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International Travel

English

Country Information

Ecuador

Country Information

Ecuador
Republic of Ecuador
Last Updated: October 4, 2017
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Embassy Messages

Quito
Guayaquil

 

 

Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

1 page per stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

No, for stays less than 90 days in any 12-month period

VACCINATIONS:

Yellow fever, if traveling in the Amazon Basin or to other South American destinations

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

None 

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

There is a 5 percent tax on currency taken out of Ecuador above $1098.00. See the Ecuadorian Revenue Service website

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Quito

Ave. Avigiras E12-170 y Ave. Eloy Alfaro 
Quito, Ecuador
Telephone: +(593)(2) 398-5000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(593)(2) 398-5000
Fax: +(593)(2) 398-5100

Consulates

U.S. Consulate General Guayaquil
Santa Ana St. and Jose Rodriguez Bonin Ave.
San Eduardo, Ecuador
Telephone: +(593)(4) 371-7000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(593)(4) 371-7000
Fax: +(593)(4) 371-7045

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Ecuador for information on U.S. – Ecuador relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

If you are traveling for business or tourism, you do not need a visa for stays of up to 90 days in any 12-month period.  You can request an extension through provincial migration offices.  Additional information is available on the Ecuadorian Ministry of Interior website.

  • If you are planning a visit longer than 90 days, you must obtain a visa in advance.  Visit the Embassy of Ecuador website for the most current visa information.
  • You must carry identification, including proof of U.S. citizenship. Carry a photocopy of your passport (including the entry stamp and/or visa) with you at all times.
  • If your passport is lost or stolen while you are in Ecuador, you should obtain a police report and apply for a new passport at the U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate General. We also recommend obtaining an entry/exit report from an Ecuadorian immigration office before leaving the country.  For further information, see the Ecuadorian Ministry of Interior website, as well as Mission Ecuador's website.
  • U.S. citizens born in Ecuador are required to show an Ecuadorian passport or national ID card upon entering and exiting Ecuador.  More information is available on Mission Ecuador's website.
  • U.S. citizen children born in Ecuador who are traveling without one or both parents must present a copy of a birth certificate and written authorization from the absent parent(s).  If the parent is deceased, a notarized copy of the death certificate is required.  For more information, see Mission Ecuador's website.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Ecuador.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction, and customs regulations on the State Department's website.

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Safety and Security

Exercise caution when traveling to northern Ecuador, especially the provinces of Carchi, northern Esmeraldas, and Sucumbíos.  U.S. government personnel may travel to the northern bank of the Napo River in Sucumbíos, where tourist lodges are located, an area approximately four miles wide.  All other U.S. government travel to the northern border area is prohibited without prior permission.  This region has a high rate of ransom kidnappings.  U.S. citizens are not targeted, but have been kidnapped there in the past.  

Crime: Crime is a widespread problem in Ecuador.

  • Pick-pocketing, robbery, and hotel room theft are the most common crimes.  Tourists have been robbed at gunpoint on beaches and along hiking trails.  Passengers arriving at the Quito and Guayaquil airports have also been targets of armed robberies.
  • Use hotel safes if available, avoid wearing obviously expensive jewelry or clothing, and carry only the cash or credit cards that you need.  Stay alert in crowds and on public transportation.  Be aware that thieves might create distractions to target you.
  • Be alert for express kidnappings, in which criminals enter a taxi and force victims to withdraw money from ATMs.  Some victims have been beaten or raped.  Avoid hailing taxis on the street.  Order taxis by phone or use a service affiliated with major hotels.  Avoid withdrawing large amounts of cash at one time.  Use ATMs in well-protected indoor areas.
  • To avoid carjacking or theft from your car while you are stopped at intersections, drive with your doors locked and windows rolled up. Do not leave valuables in plain view.
  • Sexual assaults and rapes can occur, even in tourist areas.  Travel in groups, do not leave food or drinks unattended, and never allow a stranger to give you a drink.
  • Do not let your credit card out of your sight in order to avoid credit card “skimming.”
  • Incapacitating drugs, such as rohypnol and scopolamine, have been used to facilitate violent robberies and sexual assaults.

See the Department of State and the FBI webpages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: Report crimes to the local police by calling 911. In Quito, you can visit an Ecuadorian Tourist Security Service Attention Center.  You should also contact the U.S. Embassy at +593-2-398-5000 or the U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil at +593-4-371-7000

Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.

See the State Department’s webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.  Information about victim’s assistance programs in Ecuador is available on the Mission Ecuador website.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide information on victim’s compensation programs in the United States.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical
  • support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy or Consulate General for assistance.

Civil Unrest:  Demonstrations occur frequently.  Protesters often block roads and sometimes burn tires, throw rocks, and damage other personal property.

  • Police may respond using water cannons and tear gas.
  • Avoid demonstrations and prepare back-up transportation plans. Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent with little or no warning.

Messages regarding demonstrations and strikes, explosive devices/suspicious packages, and weather-related events are posted on Mission Ecuador’s website.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:  You are subject to local laws.  If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

  • Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking illegal drugs in Ecuador are severe.  Offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
  • Never agree to carry a suitcase or package through customs for anyone.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law.  For examples, see the State Department’s website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate General immediately.  See the State Department’s webpage for further information.

Seismic Activity:  There are numerous active volcanoes, and earthquakes are common.  Earthquakes can trigger deadly tsunamis.  Visit Ecuador’s National Risk Management Secretariat and the Ecuadorian Geophysical Institute for more information.

  • Mud or lava flows from Tungurahua volcano could pose a significant and immediate threat to travelers in Baños.
  • The town of Latacunga is directly in the path of potential mud or lava flow from the Cotopaxi volcano.  Even small emissions from the volcano can trigger avalanches and landslides.  Low lying areas in the greater Quito area could also be affected if Cotopaxi erupts.
  • In the event of a natural disaster, pay attention to the news media for updates. 
  • See the Center for Disease Control website for information on emergency preparedness and response.

Hallucinogens:  Traditional hallucinogens, often referred to as ayahuasca or San Pedro, are often marketed to tourists as ”spiritual cleansing,” and typically contain dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a strong hallucinogen that is illegal in the United States, Ecuador, and many other countries.  Health risks are not well understood, and, on occasion, people suffer serious illness or death after taking these drugs.  Intoxicated travelers also have been assaulted and robbed.  These incidents often occur a great distance from medical facilities, making the risks even greater.  

Galápagos Islands: Be aware of the following challenges:

  • Many Ecuadorian tour vessels operating in the Galápagos do not meet international safety standards.  Inquire about safety features when boarding vessels.
  • The two hospitals on Santa Cruz and San Cristobal Islands do not perform major medical procedures.
  • Serious injury or illness in the Galapagos typically requires medical evacuation to the Ecuadorian mainland or the United States.  This can cost $60,000 or more and take significant time to arrange.  We strongly recommend you purchase travel insurance that includes health coverage and air evacuation.
  • There are limited decompression facilities for scuba divers.
  • The Ecuadorian government restricts the entry of certain items into the Galapagos.  Visit the Agency for Biosecurity and Quarantine Regulation and Control for the Galapagos for more information.

Retiring in Ecuador:  In recent years, Ecuador has become a top overseas destination for retiring U.S. citizens.

  • U.S. citizens have reported unethical practices by lawyers, real estate agents, and others, resulting in costly losses and little hope of remedy through the local judicial system.
  • Ecuadorian rules governing visas and customs are subject to change with little notice.  The Ecuadorian government publishes little information in English. The U.S. Embassy and U.S. Consulate General cannot give detailed advice about Ecuadorian immigration law.

Faith-Based Travelers:  See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Ecuador.  Same-sex marriage is prohibited, but civil unions are allowed.  LGBTI individuals may face discrimination.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Travelers with disabilities might have difficulty accessing buildings.  Sidewalks in some areas are narrow and poorly maintained.

Students:  See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers:  See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

Adequate medical and dental care is available in major cities.  In smaller communities and in the Galapagos Islands, services are limited, and the quality is generally well below U.S. standards.

  • Ambulance service is limited.
  • Specialized medical care can cost tens of thousands of dollars.
  • Pharmacies are widely available.  However, some medications might not be offered, and brand names will differ from products in the United States.
  • Exercise caution if you explore herbal and folk remedies.
  • Quito is 9,400 feet above sea level.  Some other tourist destinations in the mountainous region may be higher.  Consult your doctor for recommendations concerning medication and lifestyle tips at high altitude.

We do not pay medical bills.  Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.  See the State Department’s webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.  Carry proof of health of insurance at all times.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Ecuador’s National Customs Service for personal use procedures.  Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

The following diseases are present:

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:  Some roads are poorly maintained and may lack crash barriers, guard rails, signs, and streetlights.  Heavy fog and rain make conditions more treacherous.

  • Due to a lack of sidewalks, many roads are also used by pedestrians.
  • Slow-moving buses and trucks frequently stop in the middle of the road unexpectedly.
  • In rural areas, you may encounter livestock in the road.
  • Many vehicles are poorly maintained and breakdowns are common.

Traffic Laws:  You may use your U.S. driver’s license for up to 90 days.  If you are staying in Ecuador longer, you should contact the National Transit Agency to obtain a valid driver’s license.

  • Drivers often disobey traffic laws and signals.  They rarely yield to pedestrians and cyclists.
  • If you are involved in an accident, even if you are not at fault, you may be taken into police custody, especially if there are injuries or if you do not have insurance.  If the injuries or damages are serious, you may face criminal charges.
  • You might encounter intoxicated drivers.  Chances of a drunk-driving accident are higher on weekends and Ecuadorian holidays.
  • If you want to import a vehicle, contact Ecuador’s National Customs Service for local regulations.  You must pay for local liability insurance, called SPPAT.

Public Transportation:  Intra- and inter-city bus passengers are often targets of crime, including robbery and sexual assault.  

  • Armed criminals have been known to board local city buses and rob passengers.
  • Numerous bus accidents occur every year in Ecuador.  Many buses are overcrowded, poorly maintained, and lack safety features such as seat belts.  

See the State Department’s Road Safety page for more information.  Visit the website of Ecuador's national tourist office and national authority responsible for road safety.

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Ecuador’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Ecuador’s air carrier operations.  Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Ecuador should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts.  Information may also be posted to the  U.S. Coast Guard homeport website, and the NGA broadcast warnings website (click “Broadcast Warnings”).

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Quito

Ave. Avigiras E12-170 y Ave. Eloy Alfaro 
Quito, Ecuador
Telephone: +(593)(2) 398-5000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(593)(2) 398-5000
Fax: +(593)(2) 398-5100

Consulates

U.S. Consulate General Guayaquil
Santa Ana St. and Jose Rodriguez Bonin Ave.
San Eduardo, Ecuador
Telephone: +(593)(4) 371-7000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(593)(4) 371-7000
Fax: +(593)(4) 371-7045

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General Information

Ecuador and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction Convention (Hague Abduction Convention) since April 1, 1992.

