoid leaving any possessions unattended in a vehicle, even in the trunk. Due to the high incidence of such crimes, motorists in Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver and some other jurisdictions can be fined for leaving their car doors unlocked or for leaving valuables in view. Visitors should exercise precausion to safeguard their property.

While Canadian gun control laws are much stricter than those in the United States, such laws have not prevented gun-related violence in certain areas.

Be aware of your surroundings. As in the United States, travelers in popular tourist areas may be targeted by pickpockets and other petty criminals.

In many countries around the world, counterfeit and pirated goods are widely available. Do not buy counterfeit and pirated goods, even if they are widely available. Not only are the bootlegs illegal in the United States, if you purchase them you may also be breaking local law.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: If you or someone you know becomes the victim of a crime abroad, you should contact the local police and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

As in the United States, emergency assistance can be reached by dialing 911.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Controlled Substances: Canadian law prohibits the importation or trafficking of controlled substances and narcotics, including those which may be legal to possess under the law of certain states. Smugglers risk substantial fines, a permanent bar from Canada, and imprisonment.

Importation of Firearms: Firearms are more strictly controlled in Canada than in the United States. Violation of firearms restrictions may result in prosecution and imprisonment.

Visitors bringing any firearms or ammunition into Canada, or planning to borrow and use firearms while in Canada, must declare the firearms in writing using a Non-Resident Firearm Declaration form. Visitors planning to borrow a firearm in Canada must obtain a Temporary Firearms Borrowing License in advance. These forms must be presented in triplicate and signed in front of a CBSA officer at the border (it is not possible to make photocopies at the border). Full details and downloadable forms are available at the Canadian Firearms Centre website, under the heading "Visitors / Non Residents."

Canadian law requires that officials confiscate any firearms, ammunition, and other weapons from persons crossing the border who deny having the items in their possession. Confiscated firearms, ammunition, and weapons are not returned. Possession of an undeclared firearm may result in arrest and imprisonment. Travelers are strongly advised to inspect all belongings thoroughly prior to travel to Canada to avoid the accidental import of firearms or ammunition.

Pornography: Canada has strict laws concerning child pornography, and in recent years there has been an increase in random checks of electronic media of travelers entering Canada. 

Computers and cell phones are subject to searches without a warrant at the border and illegal content can result in the seizure of the computer as well as detention, arrest, and prosecution of the bearer. 

Alcohol-related driving offenses, such as driving while intoxicated (DWI), driving while ability-impaired, and driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol, are criminal offenses in Canada. Penalties are heavy, and any prior conviction (no matter how old or how minor the infraction) is grounds for exclusion from Canada. U.S. citizens with a DWI record must seek approval for rehabilitation from Canadian authorities before traveling to Canada, which requires several weeks or months to process. Please see the CBSA websitefor details on this program.

Tax Issues: For information on U.S. Federal tax issues, please refer to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) website for international taxpayers.

Refer to this link for reporting requirements regarding Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR).

Refer to this link for information on the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA).

Refer to this link for information about the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Agreement (OVDI). For answers to commonly asked questions about the OVDI, please follow this link to OVDI FAQ.

Please see our Customs Information.

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State's International Religious Freedom Report .

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Canada. Seeour LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Although Canada has effectively implemented laws mandating access to buildings for persons with disabilities, individuals with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different from what you find in the United States.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips .

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.   See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance (our webpage) to cover medical evacuation.

Carry prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription. 

Healthcare in Canada: The level of public health and sanitation in Canada is high. Canada’s medical care is of a high standard but is government-controlled. Quick and easy access to ongoing medical care is difficult for temporary visitors who are not members of each province’s government-run health care plans. Many physicians will not take new patients. Access to a specialist is only by referral and may take months to obtain. Emergency room waits can be very long. Some health care professionals in the province of Québec may speak only French.

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: As in the United States, all emergency assistance in Canada can be reached by dialing 911.

For detailed information on road conditions throughout Canada, as well as links to provincial government websites, please see the Transport Canada website or the Canadian Automobile Association (CAA) website. The CAA honors American Automobile Association membership. Some automobile warranties of vehicles purchased in the United States may be invalid in Canada.

Driving in Canada is similar to driving in many parts of the United States. Distances and speeds, however, are posted in kilometers per hour and some signs, particularly in Québec, may only be in French. U.S. driver’s licenses are valid for visitors in Canada. Proof of auto insurance is required. U.S. auto insurance is accepted as long as an individual is a tourist in Canada. U.S. insurance firms will issue a Canadian insurance card, which should be obtained and carried prior to driving into Canada. For specific information concerning Canadian driving permits, mandatory insurance and entry regulations, please contact the Canadian National Tourist Organization.

Some provinces require drivers to keep their vehicles’ headlights on during the day and some have banned driving while using a hand-held cell phone. Motorcycles cannot share a lane, and safety helmets for motorcycle riders and passengers are mandatory.

Drivers should be aware that running a red light is a serious concern throughout Canada and motorists are advised to pause before proceeding when a light turns green. Turning right at a red light is prohibited on the Island of Montreal, and motorists are subject to substantial fines.

It is illegal to take automobile radar detectors into Québec, Ontario, Manitoba, the Yukon or the Northwest Territories, regardless of whether they are used or not. Police there may confiscate radar detectors, operational or not, and impose substantial fines.

Winter travel can be dangerous due to heavy snowfalls and hazardous icy conditions. Some roads and bridges are subject to periodic winter closures. Snow tires are required in some provinces. The CAA has tips for winter driving in Canada.

Approaches to border crossings into the United States may experience unexpected traffic backups. Drivers should be alert, as lane restrictions at border approaches exist for drivers in NEXUS and FAST expedited inspection programs.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. Also, we suggest that you visit the website of Canada’s national authority responsible for road safety.

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Canada’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Canada’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Canada should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts on the Maritime Administration website. Information may also be posted to the websites of the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Geospace Intelligence Agency (select “broadcast warnings”).

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Ottawa

490 Sussex Drive
Ottawa,
Ontario, K1N 1G8
Canada
Telephone: +(613) 688-5335
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(613) 238-5335
Fax: +(613) 688-3082
OttawaCONS@state.gov

The Ottawa consular district includes the counties of Kingston, Lanark, Leeds, Prescott, Refrew, Russell, and Stormont in Eastern Ontario, and those parts of the Québec regions of Outaouais and Abitibi-Témiscamingue near Ottawa.

CONSULATES

U.S. Consulate General Montreal
1155 rue St. Alexandre
Montréal, Quebec H3B 3Z1
Canada
Telephone: + (514) 398-9695
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(514) 981-5059
Fax: +(514) 398-9748

The Montreal consular district includes Greater Montreal and the regions of Southern Quebec Province (Laurentides, Lanaudiere, Laval, Montreal, Montregie, Estrie, and the southern parts of Centre-du-Quebec), including Joliete, Drummondville, and Sherbrooke.

montreal-ACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Toronto
360 University Ave
Toronto, Ontario M5G 1S4
Canada
Telephone: +(416) 595-1700
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(416) 595-6506
Fax: +(416) 595-5466

The consular district includes the province of Ontario except for the counties of Kingston, Lanark, Leeds, Prescott, Refrew, Russell, and Stormont, which are served by the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa.

TorontoPassport@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Vancouver
1075 West Pender Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6E 2M6
Canada
Telephone: +(604) 685-4311
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(604) 685-4311
Fax: +(604) 685-7175

The consular district includes British Columbia and the Yukon Territory.

vancouverACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Halifax
Purdy's Wharf Tower II
1969 Upper Water Street, Suite 904
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 3R7
Canada
Telephone: +(902) 429-2480
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(902) 429-2480
Fax: +(902) 423-6861

The Halifax consular district includes New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and the French islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon.

Halifax-ACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate Winnipeg
201 Portage Avenue, Suite 860
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 3K6
Canada
Telephone: +(204) 940-1800
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: 403-266-8962 and press "0" for assistance (Consulate General Calgary)
Fax: +(204) 940-1809

The Consulate in Winnipeg provides only emergency services for U.S. citizens. Routine services such as visas, passports and notarials are handled at other U.S. Consulates General, primarily Calgary.

U.S. Consulate General Quebec 
2, rue de la Terrasse Dufferin
(Vieux Quebec, behind Chateau Frontenac)
Quebec, Quebec G1R 4T9
Canada
Telephone: +(418) 692-2095
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(418) 692-2096
Fax: +(418) 692-4640

The consular district includes Quebec City and those regions of Quebec Province to the North and East of the Montreal and Ottawa Districts (indicated above), plus the Territory of Nunavut.

quebecacs@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Calgary 
615 Macleod Trail S.E.,
10th Floor
Calgary, Alberta, T2G 4T8
Canada
Telephone: +(403) 266-8962
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(403) 266-8962 then press '0'
Fax: +(403) 263-2241

The consular district includes Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and the Northwest Territories, excluding Nunavut.

Calgary-ACS@state.gov

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General Information

Canada and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) since July 1, 1988.

For information concerning travel to Canada, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Canada.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

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Hague Abduction Convention


The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizen Services, Office of Children's Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Canada.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State 
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website: travel.state.gov

In Canada, each province and territory has its own Central Authority for the Hague Abduction Convention.  If the whereabouts of the child is known or there is reason to believe the child is located in a specific province or territory, the USCA forwards applications under the Hague Convention to the appropriate Provincial Central Authority.  If the child's whereabouts are not known, the applications are forwarded to the Federal Central Authority in Ottawa, Ontario. 

The following is a list of all Canadian Central Authorities:

OTTAWA

Canadian Federal Central Authority
Ms. Sandra Zed Finless
Justice Legal Services
Foreign Affairs and International Trade
125 Sussex Drive, Tower C, 7th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G2
Tel: (613) 996-1300
Fax: (613) 992-6485

ALBERTA

Edmonton Office
Doug Lewis
Acting Director of Family Law
Alberta Justice
13th Floor, City Centre Place
10025 - 102A Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 2Z2
Tel: (780) 415-1880
Fax: (780) 427-5914

Calgary Office
Jonathan Nicholson
Family Law Calgary
Department of Justice
1660 Standard Life Building
639 - 5th Avenue S.W.
Calgary, Alberta T2P 0M9
Tel: (403) 297-3780
Fax: (403) 297-6381

BRITISH COLUMBIA

Penelope Lipsack
Barrister and Solicitor
Legal Services Branch
P.O. Box 9280, Stn. Prov. Govt.
1001 Douglas St.
Victoria, British Columbia V8W 9J7
Tel: (250) 356-8433
Fax: (250) 356-8992

MANITOBA

Janet Sigurdson
Family Law Branch
Manitoba Justice
1230 - 405 Broadway
Winnipeg, MB R3C 3L6
Tel: (204) 945-2850
Fax: (204) 948-2004

NEW BRUNSWICK

Catherine Berryman
Office of the Attorney General - Family Crown Services
P.O. Box 5001 (14th Floor)
Moncton, New Brunswick E1C 8R3
Tel: (506) 856-3844
Fax: (506) 869-6148

NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR

Brian F. Furey, QC
Family Litigation Unit
Civil Division
Department of Justice
P.O. Box 8700
St. John's, Newfoundland A1B 4J6
Tel: (709) 729-2887
Fax: (709) 729-2129

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES

Dana Webster
Policy and Planning Division
Department of Justice, GNWT
P.O. Box 1320
Yellowknife, Northwest Territories X1A 2L9
Tel: (867) 920-3362
Fax: (867) 873-0659

NOVA SCOTIA

Nicholas Dorrance
Senior Solicitor
Nova Scotia Department of Justice
P.O. Box 7
4th Floor, 5151 Terminal Road
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2L6
Tel: (902) 424-7788
Fax: (902) 424-7158

NUNAVUT

Erin George
Legal and Constitutional Law Division
Department of Justice
P.O. Box 1000, Station 540
Iqaluit, Nunavut X0A 0H0
Tel: (867) 975-6354
Fax: (867) 975-6349

ONTARIO

Shane Foulds
Ministry of the Attorney General
Central Authority for Ontario
1201 Wilson Avenue, Building B, 5th floor
Downsview, Ontario M3M 1J8
Tel: (416) 240-2484
Fax: (416) 240-2411

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Loretta Coady MacAulay
Department of Justice and Public Safety
Family Law Centre
1 Harbourside Access Road
P.O. Box 2000
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 7N8
Tel: (902) 368-4886
Fax: (902) 368-6474

QUEBEC

France Remillard
Direction des Services Professionnels
Ministere de la Justice du Quebec
1200, route de l'Eglise, 2e etage
Quebec G1V 4M1
Tel: (418) 644-7153
Fax: (418) 528-9716

SASKATCHEWAN

Betty Ann Pottruff, Q.C.
Ministry of Justice and Attorney General
Policy, Planning and Evaluation
310-1874 Scarth Street
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 4B3
Tel: (306) 787-8954
Fax: (306) 787-9008

YUKON TERRITORY

Judith M. Hartling
Litigation Group
Legal Services Branch, YTG
P.O. Box 2703
Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2C6
Tel: (867) 667-5856
Fax: (867) 393-6379

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Canada, the left behind parent may submit a Hague application to the Canadian Central Authority, either directly or through the U.S. Central Authority. The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to the appropriate central authority in Canada, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the United States or the Canadian central authorities. Attorney fees, if necessary, are the sole responsibility of the person hiring the attorney. Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Canada.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Canada.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Retaining an Attorney

Procedures vary across Canada; however, in most provinces, the central authority performs an administrative function and does not present the case to a court or represent the applicant parent in legal proceedings. Applicant parents generally must present the case to court directly, usually with the assistance of legal counsel. Therefore, retaining an attorney in Canada for Hague petitions is strongly encouraged. Under the Hague Convention, Canada is not obligated to pay for, or in any way assume any costs resulting from, court proceedings. Some provinces or territories provide legal assistance based on economic need. For information regarding procedures or how to apply for legal assistance in a particular province or territory, contact the U.S. Central Authority or the appropriate provincial or territorial Central Authority office.

