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Country Information

Uzbekistan

Country Information

Uzbekistan
Republic of Uzbekistan
Last Updated: February 24, 2017
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Must be valid at time of entry 

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required for entry stamp  

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Yes

VACCINATIONS:

None required. Vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

The amount of U.S. dollars or any foreign currency may not exceed the total declared by the traveler upon entry. If it does, the traveler must present bank documents showing the source of the additional currency.

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Tashkent

3 Moyqorghon Street, 5th block
Yunusobod District  100093
Tashkent
Uzbekistan

Telephone: +(998) (71) 120-5450

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(998) (71) 120-5450

Fax: +(998) (71) 120-5448

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Uzbekistan for additional information on U.S.-Uzbekistan relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Uzbek Immigration Law: Uzbek immigration laws and regulations are complex and often enforced in a discretionary, arbitrary manner. In some cases, U.S. citizen travelers have received contradictory guidance from Uzbek officials. The Department of State strives to provide accurate information but has no authority over Uzbek entry and exit controls or visa requirements. For more information, contact the Uzbek Embassy in the United States, the Uzbek Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Uzbek Ministry of Interior (page in Russian and Uzbek only).

Visas: All U.S. citizen travelers must possess a valid Uzbek visa in a valid U.S. passport. Visitors may not enter Uzbekistan with a valid Uzbek visa in a canceled or expired U.S. passport, even if they present another valid U.S. passport at the port of entry. Visit the visa information page of the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C., for current visa information.

U.S. citizens should apply for visas well in advance of their travel. Visitors coming from countries in which Uzbekistan does not have diplomatic or consular representation should obtain visas in a third country. A list of Uzbekistan’s consular missions abroad is available on the official website of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Visas cannot be obtained upon arrival at Uzbek airports.

Visitors most often apply for three types of visas:

Tourist Visas (T):

  • Apply at an Uzbek embassy or consulate by filling out the required application form.
  • Provide any other requested information.

Visitors who will stay at hotels should apply for tourist (T) visas. Such visitors are required to stay at hotels and may not legally stay at private residences. Hotels are responsible for registering guests with T visas with the Office of Entry, Exit, and Citizenship Issues of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, commonly known as OVIR, and will ask guests to turn over their passports so that hotel staff may perform this task. Tourist visas cannot be extended after arriving in Uzbekistan.

Private Visitor Visas (PV):

  • Apply at an Uzbek embassy or consulate by filling out the required application form.
  • Invitation Letter: The inviting party must file an official invitation letter in Uzbekistan with OVIR. The inviting party should obtain approval, which includes a “telex number,” and then send the approved invitation letter to the U.S. citizen. This approved letter with the “telex number” must then be included with the visa application.

Visitors who will stay at private residences (e.g., with friends or family) should apply for private visitor (PV) visas. Official invitation letters are required in order to apply for a PV visa. PV visa holders are responsible for registering at OVIR offices within three days of arrival in country. PV visa holders who stay at multiple residences are responsible for re-registering each time they move to another address and need to plan accordingly to provide for an uninterrupted registration between moves. If PV visa holders decide to stay at hotels, the hotel staff will then complete the guest’s registration with OVIR for the hotel stay.

Business Visas (B):

  • Apply at an Uzbek embassy or consulate by filling out the required application form.
  • The inviting party must file an official business invitation letter in Uzbekistan with OVIR. The inviting party should obtain approval, which includes a “telex number,” and then send the approved invitation letter to the U.S. citizen. This approved letter with the “telex number” must then be included with the visa application.

Please note, that U.S. citizens may request business visas with validity of up to one year and allowing multiple entries. This should be noted both on the invitation letter and the visa application. The U.S. Embassy is committed to visa reciprocity for U.S. citizens and welcomes any feedback on the validity of the visas U.S. citizen business travelers are receiving.

Please visit the visa information page of the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C., for details about these visa categories.