For information concerning travel to Ecuador, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, health conditions, currency and entry regulations, and crime and security, please see country-specific information for Ecuador.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizen Services, Office of Children’s Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Ecuador.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children’s Issues
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Fax: 202-485-6221
Website

The Ecuadorian Central Authority (ECA) is the Edificio del Ministerio de Inclusión Económica y Social (MIES). The office can be reached at:

Autoridad Central
Subsecretaria de protección especial
Edificio del Ministerio de Inclusión Económica y Social (MIES)
1er piso
Quito, Ecuador
Telephone: +593(2)398 3000 Ext.5152
E-mail
Website

To initiate a Hague case for return or for access to a child abducted to Ecuador, the left-behind parent must submit a Hague application to the ECA, either directly or through the USCA.  The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to ECA, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the United States or Ecuadorian central authorities.  Attorney fees, if necessary, are the sole responsibility of the person hiring the attorney.  Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Ecuador.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Ecuador. The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand Ecuador-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Retaining an Attorney

Retaining a private attorney is not required in order to file Hague Abduction Convention with courts in Ecuador. The ECA will act on behalf of the left-behind parent when a private attorney is not retained. Beginning in January 2012, per an agreement entered with ECA, the Ecuadorian Office of Public Defenders assumed the role of legal representation on behalf of the ECA for left-behind parents in Hague Convention cases.    

The U.S. Embassy in Quito maintains a list of attorneys. Additionally, the US Consulate General in Guayaquil maintains a list of attorneys that specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The Ecuadorian Central Authority strongly promotes mediation in abduction cases and will attempt to initiate mediation in all Hague Abduction Convention cases. 

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Adoptions to the United States from Ecuador and from the United States to Ecuador are possible.

See our section on Adoptions from the United States for more information on the process for adopting a child from the United States. 

Ecuador is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoption processing in Hague countries is done in accordance with the requirements of the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation; the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); the IAA’s implementing regulations; and the implementing legislation and regulations of Ecuador.

Ecuadorian law does not allow an Ecuadorian child to travel to the United States to be adopted. Therefore, prospective adoptive parents must obtain a full and final adoption under Ecuadorian law before the child can immigrate to the United States.

Ecuadorian law gives preference to adoptions to Ecuadorian nationals living in Ecuador. Intercountry adoptions are limited to exceptional cases which involve children with disabilities and/or older than four years of age and/or groups of siblings who have not been able to be placed with local families. Prospective adoptive parents seeking to adopt a blood relative in Ecuador (such as a nephew, niece, grandchild, or great-grandchild) should contact the Ecuadorian Central Authority prior to beginning the adoption process.

Note: Special transition provisions apply to adoptions initiated before April 1, 2008. Read about Transition Cases.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Ecuador, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee under U.S. law in order to immigrate to the United States on an IH-3 or IH-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to the U.S. requirements, prospective adoptive parents need to meet Ecuador’s requirements to adopt a child from Ecuador:

  • Residency: There are no minimum residency requirements to adopt in Ecuador. However, both prospective adoptive parent(s), if applicable, must be present to complete the adoption in Ecuador. This process typically takes 6 to 8 weeks. Once an adoption decree is issued, at least one parent is required to remain in Ecuador with the child to complete the adoption process, usually an additional week.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: If married, both parents must be over 25 years of age and have been married for more than three years. There must be an age difference of at least 14 years between the younger parent and the child and no more than 45 years between the older parent and the child.
  • Marriage: Both single and married individuals may apply to adopt. Ecuadorian law only recognizes opposite sex marriages. An unmarried (single, widowed, divorced) adoptive parent may only adopt a child of the same sex, unless the National Adoption Agency issues a favorable report for adoption of a child of the opposite sex. Priority is given to married prospective parents. 
  • Income: Prospective adoptive parents must demonstrate the means to support the physical, emotional and financial needs of the child. 
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Who Can Be Adopted

Because Ecuador is party to The Hague Adoption Convention, children from Ecuador must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. For example, the adoption may take place only if the competent authorities of Ecuador determine placement of the child within Ecuador has been given due consideration and an intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interest. In addition to Ecuador’s requirements, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee to be eligible for an immigrant visa to bring him or her to the United States.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Abandonment: Children who have been declared abandoned by a judge are eligible for intercountry adoption. The abandonment is formalized with a decree called “Sentencia de Adoptabilidad.”
  • Age of Adoptive Child: The Central Authority matches children of all ages. However, children older than four years have adoption priority. 
  • Sibling Adoptions: The Central Authority prioritizes the adoption of sibling groups.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: The Central Authority prioritizes the adoption of children with special needs or medical conditions.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Matching periods range from several months to years.  
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How to Adopt

WARNING: Do not adopt or obtain legal custody of a child in Ecuador before a U.S. consular officer issues a letter (referred to as a Hague Adoption Convention “Article 5 Letter”) to Ecuador’s Central Authority. The letter is issued in any intercountry adoption involving U.S. citizen parents and a child from Ecuador when all Convention requirements are met and the consular officer determines the child appears eligible to immigrate to the United States. Read on for more information.

Ecuador’s Adoption Authority

Subsecretaria de Protección Especial
Ministerio de Inclusión Económica y Social

The Process

Because Ecuador is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adopting from Ecuador must follow a specific process. A brief summary is given below. You must complete these steps.  Adoptions completed out of order may result in the child not being eligible for an immigrant visa to the United States.

  1. Choose a U.S. accredited Adoption Service Provider approved to operate in Ecuador
  2. Apply with USCIS for Determination of Suitability to Adopt
  3. Be matched with a child by authorities in Ecuador
  4. Apply to USCIS to determine the child’s eligibility for classification as a Convention adoptee
  5. Full and Final Adoption of child in Ecuador
  6. Apply for an immigrant visa for your child in order to return home

1. Choose a U.S. accredited Adoption Service Provider Approved to Operate in Ecuador

The recommended first step in adopting a child from Ecuador is to select an Adoption Service Provider accredited in the United States to provide such services. Only these agencies may act as the primary provider in your case and are responsible to act in accordance with The Hague Adoption Convention and U.S. laws and regulations. Learn more about Agency Accreditation.

To obtain updated information regarding which U.S. Adoption Service Providers are authorized by the Ecuadorian Central Authority, prospective adoption parents may contact the U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil or the Central Authority directly.

2.  Apply with USCIS for Determination of Suitability to Adopt

After you choose an accredited Adoption Service Provider, you must apply to be found eligible to adopt by the responsible U.S. government agency, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), by submitting Form I-800A. Read more about Eligibility Requirements.

Once USCIS determines you are “eligible” and “suited” to adopt by approving the Form I-800A, your adoption service provider will provide your approval notice, home study, and any other required information to the adoption authority in Ecuador as part of your adoption dossier. Ecuador’s adoption authority will review your application to determine whether you are also eligible to adopt under Ecuador’s law. This process may take up to one year, or longer.

3.  Be Matched with a Child by Authorities in Ecuador

If both the United States and Ecuador determine you are eligible to adopt and the Central Authority determines a child is available for adoption and intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interests, the Central Authority in Ecuador may provide you with a referral for a child. The referral is a proposed match between you and a specific child based on a review of your dossier and the needs of a specific child in Ecuador. The Central Authority will provide a background study and other information, if available, about the child to help you decide whether or not to accept the referral. Prospective adoptive parent(s) must express acceptance of the referral in writing. Each family must decide whether or not it will be able to meet the needs and provide a permanent home for a particular child. If you accept the referral, the Adoption Service Provider communicates the decision to the Central Authority. Learn more about this critical decision.

4.  Apply to USCIS to Determine the Child’s Eligibility for Classification as a Convention Adoptee

After you accept a match with a child, you will apply to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for provisional approval for the child to immigrate to the United States (Form I-800). USCIS will make a provisional determination as to whether the child meets the definition of a Convention Adoptee and will be eligible to enter the United States and reside permanently as an immigrant.

After provisional approval of Form I-800, your Adoption Service Provider or you will submit an immigrant visa application to the Consular Section of the U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil, Ecuador. This is the only designated location for issuing immigrant visas in Ecuador. A consular officer will review the Form I-800 and the visa application for possible visa ineligibilities and advise you of options for the waiver of any noted ineligibilities.

5.  Full and Final Adoption of child in Ecuador

  • NOTE: For children adopted by two parents, Ecuadorian law requires both parents travel to Ecuador for the official integration period with the child and for the initial court date. Only one parent is required to remain in Ecuador following the initial hearing with the judge. Should one parent choose to return to the United States, the departing parent must go to an Ecuadorian notary to prepare a travel authorization to be then presented to the court for final adoption paperwork. The Family, Childhood and Adolescence Court Unit (Unidades Judiciales de Familia, Mujer, Niñez y Adolescencia) will annotate its authorization for the one parent to travel out of Ecuador with the adopted child. 

The process for finalizing the adoption in Ecuador generally includes the following:

  • Role of Adoption Authority: The Central Authority oversees the entire adoption process and issues the Certificate of Conformity (Article 23 letter).
  • Role of the Court: After the integration period, provisional custody is awarded to the prospective adoptive parents. The orphanage will issue a report attesting to the compatibility and bonding of the child and the prospective adoptive parents. The report is reviewed by the Technical Adoption Unit and then the Adoptive Service Provider files the petition before the court. The judge will review the application, including the integration report, all supporting documents, psychological reports and financial statements. The prospective adoptive parents will then appear in court to finalize the adoption. The adoption decree becomes final three days after issuance. At that point, the adoptive parent(s) can obtain a birth certificate for their child from the Civil Registry Office. The new birth certificate will include the name(s) of the parent(s) and the new name for the child as per the adoption decree. With this new birth certificate, the parent(s) (or the Adoption Service Provider on their behalf) can obtain an Ecuadorian identity card (cedula) and an Ecuadorian passport for the child.  
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: The Government of Ecuador requires prospective adoptive parents work through an accredited U.S. Adoption Service Provider that has signed an agreement with the Government of Ecuador. The agency can provide you with an estimate of costs associated with the adoption process. A list of these agencies may be obtained from the U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil. Before traveling to Ecuador, we recommend you confirm with the Adoption Service Provider the services they provide in-country. Although the Ecuadorian government requires Adoption Service Providers assist and guide you through the adoption process in Ecuador, families report differing levels of support.
  • Time Frame: Once in Ecuador, following the issuance of the Article 5 Letter, the process generally takes approximately six to eight weeks. 
  • Adoption Fees: In the adoption services contract you sign at the beginning of the adoption process, your agency should itemize the fees and estimated expenses related to your adoption process. The Central Authority does not charge for administrative processing.
  • Some of the fees (excluding airfare and lodging) specifically associated with adopting from Ecuador typically include: translations, notarial services, a new birth certificate, an Ecuadorian passport, and a medical exam fee, all of which typically adds up to about $400. 
  • Documents Required: Note:  For any documents from the United States, certifications, notarizations and apostilles must be completed in the United States before the prospective adoptive parents travel to Ecuador or prior to submitting the application for adoption. Translations may be completed while in Ecuador. Additional documents may be requested at any stage of the adoption.  
  • The following documents are required by the Central Authority:
    • Original birth certificates for the prospective adoptive parent(s)
    • Marriage certificate, if applicable
    • Divorce certificate(s), if applicable
    • Death certificate, if the prospective adoptive parent is widow(er)
    • Copy of passport(s)
    • Copy of the applicable state law regulating adoptions in the prospective adoptive parents’ state of residence
    • Copy of the Home Study Report submitted as part of the I-800A
    • Police reports from the place of residence of the prospective adoptive parents
    • Job letters verifying employment and salary   
    • Latest available Income Tax Return
    • Adoption Service Provider certification of Suitability to Adopt for prospective adoptive parent(s) 
  • Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof a document from the United States is authentic. The United States and Ecuador are parties to the Hague Apostille Convention. U.S. public documents may be authenticated with Apostilles by the appropriate U.S. Competent Authority in the United States.