The U.S. Embassy in Ottawa, Canada posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms.  Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

Although Canada does not have a standardized mediation process for Hague Convention cases, mediation may be an option in a number of provinces. The relevant Canadian Central Authority can provide information on mediation options to assist parents in pursuing the return of, or access to, their children under the Hague Convention.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Canada is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention or Convention). Intercountry adoption processing in Convention countries is done in accordance with the requirements of the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations;, as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Canada.

Canada is not considered a country of origin in intercountry adoption. The information provided is intended primarily to assist in extremely rare adoption cases from Canada, including adoptions of Canada children by relatives in the United States, as well as adoptions from third countries by U.S. citizens  living in Canada. 

Note: Special transition provisions apply to adoptions initiated before April 1, 2008. Read about Transition Cases.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Canada, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements.  The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee under U.S. law in order to immigrate to the United States on an IH-3 or IH-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to the U.S. requirements, prospective adoptive parents need to meet Canadian requirements.  In Canada, and the provinces and territories are responsible for adoption matters, and prospective adoptive parents should contact the relevant provincial or territorial Central Authority for specific information on eligibility requirements to adopt, including any age, marriage, and income requirements.

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Who Can Be Adopted

Because Canada is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, children from Canada must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. In addition to Canada’s requirements, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee  to be eligible for an immigrant visa that will allow you to bring him or her to the United States.

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How to Adopt

WARNING: Canada is party to the Hague Adoption Convention. Do not adopt or obtain legal custody of a child in Canada before a U.S. consular officer issues an “Article 5 Letter” in the case.  Read on for more information.

Canada’s Adoption Authority

In Canada, various provinces and territories are responsible for setting and administering adoption policies and procedures. The following Canadian government office provides contact information for the provincial or territorial Central Authorities who can provide specific information on adoption in Canada:

Intercountry Adoption Services (IAS), Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Note: If any of the following occurred prior to April 1, 2008 (the date on which the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force with respect to the United States), the Hague Adoption Convention may not apply to your adoption: 1) you filed a Form I-600A identifying Canada as the country where you intended to adopt; 2) you filed a Form I-600; or, 3) the adoption was completed. Under these circumstances, your adopted child’s visa application could continue to be processed in accordance with the immigration regulations for non-Convention adoptions.  For more information, read about Transition Cases

The Process

Because Canada is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adopting from Canada must follow a specific process designed to meet the Convention’s requirements. A brief summary of the Convention adoption process is given below. You must complete these steps in the following order to meet all necessary legal requirements. Adoptions completed out of order may result in the child not being eligible for an immigrant visa to the United States.
1.  Choose a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider
2.  Apply to USCIS to be found eligible to adopt
3.  Be matched with a child by authorities in Canada
4.  Apply to USCIS for the child to be found eligible for immigration to the United States and receive U.S. agreement to proceed with the adoption
5.  Adopt (or Obtain Legal Custody) of child in Canada
6.  Obtain a U.S. immigrant visa for your child and bring your child home

1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

The recommended first step in adopting a child from Canada is to select an adoption service provider in the United States that has been accredited or approved to provide services to U.S. citizens in Convention cases. Only accredited or approved adoption services providers may act as the primary provider in your case. The primary adoption service provider is responsible for ensuring that all adoption services in the case are done in accordance with the Hague Adoption Convention and U.S. laws and regulations. Learn more about Agency Accreditation.

2.  Apply to USCIS to be Found Eligible to Adopt

After you choose an accredited or approved adoption service provider, you must apply to be found eligible to adopt by the responsible U.S. government agency, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), by submitting Form I-800A.  Read more about Eligibility Requirements.

Once USCIS determines that you are “eligible” and “suited” to adopt by approving the Form I-800A, your adoption service provider will provide your approval notice, home study, and any other required information to the Canadian province or territory you wish to adopt from as part of your adoption dossier. The provincial or territorial Central Authority in Canada will review your application to determine whether you are also eligible to adopt under Canada’s law.

3.  Be Matched with a Child in Canada

If both the United States and Canada determine that you are eligible to adopt, and the provincial or territorial Central Authority in Canada for Convention adoptions has determined that a child is available for adoption and that intercountry adoption is in that child’s best interests, that Central Authority may provide you with a referral for a child. The referral is a proposed match between you and a specific child based on a review of your dossier and the needs of a specific child in Canada. The provincial or territorial Central Authority in Canada will provide a background study and other information, if available, about the child to help you decide whether to accept the referral or not. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of and provide a permanent home for a particular child. If you accept the referral, your adoption service provider will communicate that to the adoption authority in Canada. Learn more about this critical decision.

4.  Apply to USCIS for the Child to be Found Eligible for Immigration to the United States and Receive U.S. Agreement to Proceed with the Adoption

After you accept a match with a child, you will apply to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for provisional approval for the child to immigrate to the United States (Form I-800). USCIS will make a provisional determination as to whether the child meets the definition of a Convention Adoptee and will be eligible to enter the United States and reside permanently as an immigrant.

After provisional approval of Form I-800, your adoption service provider or you will submit a visa application to the Consular Section of the U.S. Consulate General in Montreal that is responsible for issuing immigrant visas to children from Canada. A consular officer will review the Form I-800 and the visa application for possible visa ineligibilities and advise you of options for the waiver of any noted ineligibilities.

WARNING: The consular officer will send a letter (referred to as an “Article 5 Letter”) to the provincial or territorial Central Authority in Canada in any intercountry adoption involving U.S. citizen parents and a child from Canada where all Convention requirements are met and the consular officer determines that the child appears eligible to immigrate to the United States.  This letter will inform the provincial or territorial Central Authority in Canada that the parents are eligible and suited to adopt, that all indications are that the child may enter and reside permanently in the United States, and that the U.S. Central Authority agrees that the adoption may proceed.

Do not attempt to adopt or obtain custody of a child in Canada before a U.S. consular officer issues the Article 5 Letter in any adoption case.

Remember: The consular officer will make a final decision about a child’s eligibility for an immigrant visa later in the adoption process.

5.  Adopt (or Obtain Legal Custody) of Child in Canada

Remember: Before you adopt (or obtain legal custody of) a child in Canada, you must have completed the above four steps.  Only after completing these steps, can you proceed to finalize the adoption or grant of custody for the purposes of adoption in Canada.

The process for finalizing the adoption (or obtaining legal custody) in Canada varies by province. Prospective parents should contact the relevant provincial adoption authority for specific information. In some provinces you may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic. If so, the Department of State, Authentications office may be able to assist. Read more about Authenticating U.S. Documents.

6.  Obtain an Immigrant Visa for your Child and Bring Your Child Home

Now that your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child for the purpose of adopting the child in the United States), there are a few more steps to take before you can head home. Specifically, you need to apply for three documents before your child can travel to the United States:

Birth Certificate
If you have finalized the adoption in Canada, you will firstneed to apply for a birth certificate for your child so that you can later apply for a passport.

If you have been granted custody for the purpose of adopting the child in the United States, the birth certificate you obtain will, in most cases, not yet include your name.

How to obtain a new birth certificate for the child in Canada.

Canada Passport
Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Canada.

How to obtain a Passport for the child in Canada.

U.S. Immigrant Visa

After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to finalize your application for a U.S. visa for your child from the U.S. Consulate General in Montreal.  After the adoption (or custody for purpose of adoption) is granted, visit the U.S. Consulate General in Montreal for final review of the case, issuance of a U.S. Hague Adoption Certificate or Hague Custody Certificate, final approval of Form I-800, and to obtain your child’s immigrant visa. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the consular officer must be provided the “Panel Physician’s” medical report on the child if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage. Read more about the Medical Examination.

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States:  A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States:  An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to automatically become a citizen after entry into the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible. Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting. Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

APPLYING FOR YOUR U.S. PASSPORT

U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

OBTAINING A VISA TO TRAVEL TO CANADA

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.  To find information about obtaining a visa for Canada, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

STAYING SAFE ON YOUR TRIP

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

STAYING IN TOUCH ON YOUR TRIP

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Canada, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

Post-Adoption/Post-Placement Reporting Requirements
Requirements, if any, vary by province.  Please contact the relevant provincial adoption or territorial authority for specific information on post-adoption/post-placement requirements.

Post-Adoption Resources
Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin.  Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Consulate General in Montreal
1155 rue Saint-Alexandre
Montreal, Quebec H3B 3Z1
Canada
Tel: (514) 398-9695
Fax: (514) 398-0973

In Canada, the various provinces and territories are responsible for setting and administering adoption policies and procedures. The following Canadian government office provide contact information for the provincial and territorial central adoption authorities, who can provide specific information on adoption in Canada:

Intercountry Adoption Services (IAS)
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
365 Laurier Ave. West, JETS B1435
OTTAWA, Ontario
Canada
K1A 1L1
Tel.: (613) 954-0880
Fax: (613) 946-1683 


Embassy of Canada
501 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20001
Tel: 202-682-1740
Fax: 202-682-7701
Internet:  www.canadainternational.gc.ca/washington  

Canada also has consulates in: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, New York, Palo Alto, San Diego, San Francisco, and Seattle.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI, SA-17A, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Email:  AdoptionUSCA@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-800A or I-800 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email: NBC.Hague@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
 
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 $40.00 Multiple 60 Months
E-2 2 $40.00 Multiple 60 Months
E-2C 12   Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-6 10 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO-7 None Multiple 24 Months
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 None Multiple 36 Months
TN 5 None Multiple 36 Months
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Note: Aliens who have "landed immigrant" (permanent residency) or "refugee" (asylee) status in Canada may be accorded Canadian reciprocity per 97 STATE 214113, but only if they apply in Canada and are not undergoing administrative processing. Such applicants who apply outside of Canada must be accorded the reciprocity of their country of nationality. Such applicants who require administrative processing must be accorded the reciprocity of their country of nationality per 06 STATE 80485.

 

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth

Births are registered in the Canadian provinces or territory in which they took place. Though each province or territory issues its own certificates for these events, there are a few basic formats for them across Canada:

  • The "small" or "short form" certificate is a computer-printed, limited extract of information from provincial records. It is a wallet-sized card, 9.5 x 6.4 cm or 2.5 x 3.75in (Specimen from British Columbia). Short-form or small certificates are not acceptable for visa purposes because they do not contain enough identification information, such as parents' names.
  • The "large" or "full-size" certificate is a computer-printed extract of information from provincial records. It is printed on currency-style paper stock, 21.6 x 17.8 cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border (Specimen from British Columbia).
  • A "certified copy of a record" is an exact or near-exact copy of the actual paper record in the provincial archives. It is printed on safety paper, usually 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14in., and bears the province or territory's raised seal. This type of certificate, being a complete record rather than an extract, contains the most information about the event.
  • A "commemorative" certificate is a decorative document intended for display (Specimen from Manitoba). Commemorative certificates are not considered legal documents in Canada and are not acceptable for visa purposes.

Note: For cases in which the subject of a birth record was adopted, see "Adoption Records" below.

Not all provinces and territories issue all of the formats noted above. Province-and-territory specific information on obtaining acceptable birth, marriage, death, and name change certificates is as follows:

  • Alberta: Applicants should obtain "large sized" certificates or certified photocopies of a registration from Alberta Vital Statistics through a private Alberta Registry Agent. Further information, including names and locations of Registry Agents, is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Alberta, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal documents. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from Alberta Vital Statistics.
  • British Columbia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copes of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency, which has offices in Vancouver (605 Robson Street, Room 250, tel: 604-660-2937) and Victoria (818 Fort Street, tel: 250-952-2681). Large certificates are also available through Government Agents located across the province. Further information, including locations of other Vital Statistics offices, names and located of Government Agents, and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Manitoba: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies from the Vital Statistics Agency in Winnipeg (254 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, 204-945-3701). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • New Brunswick: Applicants should obtain "long-form certified copies" of records from the Vital Statistics Office in Fredericton (435 King Street, Suite 203, tel: 506-453-2385). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Applicants should obtain "long-form certificates" from the Vital Statistics Division in St. John's (5 Mews Place, tel: 709-729-3308) or at Government Service Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Northwest Territories: Applicants should obtain "framing" or "restricted photocopy" certificates from the Registrar General of Vital Statistics in Inuvik Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel: 867-777-7420). Applicants may also write to: Registrar General of Vital Statistics, Government of the NWT, Bag 9 (107 MacKenzie Road/IDC Building, second floor), Inuvik, NT, X0A 0T0 (fax: 867-777-3197).
  • Nova Scotia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from Vital Statistics Office in Halifax (Joseph Howe Building, 1690 Hollis Street., ground floor, tel:902-424-4381). Further information, including instructions for ordering online or by mail, is available online.
  • Nunavut: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Division, which is based out of the Kivalliq Regional Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel:867-645-2171). Applicants may also write to: Social Services, Bag 3 RSO Building, Rankin Inlet, NU, X0C 0G0 (fax: 867-645-2580).
    Note: Nunavut was part of the Northwest Territories until April 1, 1999. Before that, all births, marriages, deaths, and name changes that occurred in the present Nunavut region would have been registered with the Northwest Territories Registrar General of Vital Statistics.
  • Ontario: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Office of the Registrar General in Toronto (Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street, second floor, tel: 416-325-8305) or at Ontario Land Registry Offices and Government Information Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Ontario, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal document. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from the Office of the Registrar General.
  • Prince Edward Island: Applicants should obtain "framing size" certificates from the Office of Vital Statistics in Montague (126 Douses Road, tel:902-838-0080) or Charlottetown (16 Garfield Street, tel:902-368-6185). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Quebec: Applicants should obtain "certified copies of an act" from the Direction de l' Etat Civil in Montreal (2050, rue de Bleury, sixth floor, tel:514-864-3900) or the Directeur de l'Etat Civil in Quebec City (2535, boulevard Laurier, Ground Floor, Sainte-Foy, tel:418-643-3900; fax:418-646-3255). Further information, including other locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
  • Saskatchewan: Applicants should obtain "frame" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Office in Regina (1942 Hamilton Street, tel:306-787-3251).
  • Yukon Territory: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency in Whitehorse (204 Lambert Street, fourth floor, tel: 867-667-5207) or a Yukon Territorial Agent. Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.