Visa Validity and Duration of Stay: Uzbek visas not only indicate the validity of the visa but also the period of time a person is allowed to stay in Uzbekistan on a given trip. A visitor must leave the country before passage of the number of days listed as the authorized duration of stay on the visa. Include precise dates for your planned period of stay on your Uzbek visa application.

Overstay Penalties: Overstaying your visa by any time at all may result in a USD 2,000 fine and a delay of a week or more before the Uzbek authorities allow you to exit the country. Travel agencies and tour companies may also be fined if customers overstay their visas or for visa application errors.

Exit Visa: Tourist visa holders who are unable to depart Uzbekistan by the visa expiration date or end date of their authorized period of stay must apply for an exit visa from the OVIR office at the Tashkent International Airport. The application must be submitted before the anticipated overstay. The service normally costs USD 160, and there is no guarantee OVIR will approve the request. Private visitor visa holders must apply for extensions at the district OVIR office at which they are registered. Again, the application must be filed before any overstay, the cost is normally USD 160, and there is no guarantee of approval.   

Registering Your Temporary Residence in Uzbekistan: All travelers present in Uzbekistan for more than three business days must register with OVIR in the district or city in which they are staying. All foreign nationals are required to obtain valid registration by their third day in Uzbekistan (excluding Sundays and national holidays). From the date of the initial registration, travelers are responsible for maintaining uninterrupted registration, and the initial three-day grace period no longer applies for subsequent moves. This means travelers must apply for registration at the new residence in advance of their intended move. The three-day grace period does not apply to tourist visa holders, who must register at a hotel as soon as they arrive in Uzbekistan. Therefore, it is important to apply for this registration as soon as possible to avoid a fine and other penalties. Registration fees vary depending on length of stay, ranging from USD 20 for a one-month stay to USD 200 for a stay of up to a year. Visitors without proper registration are subject to fines, imprisonment, and deportation; the fines range from USD 1,000 to USD 12,000.

Border Crossings: Travel within Uzbekistan by rail or land sometimes requires brief entries into neighboring countries. Travelers should obtain multiple-entry Uzbek visas as well as proper visas for the relevant neighboring countries if needed.  

Many of Uzbekistan’s land border crossings are restricted to use by Uzbek citizens and nationals of the country sharing that particular border. For more information on bordering countries see the Travel Warning for Afghanistan and Country Specific Information for Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan. Land crossings by U.S. citizens and other third country nationals are often restricted to specific border posts. U.S. citizen travelers planning an overland border crossing should ensure they will cross at an authorized point.

In certain areas of Fergana Valley, many direct routes are along roads that may temporarily cross poorly demarcated or disputed borders. These so-called transit roads are used daily by locals without incident. U.S. citizens traveling in the region, however, are advised that crossing the border in this manner, even inadvertently, may be considered an immigration violation. Taking photos or filming in border areas is prohibited and doing so may result in detainment and questioning by border guards. Please contact the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C., for the most up-to-date information.

Customs Restrictions: Foreigners must complete a customs declaration in duplicate upon entering Uzbekistan through an airport or overland crossing. Customs officials will review and stamp both copies. One will be retained by the Uzbek Customs Authority; the other must be kept by the traveler and presented at the time of departure from Uzbekistan. The amount of U.S. dollars or any foreign currency taken out of Uzbekistan cannot exceed the amount indicated on the customs declaration at the time of entry. In order to export more cash than was imported, one must obtain special permission from the National Bank of Uzbekistan. Those who understate the amount of currency on the declaration form upon departure from Uzbekistan face fines and confiscation of their unreported money.   

Uzbek customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning the temporary import to or export from Uzbekistan of items such as armaments and ammunition, space technology, encryption devices, X-ray and isotope equipment, nuclear materials, poisons, drugs, precious and semi-precious metals, cancelled securities, pieces of art, and antiques of historical value.