6.  Apply for an Immigrant Visa for your Child in Order to Return Home

Once your adoption is complete, you need to apply for the following documents before your child can travel to the United States:

Birth Certificate

Once the adoption is finalized, apply for a birth certificate for your child. The Adoption Service Provider should be able to assist you obtaining the new birth certificate from the Civil Registry.

Ecuadorian Passport

Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a passport from Ecuador. You can apply for an Ecuadorian passport for your child at any of the passport offices throughout the country.  The passport fee is $70 and passports may be processed and ready the same day.

Certificate of Conformity (Article 23 Letter)

The Adoption Service Provider will deliver the adoption decree to the Central Authority in order to obtain a Certificate of Conformity (Article 23 Letter). This letter will be required at the time of the immigrant visa interview. Verify all of your biographical information and the biographical information of your adopted child is correct.

U.S. Immigrant Visa

After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, visit the U.S Consulate in Guayaquil, Ecuador for final review of the case, issuance of a U.S. Hague Adoption Certificate, final approval of Form I-800, and your child’s immigrant visa. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you.  As part of this process, the consular officer must be provided the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child, if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage. Read more about the Medical Examination.

Once you have the documents listed above, you or your Adoption Service Provider may request an immigrant visa interview by emailing the request and a copy of the child’s passport biographical data page to IVGuayaquil@state.gov. The Consulate prioritizes adoption immigrant visa requests. The Consulate will also provide information on how to update the child’s information for his immigrant visa application (DS-260).

On the day of the interview, you and your child should come to the Consulate in Guayaquil at your scheduled time and bring:

  • Child’s Ecuadorian passport
  • Child’s birth certificate
  • Certificate of Conformity (Article 23 Letter)
  • Final adoption decree
  • Medical examination

For Ecuador, immigrant visa cases are only processed at the U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil. 

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States:  A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

*If your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important you take the steps necessary so your child does qualify as soon as possible.  Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.  Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

U.S. citizens are required to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Ecuador requires U.S. passports have at least six months validity beyond the travel dates.  Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Ecuador

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Ecuador, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Ecuador, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

Post-Adoption/Post-Placement Reporting Requirements

Ecuador requires a minimum of five post-adoption reports to be forwarded to the Ecuador’s Central Authority during the first two years after the child’s adoption at the following intervals: four months, eight months, twelve months, eighteen months, and twenty-four months.

We urge you to complete all post-adoption reports in a timely manner.  

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil
Mailing Address:
Department of State
ATTN: Immigrant Visa Unit
3430 Guayaquil Place
Washington DC 20521-3430

Street Address:
Calle Santa Ana y Av. José Rodríguez Bonín
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Tel: (011-593-4) 371-7000, extensions: 7169/7047
(011-593-4) 371-7000 (after hours emergencies)

Ecuador’s Adoption Authority
Subsecretaria de Protección Especial
Ministerio de Inclusión Económica y Social
Venezuela OE4-131 entre Espejo y Sucre
Quito, Ecuador
Tel: +593-2-398-300
Tel: +593-2-257-308
Website: http://www.inclusion.gob.ec  

Embassy of Ecuador
2535 15th Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20009
Tel: (202) 234-7200
Fax: (202) 667-3482
Email: consuladodc@ecuador.org
Website: http://ecuador.org

Ecuador also has consulates in Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, Newark, New Haven, New York, Phoenix, and San Francisco.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI, SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
Email: Adoption@state.gov
Internet: adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-800A or I-800 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email: NBC.Hague@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 60 Months
B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 None Two 3 Months
E-2C 12 None Two 3 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

General Document Information:

Documents must be obtained personally by the interested party or by a representative with a power of attorney signed by the interested party.

Since experience has shown that Ecuadorian civil documents may contain erroneous information, even though they may actually have been obtained from the correct local authority, the Embassy in Quito and the Consulate General in Guayaquil are pleased to assist in verifying Ecuadorian documents submitted at other consular posts. Posts are advised to exercise caution while reviewing Ecuadorian documents. Original documents are always preferred over copies.

General Issuing Authority Information:

The Direccion General de Registro Civil, Identificacion y Cedulacion is the national civil records registry for Ecuador. The Corporacion Registro Civil de Guayaquil is the city’s civil registry entity.

 

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available 

Fees: $3.00
Document Name:  “Inscripción de Nacimiento” issued by the National Civil Registry and “Libro de Nacimientos” issued by the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Issuing Authority: The Civil Registry (Registro Civil) offices nationwide and the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Documents from the Civil Registry (Registro Civil Nacional) will have a seal with an original signature from the Civil Registry delegate.  Documents from Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil will have a scanned signature from the delegate.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Civil Registry delegate
Registration Criteria: The person or persons registering the child must present a current I.D. (cédula) and the certificate of live birth (Certificado de Nacido Vivo) with the seal of the Public Health Office (Ministerio de Salud Pública) or the seal of the hospital where the child was born, with the signature of the doctor who performed the birth. If the child was born in wedlock, only one parent needs to be present to register the child.  If the child was born out of wedlock, both parents must be present at the time of registration. Registrations of birth are free if done within 30 days of the birth.   Registrations made after 30 days of the birth are considered late registrations, but if made before the person turns 18 years old, they have  no cost. For late registrations made after the person turns 18 years old, the cost is $2.00 at the CRCG and $5.00 at the National Civil Registry.
Procedure for Obtaining: Documents must be obtained personally by the interested party or by a representative with a power of attorney signed by the interested party.
Certified Copies Available: Certified copies of birth certificates are available.
Alternate Documents:  While it is possible to acquire various types of birth certificates or entries, the only acceptable documents are the ones listed before. The following documents are not acceptable: “Partida de Nacimiento” and “Certificado de Nacimiento”.
Exceptions: If documentation of the birth is not available, the Civil Registry will issue a letter stating as such.
Comments: Only certified original copies of the birth certificates with the appropriate seal of the civil registry office are accepted.

 

Death Certificates

 

Available
Fees:
 $ 3.00
Document Name: “Inscripción de Defunción” or “Certificado de Defunción” issued by the National Civil Registry and “Libro de Defunciones” or “Certificado de Defunción” issued by the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Issuing Authority: The Civil Registry (Registro Civil) offices nationwide and the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Documents from Civil Registry (Registro Civil Nacional) will have a seal with an original signature from the Civil Registry delegate.  Documents from Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil will have a scanned signature from the delegate.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Civil Registry delegate.
Registration Criteria: The person registering the death must present a valid I.D. (cédula) of themselves, an I.D. (cédula) of the deceased person, a certification of the death (Estadistico de defunción del INEC) with the seal of the hospital where the death occurred and the original signature and seal of the doctor who declared the death.  The registration of the death is free if done within 48 hours of the death.  If done more than 48 hours after the death, the registration costs $5.00 at National Civil Registry or $2.00 at Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Procedure for Obtaining: Documents can be obtained at the Civil Registry offices nationwide by the interested party or by a representative of the interested party with a power of attorney signed by the interested party.
Certified Copies Available: Certified copies of death certificates are available.
Alternate Documents: While it is possible to acquire various types of death certificates or entries, the only acceptable documents are the ones listed before. The following document is not acceptable: “Partida de Defunción” issued by the National Civil Registry.
Exceptions: N/A
Comments: N/A

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available

Fees: $ 3.00
Document Name: : “Inscripción de Matrimonio” issued by the National Civil Registry and “Libro de Matrimonio” issued by the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Issuing Authority: The Civil Registry (Registro Civil) offices nationwide and the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil 
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Documents from Civil Registry (Registro Civil Nacional) will have a seal with an original signature from the Civil Registry delegate.  Documents from Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil will have a scanned signature from the delegate.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Civil Registry delegate
Registration Criteria: Both spouses must present an original I.D. (cédula) and voting certificate (certificado de votación).  They must also be accompanied by two witnesses with their I.D.s and voting certificates.  For weddings performed at the National Civil Registry, the fee is $50.00.  For weddings conducted by the National Civil Registry but performed off-site,  the fee is $250.00.  For weddings in the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil, the fee is $- 39.00.  For weddings conducted by the Corporación  Registro Civil but performed off-site, the fee is $ 195.00.
Procedure for Obtaining: Documents must be obtained personally by the interested party or by a representative with a power of attorney signed by the interested party at the Civil Registry offices nationwide.
Certified Copies Available: Certified copies of marriage certificates are available
Alternate Documents: While it is possible to acquire various types of marriage certificates or entries, the only acceptable documents are the ones listed before. The following document is not acceptable: “Certificado de Matrimonio”.
Exceptions: If documentation of the marriage is not available, the Civil Registry will issue a letter stating as such.
Comments: Non-Ecuadorian citizens must also present their passport with a valid visa or authorization to stay until the wedding date and a certificate verifying they are legally able to marry (if the non-Ecuadorian spouse is divorced or a widower he/she must present all divorce or death certificates).