Death/Burial

Deaths are registered in the Canadian provinces or territory in which they took place. Though each province or territory issues its own certificates for these events, there are a few basic formats for them across Canada:

  • The "small" or "short form" certificate is a computer-printed, limited extract of information from provincial records. It is a wallet-sized card, 9.5 x 6.4 cm or 2.5 x 3.75in (Specimen from British Columbia). Short-form or small certificates are not acceptable for visa purposes because they do not contain enough identification information, such as parents' names.
  • The "large" or "full-size" certificate is a computer-printed extract of information from provincial records. It is printed on currency-style paper stock, 21.6 x 17.8 cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border (Specimen from British Columbia).
  • A "certified copy of a record" is an exact or near-exact copy of the actual paper record in the provincial archives. It is printed on safety paper, usually 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14in., and bears the province or territory's raised seal. This type of certificate, being a complete record rather than an extract, contains the most information about the event.
  • A "commemorative" certificate is a decorative document intended for display (Specimen from Manitoba). Commemorative certificates are not considered legal documents in Canada and are not acceptable for visa purposes.

Note: For cases in which the subject of a birth record was adopted, see "Adoption Records" below.

Not all provinces and territories issue all of the formats noted above. Province-and-territory specific information on obtaining acceptable birth, marriage, death, and name change certificates is as follows:

  • Alberta: Applicants should obtain "large sized" certificates or certified photocopies of a registration from Alberta Vital Statistics through a private Alberta Registry Agent. Further information, including names and locations of Registry Agents, is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Alberta, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal documents. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from Alberta Vital Statistics.
  • British Columbia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copes of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency, which has offices in Vancouver (605 Robson Street, Room 250, tel: 604-660-2937) and Victoria (818 Fort Street, tel: 250-952-2681). Large certificates are also available through Government Agents located across the province. Further information, including locations of other Vital Statistics offices, names and located of Government Agents, and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Manitoba: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies from the Vital Statistics Agency in Winnipeg (254 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, 204-945-3701). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • New Brunswick: Applicants should obtain "long-form certified copies" of records from the Vital Statistics Office in Fredericton (435 King Street, Suite 203, tel: 506-453-2385). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Applicants should obtain "long-form certificates" from the Vital Statistics Division in St. John's (5 Mews Place, tel: 709-729-3308) or at Government Service Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Northwest Territories: Applicants should obtain "framing" or "restricted photocopy" certificates from the Registrar General of Vital Statistics in Inuvik Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel: 867-777-7420). Applicants may also write to: Registrar General of Vital Statistics, Government of the NWT, Bag 9 (107 MacKenzie Road/IDC Building, second floor), Inuvik, NT, X0A 0T0 (fax: 867-777-3197).
  • Nova Scotia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from Vital Statistics Office in Halifax (Joseph Howe Building, 1690 Hollis Street., ground floor, tel:902-424-4381). Further information, including instructions for ordering online or by mail, is available online.
  • Nunavut: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Division, which is based out of the Kivalliq Regional Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel:867-645-2171). Applicants may also write to: Social Services, Bag 3 RSO Building, Rankin Inlet, NU, X0C 0G0 (fax: 867-645-2580).
    Note: Nunavut was part of the Northwest Territories until April 1, 1999. Before that, all births, marriages, deaths, and name changes that occurred in the present Nunavut region would have been registered with the Northwest Territories Registrar General of Vital Statistics.
  • Ontario: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Office of the Registrar General in Toronto (Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street, second floor, tel: 416-325-8305) or at Ontario Land Registry Offices and Government Information Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Ontario, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal document. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from the Office of the Registrar General.
  • Prince Edward Island: Applicants should obtain "framing size" certificates from the Office of Vital Statistics in Montague (126 Douses Road, tel:902-838-0080) or Charlottetown (16 Garfield Street, tel:902-368-6185). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Quebec: Applicants should obtain "certified copies of an act" from the Direction de l' Etat Civil in Montreal (2050, rue de Bleury, sixth floor, tel:514-864-3900) or the Directeur de l'Etat Civil in Quebec City (2535, boulevard Laurier, Ground Floor, Sainte-Foy, tel:418-643-3900; fax:418-646-3255). Further information, including other locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
  • Saskatchewan: Applicants should obtain "frame" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Office in Regina (1942 Hamilton Street, tel:306-787-3251). 
  • Yukon Territory: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency in Whitehorse (204 Lambert Street, fourth floor, tel: 867-667-5207) or a Yukon Territorial Agent. Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage

Marriages are registered in the Canadian provinces or territory in which they took place. Though each province or territory issues its own certificates for these events, there are a few basic formats for them across Canada:

  • The "small" or "short form" certificate is a computer-printed, limited extract of information from provincial records. It is a wallet-sized card, 9.5 x 6.4 cm or 2.5 x 3.75in (Specimen from British Columbia). Short-form or small certificates are not acceptable for visa purposes because they do not contain enough identification information, such as parents' names.
  • The "large" or "full-size" certificate is a computer-printed extract of information from provincial records. It is printed on currency-style paper stock, 21.6 x 17.8 cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border (Specimen from British Columbia).
  • A "certified copy of a record" is an exact or near-exact copy of the actual paper record in the provincial archives. It is printed on safety paper, usually 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14in., and bears the province or territory's raised seal. This type of certificate, being a complete record rather than an extract, contains the most information about the event.
  • A "commemorative" certificate is a decorative document intended for display (Specimen from Manitoba). Commemorative certificates are not considered legal documents in Canada and are not acceptable for visa purposes.

Note: For cases in which the subject of a birth record was adopted, see "Adoption Records" below.

Not all provinces and territories issue all of the formats noted above. Province-and-territory specific information on obtaining acceptable birth, marriage, death, and name change certificates is as follows:

  • Alberta: Applicants should obtain "large sized" certificates or certified photocopies of a registration from Alberta Vital Statistics through a private Alberta Registry Agent. Further information, including names and locations of Registry Agents, is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Alberta, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal documents. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from Alberta Vital Statistics.
  • British Columbia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copes of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency, which has offices in Vancouver (605 Robson Street, Room 250, tel: 604-660-2937) and Victoria (818 Fort Street, tel: 250-952-2681). Large certificates are also available through Government Agents located across the province. Further information, including locations of other Vital Statistics offices, names and located of Government Agents, and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Manitoba: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies from the Vital Statistics Agency in Winnipeg (254 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, 204-945-3701). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • New Brunswick: Applicants should obtain "long-form certified copies" of records from the Vital Statistics Office in Fredericton (435 King Street, Suite 203, tel: 506-453-2385). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Applicants should obtain "long-form certificates" from the Vital Statistics Division in St. John's (5 Mews Place, tel: 709-729-3308) or at Government Service Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Northwest Territories: Applicants should obtain "framing" or "restricted photocopy" certificates from the Registrar General of Vital Statistics in Inuvik Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel: 867-777-7420). Applicants may also write to: Registrar General of Vital Statistics, Government of the NWT, Bag 9 (107 MacKenzie Road/IDC Building, second floor), Inuvik, NT, X0A 0T0 (fax: 867-777-3197).
  • Nova Scotia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from Vital Statistics Office in Halifax (Joseph Howe Building, 1690 Hollis Street., ground floor, tel:902-424-4381). Further information, including instructions for ordering online or by mail, is available online.
  • Nunavut: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Division, which is based out of the Kivalliq Regional Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel:867-645-2171). Applicants may also write to: Social Services, Bag 3 RSO Building, Rankin Inlet, NU, X0C 0G0 (fax: 867-645-2580).
    Note: Nunavut was part of the Northwest Territories until April 1, 1999. Before that, all births, marriages, deaths, and name changes that occurred in the present Nunavut region would have been registered with the Northwest Territories Registrar General of Vital Statistics.
  • Ontario: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Office of the Registrar General in Toronto (Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street, second floor, tel: 416-325-8305) or at Ontario Land Registry Offices and Government Information Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Ontario, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal document. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from the Office of the Registrar General.
  • Prince Edward Island: Applicants should obtain "framing size" certificates from the Office of Vital Statistics in Montague (126 Douses Road, tel:902-838-0080) or Charlottetown (16 Garfield Street, tel:902-368-6185). Further information, including mail-order instructions, isavailable online.
  • Quebec: Applicants should obtain "certified copies of an act" from the Direction de l' Etat Civil in Montreal (2050, rue de Bleury, sixth floor, tel:514-864-3900) or the Directeur de l'Etat Civil in Quebec City (2535, boulevard Laurier, Ground Floor, Sainte-Foy, tel:418-643-3900; fax:418-646-3255). Further information, including other locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
  • Saskatchewan: Applicants should obtain "frame" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Office in Regina (1942 Hamilton Street, tel:306-787-3251).
  • Yukon Territory: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency in Whitehorse (204 Lambert Street, fourth floor, tel: 867-667-5207) or a Yukon Territorial Agent. Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.

Divorce

Canadian divorce records are maintained by provincial and territorial courts. Primary evidence of divorce is the original or court-certified copy of the final divorce decree from the court where the divorce took place. Some provinces also issue a "Certificate of Divorce" similar to a large or full-size marriage certificate (a computer-printed extract of information on currency style stock paper, 21.6 x 17.8cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border). The Certificate of Divorce is also acceptable evidence of divorce, though it has no information about child custody.

To obtain a court-certified copy of a divorce decree or a Certificate of Divorce, applicants should contact the clerk or registrar of the court where the divorce was granted. Applicants unsure of the court in which their divorce proceedings took place may write to the Central Registry of Divorce Proceedings, P.O. Box 2730, Station D, Ottawa, ON, K1P 5W7. The Central Registry cannot issue a divorce certificate, but will be able to confirm at which registry the divorce was granted.

To prevent international child custody disputes, in cases where a divorced parent wishes to have his minor child immigrate to the United States, U.S. diplomatic offices in Canada will request original or court-certified copies of court orders regarding child custody arrangements. Such documents should specify that the parent has "sole custody" of the child. If a divorced parent does not have court-granted sole custody, U.S. diplomatic offices in Canada will request written, notarized consent to the child's immigration from the other parent.

Adoption Certificates

For adoptions in Canada, provincial and territorial vital statistics authorities usually alter original records to obscure the names of birth parents. Therefore, birth certificates issued to applicants who were adopted likely will not accurately reflect the circumstances of their birth.

Access to pre-adoption birth records and adoption orders is restricted by provincial law, and the availability of such records varies by province or territory. In general, provinces and territories will release adoption records to adopted children if the birth parents do not object. However, there may be lengthy delays as the province or territory attempts to contact the birth parents or gives them an opportunity to object to the release of information.

Due to the difficulty in obtaining adoption records, U.S. diplomatic posts in Canada usually do not require adopted applicants to obtain their adoption records for visa purposes unless the adoption record is essential to demonstrating the relationship through which a benefit is claimed. However, U.S. posts reserve the right to request them if the circumstances of the case require it. Applicants who need to obtain pre-adoption birth records and adoption orders should use the contacts listed below.

  • Alberta: Alberta Post Adoption Registry, 11th Floor, Sterling Place, 9940-106 Street, Edmonton, AB, T5K 2N2, Tel: 780-427-6387.
  • British Columbia: Vital Statistics Agency, Confidential Services, P.O. Box 9657, STN PROV GOVT, Victoria, BC, V8W 9P3, tel: 250-952-2236.
  • Manitoba: Manitoba Post-Adoption Registry, 201-114 Garry Street, Winnipeg, MB, R3C 4V5, tel: 204-945-6964.
  • New Brunswick: Post Adoption Disclosure Services, Department of Family and Community Services, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1, tel: (506) 453-2949.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Confidential Services, Vital Statistics Division, Department Of Government Services, P.O. Box 8700, St. John's, NL, A1B 4J6, tel: 709-729-3308.
  • Northwest Territories: Registrar -- Adoptions, Department of Health and Social Services, GNWT, Box 1320 - CST 6, Yellowknife, NT, X1A 2L9, tel: 867-873-7943.
  • Nova Scotia: Adoption Disclosure Service Program, Department of Community Services, P.O. Box 696 Halifax, NS, B3J 2T7, tel: 902-424-2755.
  • Nunavut: Department of Health and Social Services, Director of Adoptions, P.O. Box 1000, Station 1000, Iquluit, NU, X0A 0H0, tel: 867-975-5781.
  • Ontario: Adoption Disclosure Unit, Ministry of Community and Social Services, 2 Bloor Street West, 24th Floor, Toronto, ON, M7A 1E9, tel: 416-327-4730.
  • Prince Edward Island: Department of Health and Social Services, Post-Adoption Service, 161 St. Peters Road, P.O. Box 2000, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 5P7, tel: 902-368-6511.
  • Quebec: Youth court (Chambre de la jeunesse) in the judicial district where the adoption took place. Additional information is available through the Quebec Ministry of Justice, tel: 418-643-5140.
  • Saskatchewan: Adoption Registry and Post Adoption Services, Saskatchewan Community Resources and Employment, 11th Floor, 1920 Broad Street, Regina, SK, S4P 3V6, tel: 306-787-3654.
  • Yukon Territory: Children's Services, Health and Social Services, Box 2703, Whitehorse, YU, Y1A 2C6, tel: 867-667-8689.

Note on Aboriginal Custom Adoption: In some provinces and territories, aboriginal children may be adopted by a process called "Aboriginal Custom Adoption," a privately-arranged adoption between two aboriginal families. Such adoptions have a similar legal effect in Canada to traditional adoptions. However, it is unclear whether such adoptions qualify for U.S. visa purposes under Section 101(b)(1)(E) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

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Identity Card

The current Certificate of Canadian Citizenship is a laminated, wallet-sized card with a color photograph of the bearer. It has minimal security features. It is evidence of Canadian citizenship and may be used to re-enter Canada. The Commemorative Certificate of Canadian Citizenship is a 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14 inch certificate, printed in both French and English, with a print of the Canadian Parliament on the right-hand side. It is an insecure document and is not evidence of Canadian citizenship.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

  • Inside Canada: Applicants who are physically present in Canada should contact their local police service or Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) office regarding criminal record check procedures. Applicants may obtain a certificate of no conviction issued by any Canadian police service so long as it notes that Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) or the national criminal records repository was searched using the applicant's name and date of birth. Applicants should ensure that the search includes all names that they have previously used, including maiden names, prior married names, or names used before Canadian naturalization. (Note: Because records checks based on name and date of birth only are sometimes less thorough than those based on fingerprints, U.S. diplomatic offices reserve the right to request that certain applicants obtain fingerprint-based searches from the RCMP.)