Uzbek customs authorities also strictly control the importation of controlled pharmaceuticals and psychotropic medicine for personal use while in or transiting through the territory of Uzbekistan. Customs authorities routinely analyze the length of stay of all visitors and ensure that the amount of controlled narcotics and psychotropic prescription pharmaceuticals does not exceed a quantity which they consider within lawful guidelines. Under Uzbek law, for foreign citizens transiting Uzbekistan, the amount of prescription narcotics may not exceed the dose required for seven days, and the amount of psychotropic substances may not exceed the dose required for a fifteen-day period (please note that Lorazepam-based medicine, regardless of the brand name, is considered a controlled substance by Uzbek law).

All visitors who expect to visit or transit through Uzbekistan with restricted types of prescription medicines should declare their prescription medicines in item 6 of the customs declaration form and present all medicines to a customs official, in addition to a letter from their physician (preferably translated into Russian and/or Uzbek) which declares the diagnosis of the traveler, the name(s) of the prescription(s), dosage, and the duration of consumption and a copy of the actual prescription/script for each medicine.

Finally, travelers are advised that Uzbek customs laws and regulations are complex and often enforced in a discretionary, arbitrary manner. Regardless of compliance with the aforementioned procedures, the importation of any quantity of prescription medication may result in fines, arrest, and/or detention by the Uzbek authorities. Visit the U.S. Embassy's website for specific information and the text of the actual legislation.

HIV/AIDS: Some HIV/AIDS entry restrictions exist for visitors to and foreign residents of Uzbekistan. Long-term visitors may be required to submit HIV test results along with their visa application. For more information, contact the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C., before you travel.

Dual Nationals:

Biometric Passport Requirement: Obtaining a biometric Uzbek passport and a new exit permit in that passport takes several months and may significantly delay dual nationals’ departure from Uzbekistan. Please see the website of the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C. for more information.

Travel on a Biometric Passport:

  • Uzbek citizens, including dual nationals, departing the Republic of Uzbekistan must exit using a biometric passport and a valid Uzbek exit permit, regardless of age.
  • To depart for the United States, dual nationals should be prepared to present a valid U.S. passport in addition to an Uzbek biometric passport with a valid exit permit.   

Travel on a Non-Biometric Passport:  Uzbek citizens may use their non-biometric Uzbek passport as a travel document solely to re-enter Uzbekistan, and to transit through the territory of third countries, if the validity period specified therein has not expired. This provision is valid until July 1, 2018.

Restrictions on Travel of a Minor of an Uzbek Citizen Parent:

Uzbek diplomatic missions will refuse to issue a visa to a U.S. citizen minor if at least one of the minor’s parents is an Uzbek citizen who has registered a permanent residence (“propiska”) in Uzbekistan. In these cases, the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C., or the Consulate General in New York will either issue an Uzbek birth certificate or a certificate for return to Uzbekistan.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites. U.S. Embassy Tashkent also has a webpage dedicated to issues faced by dual nationals.

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Safety and Security

The Department of State advises U.S. citizens that the potential for a terrorist attack or localized civil disturbance still exists in Uzbekistan. Supporters of terrorist groups such as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, al-Qai’da, ISIS, and the Islamic Jihad Union are active in the Central Asian region. Members of these groups have expressed anti-U.S. sentiments and have attacked U.S. government interests in the past. They may attempt to target U.S. government or private U.S. citizen interests in Uzbekistan. In the past, these groups have conducted kidnappings, assassinations, and suicide bombings in the broader region. In recent years, Uzbek nationals abroad have allegedly been linked to terrorist or extremist groups, and more recently, participated in terrorist attacks against the Istanbul airport and a nightclub.   

Uzbek authorities maintain a high level of alert and aggressive security measures to thwart terrorist attacks. High security at official facilities may lead terrorists and their sympathizers to seek softer targets. These may include facilities where U.S. citizens and other foreigners congregate or visit such as residential areas, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, schools, hotels, outdoor recreation events, and resorts. U.S. Embassy Tashkent continues to employ heightened security precautions. U.S. citizens should report any unusual activity to local authorities and then inform the Embassy.