 

Divorce Certificates

 

Available Fees: $ 3.00
Document Name: “Inscripción de Matrimonio” issued by the National Civil Registry and “Libro de Matrimonios” issued by the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil, with the appropriate divorce amendment.
Issuing Authority: The Civil Registry (Registro Civil) offices nationwide or the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format Documents from Civil Registry (Registro Civil Nacional) will have a seal with an original signature from the Civil Registry delegate.  Documents from Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil will have a scanned signature from the delegate
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Civil Registry delegate
Registration Criteria:  The interested party registering the divorce must present a divorce decree obtained from a court. The fee to register the divorce is $10.00 at National Civil Registry and $6.00 at Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Procedure for Obtaining: Documents can be obtained at the Civil Registry offices nationwide by the interested party or by a representative with a power of attorney signed by the interested party.
Certified Copies Available: Certified copies of marriage certificates with divorce annotation are available.
Alternate Documents: While it is possible to acquire various types of divorce certificates or entries, the only acceptable documents are the ones listed before. The following document is not acceptable: “Acta de Divorcio” issued by the Ecuadorian Court.
Exceptions: If documentation of the marriage is not available, the Civil Registry will issue a letter stating as such. 

 

Adoption Certificates

Available
Fees: $2.00
Document Name: Adoption decree (Sentencia de adopción)
Issuing Authority: Unidades Judiciales de Familia, Mujer, Niñez y Adolescencia or Juzgado de la Familia, Mujer, Niñez y Adolescencia.
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Original signatures from the Judge and the Secretary of the court in which the adoption was approved with a seal of the court.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: A Judge of the Juzgados o Unidades Judiciales de la Familia, Mujer, Niñez y Adolescencia.
Registration Criteria: Prospective adoptive parents should contact a U.S. Adoption Agency (approved by the Ecuadorian Government) to start the adoption process in Ecuador, which includes the home study, in order to be qualified as suitable adoptive parents.
Procedure for Obtaining: Adoptive parents should go to the court to request the adoption.
Certified Copies Available: Certified copies of adoption decree are available.
Comments: Following the issuance of an adoption decree, the judge will issue the order of the annulment the child's original birth certificate. The adoptive parents will then register their child at the civil registry and receive an Inscripción de Nacimiento or Certificado de Nacimiento from the Civil Registry (Registro Civil Nacional) or Libro de Nacimientos from Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil with the names of the adoptive parents and the adoption annotation. The fee for this registration is $15.00 at the National Civil Registry and $10.00 at the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.

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Identity Card

Available
Fees: $5.00 at National Civil Registry and $10.00 at Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil
Document Name: Cédula de identidad for children and Cédula de ciudadanía for adults 18 years or older.
Issuing Authority: The Civil Registry offices nationwide and the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Plastic card with biographic information.  The front side of the card has complete names, I.D. number, place of birth, date of birth, nationality, gender, marital status and signature.  The back has education level, profession, father’s complete name, mother’s complete name, place and date of issuance, date of expiration, and scanned signatures of the Civil Registry delegates.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Civil Registry delegate
Procedure for Obtaining: For first time registration of a minor, an adult family member must accompany the minor.  Adults registering the first time must present a notarized document which validates that they are who they claim to be (Información Sumaria ante un Notario Público). 

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Available
Fees: N/A
Document Name: Certificado de Antecedentes Penales
Issuing Authority: Ministry of Interior
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The police record can be printed from the Ministry of Interior website.
Procedure for Obtaining: On June 4, 2012, Ecuador eliminated the former printed certificate and implemented a webpage (www.ministeriodelinterior.gob.ec) where any person can review his own or someone else's police certificates online using an Ecuadorian national identification number or a passport number.
Exceptions: Certificado de Antecedentes Penales are not available for people under the age of 18.
Comments: The police record has a box that states "Posee Antecedentes" ("has a record"). If the box is marked "SI" ("YES"), applicants must bring their complete court records, along with an English translation, to the Consulate on the day of their interview. Failure to comply with this requirement on the day of the interview will delay visa processing. If the box is marked "NO," the applicant does not have a criminal record. Please note that this does not necessarily mean the subject has no police record, since police records can be purged upon the subject's request without judicial permission. Also, the "Certificado de Antecedentes Penales" only shows cases where a sentence has been delivered. Pending cases will not appear on this certificate. 

Court Records

Available
Fees: N/A
Document Name: Certificate from Criminal or Civil courts (Juzgado Penal or Juzgado Civil)
Issuing Authority: Every court around the country
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Court and prison records will have the original signature and personal seal of the Judge or the Secretary of the court and the seal of the court in which the request was made.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Judges from courts in all provinces of the country.
Procedure for Obtaining: The interested party needs to request the certificate through a lawyer, who will file a written request with each court in the city where the record is requested. The request should be filed with either the criminal or civil courts depending on the type of lawsuit. The response is received in three business days.

Prison Records

Available
Fees: N/A
Document Name: Certificate from Criminal or Civil courts (Juzgado Penal or Juzgado Civil)
Issuing Authority: Every court around the country
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Court and prison records will have the original signature and personal seal of the Judge or the Secretary of the court and the seal of the court in which the request was made.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Judges from courts in all provinces of the country.
Procedure for Obtaining: The interested party needs to request the certificate through a lawyer, who will file a written request with each court in the city where the record is requested. The request should be filed with either the criminal or civil courts depending on the type of lawsuit. The response is received in three business days.

Military Records

Unavailable.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Types Available (Regular, Diplomatic, Official, etc.): Regular, Special, Official, Apátrida (stateless or similar) and Diplomatic
Fees: $70 for Regular, Special, Official and Diplomatic passports (for applicants aged 65 and older, the price is $35; and there is no cost for people with a disability); $80 for Apátrida passport.
Document Name: Passport
Issuing Government Authority: For regular passports the issuing authority is the Chancellor’s Office, Embassy, Consulate or Governor’s Office if a Chancellor’s Office is not available. Only offices in Guayaquil, Quito and Cuenca are authorized to issue passports; all other offices will only collect information and capture pictures.  All other categories of passports can only be obtained at the Travel Document Directorate in Quito and Coordination Zone 5 Guayaquil (with the proper authorization).
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Regular passport is wine-colored with the Ecuadorian Shield in gold ink, and has on the first page a stamp of the city in which the passport was issued. Special passport is grey with the Ecuadorian Shield in gold ink; it has on the first page a stamp of the city in which the passport was issued, another stamp on the observations area that specifies the bearer’s position in the company where he/she works, and in the middle of the passport a Chancellor’s office stamp with the validity of the document (one month, three months or one year).  Official passport is green with the Ecuadorian Shield in gold ink; it has on the first page a stamp of the city in which the passport was issued, another stamp in the observations area that specifies the bearer’s position in the company where he/she works, and in the middle of the passport a Chancellor’s office stamp with the validity of the document (one month, three months or one year). Apátrida passport is blue with the Ecuadorian Shield in gold ink, and does not have stamps. It is issued to stateless persons or persons who for some reason are unable to obtain a passport from their country of citizenship. Diplomatic passport is black with the Ecuadorian Shield in gold ink. On the observations page there will be a stamp stating the bearer’s position within the relevant company or institution.  Additionally, a stamp from the Chancellor’s office will be placed in the middle of the passport stating the time that the bearer will remain in the assigned position (available options are one month, three months, or one year).
Registration Criteria: Documents must be obtained personally by the interested party.  In the case of a minor, both parents must be present with the minor.  If the minor’s parents are not present, the person accompanying the minor needs to present a power of attorney signed by the minor’s parents.
Procedure for Obtaining: To obtain an adult passport for first time, the interested party must present the original  personal I.D. (cédula) and voting certificate; for passport renewal the interested party must present the original  personal I.D., voting certificate and the current passport.  For a minor, the family must present the minor’s original I.D., and the originals of both parents’ I.D.s and voting certificates.
Comments: To obtain a Special passport, the interested party must comply with article 10 of the Travel Documents Law and articles 14 and 16 of the Travel Documents Law Regulations. To obtain an Official passport, the interested party must comply with article 9 of the Travel Documents Law and articles 14 and 16 of the Travel Documents Law Regulations. To obtain an Apátrida passport, the interested party must comply with articles 15 and 16 of the Travel Documents Law and article 25 of the Travel Documents Law Regulations. To obtain a Diplomatic passport, the interested party must comply with article 8 of the Travel Documents Law and articles 14, 15 and 16 of the Travel Documents Law Regulations. For more information check this website

Other Records

Enter text here.

Visa Issuing Posts


Quito, Ecuador (Embassy)-- Nonimmigrant Visas Only

Mailing Address:

CONS Quito, Ecuador
3420 Quito Place
Dulles, VA 20189

Street Address:

Avigiras E12-170 y Eloy Alfaro (next to SOLCA Hospital)

Phone Number: (011-593-2) 398-5000

(011-593-2) 398-5000 (after hours emergencies please follow the instructions

Guayaquil, Ecuador (Consulate General) -- All Categories

Mailing Address:

AMCONGEN Guayaquil, Ecuador
Department of State
3430 Guayaquil Place
Washington, DC 20521-3430

Street Address:

Calle Santa Ana y Avenida José Rodriguez Bonín

Phone Number: (011-593-4) 371-7000

011-593-4) 371-7000 (after hours emergencies please follow the instructions)

 

 

Visa Services

The United States Consulate General in Guayaquil handles the processing of all immigrant visas for the country. The following list provides the United States consular post that has jurisdiction of the issuance of nonimmigrant visas for the stated province.

Area Post
Azuay Guayaquil
Bolivar Quito
Canar Guayaquil
Carchi Quito
Chimboroazo Quito
Cotopaxi Quito
El Oro Guayaquil
Esmeraldas Quito
Galapagos Guayaquil
Guayas Guayaquil
Imbabura Quito
Loja Guayaquil
Los Rios Guayaquil
Manabi Guayaquil
Morona Santiago Quito
Napo Quito
Pastaza Quito
Pinchincha Quito
Santo Domingo de los Tsachilas Quito
Santa Elena Guayaquil
Sucumbios Quito
Tungurahua Quito
Zamora-Chichipe Guayaquil

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 234-7166 (202) 234-7200

Atlanta, GA (404) 841-2282 (404) 841-2276 (404) 841-2285

Chicago, IL (312) 338-1002 (312) 338-1003 (312) 338-1502

Houston, TX (713) 572-8731 (713) 572-8732

Los Angeles, CA (323) 658-5146 (323) 658-6020 (323) 658-1068 (323) 658-1198

Miami, FL (305) 373-8214 (305) 539-8215 (305) 593-8313

Minneapolis, MN (612) 721-6468 (612) 721-6484

New York, NY (212) 808-0170 (212) 808-0171 (212) 808-0188

Newark, NJ (973) 344-8837 (973) 344-8852 (973) 344-0008

New Haven, CT (203) 752-1947 (203) 752-0827 (203) 752-1389

Phoenix, AZ (602) 535-5567 (602) 237-5532

San Juan, PR (787) 999-5226 (787) 999-5243

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Quito
Ave. Avigiras E12-170 y Ave.
Eloy Alfaro 
Quito, Ecuador
Telephone
+(593)(2) 398-5000
Emergency
+(593)(2) 398-5000 
Fax
+(593)(2) 398-5100
Ecuador Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Ecuador
Republic of Ecuador
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Embassy Messages

Quito
Guayaquil

 

 

Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

1 page per stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

No, for stays less than 90 days in any 12-month period

VACCINATIONS:

Yellow fever, if traveling in the Amazon Basin or to other South American destinations

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

None 

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

There is a 5 percent tax on currency taken out of Ecuador above $1098.00. See the Ecuadorian Revenue Service website

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Quito

Ave. Avigiras E12-170 y Ave. Eloy Alfaro 
Quito, Ecuador
Telephone: +(593)(2) 398-5000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(593)(2) 398-5000
Fax: +(593)(2) 398-5100

Consulates

U.S. Consulate General Guayaquil
Santa Ana St. and Jose Rodriguez Bonin Ave.
San Eduardo, Ecuador
Telephone: +(593)(4) 371-7000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(593)(4) 371-7000
Fax: +(593)(4) 371-7045

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Ecuador for information on U.S. – Ecuador relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

If you are traveling for business or tourism, you do not need a visa for stays of up to 90 days in any 12-month period.  You can request an extension through provincial migration offices.  Additional information is available on the Ecuadorian Ministry of Interior website.