    Applicants who have been convicted of a crime in Canada must contact their local RCMP office to obtain a "Certified Criminal Record Check," which lists an applicant's criminal history, indicating the section of the Canadian Criminal Code under which the applicant was charged, the disposition of the case, and the penalty imposed, if any. Obtaining a Certified Criminal Records Check requires submission of a fingerprint chart; the RCMP could take between two and twelve months to process a request for a Certified Criminal Record Check. (Note: If a namecheck by a police agency reveals a conviction record, that agency may be unwilling to issue a certificate and may refer the applicant to the RCMP for a Certified Criminal Record Check.)

    Canadian pardons have no effect under U.S. law. Applicants who have been convicted of a crime in Canada that was subsequently pardoned must contact an RCMP office to obtain both a Certified Criminal Record Check and copies of their pardoned criminal record. Additional information is available online.
  • Outside Canada: Applicants who are not physically present in Canada must obtain a Certified Criminal Record Check. There is a processing fee of $25 CAN or US equivalent per criminal record and/or vulnerable sector check. Payment must be made by certified cheque or money order to the Receiver General for Canada.


Special note for applicants who reside or resided in Newfoundland and Labrador: The RCMP did not operate in Newfoundland before April 1, 1949. Therefore, applicants who were age sixteen or over in 1949 and who resided anywhere in Newfoundland and Labrador for six months or longer after reaching the age of sixteen must obtain a Good Conduct Certificate issued by the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary (RNC). Applicants should inquire at RNC offices in St. John's, Corner Brook, Churchill Falls, or Labrador City, or may contact the RNC at: Headquarters, Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, 1 Fort Townshend, St. John's, NL, A1C 2G2, tel: 709-729-8000.

Court Records

Applicants who have been convicted of a crime in Canada should obtain a certified copy of court records from the clerk or registrar of the court in which they were convicted. Court records should state the section of the Canadian Criminal Code under which the applicant was convicted, the disposition of the case, and the penalty imposed, if any. Court records must also indicate whether the case was handled as a summary or indictable offense.

Canadian pardons have no effect under U.S. law. Applicants who have been convicted of a crime in Canada that was subsequently pardoned must contact an RCMP office to obtain both a Certified Criminal Record Check and copies of their pardoned criminal record. See "Police Records" above.

In cases of controlled substance violations (such as drug possession, sales, or trafficking), court records should indicate the type and quantity of substance involved. If court records do not include this information, applicants should seek to obtain it from the records of the police service that investigated the case or the Crown prosecutor's office that prosecuted it.

Prison Records

Unavailable.

Military Records

Applicants who are currently members of the Canadian Forces or who were released less than five years ago should send their requests to Director, Access to Information and Privacy (DAIP), National Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0K2.

Library and Archives Canada maintains service records for ex-Canadian Forces members released more than five years. Applicants should write with their surname, full given name(s), date of birth, and service number or social insurance number to the Personnel Records Unit, Library and Archives Canada, 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0N3. Additional information is available online.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

The current Canadian passport is a photodigitized document similar to the current U.S. passport and is evidence of Canadian citizenship. Unlike the U.S. passport, the current Canadian passport is valid only five years.

Canadian landed immigrants (also known as permanent residents) may present their national passports in conjunction with their Canadian Permanent Residence Cards. Consult the appropriate country's Reciprocity and Country Documents page for information about its passport. The Canadian permanent resident card is a durable, wallet-sized plastic card with a black-and-white photodigitized image of the bearer. It replaced the computer-generated IMM-1000 "Record of Landing" form in June 2002. Since January 1, 2004, Canadian permanent residents may no longer use the IMM-1000 to re-enter Canada by common carrier.

The current Certificate of Identity/Certificat d' identite is a photodigitized passport-style document with a light grey cover (though older, light brown, non-photodigitized versions remain in circulation). It is issued to persons who cannot obtain passports from their countries of nationality.

The current Travel Document/Titre de voyage is a photodigitized passport-style document with a blue cover (though older, non-photodigitized versions remain in circulation). It is issued to refugees in Canada (asylees in U.S terminology) who cannot obtain passports from their countries of nationality. It is analogous to a U.S. refugee travel document.

Other Records

Name Change Records

Change of name records are maintained by provinces and territories. Applicants who have legally changed their name other than by getting married (for example, after Canadian naturalization or after a divorce) should obtain a "Change of Name" certificate from the province or territory in which the name was changed. See "Birth, Marriage, and Death Records," above, for information on formats and obtaining such certificates.

Visa Issuing Posts

Ottawa (Embassy) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Address:
490 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 1G8

Tel: (613) 238-5335

Calgary (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Halifax (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Montreal (Consulate General) -- Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Visas

Quebec (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Toronto (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Vancouver (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

 

Visa Services

As noted above, Immigrant Visas are only available at the Montreal Consulate General. Nonimmigrant Visas are available in Montreal as well as the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa and the Consulates General in Calgary, Halifax, Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, and Vancouver.

Area Post
Abitibi Quebec
Alberta (Province) Calgary
Angoma (District) Toronto
Argenteuil Montreal
Arthabaska Quebec
Bagot Montreal
Beauc Quebec
Beauharnois Montreal
Bellehasse Quebec
Berther Montreal
Bonaventure Quebec
Brant Toronto
British Columbia (Province) Vancouver
Brome Montreal
Bruce Toronto
Carleton Ottawa
Chambly Montreal
Champlain Quebec
Charlevoix Quebec
Chateauguay Montreal
Chicoutimi Quebec
Cochrane (District) Toronto
Compton Montreal
Deux-Montagnes Montreal
Dorchester Quebec
Drummond Quebec
Dufferin Toronto
Durham Toronto
Dundas Ottawa
Elgin Toronto
Essex Toronto
Franklin (District) (Northwest Territories) Montreal
Frontenac, Ontario Ottawa
Frontenac, Quebec Quebec
Gaspe (East and West) Quebec
Gatineau Ottawa
Glengarry Ottawa
Grenville Ottawa
Grey Toronto
Haldimand Toronto
Haliburton Toronto
Halton Toronto
Hastings Toronto
Hochelaga Montreal
Hull Ottawa
Huntingdon Montreal
Huron Toronto
Iberville Montreal
Jacques Cartier Montreal
Joliette Montreal
Kamouraska Quebec
Keewatin (District) (Northwest Territories) Calgary
Kenora (District) Toronto
Kent Toronto
Labelle Ottawa
Lambton Toronto
Lanark Ottawa
Laprairie Montreal
L'Assomption Montreal
Laval Montreal
Leeds Ottawa
Lennox and Addington Toronto
Levis Quebec
Lincoln Toronto
L'Islet Quebec
Lotbiniere Quebec
Mackenzie (District)
Manitoba (Province) Calgary
Manitoulin (District) Toronto
Maskinonge Montreal
Matane Quebec
Megantic Quebec
Middlesex Toronto
Missisquoi Montreal
Montcalm Montreal
Montmagny Quebec
Montmorency Quebec
Muskoka (District) Toronto
Napierville Montreal
New Brunswick (Province) Halifax
Newfoundland (Province) Halifax
Nicolet Quebec
Nipissing (District) Toronto
Norfolk Toronto
Northumberland Toronto
Northwest Territories [Refer to Listed District]
Nova Scotia (Province) Halifax
Ontario (Province) [Refer to Listed District]
Ontario (County) Toronto
Oxford Toronto
Papineau Ottawa
Parry Sound Toronto
Peel Toronto
Perth Toronto
Peterborough Toronto
Pontiac Ottawa
Portneuf Quebec
Prescott Ottawa
Prince Edward (County) Toronto
Prince Edward Island (Province) Halifax
Quebec (Province) [Refer to Listed County or District]
Quebec (County) Quebec
Rainy River (District) Toronto
Renfrew Ottawa
Richelieu Montreal
Richmond Montreal
Rimouski Quebec
Rouville Montreal
Russell Ottawa
Saguenay Quebec
Saskatchewan (Province) Calgary
Saint-Hyacinthe Montreal
Saint-Jean Montreal
Saint Maurice Quebec
Saint Pierre et Miquelon (French Overseas Territory) Halifax
Shefford Montreal
Sherbrooke Montreal
Simcoe Toronto
Soulanges Montreal
Stanstead Montreal
Stormont Ottawa
Sudbury (District) Toronto
Temiscamingue Ottawa
Temiscouata Quebec
Terrebonne Montreal
Thunder Bay (District) Toronto
Timiskaming (District) Toronto
Vaudreuil Montreal
Vercheres Montreal
Victoria Toronto
Waterloo Toronto
Welland Toronto
Wellington Toronto
Wentworth Toronto
Western Ontario Province Toronto
Windsor Toronto
Winnipeg (See Western Ontario) Calgary
Wolfe Quebec
Yamaska Montreal
York Toronto
Yukon Territory Vancouver

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

If you arrest or detain a Canadian national outside of business hours, please call the 24-hour Emergency Watch and Response Centre toll free at 1-888-949-9993.

Washington, DC (202) 682-1740 (202) 448-6502

Notifications for: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia


Atlanta, GA (404) 532-2000 (404) 532-2050

Notifications for: Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee


Boston, MA (617) 262-3760 (617) 247-5190

Notifications for: Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont


Chicago, IL (312) 616-1860 (312) 616-1877

Notifications for: Illinois, Missouri, Wisconsin and the following counties in Indiana - Jasper, Lake, Laporte, Newton and Porter


Dallas, TX (214) 922-9806 (214) 922-9296

Notifications for: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas


Denver, CO (303) 626-0640 (303) 572-1158

Notifications for: Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Utah and Wyoming


Detroit, MI (313) 567-2340 (313) 567-2164 (313) 567-2164

Notifications for: Indiana excluding Jasper, Lake, Laporte, Newton and Porter, Kentucky, Michigan and Ohio


Los Angeles, CA (213) 346-2700 (213) 346-2790

Notifications for: Arizona, Southern California and Nevada


Miami, FL (305) 579-1600 (305) 374-6774

Notifications for: Florida, Puerto Rico (emergency travel documents only) and U.S. Virgin Islands


Minneapolis, MN (612) 333-4641 (612) 332-4061

Notifications for: Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota


New York, NY (212) 596-1600 (212) 596-1666

Notifications for: Connecticut, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania


San Francisco, CA (415) 834-3180 (415) 834-3189

Notifications for: Hawaii (assisted by the Australian Consulate in Honolulu) and Northern California


Seattle, WA (206) 443-1777 (206) 443-9662

Notifications for: Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington State

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Ottawa
490 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 1G8, Canada
Telephone
+(613) 688-5335
Emergency
+(613) 238-5335
Fax
+(613) 688-3082
Canada Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Canada
Canada
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Valid at time of entry. If you are transiting Canada en route to Europe, your passport must be valid for at least 3 months beyond your planned date of departure from the Schengen area.

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required 

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Not required for stays under 180 days

VACCINATIONS:

None 

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

None 

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

None

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Ottawa

490 Sussex Drive
Ottawa,
Ontario, K1N 1G8
Canada
Telephone: +(613) 688-5335
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(613) 238-5335
Fax: +(613) 688-3082
OttawaCONS@state.gov

The Ottawa consular district includes the counties of Kingston, Lanark, Leeds, Prescott, Refrew, Russell, and Stormont in Eastern Ontario, and those parts of the Québec regions of Outaouais and Abitibi-Témiscamingue near Ottawa.

CONSULATES

U.S. Consulate General Montreal
1155 rue St. Alexandre
Montréal, Quebec H3B 3Z1
Canada
Telephone: + (514) 398-9695
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(514) 981-5059
Fax: +(514) 398-9748

The Montreal consular district includes Greater Montreal and the regions of Southern Quebec Province (Laurentides, Lanaudiere, Laval, Montreal, Montregie, Estrie, and the southern parts of Centre-du-Quebec), including Joliete, Drummondville, and Sherbrooke.

montreal-ACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Toronto
360 University Ave
Toronto, Ontario M5G 1S4
Canada
Telephone: +(416) 595-1700
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(416) 595-6506
Fax: +(416) 595-5466

The consular district includes the province of Ontario except for the counties of Kingston, Lanark, Leeds, Prescott, Refrew, Russell, and Stormont, which are served by the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa.

TorontoPassport@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Vancouver
1075 West Pender Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6E 2M6
Canada
Telephone: +(604) 685-4311
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(604) 685-4311
Fax: +(604) 685-7175

The consular district includes British Columbia and the Yukon Territory.

vancouverACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Halifax
Purdy's Wharf Tower II
1969 Upper Water Street, Suite 904
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 3R7
Canada
Telephone: +(902) 429-2480
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(902) 429-2480
Fax: +(902) 423-6861

The Halifax consular district includes New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and the French islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon.

Halifax-ACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate Winnipeg
201 Portage Avenue, Suite 860
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 3K6
Canada
Telephone: +(204) 940-1800
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: 403-266-8962 and press "0" for assistance (Consulate General Calgary)
Fax: +(204) 940-1809

The Consulate in Winnipeg provides only emergency services for U.S. citizens. Routine services such as visas, passports and notarials are handled at other U.S. Consulates General, primarily Calgary.

U.S. Consulate General Quebec 
2, rue de la Terrasse Dufferin
(Vieux Quebec, behind Chateau Frontenac)
Quebec, Quebec G1R 4T9
Canada
Telephone: +(418) 692-2095
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(418) 692-2096
Fax: +(418) 692-4640

The consular district includes Quebec City and those regions of Quebec Province to the North and East of the Montreal and Ottawa Districts (indicated above), plus the Territory of Nunavut.

quebecacs@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Calgary 
615 Macleod Trail S.E.,
10th Floor
Calgary, Alberta, T2G 4T8
Canada
Telephone: +(403) 266-8962
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(403) 266-8962 then press '0'
Fax: +(403) 263-2241

The consular district includes Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and the Northwest Territories, excluding Nunavut.