Depending upon security conditions, travelers may experience restricted personal movement, including the closing of roads to traffic in addition to frequent document, vehicle, and personal identification checks. The Uzbek government has intermittently restricted travel to certain parts of the country in response to security concerns.

Crime: The rate of violent crime in Uzbekistan, including violent crime against foreigners, has increased in recent years. In urban areas, travelers are urged to take the same precautions they would take in any large U.S. city. If traveling at night, stay in well-lit areas, travel in groups, maintain a low profile, and do not display large amounts of cash. Beware of pickpockets in public places, such as tourist destinations, train stations, and local markets. Although using private cars as taxis is common in Uzbekistan, U.S. citizens, especially women, should not consider this a safe practice. U.S. citizens are encouraged to use clearly marked taxis, such as those at hotels, and should avoid riding in taxis alone.

Counterfeit Goods: It is recommended that travelers not buy counterfeit and pirated goods, even if they are widely available. Not only are they illegal in the United States, you may also be breaking local law if you purchase them.

Scams: See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: Contact the local police and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the embassy for assistance.       

We can:

  • Replace a stolen passport.
  • Help you find appropriate medical care if you are the victim of violent crimes such as assault or rape.
  • Put you in contact with the appropriate police authorities, and, if you want us to, contact family members or friends.
  • Help you understand the local criminal justice process and direct you to local attorneys, although it is important to remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.   

The local equivalent of the 911 emergency line in most areas of Uzbekistan is 01 for fire, 02 for police, 03 for an ambulance, and 050 for the Ministry of Emergency Situations. Please note that in Tashkent city these numbers are 101, 102, 103, and 1050, respectively.   

For Further Information:   

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.   

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Illicit Narcotics and Alcohol: Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Uzbekistan are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Uzbekistan has a zero-tolerance policy for driving under the influence of alcohol.

Photography: Taking photographs of military or security installations or other locations of strategic significance (ministries, border and other checkpoints, bridges, tunnels, reservoirs, mountain passes, the subway system, etc.) is prohibited in Uzbekistan. Uzbek authorities enforce these regulations strictly. Obey all signs restricting photography and remember that the absence of such a sign does not mean you may take a picture.

Financial Transactions: Most transactions are conducted on a cash-only, local-currency (soum) basis. Some merchants accept dollars for larger tourist handicraft purchases. Credit cards are accepted only at the main hotels and a few shops and restaurants, and traveler’s checks can be cashed into dollars at the National Bank of Uzbekistan. The commission fee is two percent. Old U.S. bills (prior to 1997) and/or those in poor condition (with tears, writing, or stamps) will not be accepted. Payment in U.S. dollars is required for all hotel charges, airline tickets, and visa fees, but other dollar transactions, as well as black market currency exchanges, are prohibited.

Religious Activities: In Uzbekistan, religious congregation is only allowed by registered religious communities. The registration process for religious organizations and groups is strict and complex. Activities such as proselytizing, importing and disseminating religious literature, and offering private religious instruction are subject to criminal penalties and/or deportation. Carrying religious literature such as religious books, and/or open displays of worship can quickly catch the attention of security authorities as well.     

Public Speeches: Foreign citizens should not give public speeches or engage in other public events, regardless of size, unless their participation in the event has been authorized by the Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Uzbekistan or its branch that covers the region where the event is being held. The Uzbek government is strict about public events, especially when a foreigner is present.

Earthquakes: Uzbekistan is an earthquake-prone country. General information about natural disaster preparedness is available from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Visitors to Uzbekistan should evaluate their own emergency preparedness and plan accordingly.

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

Women Travelers: Please review our travel tips for women travelers.

LGBTI: Sexual relations between men are against Uzbek law and punishable by up to three years’ imprisonment. The law does not specifically address same-sex sexual activity between women. Same-sex sexual activity is generally a taboo subject in Uzbek society, and there are no known LGBTI organizations. For further information, see our LGBTI Travel Information page and section six of our Human Rights report.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Local public transportation and the majority of buildings in Uzbekistan are not easily accessible for disabled individuals.