  • If you are planning a visit longer than 90 days, you must obtain a visa in advance.  Visit the Embassy of Ecuador website for the most current visa information.
  • You must carry identification, including proof of U.S. citizenship. Carry a photocopy of your passport (including the entry stamp and/or visa) with you at all times.
  • If your passport is lost or stolen while you are in Ecuador, you should obtain a police report and apply for a new passport at the U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate General. We also recommend obtaining an entry/exit report from an Ecuadorian immigration office before leaving the country.  For further information, see the Ecuadorian Ministry of Interior website, as well as Mission Ecuador's website.
  • U.S. citizens born in Ecuador are required to show an Ecuadorian passport or national ID card upon entering and exiting Ecuador.  More information is available on Mission Ecuador's website.
  • U.S. citizen children born in Ecuador who are traveling without one or both parents must present a copy of a birth certificate and written authorization from the absent parent(s).  If the parent is deceased, a notarized copy of the death certificate is required.  For more information, see Mission Ecuador's website.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Ecuador.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction, and customs regulations on the State Department's website.

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Safety and Security

Exercise caution when traveling to northern Ecuador, especially the provinces of Carchi, northern Esmeraldas, and Sucumbíos.  U.S. government personnel may travel to the northern bank of the Napo River in Sucumbíos, where tourist lodges are located, an area approximately four miles wide.  All other U.S. government travel to the northern border area is prohibited without prior permission.  This region has a high rate of ransom kidnappings.  U.S. citizens are not targeted, but have been kidnapped there in the past.  

Crime: Crime is a widespread problem in Ecuador.

  • Pick-pocketing, robbery, and hotel room theft are the most common crimes.  Tourists have been robbed at gunpoint on beaches and along hiking trails.  Passengers arriving at the Quito and Guayaquil airports have also been targets of armed robberies.
  • Use hotel safes if available, avoid wearing obviously expensive jewelry or clothing, and carry only the cash or credit cards that you need.  Stay alert in crowds and on public transportation.  Be aware that thieves might create distractions to target you.
  • Be alert for express kidnappings, in which criminals enter a taxi and force victims to withdraw money from ATMs.  Some victims have been beaten or raped.  Avoid hailing taxis on the street.  Order taxis by phone or use a service affiliated with major hotels.  Avoid withdrawing large amounts of cash at one time.  Use ATMs in well-protected indoor areas.
  • To avoid carjacking or theft from your car while you are stopped at intersections, drive with your doors locked and windows rolled up. Do not leave valuables in plain view.
  • Sexual assaults and rapes can occur, even in tourist areas.  Travel in groups, do not leave food or drinks unattended, and never allow a stranger to give you a drink.
  • Do not let your credit card out of your sight in order to avoid credit card “skimming.”
  • Incapacitating drugs, such as rohypnol and scopolamine, have been used to facilitate violent robberies and sexual assaults.

See the Department of State and the FBI webpages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: Report crimes to the local police by calling 911. In Quito, you can visit an Ecuadorian Tourist Security Service Attention Center.  You should also contact the U.S. Embassy at +593-2-398-5000 or the U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil at +593-4-371-7000

Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.

See the State Department’s webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.  Information about victim’s assistance programs in Ecuador is available on the Mission Ecuador website.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide information on victim’s compensation programs in the United States.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical
  • support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy or Consulate General for assistance.

Civil Unrest:  Demonstrations occur frequently.  Protesters often block roads and sometimes burn tires, throw rocks, and damage other personal property.

  • Police may respond using water cannons and tear gas.
  • Avoid demonstrations and prepare back-up transportation plans. Even peaceful demonstrations can turn violent with little or no warning.

Messages regarding demonstrations and strikes, explosive devices/suspicious packages, and weather-related events are posted on Mission Ecuador’s website.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:  You are subject to local laws.  If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

  • Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking illegal drugs in Ecuador are severe.  Offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
  • Never agree to carry a suitcase or package through customs for anyone.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law.  For examples, see the State Department’s website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate General immediately.  See the State Department’s webpage for further information.

Seismic Activity:  There are numerous active volcanoes, and earthquakes are common.  Earthquakes can trigger deadly tsunamis.  Visit Ecuador’s National Risk Management Secretariat and the Ecuadorian Geophysical Institute for more information.

  • Mud or lava flows from Tungurahua volcano could pose a significant and immediate threat to travelers in Baños.
  • The town of Latacunga is directly in the path of potential mud or lava flow from the Cotopaxi volcano.  Even small emissions from the volcano can trigger avalanches and landslides.  Low lying areas in the greater Quito area could also be affected if Cotopaxi erupts.
  • In the event of a natural disaster, pay attention to the news media for updates. 
  • See the Center for Disease Control website for information on emergency preparedness and response.

Hallucinogens:  Traditional hallucinogens, often referred to as ayahuasca or San Pedro, are often marketed to tourists as ”spiritual cleansing,” and typically contain dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a strong hallucinogen that is illegal in the United States, Ecuador, and many other countries.  Health risks are not well understood, and, on occasion, people suffer serious illness or death after taking these drugs.  Intoxicated travelers also have been assaulted and robbed.  These incidents often occur a great distance from medical facilities, making the risks even greater.  

Galápagos Islands: Be aware of the following challenges:

  • Many Ecuadorian tour vessels operating in the Galápagos do not meet international safety standards.  Inquire about safety features when boarding vessels.
  • The two hospitals on Santa Cruz and San Cristobal Islands do not perform major medical procedures.
  • Serious injury or illness in the Galapagos typically requires medical evacuation to the Ecuadorian mainland or the United States.  This can cost $60,000 or more and take significant time to arrange.  We strongly recommend you purchase travel insurance that includes health coverage and air evacuation.
  • There are limited decompression facilities for scuba divers.
  • The Ecuadorian government restricts the entry of certain items into the Galapagos.  Visit the Agency for Biosecurity and Quarantine Regulation and Control for the Galapagos for more information.

Retiring in Ecuador:  In recent years, Ecuador has become a top overseas destination for retiring U.S. citizens.

  • U.S. citizens have reported unethical practices by lawyers, real estate agents, and others, resulting in costly losses and little hope of remedy through the local judicial system.
  • Ecuadorian rules governing visas and customs are subject to change with little notice.  The Ecuadorian government publishes little information in English. The U.S. Embassy and U.S. Consulate General cannot give detailed advice about Ecuadorian immigration law.

Faith-Based Travelers:  See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Ecuador.  Same-sex marriage is prohibited, but civil unions are allowed.  LGBTI individuals may face discrimination.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Travelers with disabilities might have difficulty accessing buildings.  Sidewalks in some areas are narrow and poorly maintained.

Students:  See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers:  See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

Adequate medical and dental care is available in major cities.  In smaller communities and in the Galapagos Islands, services are limited, and the quality is generally well below U.S. standards.

  • Ambulance service is limited.
  • Specialized medical care can cost tens of thousands of dollars.
  • Pharmacies are widely available.  However, some medications might not be offered, and brand names will differ from products in the United States.
  • Exercise caution if you explore herbal and folk remedies.
  • Quito is 9,400 feet above sea level.  Some other tourist destinations in the mountainous region may be higher.  Consult your doctor for recommendations concerning medication and lifestyle tips at high altitude.

We do not pay medical bills.  Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.  See the State Department’s webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.  Carry proof of health of insurance at all times.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Ecuador’s National Customs Service for personal use procedures.  Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

The following diseases are present:

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety:  Some roads are poorly maintained and may lack crash barriers, guard rails, signs, and streetlights.  Heavy fog and rain make conditions more treacherous.

  • Due to a lack of sidewalks, many roads are also used by pedestrians.
  • Slow-moving buses and trucks frequently stop in the middle of the road unexpectedly.
  • In rural areas, you may encounter livestock in the road.
  • Many vehicles are poorly maintained and breakdowns are common.

Traffic Laws:  You may use your U.S. driver’s license for up to 90 days.  If you are staying in Ecuador longer, you should contact the National Transit Agency to obtain a valid driver’s license.

  • Drivers often disobey traffic laws and signals.  They rarely yield to pedestrians and cyclists.
  • If you are involved in an accident, even if you are not at fault, you may be taken into police custody, especially if there are injuries or if you do not have insurance.  If the injuries or damages are serious, you may face criminal charges.
  • You might encounter intoxicated drivers.  Chances of a drunk-driving accident are higher on weekends and Ecuadorian holidays.
  • If you want to import a vehicle, contact Ecuador’s National Customs Service for local regulations.  You must pay for local liability insurance, called SPPAT.

Public Transportation:  Intra- and inter-city bus passengers are often targets of crime, including robbery and sexual assault.  

  • Armed criminals have been known to board local city buses and rob passengers.
  • Numerous bus accidents occur every year in Ecuador.  Many buses are overcrowded, poorly maintained, and lack safety features such as seat belts.  

See the State Department’s Road Safety page for more information.  Visit the website of Ecuador's national tourist office and national authority responsible for road safety.

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Ecuador’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Ecuador’s air carrier operations.  Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Ecuador should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts.  Information may also be posted to the  U.S. Coast Guard homeport website, and the NGA broadcast warnings website (click “Broadcast Warnings”).

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Quito

Ave. Avigiras E12-170 y Ave. Eloy Alfaro 
Quito, Ecuador
Telephone: +(593)(2) 398-5000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(593)(2) 398-5000
Fax: +(593)(2) 398-5100

Consulates

U.S. Consulate General Guayaquil
Santa Ana St. and Jose Rodriguez Bonin Ave.
San Eduardo, Ecuador
Telephone: +(593)(4) 371-7000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(593)(4) 371-7000
Fax: +(593)(4) 371-7045

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General Information

Ecuador and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction Convention (Hague Abduction Convention) since April 1, 1992.