Calgary-ACS@state.gov

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Canada for additional information on U.S.-Canada relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

For tourist visits to Canada of less than 180 days, U.S. citizens do not need visas. Other types of travel (e.g., to work, study, or immigrate) generally requires visas. For complete information on visa categories and requirements, consult the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) website.

Anyone with a criminal record (including misdemeanors or alcohol-related driving offenses) may not be able to enter Canada without first obtaining an approval for rehabilitation well in advance of any planned travel. To determine whether you may be inadmissible and how to overcome this finding, please refer to the CIC website.

Entry into Canada is solely determined by Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officials in accordance with Canadian law. Please see the CBSA’s website for full details.

Travel Programs: Both the U.S. and Canadian governments urge frequent travelers to join the NEXUS trusted traveler program.

Entry into Canada: Canadian law requires that all persons entering Canada carry both proof of citizenship and proof of identity. A valid U.S. passport, passport card, or NEXUS card satisfies these requirements for U.S. citizens.

Children under 16 need only present proof of U.S. citizenship.

Entry into the United States: When traveling by air from Canada, U.S. citizens are required by U.S. law to present a U.S. passport book. A few exceptions to this rule and a full list of documents that can be used at land and sea borders are provided on the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) website.

Travel with Minors: If you plan to travel to Canada with a minor who is not your own child or for whom you do not have full legal custody, CBSA may require you to present a notarized affidavit of consent from the minor’s parents. Please refer to the CBSA websitefor more details.

Travel for Private Boaters and Recreational Vessels: Canadian law requires all foreign private boaters, including recreational vessels, to present themselves upon their arrival in Canada to the CBSA. See the CBSA website for information regarding reporting requirements upon entry to Canada by boat. For procedures to report arrivals in the United States, please refer to the Small Vessel Reporting System and Pleasure Boat Reporting Requirements.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Canada.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international parental child abduction, and customs information on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Crime: Although Canada generally has a lower crime rate than the United States, violent crimes do occur throughout the country, especially in urban areas. Visitors to large cities should be aware that parked cars are regularly targeted for opportunistic smash-and-grab thefts, and they are cautioned to avoid leaving any possessions unattended in a vehicle, even in the trunk. Due to the high incidence of such crimes, motorists in Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver and some other jurisdictions can be fined for leaving their car doors unlocked or for leaving valuables in view. Visitors should exercise precausion to safeguard their property.

While Canadian gun control laws are much stricter than those in the United States, such laws have not prevented gun-related violence in certain areas.

Be aware of your surroundings. As in the United States, travelers in popular tourist areas may be targeted by pickpockets and other petty criminals.

In many countries around the world, counterfeit and pirated goods are widely available. Do not buy counterfeit and pirated goods, even if they are widely available. Not only are the bootlegs illegal in the United States, if you purchase them you may also be breaking local law.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: If you or someone you know becomes the victim of a crime abroad, you should contact the local police and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate. Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

As in the United States, emergency assistance can be reached by dialing 911.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Controlled Substances: Canadian law prohibits the importation or trafficking of controlled substances and narcotics, including those which may be legal to possess under the law of certain states. Smugglers risk substantial fines, a permanent bar from Canada, and imprisonment.

Importation of Firearms: Firearms are more strictly controlled in Canada than in the United States. Violation of firearms restrictions may result in prosecution and imprisonment.

Visitors bringing any firearms or ammunition into Canada, or planning to borrow and use firearms while in Canada, must declare the firearms in writing using a Non-Resident Firearm Declaration form. Visitors planning to borrow a firearm in Canada must obtain a Temporary Firearms Borrowing License in advance. These forms must be presented in triplicate and signed in front of a CBSA officer at the border (it is not possible to make photocopies at the border). Full details and downloadable forms are available at the Canadian Firearms Centre website, under the heading "Visitors / Non Residents."

Canadian law requires that officials confiscate any firearms, ammunition, and other weapons from persons crossing the border who deny having the items in their possession. Confiscated firearms, ammunition, and weapons are not returned. Possession of an undeclared firearm may result in arrest and imprisonment. Travelers are strongly advised to inspect all belongings thoroughly prior to travel to Canada to avoid the accidental import of firearms or ammunition.

Pornography: Canada has strict laws concerning child pornography, and in recent years there has been an increase in random checks of electronic media of travelers entering Canada. 

Computers and cell phones are subject to searches without a warrant at the border and illegal content can result in the seizure of the computer as well as detention, arrest, and prosecution of the bearer. 

Alcohol-related driving offenses, such as driving while intoxicated (DWI), driving while ability-impaired, and driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol, are criminal offenses in Canada. Penalties are heavy, and any prior conviction (no matter how old or how minor the infraction) is grounds for exclusion from Canada. U.S. citizens with a DWI record must seek approval for rehabilitation from Canadian authorities before traveling to Canada, which requires several weeks or months to process. Please see the CBSA websitefor details on this program.

Tax Issues: For information on U.S. Federal tax issues, please refer to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) website for international taxpayers.

Refer to this link for reporting requirements regarding Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR).

Refer to this link for information on the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA).

Refer to this link for information about the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Agreement (OVDI). For answers to commonly asked questions about the OVDI, please follow this link to OVDI FAQ.

Please see our Customs Information.

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State's International Religious Freedom Report .

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Canada. Seeour LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Although Canada has effectively implemented laws mandating access to buildings for persons with disabilities, individuals with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different from what you find in the United States.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips .

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.   See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance (our webpage) to cover medical evacuation.

Carry prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription. 

Healthcare in Canada: The level of public health and sanitation in Canada is high. Canada’s medical care is of a high standard but is government-controlled. Quick and easy access to ongoing medical care is difficult for temporary visitors who are not members of each province’s government-run health care plans. Many physicians will not take new patients. Access to a specialist is only by referral and may take months to obtain. Emergency room waits can be very long. Some health care professionals in the province of Québec may speak only French.

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: As in the United States, all emergency assistance in Canada can be reached by dialing 911.

For detailed information on road conditions throughout Canada, as well as links to provincial government websites, please see the Transport Canada website or the Canadian Automobile Association (CAA) website. The CAA honors American Automobile Association membership. Some automobile warranties of vehicles purchased in the United States may be invalid in Canada.

Driving in Canada is similar to driving in many parts of the United States. Distances and speeds, however, are posted in kilometers per hour and some signs, particularly in Québec, may only be in French. U.S. driver’s licenses are valid for visitors in Canada. Proof of auto insurance is required. U.S. auto insurance is accepted as long as an individual is a tourist in Canada. U.S. insurance firms will issue a Canadian insurance card, which should be obtained and carried prior to driving into Canada. For specific information concerning Canadian driving permits, mandatory insurance and entry regulations, please contact the Canadian National Tourist Organization.

Some provinces require drivers to keep their vehicles’ headlights on during the day and some have banned driving while using a hand-held cell phone. Motorcycles cannot share a lane, and safety helmets for motorcycle riders and passengers are mandatory.

Drivers should be aware that running a red light is a serious concern throughout Canada and motorists are advised to pause before proceeding when a light turns green. Turning right at a red light is prohibited on the Island of Montreal, and motorists are subject to substantial fines.

It is illegal to take automobile radar detectors into Québec, Ontario, Manitoba, the Yukon or the Northwest Territories, regardless of whether they are used or not. Police there may confiscate radar detectors, operational or not, and impose substantial fines.

Winter travel can be dangerous due to heavy snowfalls and hazardous icy conditions. Some roads and bridges are subject to periodic winter closures. Snow tires are required in some provinces. The CAA has tips for winter driving in Canada.

Approaches to border crossings into the United States may experience unexpected traffic backups. Drivers should be alert, as lane restrictions at border approaches exist for drivers in NEXUS and FAST expedited inspection programs.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. Also, we suggest that you visit the website of Canada’s national authority responsible for road safety.

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Canada’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Canada’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Canada should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts on the Maritime Administration website. Information may also be posted to the websites of the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Geospace Intelligence Agency (select “broadcast warnings”).

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Ottawa

490 Sussex Drive
Ottawa,
Ontario, K1N 1G8
Canada
Telephone: +(613) 688-5335
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(613) 238-5335
Fax: +(613) 688-3082
OttawaCONS@state.gov

The Ottawa consular district includes the counties of Kingston, Lanark, Leeds, Prescott, Refrew, Russell, and Stormont in Eastern Ontario, and those parts of the Québec regions of Outaouais and Abitibi-Témiscamingue near Ottawa.

CONSULATES

U.S. Consulate General Montreal
1155 rue St. Alexandre
Montréal, Quebec H3B 3Z1
Canada
Telephone: + (514) 398-9695
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(514) 981-5059
Fax: +(514) 398-9748

The Montreal consular district includes Greater Montreal and the regions of Southern Quebec Province (Laurentides, Lanaudiere, Laval, Montreal, Montregie, Estrie, and the southern parts of Centre-du-Quebec), including Joliete, Drummondville, and Sherbrooke.

montreal-ACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Toronto
360 University Ave
Toronto, Ontario M5G 1S4
Canada
Telephone: +(416) 595-1700
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(416) 595-6506
Fax: +(416) 595-5466

The consular district includes the province of Ontario except for the counties of Kingston, Lanark, Leeds, Prescott, Refrew, Russell, and Stormont, which are served by the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa.

TorontoPassport@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Vancouver
1075 West Pender Street
Vancouver, British Columbia
V6E 2M6
Canada
Telephone: +(604) 685-4311
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(604) 685-4311
Fax: +(604) 685-7175

The consular district includes British Columbia and the Yukon Territory.

vancouverACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Halifax
Purdy's Wharf Tower II
1969 Upper Water Street, Suite 904
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 3R7
Canada
Telephone: +(902) 429-2480
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(902) 429-2480
Fax: +(902) 423-6861

The Halifax consular district includes New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and the French islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon.

Halifax-ACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate Winnipeg
201 Portage Avenue, Suite 860
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3B 3K6
Canada
Telephone: +(204) 940-1800
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: 403-266-8962 and press "0" for assistance (Consulate General Calgary)
Fax: +(204) 940-1809

The Consulate in Winnipeg provides only emergency services for U.S. citizens. Routine services such as visas, passports and notarials are handled at other U.S. Consulates General, primarily Calgary.

U.S. Consulate General Quebec 
2, rue de la Terrasse Dufferin
(Vieux Quebec, behind Chateau Frontenac)
Quebec, Quebec G1R 4T9
Canada
Telephone: +(418) 692-2095
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(418) 692-2096
Fax: +(418) 692-4640

The consular district includes Quebec City and those regions of Quebec Province to the North and East of the Montreal and Ottawa Districts (indicated above), plus the Territory of Nunavut.

quebecacs@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Calgary 
615 Macleod Trail S.E.,
10th Floor
Calgary, Alberta, T2G 4T8
Canada
Telephone: +(403) 266-8962
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(403) 266-8962 then press '0'
Fax: +(403) 263-2241

The consular district includes Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and the Northwest Territories, excluding Nunavut.

Calgary-ACS@state.gov

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General Information

Canada and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) since July 1, 1988.

For information concerning travel to Canada, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Canada.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

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Hague Abduction Convention


The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizen Services, Office of Children's Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Canada.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State 
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website: travel.state.gov

In Canada, each province and territory has its own Central Authority for the Hague Abduction Convention.  If the whereabouts of the child is known or there is reason to believe the child is located in a specific province or territory, the USCA forwards applications under the Hague Convention to the appropriate Provincial Central Authority.  If the child's whereabouts are not known, the applications are forwarded to the Federal Central Authority in Ottawa, Ontario. 

The following is a list of all Canadian Central Authorities:

OTTAWA

Canadian Federal Central Authority
Ms. Sandra Zed Finless
Justice Legal Services
Foreign Affairs and International Trade
125 Sussex Drive, Tower C, 7th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0G2
Tel: (613) 996-1300
Fax: (613) 992-6485

ALBERTA

Edmonton Office
Doug Lewis
Acting Director of Family Law
Alberta Justice
13th Floor, City Centre Place
10025 - 102A Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 2Z2
Tel: (780) 415-1880
Fax: (780) 427-5914

Calgary Office
Jonathan Nicholson
Family Law Calgary
Department of Justice
1660 Standard Life Building
639 - 5th Avenue S.W.
Calgary, Alberta T2P 0M9
Tel: (403) 297-3780
Fax: (403) 297-6381

BRITISH COLUMBIA

Penelope Lipsack
Barrister and Solicitor
Legal Services Branch
P.O. Box 9280, Stn. Prov. Govt.
1001 Douglas St.
Victoria, British Columbia V8W 9J7
Tel: (250) 356-8433
Fax: (250) 356-8992

MANITOBA

Janet Sigurdson
Family Law Branch
Manitoba Justice
1230 - 405 Broadway
Winnipeg, MB R3C 3L6
Tel: (204) 945-2850
Fax: (204) 948-2004

NEW BRUNSWICK

Catherine Berryman
Office of the Attorney General - Family Crown Services
P.O. Box 5001 (14th Floor)
Moncton, New Brunswick E1C 8R3
Tel: (506) 856-3844
Fax: (506) 869-6148

NEWFOUNDLAND & LABRADOR

Brian F. Furey, QC
Family Litigation Unit
Civil Division
Department of Justice
P.O. Box 8700
St. John's, Newfoundland A1B 4J6
Tel: (709) 729-2887
Fax: (709) 729-2129

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES

Dana Webster
Policy and Planning Division
Department of Justice, GNWT
P.O. Box 1320
Yellowknife, Northwest Territories X1A 2L9
Tel: (867) 920-3362
Fax: (867) 873-0659

NOVA SCOTIA

Nicholas Dorrance
Senior Solicitor
Nova Scotia Department of Justice
P.O. Box 7
4th Floor, 5151 Terminal Road
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2L6
Tel: (902) 424-7788
Fax: (902) 424-7158

NUNAVUT

Erin George
Legal and Constitutional Law Division
Department of Justice
P.O. Box 1000, Station 540
Iqaluit, Nunavut X0A 0H0
Tel: (867) 975-6354
Fax: (867) 975-6349

ONTARIO

Shane Foulds
Ministry of the Attorney General
Central Authority for Ontario
1201 Wilson Avenue, Building B, 5th floor
Downsview, Ontario M3M 1J8
Tel: (416) 240-2484
Fax: (416) 240-2411

PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND

Loretta Coady MacAulay
Department of Justice and Public Safety
Family Law Centre
1 Harbourside Access Road
P.O. Box 2000
Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island C1A 7N8
Tel: (902) 368-4886
Fax: (902) 368-6474

QUEBEC

France Remillard
Direction des Services Professionnels
Ministere de la Justice du Quebec
1200, route de l'Eglise, 2e etage
Quebec G1V 4M1
Tel: (418) 644-7153
Fax: (418) 528-9716

SASKATCHEWAN

Betty Ann Pottruff, Q.C.
Ministry of Justice and Attorney General
Policy, Planning and Evaluation
310-1874 Scarth Street
Regina, Saskatchewan S4P 4B3
Tel: (306) 787-8954
Fax: (306) 787-9008

YUKON TERRITORY

Judith M. Hartling
Litigation Group
Legal Services Branch, YTG
P.O. Box 2703
Whitehorse, Yukon Y1A 2C6
Tel: (867) 667-5856
Fax: (867) 393-6379

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Canada, the left behind parent may submit a Hague application to the Canadian Central Authority, either directly or through the U.S. Central Authority. The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to the appropriate central authority in Canada, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the United States or the Canadian central authorities. Attorney fees, if necessary, are the sole responsibility of the person hiring the attorney. Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Canada.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Canada.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Retaining an Attorney

Procedures vary across Canada; however, in most provinces, the central authority performs an administrative function and does not present the case to a court or represent the applicant parent in legal proceedings. Applicant parents generally must present the case to court directly, usually with the assistance of legal counsel. Therefore, retaining an attorney in Canada for Hague petitions is strongly encouraged. Under the Hague Convention, Canada is not obligated to pay for, or in any way assume any costs resulting from, court proceedings. Some provinces or territories provide legal assistance based on economic need. For information regarding procedures or how to apply for legal assistance in a particular province or territory, contact the U.S. Central Authority or the appropriate provincial or territorial Central Authority office.