Special Circumstances: Travelers to Uzbekistan are subject to frequent document inspections. Therefore, U.S. citizens are strongly encouraged to carry their U.S. passports with their Uzbek visas, or certified copies, with them at all times.

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Health

Medical Care: Medical care in Uzbekistan is below Western standards, with shortages of basic medical supplies, including disposable needles, anesthetics, and antibiotics. A large percentage of medication sold in local pharmacies is known to be counterfeit. Elderly travelers and those with pre-existing health problems may be at particular risk due to inadequate medical facilities. Most resident U.S. citizens travel to North America or Western Europe for their medical needs. U.S. Embassy Tashkent’s Consular Section maintains a list of medical contacts on the Embassy website.

Avoiding Traveler’s Diarrhea: Drink only boiled or bottled water, peel fruits and vegetables, and avoid undercooked meat. Avoid eating unpasteurized dairy products and most food sold in the street.

Prevalent Diseases:

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further Health Information:

Trauma care in Uzbekistan is far below Western trauma care standards, and therefore emergency medical conditions and issues often require medical evacuation. Aeromedical evacuation can take days and is very expensive. Travelers are urged to purchase medical evacuation insurance before traveling to Uzbekistan.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare and Medicaid do not apply overseas.   

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.    

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Uzbekistan has a developed but inconsistently maintained traffic infrastructure. Although main roads in central Tashkent are relatively well maintained, many secondary roads inside and outside Tashkent, and particularly those in the Tien Shan Mountains, are in poor condition and may be passable only by four-wheel-drive vehicles. Driving at night can be dangerous because only the main roads in Tashkent and a few other major cities have streetlights; rural roads and highways generally are not lit. Visitors are urged to avoid driving at night outside Tashkent. The fuel supply can be sporadic; therefore, travelers should expect occasional difficulty finding gasoline or diesel, particularly outside Tashkent.

Livestock, as well as farm equipment and animal-drawn carts that lack lights or reflectors, are found on both urban and rural roads at any hour. Local drivers are unfamiliar with safe driving techniques. Pedestrians cross streets unexpectedly and often without looking for oncoming traffic.

Traffic Laws: Uzbekistan has a large traffic police force, which frequently stops drivers for minor infractions or simple document checks. There have been reports of traffic police harassing foreign drivers and asking them for bribes.   

Uzbekistan has a zero-tolerance policy for driving under the influence of alcohol.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Uzbekistan’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Uzbekistan’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Tashkent

3 Moyqorghon Street, 5th block
Yunusobod District  100093
Tashkent
Uzbekistan

Telephone: +(998) (71) 120-5450

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(998) (71) 120-5450

Fax: +(998) (71) 120-5448

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General Information

 

For information concerning travel to Uzbekistan, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Uzbekistan.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

 

 

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Hague Abduction Convention


Uzbekistan acceded to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) on May 31, 1999; however, the United States and Uzbekistan are not yet treaty partners.  Until Uzbekistan and the United States establish a treaty relationship per Article 38 of the Convention, parents whose children have been abducted from the United States to Uzbekistan or wrongfully retained in Uzbekistan are unable to invoke the Convention to pursue their children's return or to seek access to them.

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Return

 

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  The government of Uzbekistan maintains information about custody, visitation, and family law on the Internet at www.lex.uz.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Uzbekistan and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children's Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction.  For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children's Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children's Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website
Email: AskCI@state.gov

Parental child abduction is not a crime in Uzbekistan.

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court.  Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information.

 

 

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Visitation/Access


Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country. Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Uzbekistan and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children's Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States. Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the appropriate U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Uzbekistan for information and possible assistance.

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Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children’s Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy or Consulates in Uzbekistan are authorized to provide legal advice.

The U.S. Embassy in Tashkent, Uzbekistan posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

We are not aware of any mediation programs in Uzbekistan.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Uzbekistan is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption(Hague Adoption Convention).  Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section 204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F).