For information concerning travel to Ecuador, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, health conditions, currency and entry regulations, and crime and security, please see country-specific information for Ecuador.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizen Services, Office of Children’s Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Ecuador.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children’s Issues
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Fax: 202-485-6221
Website

The Ecuadorian Central Authority (ECA) is the Edificio del Ministerio de Inclusión Económica y Social (MIES). The office can be reached at:

Autoridad Central
Subsecretaria de protección especial
Edificio del Ministerio de Inclusión Económica y Social (MIES)
1er piso
Quito, Ecuador
Telephone: +593(2)398 3000 Ext.5152
E-mail
Website

To initiate a Hague case for return or for access to a child abducted to Ecuador, the left-behind parent must submit a Hague application to the ECA, either directly or through the USCA.  The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to ECA, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the United States or Ecuadorian central authorities.  Attorney fees, if necessary, are the sole responsibility of the person hiring the attorney.  Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Ecuador.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Ecuador. The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand Ecuador-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Retaining an Attorney

Retaining a private attorney is not required in order to file Hague Abduction Convention with courts in Ecuador. The ECA will act on behalf of the left-behind parent when a private attorney is not retained. Beginning in January 2012, per an agreement entered with ECA, the Ecuadorian Office of Public Defenders assumed the role of legal representation on behalf of the ECA for left-behind parents in Hague Convention cases.    

The U.S. Embassy in Quito maintains a list of attorneys. Additionally, the US Consulate General in Guayaquil maintains a list of attorneys that specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The Ecuadorian Central Authority strongly promotes mediation in abduction cases and will attempt to initiate mediation in all Hague Abduction Convention cases. 

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Adoptions to the United States from Ecuador and from the United States to Ecuador are possible.

See our section on Adoptions from the United States for more information on the process for adopting a child from the United States. 

Ecuador is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoption processing in Hague countries is done in accordance with the requirements of the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation; the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); the IAA’s implementing regulations; and the implementing legislation and regulations of Ecuador.

Ecuadorian law does not allow an Ecuadorian child to travel to the United States to be adopted. Therefore, prospective adoptive parents must obtain a full and final adoption under Ecuadorian law before the child can immigrate to the United States.

Ecuadorian law gives preference to adoptions to Ecuadorian nationals living in Ecuador. Intercountry adoptions are limited to exceptional cases which involve children with disabilities and/or older than four years of age and/or groups of siblings who have not been able to be placed with local families. Prospective adoptive parents seeking to adopt a blood relative in Ecuador (such as a nephew, niece, grandchild, or great-grandchild) should contact the Ecuadorian Central Authority prior to beginning the adoption process.

Note: Special transition provisions apply to adoptions initiated before April 1, 2008. Read about Transition Cases.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Ecuador, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee under U.S. law in order to immigrate to the United States on an IH-3 or IH-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to the U.S. requirements, prospective adoptive parents need to meet Ecuador’s requirements to adopt a child from Ecuador:

  • Residency: There are no minimum residency requirements to adopt in Ecuador. However, both prospective adoptive parent(s), if applicable, must be present to complete the adoption in Ecuador. This process typically takes 6 to 8 weeks. Once an adoption decree is issued, at least one parent is required to remain in Ecuador with the child to complete the adoption process, usually an additional week.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: If married, both parents must be over 25 years of age and have been married for more than three years. There must be an age difference of at least 14 years between the younger parent and the child and no more than 45 years between the older parent and the child.
  • Marriage: Both single and married individuals may apply to adopt. Ecuadorian law only recognizes opposite sex marriages. An unmarried (single, widowed, divorced) adoptive parent may only adopt a child of the same sex, unless the National Adoption Agency issues a favorable report for adoption of a child of the opposite sex. Priority is given to married prospective parents. 
  • Income: Prospective adoptive parents must demonstrate the means to support the physical, emotional and financial needs of the child. 
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Who Can Be Adopted

Because Ecuador is party to The Hague Adoption Convention, children from Ecuador must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. For example, the adoption may take place only if the competent authorities of Ecuador determine placement of the child within Ecuador has been given due consideration and an intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interest. In addition to Ecuador’s requirements, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee to be eligible for an immigrant visa to bring him or her to the United States.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Abandonment: Children who have been declared abandoned by a judge are eligible for intercountry adoption. The abandonment is formalized with a decree called “Sentencia de Adoptabilidad.”
  • Age of Adoptive Child: The Central Authority matches children of all ages. However, children older than four years have adoption priority. 
  • Sibling Adoptions: The Central Authority prioritizes the adoption of sibling groups.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: The Central Authority prioritizes the adoption of children with special needs or medical conditions.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Matching periods range from several months to years.  
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How to Adopt

WARNING: Do not adopt or obtain legal custody of a child in Ecuador before a U.S. consular officer issues a letter (referred to as a Hague Adoption Convention “Article 5 Letter”) to Ecuador’s Central Authority. The letter is issued in any intercountry adoption involving U.S. citizen parents and a child from Ecuador when all Convention requirements are met and the consular officer determines the child appears eligible to immigrate to the United States. Read on for more information.

Ecuador’s Adoption Authority

Subsecretaria de Protección Especial
Ministerio de Inclusión Económica y Social

The Process

Because Ecuador is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adopting from Ecuador must follow a specific process. A brief summary is given below. You must complete these steps.  Adoptions completed out of order may result in the child not being eligible for an immigrant visa to the United States.

  1. Choose a U.S. accredited Adoption Service Provider approved to operate in Ecuador
  2. Apply with USCIS for Determination of Suitability to Adopt
  3. Be matched with a child by authorities in Ecuador
  4. Apply to USCIS to determine the child’s eligibility for classification as a Convention adoptee
  5. Full and Final Adoption of child in Ecuador
  6. Apply for an immigrant visa for your child in order to return home

1. Choose a U.S. accredited Adoption Service Provider Approved to Operate in Ecuador

The recommended first step in adopting a child from Ecuador is to select an Adoption Service Provider accredited in the United States to provide such services. Only these agencies may act as the primary provider in your case and are responsible to act in accordance with The Hague Adoption Convention and U.S. laws and regulations. Learn more about Agency Accreditation.

To obtain updated information regarding which U.S. Adoption Service Providers are authorized by the Ecuadorian Central Authority, prospective adoption parents may contact the U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil or the Central Authority directly.

2.  Apply with USCIS for Determination of Suitability to Adopt

After you choose an accredited Adoption Service Provider, you must apply to be found eligible to adopt by the responsible U.S. government agency, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), by submitting Form I-800A. Read more about Eligibility Requirements.

Once USCIS determines you are “eligible” and “suited” to adopt by approving the Form I-800A, your adoption service provider will provide your approval notice, home study, and any other required information to the adoption authority in Ecuador as part of your adoption dossier. Ecuador’s adoption authority will review your application to determine whether you are also eligible to adopt under Ecuador’s law. This process may take up to one year, or longer.

3.  Be Matched with a Child by Authorities in Ecuador

If both the United States and Ecuador determine you are eligible to adopt and the Central Authority determines a child is available for adoption and intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interests, the Central Authority in Ecuador may provide you with a referral for a child. The referral is a proposed match between you and a specific child based on a review of your dossier and the needs of a specific child in Ecuador. The Central Authority will provide a background study and other information, if available, about the child to help you decide whether or not to accept the referral. Prospective adoptive parent(s) must express acceptance of the referral in writing. Each family must decide whether or not it will be able to meet the needs and provide a permanent home for a particular child. If you accept the referral, the Adoption Service Provider communicates the decision to the Central Authority. Learn more about this critical decision.

4.  Apply to USCIS to Determine the Child’s Eligibility for Classification as a Convention Adoptee

After you accept a match with a child, you will apply to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for provisional approval for the child to immigrate to the United States (Form I-800). USCIS will make a provisional determination as to whether the child meets the definition of a Convention Adoptee and will be eligible to enter the United States and reside permanently as an immigrant.

After provisional approval of Form I-800, your Adoption Service Provider or you will submit an immigrant visa application to the Consular Section of the U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil, Ecuador. This is the only designated location for issuing immigrant visas in Ecuador. A consular officer will review the Form I-800 and the visa application for possible visa ineligibilities and advise you of options for the waiver of any noted ineligibilities.

5.  Full and Final Adoption of child in Ecuador

  • NOTE: For children adopted by two parents, Ecuadorian law requires both parents travel to Ecuador for the official integration period with the child and for the initial court date. Only one parent is required to remain in Ecuador following the initial hearing with the judge. Should one parent choose to return to the United States, the departing parent must go to an Ecuadorian notary to prepare a travel authorization to be then presented to the court for final adoption paperwork. The Family, Childhood and Adolescence Court Unit (Unidades Judiciales de Familia, Mujer, Niñez y Adolescencia) will annotate its authorization for the one parent to travel out of Ecuador with the adopted child. 

The process for finalizing the adoption in Ecuador generally includes the following:

  • Role of Adoption Authority: The Central Authority oversees the entire adoption process and issues the Certificate of Conformity (Article 23 letter).
  • Role of the Court: After the integration period, provisional custody is awarded to the prospective adoptive parents. The orphanage will issue a report attesting to the compatibility and bonding of the child and the prospective adoptive parents. The report is reviewed by the Technical Adoption Unit and then the Adoptive Service Provider files the petition before the court. The judge will review the application, including the integration report, all supporting documents, psychological reports and financial statements. The prospective adoptive parents will then appear in court to finalize the adoption. The adoption decree becomes final three days after issuance. At that point, the adoptive parent(s) can obtain a birth certificate for their child from the Civil Registry Office. The new birth certificate will include the name(s) of the parent(s) and the new name for the child as per the adoption decree. With this new birth certificate, the parent(s) (or the Adoption Service Provider on their behalf) can obtain an Ecuadorian identity card (cedula) and an Ecuadorian passport for the child.  
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: The Government of Ecuador requires prospective adoptive parents work through an accredited U.S. Adoption Service Provider that has signed an agreement with the Government of Ecuador. The agency can provide you with an estimate of costs associated with the adoption process. A list of these agencies may be obtained from the U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil. Before traveling to Ecuador, we recommend you confirm with the Adoption Service Provider the services they provide in-country. Although the Ecuadorian government requires Adoption Service Providers assist and guide you through the adoption process in Ecuador, families report differing levels of support.
  • Time Frame: Once in Ecuador, following the issuance of the Article 5 Letter, the process generally takes approximately six to eight weeks. 
  • Adoption Fees: In the adoption services contract you sign at the beginning of the adoption process, your agency should itemize the fees and estimated expenses related to your adoption process. The Central Authority does not charge for administrative processing.
  • Some of the fees (excluding airfare and lodging) specifically associated with adopting from Ecuador typically include: translations, notarial services, a new birth certificate, an Ecuadorian passport, and a medical exam fee, all of which typically adds up to about $400. 
  • Documents Required: Note:  For any documents from the United States, certifications, notarizations and apostilles must be completed in the United States before the prospective adoptive parents travel to Ecuador or prior to submitting the application for adoption. Translations may be completed while in Ecuador. Additional documents may be requested at any stage of the adoption.  
  • The following documents are required by the Central Authority:
    • Original birth certificates for the prospective adoptive parent(s)
    • Marriage certificate, if applicable
    • Divorce certificate(s), if applicable
    • Death certificate, if the prospective adoptive parent is widow(er)
    • Copy of passport(s)
    • Copy of the applicable state law regulating adoptions in the prospective adoptive parents’ state of residence
    • Copy of the Home Study Report submitted as part of the I-800A
    • Police reports from the place of residence of the prospective adoptive parents
    • Job letters verifying employment and salary   
    • Latest available Income Tax Return
    • Adoption Service Provider certification of Suitability to Adopt for prospective adoptive parent(s) 
  • Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof a document from the United States is authentic. The United States and Ecuador are parties to the Hague Apostille Convention. U.S. public documents may be authenticated with Apostilles by the appropriate U.S. Competent Authority in the United States.