The U.S. Embassy in Ottawa, Canada posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms.  Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

Although Canada does not have a standardized mediation process for Hague Convention cases, mediation may be an option in a number of provinces. The relevant Canadian Central Authority can provide information on mediation options to assist parents in pursuing the return of, or access to, their children under the Hague Convention.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Canada is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention or Convention). Intercountry adoption processing in Convention countries is done in accordance with the requirements of the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations;, as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Canada.

Canada is not considered a country of origin in intercountry adoption. The information provided is intended primarily to assist in extremely rare adoption cases from Canada, including adoptions of Canada children by relatives in the United States, as well as adoptions from third countries by U.S. citizens  living in Canada. 

Note: Special transition provisions apply to adoptions initiated before April 1, 2008. Read about Transition Cases.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Canada, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements.  The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee under U.S. law in order to immigrate to the United States on an IH-3 or IH-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to the U.S. requirements, prospective adoptive parents need to meet Canadian requirements.  In Canada, and the provinces and territories are responsible for adoption matters, and prospective adoptive parents should contact the relevant provincial or territorial Central Authority for specific information on eligibility requirements to adopt, including any age, marriage, and income requirements.

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Who Can Be Adopted

Because Canada is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, children from Canada must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. In addition to Canada’s requirements, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee  to be eligible for an immigrant visa that will allow you to bring him or her to the United States.

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How to Adopt

WARNING: Canada is party to the Hague Adoption Convention. Do not adopt or obtain legal custody of a child in Canada before a U.S. consular officer issues an “Article 5 Letter” in the case.  Read on for more information.

Canada’s Adoption Authority

In Canada, various provinces and territories are responsible for setting and administering adoption policies and procedures. The following Canadian government office provides contact information for the provincial or territorial Central Authorities who can provide specific information on adoption in Canada:

Intercountry Adoption Services (IAS), Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Note: If any of the following occurred prior to April 1, 2008 (the date on which the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force with respect to the United States), the Hague Adoption Convention may not apply to your adoption: 1) you filed a Form I-600A identifying Canada as the country where you intended to adopt; 2) you filed a Form I-600; or, 3) the adoption was completed. Under these circumstances, your adopted child’s visa application could continue to be processed in accordance with the immigration regulations for non-Convention adoptions.  For more information, read about Transition Cases

The Process

Because Canada is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adopting from Canada must follow a specific process designed to meet the Convention’s requirements. A brief summary of the Convention adoption process is given below. You must complete these steps in the following order to meet all necessary legal requirements. Adoptions completed out of order may result in the child not being eligible for an immigrant visa to the United States.
1.  Choose a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider
2.  Apply to USCIS to be found eligible to adopt
3.  Be matched with a child by authorities in Canada
4.  Apply to USCIS for the child to be found eligible for immigration to the United States and receive U.S. agreement to proceed with the adoption
5.  Adopt (or Obtain Legal Custody) of child in Canada
6.  Obtain a U.S. immigrant visa for your child and bring your child home

1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

The recommended first step in adopting a child from Canada is to select an adoption service provider in the United States that has been accredited or approved to provide services to U.S. citizens in Convention cases. Only accredited or approved adoption services providers may act as the primary provider in your case. The primary adoption service provider is responsible for ensuring that all adoption services in the case are done in accordance with the Hague Adoption Convention and U.S. laws and regulations. Learn more about Agency Accreditation.

2.  Apply to USCIS to be Found Eligible to Adopt

After you choose an accredited or approved adoption service provider, you must apply to be found eligible to adopt by the responsible U.S. government agency, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), by submitting Form I-800A.  Read more about Eligibility Requirements.

Once USCIS determines that you are “eligible” and “suited” to adopt by approving the Form I-800A, your adoption service provider will provide your approval notice, home study, and any other required information to the Canadian province or territory you wish to adopt from as part of your adoption dossier. The provincial or territorial Central Authority in Canada will review your application to determine whether you are also eligible to adopt under Canada’s law.

3.  Be Matched with a Child in Canada

If both the United States and Canada determine that you are eligible to adopt, and the provincial or territorial Central Authority in Canada for Convention adoptions has determined that a child is available for adoption and that intercountry adoption is in that child’s best interests, that Central Authority may provide you with a referral for a child. The referral is a proposed match between you and a specific child based on a review of your dossier and the needs of a specific child in Canada. The provincial or territorial Central Authority in Canada will provide a background study and other information, if available, about the child to help you decide whether to accept the referral or not. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of and provide a permanent home for a particular child. If you accept the referral, your adoption service provider will communicate that to the adoption authority in Canada. Learn more about this critical decision.

4.  Apply to USCIS for the Child to be Found Eligible for Immigration to the United States and Receive U.S. Agreement to Proceed with the Adoption

After you accept a match with a child, you will apply to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for provisional approval for the child to immigrate to the United States (Form I-800). USCIS will make a provisional determination as to whether the child meets the definition of a Convention Adoptee and will be eligible to enter the United States and reside permanently as an immigrant.

After provisional approval of Form I-800, your adoption service provider or you will submit a visa application to the Consular Section of the U.S. Consulate General in Montreal that is responsible for issuing immigrant visas to children from Canada. A consular officer will review the Form I-800 and the visa application for possible visa ineligibilities and advise you of options for the waiver of any noted ineligibilities.

WARNING: The consular officer will send a letter (referred to as an “Article 5 Letter”) to the provincial or territorial Central Authority in Canada in any intercountry adoption involving U.S. citizen parents and a child from Canada where all Convention requirements are met and the consular officer determines that the child appears eligible to immigrate to the United States.  This letter will inform the provincial or territorial Central Authority in Canada that the parents are eligible and suited to adopt, that all indications are that the child may enter and reside permanently in the United States, and that the U.S. Central Authority agrees that the adoption may proceed.

Do not attempt to adopt or obtain custody of a child in Canada before a U.S. consular officer issues the Article 5 Letter in any adoption case.

Remember: The consular officer will make a final decision about a child’s eligibility for an immigrant visa later in the adoption process.

5.  Adopt (or Obtain Legal Custody) of Child in Canada

Remember: Before you adopt (or obtain legal custody of) a child in Canada, you must have completed the above four steps.  Only after completing these steps, can you proceed to finalize the adoption or grant of custody for the purposes of adoption in Canada.

The process for finalizing the adoption (or obtaining legal custody) in Canada varies by province. Prospective parents should contact the relevant provincial adoption authority for specific information. In some provinces you may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic. If so, the Department of State, Authentications office may be able to assist. Read more about Authenticating U.S. Documents.

6.  Obtain an Immigrant Visa for your Child and Bring Your Child Home

Now that your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child for the purpose of adopting the child in the United States), there are a few more steps to take before you can head home. Specifically, you need to apply for three documents before your child can travel to the United States:

Birth Certificate
If you have finalized the adoption in Canada, you will firstneed to apply for a birth certificate for your child so that you can later apply for a passport.

If you have been granted custody for the purpose of adopting the child in the United States, the birth certificate you obtain will, in most cases, not yet include your name.

How to obtain a new birth certificate for the child in Canada.

Canada Passport
Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Canada.

How to obtain a Passport for the child in Canada.

U.S. Immigrant Visa

After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to finalize your application for a U.S. visa for your child from the U.S. Consulate General in Montreal.  After the adoption (or custody for purpose of adoption) is granted, visit the U.S. Consulate General in Montreal for final review of the case, issuance of a U.S. Hague Adoption Certificate or Hague Custody Certificate, final approval of Form I-800, and to obtain your child’s immigrant visa. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the consular officer must be provided the “Panel Physician’s” medical report on the child if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage. Read more about the Medical Examination.

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States:  A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States:  An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to automatically become a citizen after entry into the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible. Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting. Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

APPLYING FOR YOUR U.S. PASSPORT

U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

OBTAINING A VISA TO TRAVEL TO CANADA

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.  To find information about obtaining a visa for Canada, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

STAYING SAFE ON YOUR TRIP

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

STAYING IN TOUCH ON YOUR TRIP

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Canada, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

Post-Adoption/Post-Placement Reporting Requirements
Requirements, if any, vary by province.  Please contact the relevant provincial adoption or territorial authority for specific information on post-adoption/post-placement requirements.

Post-Adoption Resources
Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin.  Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Consulate General in Montreal
1155 rue Saint-Alexandre
Montreal, Quebec H3B 3Z1
Canada
Tel: (514) 398-9695
Fax: (514) 398-0973

In Canada, the various provinces and territories are responsible for setting and administering adoption policies and procedures. The following Canadian government office provide contact information for the provincial and territorial central adoption authorities, who can provide specific information on adoption in Canada:

Intercountry Adoption Services (IAS)
Citizenship and Immigration Canada
365 Laurier Ave. West, JETS B1435
OTTAWA, Ontario
Canada
K1A 1L1
Tel.: (613) 954-0880
Fax: (613) 946-1683 


Embassy of Canada
501 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20001
Tel: 202-682-1740
Fax: 202-682-7701
Internet:  www.canadainternational.gc.ca/washington  

Canada also has consulates in: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, New York, Palo Alto, San Diego, San Francisco, and Seattle.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI, SA-17A, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Email:  AdoptionUSCA@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-800A or I-800 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email: NBC.Hague@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
 
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 $40.00 Multiple 60 Months
E-2 2 $40.00 Multiple 60 Months
E-2C 12   Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-6 10 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO-7 None Multiple 24 Months
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 None Multiple 36 Months
TN 5 None Multiple 36 Months
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Note: Aliens who have "landed immigrant" (permanent residency) or "refugee" (asylee) status in Canada may be accorded Canadian reciprocity per 97 STATE 214113, but only if they apply in Canada and are not undergoing administrative processing. Such applicants who apply outside of Canada must be accorded the reciprocity of their country of nationality. Such applicants who require administrative processing must be accorded the reciprocity of their country of nationality per 06 STATE 80485.

 

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth

Births are registered in the Canadian provinces or territory in which they took place. Though each province or territory issues its own certificates for these events, there are a few basic formats for them across Canada:

  • The "small" or "short form" certificate is a computer-printed, limited extract of information from provincial records. It is a wallet-sized card, 9.5 x 6.4 cm or 2.5 x 3.75in (Specimen from British Columbia). Short-form or small certificates are not acceptable for visa purposes because they do not contain enough identification information, such as parents' names.
  • The "large" or "full-size" certificate is a computer-printed extract of information from provincial records. It is printed on currency-style paper stock, 21.6 x 17.8 cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border (Specimen from British Columbia).
  • A "certified copy of a record" is an exact or near-exact copy of the actual paper record in the provincial archives. It is printed on safety paper, usually 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14in., and bears the province or territory's raised seal. This type of certificate, being a complete record rather than an extract, contains the most information about the event.
  • A "commemorative" certificate is a decorative document intended for display (Specimen from Manitoba). Commemorative certificates are not considered legal documents in Canada and are not acceptable for visa purposes.

Note: For cases in which the subject of a birth record was adopted, see "Adoption Records" below.

Not all provinces and territories issue all of the formats noted above. Province-and-territory specific information on obtaining acceptable birth, marriage, death, and name change certificates is as follows:

  • Alberta: Applicants should obtain "large sized" certificates or certified photocopies of a registration from Alberta Vital Statistics through a private Alberta Registry Agent. Further information, including names and locations of Registry Agents, is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Alberta, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal documents. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from Alberta Vital Statistics.
  • British Columbia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copes of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency, which has offices in Vancouver (605 Robson Street, Room 250, tel: 604-660-2937) and Victoria (818 Fort Street, tel: 250-952-2681). Large certificates are also available through Government Agents located across the province. Further information, including locations of other Vital Statistics offices, names and located of Government Agents, and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Manitoba: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies from the Vital Statistics Agency in Winnipeg (254 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, 204-945-3701). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • New Brunswick: Applicants should obtain "long-form certified copies" of records from the Vital Statistics Office in Fredericton (435 King Street, Suite 203, tel: 506-453-2385). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Applicants should obtain "long-form certificates" from the Vital Statistics Division in St. John's (5 Mews Place, tel: 709-729-3308) or at Government Service Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Northwest Territories: Applicants should obtain "framing" or "restricted photocopy" certificates from the Registrar General of Vital Statistics in Inuvik Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel: 867-777-7420). Applicants may also write to: Registrar General of Vital Statistics, Government of the NWT, Bag 9 (107 MacKenzie Road/IDC Building, second floor), Inuvik, NT, X0A 0T0 (fax: 867-777-3197).
  • Nova Scotia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from Vital Statistics Office in Halifax (Joseph Howe Building, 1690 Hollis Street., ground floor, tel:902-424-4381). Further information, including instructions for ordering online or by mail, is available online.
  • Nunavut: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Division, which is based out of the Kivalliq Regional Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel:867-645-2171). Applicants may also write to: Social Services, Bag 3 RSO Building, Rankin Inlet, NU, X0C 0G0 (fax: 867-645-2580).
    Note: Nunavut was part of the Northwest Territories until April 1, 1999. Before that, all births, marriages, deaths, and name changes that occurred in the present Nunavut region would have been registered with the Northwest Territories Registrar General of Vital Statistics.
  • Ontario: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Office of the Registrar General in Toronto (Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street, second floor, tel: 416-325-8305) or at Ontario Land Registry Offices and Government Information Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Ontario, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal document. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from the Office of the Registrar General.
  • Prince Edward Island: Applicants should obtain "framing size" certificates from the Office of Vital Statistics in Montague (126 Douses Road, tel:902-838-0080) or Charlottetown (16 Garfield Street, tel:902-368-6185). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Quebec: Applicants should obtain "certified copies of an act" from the Direction de l' Etat Civil in Montreal (2050, rue de Bleury, sixth floor, tel:514-864-3900) or the Directeur de l'Etat Civil in Quebec City (2535, boulevard Laurier, Ground Floor, Sainte-Foy, tel:418-643-3900; fax:418-646-3255). Further information, including other locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
  • Saskatchewan: Applicants should obtain "frame" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Office in Regina (1942 Hamilton Street, tel:306-787-3251).
  • Yukon Territory: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency in Whitehorse (204 Lambert Street, fourth floor, tel: 867-667-5207) or a Yukon Territorial Agent. Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.

Death/Burial

Deaths are registered in the Canadian provinces or territory in which they took place. Though each province or territory issues its own certificates for these events, there are a few basic formats for them across Canada:

  • The "small" or "short form" certificate is a computer-printed, limited extract of information from provincial records. It is a wallet-sized card, 9.5 x 6.4 cm or 2.5 x 3.75in (Specimen from British Columbia). Short-form or small certificates are not acceptable for visa purposes because they do not contain enough identification information, such as parents' names.
  • The "large" or "full-size" certificate is a computer-printed extract of information from provincial records. It is printed on currency-style paper stock, 21.6 x 17.8 cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border (Specimen from British Columbia).
  • A "certified copy of a record" is an exact or near-exact copy of the actual paper record in the provincial archives. It is printed on safety paper, usually 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14in., and bears the province or territory's raised seal. This type of certificate, being a complete record rather than an extract, contains the most information about the event.
  • A "commemorative" certificate is a decorative document intended for display (Specimen from Manitoba). Commemorative certificates are not considered legal documents in Canada and are not acceptable for visa purposes.

Note: For cases in which the subject of a birth record was adopted, see "Adoption Records" below.

Not all provinces and territories issue all of the formats noted above. Province-and-territory specific information on obtaining acceptable birth, marriage, death, and name change certificates is as follows:

  • Alberta: Applicants should obtain "large sized" certificates or certified photocopies of a registration from Alberta Vital Statistics through a private Alberta Registry Agent. Further information, including names and locations of Registry Agents, is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Alberta, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal documents. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from Alberta Vital Statistics.
  • British Columbia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copes of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency, which has offices in Vancouver (605 Robson Street, Room 250, tel: 604-660-2937) and Victoria (818 Fort Street, tel: 250-952-2681). Large certificates are also available through Government Agents located across the province. Further information, including locations of other Vital Statistics offices, names and located of Government Agents, and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Manitoba: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies from the Vital Statistics Agency in Winnipeg (254 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, 204-945-3701). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • New Brunswick: Applicants should obtain "long-form certified copies" of records from the Vital Statistics Office in Fredericton (435 King Street, Suite 203, tel: 506-453-2385). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Applicants should obtain "long-form certificates" from the Vital Statistics Division in St. John's (5 Mews Place, tel: 709-729-3308) or at Government Service Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Northwest Territories: Applicants should obtain "framing" or "restricted photocopy" certificates from the Registrar General of Vital Statistics in Inuvik Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel: 867-777-7420). Applicants may also write to: Registrar General of Vital Statistics, Government of the NWT, Bag 9 (107 MacKenzie Road/IDC Building, second floor), Inuvik, NT, X0A 0T0 (fax: 867-777-3197).
  • Nova Scotia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from Vital Statistics Office in Halifax (Joseph Howe Building, 1690 Hollis Street., ground floor, tel:902-424-4381). Further information, including instructions for ordering online or by mail, is available online.
  • Nunavut: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Division, which is based out of the Kivalliq Regional Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel:867-645-2171). Applicants may also write to: Social Services, Bag 3 RSO Building, Rankin Inlet, NU, X0C 0G0 (fax: 867-645-2580).
    Note: Nunavut was part of the Northwest Territories until April 1, 1999. Before that, all births, marriages, deaths, and name changes that occurred in the present Nunavut region would have been registered with the Northwest Territories Registrar General of Vital Statistics.
  • Ontario: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Office of the Registrar General in Toronto (Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street, second floor, tel: 416-325-8305) or at Ontario Land Registry Offices and Government Information Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Ontario, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal document. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from the Office of the Registrar General.
  • Prince Edward Island: Applicants should obtain "framing size" certificates from the Office of Vital Statistics in Montague (126 Douses Road, tel:902-838-0080) or Charlottetown (16 Garfield Street, tel:902-368-6185). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Quebec: Applicants should obtain "certified copies of an act" from the Direction de l' Etat Civil in Montreal (2050, rue de Bleury, sixth floor, tel:514-864-3900) or the Directeur de l'Etat Civil in Quebec City (2535, boulevard Laurier, Ground Floor, Sainte-Foy, tel:418-643-3900; fax:418-646-3255). Further information, including other locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
  • Saskatchewan: Applicants should obtain "frame" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Office in Regina (1942 Hamilton Street, tel:306-787-3251). 
  • Yukon Territory: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency in Whitehorse (204 Lambert Street, fourth floor, tel: 867-667-5207) or a Yukon Territorial Agent. Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage

Marriages are registered in the Canadian provinces or territory in which they took place. Though each province or territory issues its own certificates for these events, there are a few basic formats for them across Canada:

  • The "small" or "short form" certificate is a computer-printed, limited extract of information from provincial records. It is a wallet-sized card, 9.5 x 6.4 cm or 2.5 x 3.75in (Specimen from British Columbia). Short-form or small certificates are not acceptable for visa purposes because they do not contain enough identification information, such as parents' names.
  • The "large" or "full-size" certificate is a computer-printed extract of information from provincial records. It is printed on currency-style paper stock, 21.6 x 17.8 cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border (Specimen from British Columbia).
  • A "certified copy of a record" is an exact or near-exact copy of the actual paper record in the provincial archives. It is printed on safety paper, usually 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14in., and bears the province or territory's raised seal. This type of certificate, being a complete record rather than an extract, contains the most information about the event.
  • A "commemorative" certificate is a decorative document intended for display (Specimen from Manitoba). Commemorative certificates are not considered legal documents in Canada and are not acceptable for visa purposes.

Note: For cases in which the subject of a birth record was adopted, see "Adoption Records" below.

Not all provinces and territories issue all of the formats noted above. Province-and-territory specific information on obtaining acceptable birth, marriage, death, and name change certificates is as follows:

  • Alberta: Applicants should obtain "large sized" certificates or certified photocopies of a registration from Alberta Vital Statistics through a private Alberta Registry Agent. Further information, including names and locations of Registry Agents, is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Alberta, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal documents. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from Alberta Vital Statistics.
  • British Columbia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copes of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency, which has offices in Vancouver (605 Robson Street, Room 250, tel: 604-660-2937) and Victoria (818 Fort Street, tel: 250-952-2681). Large certificates are also available through Government Agents located across the province. Further information, including locations of other Vital Statistics offices, names and located of Government Agents, and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Manitoba: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies from the Vital Statistics Agency in Winnipeg (254 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, 204-945-3701). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • New Brunswick: Applicants should obtain "long-form certified copies" of records from the Vital Statistics Office in Fredericton (435 King Street, Suite 203, tel: 506-453-2385). Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Applicants should obtain "long-form certificates" from the Vital Statistics Division in St. John's (5 Mews Place, tel: 709-729-3308) or at Government Service Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and mail-order instructions, is available online.
  • Northwest Territories: Applicants should obtain "framing" or "restricted photocopy" certificates from the Registrar General of Vital Statistics in Inuvik Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel: 867-777-7420). Applicants may also write to: Registrar General of Vital Statistics, Government of the NWT, Bag 9 (107 MacKenzie Road/IDC Building, second floor), Inuvik, NT, X0A 0T0 (fax: 867-777-3197).
  • Nova Scotia: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from Vital Statistics Office in Halifax (Joseph Howe Building, 1690 Hollis Street., ground floor, tel:902-424-4381). Further information, including instructions for ordering online or by mail, is available online.
  • Nunavut: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Division, which is based out of the Kivalliq Regional Office of the Department of Health and Social Services (tel:867-645-2171). Applicants may also write to: Social Services, Bag 3 RSO Building, Rankin Inlet, NU, X0C 0G0 (fax: 867-645-2580).
    Note: Nunavut was part of the Northwest Territories until April 1, 1999. Before that, all births, marriages, deaths, and name changes that occurred in the present Nunavut region would have been registered with the Northwest Territories Registrar General of Vital Statistics.
  • Ontario: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Office of the Registrar General in Toronto (Macdonald Block, 900 Bay Street, second floor, tel: 416-325-8305) or at Ontario Land Registry Offices and Government Information Centers located throughout the province. Further information, including locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
    Note: For marriages in Ontario, the certificate torn off the marriage license and given to the couple at the conclusion of the ceremony confirms that the marriage took place, but is not a legal document. Applicants must obtain a marriage certificate or certified copy of marriage record from the Office of the Registrar General.
  • Prince Edward Island: Applicants should obtain "framing size" certificates from the Office of Vital Statistics in Montague (126 Douses Road, tel:902-838-0080) or Charlottetown (16 Garfield Street, tel:902-368-6185). Further information, including mail-order instructions, isavailable online.
  • Quebec: Applicants should obtain "certified copies of an act" from the Direction de l' Etat Civil in Montreal (2050, rue de Bleury, sixth floor, tel:514-864-3900) or the Directeur de l'Etat Civil in Quebec City (2535, boulevard Laurier, Ground Floor, Sainte-Foy, tel:418-643-3900; fax:418-646-3255). Further information, including other locations and information on ordering by mail is available online.
  • Saskatchewan: Applicants should obtain "frame" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Office in Regina (1942 Hamilton Street, tel:306-787-3251).
  • Yukon Territory: Applicants should obtain "large" certificates or certified copies of a registration from the Vital Statistics Agency in Whitehorse (204 Lambert Street, fourth floor, tel: 867-667-5207) or a Yukon Territorial Agent. Further information, including mail-order instructions, is available online.

Divorce

Canadian divorce records are maintained by provincial and territorial courts. Primary evidence of divorce is the original or court-certified copy of the final divorce decree from the court where the divorce took place. Some provinces also issue a "Certificate of Divorce" similar to a large or full-size marriage certificate (a computer-printed extract of information on currency style stock paper, 21.6 x 17.8cm or 7 x 8.25 in., with an intaglio border). The Certificate of Divorce is also acceptable evidence of divorce, though it has no information about child custody.

To obtain a court-certified copy of a divorce decree or a Certificate of Divorce, applicants should contact the clerk or registrar of the court where the divorce was granted. Applicants unsure of the court in which their divorce proceedings took place may write to the Central Registry of Divorce Proceedings, P.O. Box 2730, Station D, Ottawa, ON, K1P 5W7. The Central Registry cannot issue a divorce certificate, but will be able to confirm at which registry the divorce was granted.

To prevent international child custody disputes, in cases where a divorced parent wishes to have his minor child immigrate to the United States, U.S. diplomatic offices in Canada will request original or court-certified copies of court orders regarding child custody arrangements. Such documents should specify that the parent has "sole custody" of the child. If a divorced parent does not have court-granted sole custody, U.S. diplomatic offices in Canada will request written, notarized consent to the child's immigration from the other parent.

Adoption Certificates

For adoptions in Canada, provincial and territorial vital statistics authorities usually alter original records to obscure the names of birth parents. Therefore, birth certificates issued to applicants who were adopted likely will not accurately reflect the circumstances of their birth.

Access to pre-adoption birth records and adoption orders is restricted by provincial law, and the availability of such records varies by province or territory. In general, provinces and territories will release adoption records to adopted children if the birth parents do not object. However, there may be lengthy delays as the province or territory attempts to contact the birth parents or gives them an opportunity to object to the release of information.

Due to the difficulty in obtaining adoption records, U.S. diplomatic posts in Canada usually do not require adopted applicants to obtain their adoption records for visa purposes unless the adoption record is essential to demonstrating the relationship through which a benefit is claimed. However, U.S. posts reserve the right to request them if the circumstances of the case require it. Applicants who need to obtain pre-adoption birth records and adoption orders should use the contacts listed below.