6.  Apply for an Immigrant Visa for your Child in Order to Return Home

Once your adoption is complete, you need to apply for the following documents before your child can travel to the United States:

Birth Certificate

Once the adoption is finalized, apply for a birth certificate for your child. The Adoption Service Provider should be able to assist you obtaining the new birth certificate from the Civil Registry.

Ecuadorian Passport

Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a passport from Ecuador. You can apply for an Ecuadorian passport for your child at any of the passport offices throughout the country.  The passport fee is $70 and passports may be processed and ready the same day.

Certificate of Conformity (Article 23 Letter)

The Adoption Service Provider will deliver the adoption decree to the Central Authority in order to obtain a Certificate of Conformity (Article 23 Letter). This letter will be required at the time of the immigrant visa interview. Verify all of your biographical information and the biographical information of your adopted child is correct.

U.S. Immigrant Visa

After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, visit the U.S Consulate in Guayaquil, Ecuador for final review of the case, issuance of a U.S. Hague Adoption Certificate, final approval of Form I-800, and your child’s immigrant visa. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you.  As part of this process, the consular officer must be provided the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child, if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage. Read more about the Medical Examination.

Once you have the documents listed above, you or your Adoption Service Provider may request an immigrant visa interview by emailing the request and a copy of the child’s passport biographical data page to IVGuayaquil@state.gov. The Consulate prioritizes adoption immigrant visa requests. The Consulate will also provide information on how to update the child’s information for his immigrant visa application (DS-260).

On the day of the interview, you and your child should come to the Consulate in Guayaquil at your scheduled time and bring:

  • Child’s Ecuadorian passport
  • Child’s birth certificate
  • Certificate of Conformity (Article 23 Letter)
  • Final adoption decree
  • Medical examination

For Ecuador, immigrant visa cases are only processed at the U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil. 

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States:  A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

*If your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important you take the steps necessary so your child does qualify as soon as possible.  Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.  Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

U.S. citizens are required to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Ecuador requires U.S. passports have at least six months validity beyond the travel dates.  Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Ecuador

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Ecuador, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Ecuador, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

Post-Adoption/Post-Placement Reporting Requirements

Ecuador requires a minimum of five post-adoption reports to be forwarded to the Ecuador’s Central Authority during the first two years after the child’s adoption at the following intervals: four months, eight months, twelve months, eighteen months, and twenty-four months.

We urge you to complete all post-adoption reports in a timely manner.  

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Consulate General in Guayaquil
Mailing Address:
Department of State
ATTN: Immigrant Visa Unit
3430 Guayaquil Place
Washington DC 20521-3430

Street Address:
Calle Santa Ana y Av. José Rodríguez Bonín
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Tel: (011-593-4) 371-7000, extensions: 7169/7047
(011-593-4) 371-7000 (after hours emergencies)

Ecuador’s Adoption Authority
Subsecretaria de Protección Especial
Ministerio de Inclusión Económica y Social
Venezuela OE4-131 entre Espejo y Sucre
Quito, Ecuador
Tel: +593-2-398-300
Tel: +593-2-257-308
Website: http://www.inclusion.gob.ec  

Embassy of Ecuador
2535 15th Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20009
Tel: (202) 234-7200
Fax: (202) 667-3482
Email: consuladodc@ecuador.org
Website: http://ecuador.org

Ecuador also has consulates in Atlanta, Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, Newark, New Haven, New York, Phoenix, and San Francisco.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI, SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
Email: Adoption@state.gov
Internet: adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-800A or I-800 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email: NBC.Hague@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 60 Months
B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 None Two 3 Months
E-2C 12 None Two 3 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

General Document Information:

Documents must be obtained personally by the interested party or by a representative with a power of attorney signed by the interested party.

Since experience has shown that Ecuadorian civil documents may contain erroneous information, even though they may actually have been obtained from the correct local authority, the Embassy in Quito and the Consulate General in Guayaquil are pleased to assist in verifying Ecuadorian documents submitted at other consular posts. Posts are advised to exercise caution while reviewing Ecuadorian documents. Original documents are always preferred over copies.

General Issuing Authority Information:

The Direccion General de Registro Civil, Identificacion y Cedulacion is the national civil records registry for Ecuador. The Corporacion Registro Civil de Guayaquil is the city’s civil registry entity.

 

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available 

Fees: $3.00
Document Name:  “Inscripción de Nacimiento” issued by the National Civil Registry and “Libro de Nacimientos” issued by the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Issuing Authority: The Civil Registry (Registro Civil) offices nationwide and the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Documents from the Civil Registry (Registro Civil Nacional) will have a seal with an original signature from the Civil Registry delegate.  Documents from Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil will have a scanned signature from the delegate.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Civil Registry delegate
Registration Criteria: The person or persons registering the child must present a current I.D. (cédula) and the certificate of live birth (Certificado de Nacido Vivo) with the seal of the Public Health Office (Ministerio de Salud Pública) or the seal of the hospital where the child was born, with the signature of the doctor who performed the birth. If the child was born in wedlock, only one parent needs to be present to register the child.  If the child was born out of wedlock, both parents must be present at the time of registration. Registrations of birth are free if done within 30 days of the birth.   Registrations made after 30 days of the birth are considered late registrations, but if made before the person turns 18 years old, they have  no cost. For late registrations made after the person turns 18 years old, the cost is $2.00 at the CRCG and $5.00 at the National Civil Registry.
Procedure for Obtaining: Documents must be obtained personally by the interested party or by a representative with a power of attorney signed by the interested party.
Certified Copies Available: Certified copies of birth certificates are available.
Alternate Documents:  While it is possible to acquire various types of birth certificates or entries, the only acceptable documents are the ones listed before. The following documents are not acceptable: “Partida de Nacimiento” and “Certificado de Nacimiento”.
Exceptions: If documentation of the birth is not available, the Civil Registry will issue a letter stating as such.
Comments: Only certified original copies of the birth certificates with the appropriate seal of the civil registry office are accepted.

 

Death Certificates

 

Available
Fees:
 $ 3.00
Document Name: “Inscripción de Defunción” or “Certificado de Defunción” issued by the National Civil Registry and “Libro de Defunciones” or “Certificado de Defunción” issued by the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Issuing Authority: The Civil Registry (Registro Civil) offices nationwide and the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Documents from Civil Registry (Registro Civil Nacional) will have a seal with an original signature from the Civil Registry delegate.  Documents from Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil will have a scanned signature from the delegate.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Civil Registry delegate.
Registration Criteria: The person registering the death must present a valid I.D. (cédula) of themselves, an I.D. (cédula) of the deceased person, a certification of the death (Estadistico de defunción del INEC) with the seal of the hospital where the death occurred and the original signature and seal of the doctor who declared the death.  The registration of the death is free if done within 48 hours of the death.  If done more than 48 hours after the death, the registration costs $5.00 at National Civil Registry or $2.00 at Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Procedure for Obtaining: Documents can be obtained at the Civil Registry offices nationwide by the interested party or by a representative of the interested party with a power of attorney signed by the interested party.
Certified Copies Available: Certified copies of death certificates are available.
Alternate Documents: While it is possible to acquire various types of death certificates or entries, the only acceptable documents are the ones listed before. The following document is not acceptable: “Partida de Defunción” issued by the National Civil Registry.
Exceptions: N/A
Comments: N/A

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available

Fees: $ 3.00
Document Name: : “Inscripción de Matrimonio” issued by the National Civil Registry and “Libro de Matrimonio” issued by the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Issuing Authority: The Civil Registry (Registro Civil) offices nationwide and the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil 
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Documents from Civil Registry (Registro Civil Nacional) will have a seal with an original signature from the Civil Registry delegate.  Documents from Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil will have a scanned signature from the delegate.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Civil Registry delegate
Registration Criteria: Both spouses must present an original I.D. (cédula) and voting certificate (certificado de votación).  They must also be accompanied by two witnesses with their I.D.s and voting certificates.  For weddings performed at the National Civil Registry, the fee is $50.00.  For weddings conducted by the National Civil Registry but performed off-site,  the fee is $250.00.  For weddings in the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil, the fee is $- 39.00.  For weddings conducted by the Corporación  Registro Civil but performed off-site, the fee is $ 195.00.
Procedure for Obtaining: Documents must be obtained personally by the interested party or by a representative with a power of attorney signed by the interested party at the Civil Registry offices nationwide.
Certified Copies Available: Certified copies of marriage certificates are available
Alternate Documents: While it is possible to acquire various types of marriage certificates or entries, the only acceptable documents are the ones listed before. The following document is not acceptable: “Certificado de Matrimonio”.
Exceptions: If documentation of the marriage is not available, the Civil Registry will issue a letter stating as such.
Comments: Non-Ecuadorian citizens must also present their passport with a valid visa or authorization to stay until the wedding date and a certificate verifying they are legally able to marry (if the non-Ecuadorian spouse is divorced or a widower he/she must present all divorce or death certificates).

 

Divorce Certificates

 

Available Fees: $ 3.00
Document Name: “Inscripción de Matrimonio” issued by the National Civil Registry and “Libro de Matrimonios” issued by the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil, with the appropriate divorce amendment.
Issuing Authority: The Civil Registry (Registro Civil) offices nationwide or the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format Documents from Civil Registry (Registro Civil Nacional) will have a seal with an original signature from the Civil Registry delegate.  Documents from Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil will have a scanned signature from the delegate
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Civil Registry delegate
Registration Criteria:  The interested party registering the divorce must present a divorce decree obtained from a court. The fee to register the divorce is $10.00 at National Civil Registry and $6.00 at Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.
Procedure for Obtaining: Documents can be obtained at the Civil Registry offices nationwide by the interested party or by a representative with a power of attorney signed by the interested party.
Certified Copies Available: Certified copies of marriage certificates with divorce annotation are available.
Alternate Documents: While it is possible to acquire various types of divorce certificates or entries, the only acceptable documents are the ones listed before. The following document is not acceptable: “Acta de Divorcio” issued by the Ecuadorian Court.
Exceptions: If documentation of the marriage is not available, the Civil Registry will issue a letter stating as such. 

 

Adoption Certificates

Available
Fees: $2.00
Document Name: Adoption decree (Sentencia de adopción)
Issuing Authority: Unidades Judiciales de Familia, Mujer, Niñez y Adolescencia or Juzgado de la Familia, Mujer, Niñez y Adolescencia.
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Original signatures from the Judge and the Secretary of the court in which the adoption was approved with a seal of the court.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: A Judge of the Juzgados o Unidades Judiciales de la Familia, Mujer, Niñez y Adolescencia.
Registration Criteria: Prospective adoptive parents should contact a U.S. Adoption Agency (approved by the Ecuadorian Government) to start the adoption process in Ecuador, which includes the home study, in order to be qualified as suitable adoptive parents.
Procedure for Obtaining: Adoptive parents should go to the court to request the adoption.
Certified Copies Available: Certified copies of adoption decree are available.
Comments: Following the issuance of an adoption decree, the judge will issue the order of the annulment the child's original birth certificate. The adoptive parents will then register their child at the civil registry and receive an Inscripción de Nacimiento or Certificado de Nacimiento from the Civil Registry (Registro Civil Nacional) or Libro de Nacimientos from Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil with the names of the adoptive parents and the adoption annotation. The fee for this registration is $15.00 at the National Civil Registry and $10.00 at the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil.

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Identity Card

Available
Fees: $5.00 at National Civil Registry and $10.00 at Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil
Document Name: Cédula de identidad for children and Cédula de ciudadanía for adults 18 years or older.
Issuing Authority: The Civil Registry offices nationwide and the Corporación Registro Civil de Guayaquil
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Plastic card with biographic information.  The front side of the card has complete names, I.D. number, place of birth, date of birth, nationality, gender, marital status and signature.  The back has education level, profession, father’s complete name, mother’s complete name, place and date of issuance, date of expiration, and scanned signatures of the Civil Registry delegates.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Civil Registry delegate
Procedure for Obtaining: For first time registration of a minor, an adult family member must accompany the minor.  Adults registering the first time must present a notarized document which validates that they are who they claim to be (Información Sumaria ante un Notario Público). 

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Available
Fees: N/A
Document Name: Certificado de Antecedentes Penales
Issuing Authority: Ministry of Interior
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The police record can be printed from the Ministry of Interior website.
Procedure for Obtaining: On June 4, 2012, Ecuador eliminated the former printed certificate and implemented a webpage (www.ministeriodelinterior.gob.ec) where any person can review his own or someone else's police certificates online using an Ecuadorian national identification number or a passport number.
Exceptions: Certificado de Antecedentes Penales are not available for people under the age of 18.
Comments: The police record has a box that states "Posee Antecedentes" ("has a record"). If the box is marked "SI" ("YES"), applicants must bring their complete court records, along with an English translation, to the Consulate on the day of their interview. Failure to comply with this requirement on the day of the interview will delay visa processing. If the box is marked "NO," the applicant does not have a criminal record. Please note that this does not necessarily mean the subject has no police record, since police records can be purged upon the subject's request without judicial permission. Also, the "Certificado de Antecedentes Penales" only shows cases where a sentence has been delivered. Pending cases will not appear on this certificate. 

Court Records

Available
Fees: N/A
Document Name: Certificate from Criminal or Civil courts (Juzgado Penal or Juzgado Civil)
Issuing Authority: Every court around the country
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Court and prison records will have the original signature and personal seal of the Judge or the Secretary of the court and the seal of the court in which the request was made.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Judges from courts in all provinces of the country.
Procedure for Obtaining: The interested party needs to request the certificate through a lawyer, who will file a written request with each court in the city where the record is requested. The request should be filed with either the criminal or civil courts depending on the type of lawsuit. The response is received in three business days.

Prison Records

Available
Fees: N/A
Document Name: Certificate from Criminal or Civil courts (Juzgado Penal or Juzgado Civil)
Issuing Authority: Every court around the country
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Court and prison records will have the original signature and personal seal of the Judge or the Secretary of the court and the seal of the court in which the request was made.
Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Judges from courts in all provinces of the country.
Procedure for Obtaining: The interested party needs to request the certificate through a lawyer, who will file a written request with each court in the city where the record is requested. The request should be filed with either the criminal or civil courts depending on the type of lawsuit. The response is received in three business days.

Military Records

Unavailable.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Types Available (Regular, Diplomatic, Official, etc.): Regular, Special, Official, Apátrida (stateless or similar) and Diplomatic
Fees: $70 for Regular, Special, Official and Diplomatic passports (for applicants aged 65 and older, the price is $35; and there is no cost for people with a disability); $80 for Apátrida passport.
Document Name: Passport
Issuing Government Authority: For regular passports the issuing authority is the Chancellor’s Office, Embassy, Consulate or Governor’s Office if a Chancellor’s Office is not available. Only offices in Guayaquil, Quito and Cuenca are authorized to issue passports; all other offices will only collect information and capture pictures.  All other categories of passports can only be obtained at the Travel Document Directorate in Quito and Coordination Zone 5 Guayaquil (with the proper authorization).
Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Regular passport is wine-colored with the Ecuadorian Shield in gold ink, and has on the first page a stamp of the city in which the passport was issued. Special passport is grey with the Ecuadorian Shield in gold ink; it has on the first page a stamp of the city in which the passport was issued, another stamp on the observations area that specifies the bearer’s position in the company where he/she works, and in the middle of the passport a Chancellor’s office stamp with the validity of the document (one month, three months or one year).  Official passport is green with the Ecuadorian Shield in gold ink; it has on the first page a stamp of the city in which the passport was issued, another stamp in the observations area that specifies the bearer’s position in the company where he/she works, and in the middle of the passport a Chancellor’s office stamp with the validity of the document (one month, three months or one year). Apátrida passport is blue with the Ecuadorian Shield in gold ink, and does not have stamps. It is issued to stateless persons or persons who for some reason are unable to obtain a passport from their country of citizenship. Diplomatic passport is black with the Ecuadorian Shield in gold ink. On the observations page there will be a stamp stating the bearer’s position within the relevant company or institution.  Additionally, a stamp from the Chancellor’s office will be placed in the middle of the passport stating the time that the bearer will remain in the assigned position (available options are one month, three months, or one year).
Registration Criteria: Documents must be obtained personally by the interested party.  In the case of a minor, both parents must be present with the minor.  If the minor’s parents are not present, the person accompanying the minor needs to present a power of attorney signed by the minor’s parents.
Procedure for Obtaining: To obtain an adult passport for first time, the interested party must present the original  personal I.D. (cédula) and voting certificate; for passport renewal the interested party must present the original  personal I.D., voting certificate and the current passport.  For a minor, the family must present the minor’s original I.D., and the originals of both parents’ I.D.s and voting certificates.
Comments: To obtain a Special passport, the interested party must comply with article 10 of the Travel Documents Law and articles 14 and 16 of the Travel Documents Law Regulations. To obtain an Official passport, the interested party must comply with article 9 of the Travel Documents Law and articles 14 and 16 of the Travel Documents Law Regulations. To obtain an Apátrida passport, the interested party must comply with articles 15 and 16 of the Travel Documents Law and article 25 of the Travel Documents Law Regulations. To obtain a Diplomatic passport, the interested party must comply with article 8 of the Travel Documents Law and articles 14, 15 and 16 of the Travel Documents Law Regulations. For more information check this website

Other Records

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Visa Issuing Posts


Quito, Ecuador (Embassy)-- Nonimmigrant Visas Only

Mailing Address:

CONS Quito, Ecuador
3420 Quito Place
Dulles, VA 20189

Street Address:

Avigiras E12-170 y Eloy Alfaro (next to SOLCA Hospital)

Phone Number: (011-593-2) 398-5000

(011-593-2) 398-5000 (after hours emergencies please follow the instructions

Guayaquil, Ecuador (Consulate General) -- All Categories

Mailing Address:

AMCONGEN Guayaquil, Ecuador
Department of State
3430 Guayaquil Place
Washington, DC 20521-3430

Street Address:

Calle Santa Ana y Avenida José Rodriguez Bonín

Phone Number: (011-593-4) 371-7000

011-593-4) 371-7000 (after hours emergencies please follow the instructions)

 

 

Visa Services

The United States Consulate General in Guayaquil handles the processing of all immigrant visas for the country. The following list provides the United States consular post that has jurisdiction of the issuance of nonimmigrant visas for the stated province.

Area Post
Azuay Guayaquil
Bolivar Quito
Canar Guayaquil
Carchi Quito
Chimboroazo Quito
Cotopaxi Quito
El Oro Guayaquil
Esmeraldas Quito
Galapagos Guayaquil
Guayas Guayaquil
Imbabura Quito
Loja Guayaquil
Los Rios Guayaquil
Manabi Guayaquil
Morona Santiago Quito
Napo Quito
Pastaza Quito
Pinchincha Quito
Santo Domingo de los Tsachilas Quito
Santa Elena Guayaquil
Sucumbios Quito
Tungurahua Quito
Zamora-Chichipe Guayaquil

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 234-7166 (202) 234-7200

Atlanta, GA (404) 841-2282 (404) 841-2276 (404) 841-2285

Chicago, IL (312) 338-1002 (312) 338-1003 (312) 338-1502

Houston, TX (713) 572-8731 (713) 572-8732

Los Angeles, CA (323) 658-5146 (323) 658-6020 (323) 658-1068 (323) 658-1198

Miami, FL (305) 373-8214 (305) 539-8215 (305) 593-8313

Minneapolis, MN (612) 721-6468 (612) 721-6484

New York, NY (212) 808-0170 (212) 808-0171 (212) 808-0188

Newark, NJ (973) 344-8837 (973) 344-8852 (973) 344-0008

New Haven, CT (203) 752-1947 (203) 752-0827 (203) 752-1389

Phoenix, AZ (602) 535-5567 (602) 237-5532

San Juan, PR (787) 999-5226 (787) 999-5243

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Quito
Ave. Avigiras E12-170 y Ave.
Eloy Alfaro 
Quito, Ecuador
Telephone
+(593)(2) 398-5000
Emergency
+(593)(2) 398-5000 
Fax
+(593)(2) 398-5100
Ecuador Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.