  • Alberta: Alberta Post Adoption Registry, 11th Floor, Sterling Place, 9940-106 Street, Edmonton, AB, T5K 2N2, Tel: 780-427-6387.
  • British Columbia: Vital Statistics Agency, Confidential Services, P.O. Box 9657, STN PROV GOVT, Victoria, BC, V8W 9P3, tel: 250-952-2236.
  • Manitoba: Manitoba Post-Adoption Registry, 201-114 Garry Street, Winnipeg, MB, R3C 4V5, tel: 204-945-6964.
  • New Brunswick: Post Adoption Disclosure Services, Department of Family and Community Services, P.O. Box 6000, Fredericton, NB, E3B 5H1, tel: (506) 453-2949.
  • Newfoundland and Labrador: Confidential Services, Vital Statistics Division, Department Of Government Services, P.O. Box 8700, St. John's, NL, A1B 4J6, tel: 709-729-3308.
  • Northwest Territories: Registrar -- Adoptions, Department of Health and Social Services, GNWT, Box 1320 - CST 6, Yellowknife, NT, X1A 2L9, tel: 867-873-7943.
  • Nova Scotia: Adoption Disclosure Service Program, Department of Community Services, P.O. Box 696 Halifax, NS, B3J 2T7, tel: 902-424-2755.
  • Nunavut: Department of Health and Social Services, Director of Adoptions, P.O. Box 1000, Station 1000, Iquluit, NU, X0A 0H0, tel: 867-975-5781.
  • Ontario: Adoption Disclosure Unit, Ministry of Community and Social Services, 2 Bloor Street West, 24th Floor, Toronto, ON, M7A 1E9, tel: 416-327-4730.
  • Prince Edward Island: Department of Health and Social Services, Post-Adoption Service, 161 St. Peters Road, P.O. Box 2000, Charlottetown, PE, C1A 5P7, tel: 902-368-6511.
  • Quebec: Youth court (Chambre de la jeunesse) in the judicial district where the adoption took place. Additional information is available through the Quebec Ministry of Justice, tel: 418-643-5140.
  • Saskatchewan: Adoption Registry and Post Adoption Services, Saskatchewan Community Resources and Employment, 11th Floor, 1920 Broad Street, Regina, SK, S4P 3V6, tel: 306-787-3654.
  • Yukon Territory: Children's Services, Health and Social Services, Box 2703, Whitehorse, YU, Y1A 2C6, tel: 867-667-8689.

Note on Aboriginal Custom Adoption: In some provinces and territories, aboriginal children may be adopted by a process called "Aboriginal Custom Adoption," a privately-arranged adoption between two aboriginal families. Such adoptions have a similar legal effect in Canada to traditional adoptions. However, it is unclear whether such adoptions qualify for U.S. visa purposes under Section 101(b)(1)(E) of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

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Identity Card

The current Certificate of Canadian Citizenship is a laminated, wallet-sized card with a color photograph of the bearer. It has minimal security features. It is evidence of Canadian citizenship and may be used to re-enter Canada. The Commemorative Certificate of Canadian Citizenship is a 21.5 x 28 cm or 8.5 x 14 inch certificate, printed in both French and English, with a print of the Canadian Parliament on the right-hand side. It is an insecure document and is not evidence of Canadian citizenship.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

  • Inside Canada: Applicants who are physically present in Canada should contact their local police service or Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) office regarding criminal record check procedures. Applicants may obtain a certificate of no conviction issued by any Canadian police service so long as it notes that Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) or the national criminal records repository was searched using the applicant's name and date of birth. Applicants should ensure that the search includes all names that they have previously used, including maiden names, prior married names, or names used before Canadian naturalization. (Note: Because records checks based on name and date of birth only are sometimes less thorough than those based on fingerprints, U.S. diplomatic offices reserve the right to request that certain applicants obtain fingerprint-based searches from the RCMP.)

    Applicants who have been convicted of a crime in Canada must contact their local RCMP office to obtain a "Certified Criminal Record Check," which lists an applicant's criminal history, indicating the section of the Canadian Criminal Code under which the applicant was charged, the disposition of the case, and the penalty imposed, if any. Obtaining a Certified Criminal Records Check requires submission of a fingerprint chart; the RCMP could take between two and twelve months to process a request for a Certified Criminal Record Check. (Note: If a namecheck by a police agency reveals a conviction record, that agency may be unwilling to issue a certificate and may refer the applicant to the RCMP for a Certified Criminal Record Check.)

    Canadian pardons have no effect under U.S. law. Applicants who have been convicted of a crime in Canada that was subsequently pardoned must contact an RCMP office to obtain both a Certified Criminal Record Check and copies of their pardoned criminal record. Additional information is available online.
  • Outside Canada: Applicants who are not physically present in Canada must obtain a Certified Criminal Record Check. There is a processing fee of $25 CAN or US equivalent per criminal record and/or vulnerable sector check. Payment must be made by certified cheque or money order to the Receiver General for Canada.


Special note for applicants who reside or resided in Newfoundland and Labrador: The RCMP did not operate in Newfoundland before April 1, 1949. Therefore, applicants who were age sixteen or over in 1949 and who resided anywhere in Newfoundland and Labrador for six months or longer after reaching the age of sixteen must obtain a Good Conduct Certificate issued by the Royal Newfoundland Constabulary (RNC). Applicants should inquire at RNC offices in St. John's, Corner Brook, Churchill Falls, or Labrador City, or may contact the RNC at: Headquarters, Royal Newfoundland Constabulary, 1 Fort Townshend, St. John's, NL, A1C 2G2, tel: 709-729-8000.

Court Records

Applicants who have been convicted of a crime in Canada should obtain a certified copy of court records from the clerk or registrar of the court in which they were convicted. Court records should state the section of the Canadian Criminal Code under which the applicant was convicted, the disposition of the case, and the penalty imposed, if any. Court records must also indicate whether the case was handled as a summary or indictable offense.

Canadian pardons have no effect under U.S. law. Applicants who have been convicted of a crime in Canada that was subsequently pardoned must contact an RCMP office to obtain both a Certified Criminal Record Check and copies of their pardoned criminal record. See "Police Records" above.

In cases of controlled substance violations (such as drug possession, sales, or trafficking), court records should indicate the type and quantity of substance involved. If court records do not include this information, applicants should seek to obtain it from the records of the police service that investigated the case or the Crown prosecutor's office that prosecuted it.

Prison Records

Unavailable.

Military Records

Applicants who are currently members of the Canadian Forces or who were released less than five years ago should send their requests to Director, Access to Information and Privacy (DAIP), National Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0K2.

Library and Archives Canada maintains service records for ex-Canadian Forces members released more than five years. Applicants should write with their surname, full given name(s), date of birth, and service number or social insurance number to the Personnel Records Unit, Library and Archives Canada, 395 Wellington Street, Ottawa, ON, K1A 0N3. Additional information is available online.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

The current Canadian passport is a photodigitized document similar to the current U.S. passport and is evidence of Canadian citizenship. Unlike the U.S. passport, the current Canadian passport is valid only five years.

Canadian landed immigrants (also known as permanent residents) may present their national passports in conjunction with their Canadian Permanent Residence Cards. Consult the appropriate country's Reciprocity and Country Documents page for information about its passport. The Canadian permanent resident card is a durable, wallet-sized plastic card with a black-and-white photodigitized image of the bearer. It replaced the computer-generated IMM-1000 "Record of Landing" form in June 2002. Since January 1, 2004, Canadian permanent residents may no longer use the IMM-1000 to re-enter Canada by common carrier.

The current Certificate of Identity/Certificat d' identite is a photodigitized passport-style document with a light grey cover (though older, light brown, non-photodigitized versions remain in circulation). It is issued to persons who cannot obtain passports from their countries of nationality.

The current Travel Document/Titre de voyage is a photodigitized passport-style document with a blue cover (though older, non-photodigitized versions remain in circulation). It is issued to refugees in Canada (asylees in U.S terminology) who cannot obtain passports from their countries of nationality. It is analogous to a U.S. refugee travel document.

Other Records

Name Change Records

Change of name records are maintained by provinces and territories. Applicants who have legally changed their name other than by getting married (for example, after Canadian naturalization or after a divorce) should obtain a "Change of Name" certificate from the province or territory in which the name was changed. See "Birth, Marriage, and Death Records," above, for information on formats and obtaining such certificates.

Visa Issuing Posts

Ottawa (Embassy) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Address:
490 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario K1N 1G8

Tel: (613) 238-5335

Calgary (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Halifax (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Montreal (Consulate General) -- Immigrant and Nonimmigrant Visas

Quebec (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Toronto (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

Vancouver (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas

 

Visa Services

As noted above, Immigrant Visas are only available at the Montreal Consulate General. Nonimmigrant Visas are available in Montreal as well as the U.S. Embassy in Ottawa and the Consulates General in Calgary, Halifax, Montreal, Quebec, Toronto, and Vancouver.

Area Post
Abitibi Quebec
Alberta (Province) Calgary
Angoma (District) Toronto
Argenteuil Montreal
Arthabaska Quebec
Bagot Montreal
Beauc Quebec
Beauharnois Montreal
Bellehasse Quebec
Berther Montreal
Bonaventure Quebec
Brant Toronto
British Columbia (Province) Vancouver
Brome Montreal
Bruce Toronto
Carleton Ottawa
Chambly Montreal
Champlain Quebec
Charlevoix Quebec
Chateauguay Montreal
Chicoutimi Quebec
Cochrane (District) Toronto
Compton Montreal
Deux-Montagnes Montreal
Dorchester Quebec
Drummond Quebec
Dufferin Toronto
Durham Toronto
Dundas Ottawa
Elgin Toronto
Essex Toronto
Franklin (District) (Northwest Territories) Montreal
Frontenac, Ontario Ottawa
Frontenac, Quebec Quebec
Gaspe (East and West) Quebec
Gatineau Ottawa
Glengarry Ottawa
Grenville Ottawa
Grey Toronto
Haldimand Toronto
Haliburton Toronto
Halton Toronto
Hastings Toronto
Hochelaga Montreal
Hull Ottawa
Huntingdon Montreal
Huron Toronto
Iberville Montreal
Jacques Cartier Montreal
Joliette Montreal
Kamouraska Quebec
Keewatin (District) (Northwest Territories) Calgary
Kenora (District) Toronto
Kent Toronto
Labelle Ottawa
Lambton Toronto
Lanark Ottawa
Laprairie Montreal
L'Assomption Montreal
Laval Montreal
Leeds Ottawa
Lennox and Addington Toronto
Levis Quebec
Lincoln Toronto
L'Islet Quebec
Lotbiniere Quebec
Mackenzie (District)
Manitoba (Province) Calgary
Manitoulin (District) Toronto
Maskinonge Montreal
Matane Quebec
Megantic Quebec
Middlesex Toronto
Missisquoi Montreal
Montcalm Montreal
Montmagny Quebec
Montmorency Quebec
Muskoka (District) Toronto
Napierville Montreal
New Brunswick (Province) Halifax
Newfoundland (Province) Halifax
Nicolet Quebec
Nipissing (District) Toronto
Norfolk Toronto
Northumberland Toronto
Northwest Territories [Refer to Listed District]
Nova Scotia (Province) Halifax
Ontario (Province) [Refer to Listed District]
Ontario (County) Toronto
Oxford Toronto
Papineau Ottawa
Parry Sound Toronto
Peel Toronto
Perth Toronto
Peterborough Toronto
Pontiac Ottawa
Portneuf Quebec
Prescott Ottawa
Prince Edward (County) Toronto
Prince Edward Island (Province) Halifax
Quebec (Province) [Refer to Listed County or District]
Quebec (County) Quebec
Rainy River (District) Toronto
Renfrew Ottawa
Richelieu Montreal
Richmond Montreal
Rimouski Quebec
Rouville Montreal
Russell Ottawa
Saguenay Quebec
Saskatchewan (Province) Calgary
Saint-Hyacinthe Montreal
Saint-Jean Montreal
Saint Maurice Quebec
Saint Pierre et Miquelon (French Overseas Territory) Halifax
Shefford Montreal
Sherbrooke Montreal
Simcoe Toronto
Soulanges Montreal
Stanstead Montreal
Stormont Ottawa
Sudbury (District) Toronto
Temiscamingue Ottawa
Temiscouata Quebec
Terrebonne Montreal
Thunder Bay (District) Toronto
Timiskaming (District) Toronto
Vaudreuil Montreal
Vercheres Montreal
Victoria Toronto
Waterloo Toronto
Welland Toronto
Wellington Toronto
Wentworth Toronto
Western Ontario Province Toronto
Windsor Toronto
Winnipeg (See Western Ontario) Calgary
Wolfe Quebec
Yamaska Montreal
York Toronto
Yukon Territory Vancouver

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

If you arrest or detain a Canadian national outside of business hours, please call the 24-hour Emergency Watch and Response Centre toll free at 1-888-949-9993.

Washington, DC (202) 682-1740 (202) 448-6502

Notifications for: Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia


Atlanta, GA (404) 532-2000 (404) 532-2050

Notifications for: Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee


Boston, MA (617) 262-3760 (617) 247-5190

Notifications for: Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont


Chicago, IL (312) 616-1860 (312) 616-1877

Notifications for: Illinois, Missouri, Wisconsin and the following counties in Indiana - Jasper, Lake, Laporte, Newton and Porter


Dallas, TX (214) 922-9806 (214) 922-9296

Notifications for: Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas


Denver, CO (303) 626-0640 (303) 572-1158

Notifications for: Colorado, Kansas, Montana, Utah and Wyoming


Detroit, MI (313) 567-2340 (313) 567-2164 (313) 567-2164

Notifications for: Indiana excluding Jasper, Lake, Laporte, Newton and Porter, Kentucky, Michigan and Ohio


Los Angeles, CA (213) 346-2700 (213) 346-2790

Notifications for: Arizona, Southern California and Nevada


Miami, FL (305) 579-1600 (305) 374-6774

Notifications for: Florida, Puerto Rico (emergency travel documents only) and U.S. Virgin Islands


Minneapolis, MN (612) 333-4641 (612) 332-4061

Notifications for: Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota


New York, NY (212) 596-1600 (212) 596-1666

Notifications for: Connecticut, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania


San Francisco, CA (415) 834-3180 (415) 834-3189

Notifications for: Hawaii (assisted by the Australian Consulate in Honolulu) and Northern California


Seattle, WA (206) 443-1777 (206) 443-9662

Notifications for: Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington State

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Ottawa
490 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario
K1N 1G8, Canada
Telephone
+(613) 688-5335
Emergency
+(613) 238-5335
Fax
+(613) 688-3082
Canada Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.