Adopting in Uzbekistan is difficult.  Although legal changes made in 2007 led to a modest increase in the number of foreign parents seeking to adopt in Uzbekistan, there have been few successfully completed intercountry adoptions. 

May 2013

In May 2013, the Government of Uzbekistan issued a decree amending the Civil Procedural Code concerning Courts appointed as adoption authorities to review domestic and intercountry adoptions.  The changes will require the judicial system of Uzbekistan to implement certain procedural steps for reviewing adoption cases.  Because the details of these changes will not be available until the Cabinet of Ministers releases final procedural orders, prospective adoptive parents may face unexpected delays during the implementation of the new process.  Updated information about the new procedural steps will be added as soon as it becomes available.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Uzbekistan, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements.  The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States on an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, you must also meet the following requirements in order to adopt a child from Uzbekistan:

  • Residency:  None
  • Age of Adopting Parents:  Prospective adoptive parents must be at least 15 years older than the child (except in cases where the child is being adopted by a step-parent).
  • Marriage:  None
  • Income:  None
  • Other:  Prospective adoptive parents MUST appear in person in the beginning and at the final stage of the adoption process
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Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, Uzbekistan has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption:

  • Relinquishment:  Minimum legal requirements must be met prior to the issuance of an adoption decree by a court.  One such requirement is that a child who has been placed with social services by his or her parents must remain in an orphanage for at least one year before becoming eligible for adoption.  However, if there is a legal finding that the parents are “missing,” “deprived of parental rights,” “legally incapable,” or “deceased,” the one-year rule does not apply.  In the case of missing parents, a competent authority must make a reasonable effort to locate the birth parents to satisfy U.S. and Uzbek law.
  • Abandonment:  The Ministry of Internal Affairs (police) must document all instances of children reported as abandoned or found, including the party that claims to have found the child (often the director of a clinic or maternity hospital).  Following documentation of abandonment, the Ministry of Health (for children under age 3) or the Ministry of Public Education (for children over age 3) will assume tutelage of the child.
  • Age of Adoptive Child:  For the purposes of adoption in Uzbekistan, a child must be under 16 years of age by the time the adoption is completed.  Under the law of Uzbekistan, the age difference between the adoptive parent and the adoptive child must be at least 15 years, except in cases where the child is being adopted by a step-parent.
  • Sibling Adoptions:  Siblings generally must be adopted by one adoptive family, except in cases where health or other considerations prevent them from being raised together.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions:  There are no special requirements for children with special needs or medical conditions.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care:  Absent an earlier legal finding of abandonment, one year must pass from the date the child was found abandoned before s/he becomes eligible for adoption.

Caution:  Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable.  In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible.  In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

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How to Adopt

Uzbek Adoption Authority
Uzbek Regional and City Courts and the Department for Social Support and Rehabilitation of the Ministry of Public Education (Education Ministry)

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Uzbekistan generally includes the following steps:

1.  Choose an adoption service provider
2.  Apply to the court
3.  Obtain court determination letter
4.  Be matched with the child and obtain conclusion letter
5.  Adopt (or obtain custody of) the child in Uzbekistan
6.  Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status
7.  Bring your child home

1.  Choose an Adoption Service Provider

The recommended first step in adopting a child from Uzbekistan is to decide whether or not to use a licensed adoption service provider in the United States that can help you with your adoption.  Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate.  The Department of State provides information on selecting an adoption service provider on its website.

2.  Apply to the Court

In order to adopt a child from Uzbekistan, you will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Uzbekistan and U.S. immigration law.  You must submit an application to the Regional or City courts in the domicile of the adoptee.

To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also file an I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition with U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to be found eligible and suitable to adopt.

3.  Obtain Court Determination letter

During preparation of the case for judicial review, a judge will issue a determination letter obliging guardianship and trusteeship bodies in the domicile of the adoptee to issue a conclusion letter on justification of the adoption and how it will benefit the adoptee.  The guardianship and trusteeship body is the Department of Social Support and Rehabilitation of the Ministry of Public Education and its regional and local branches.

4.  Obtain Conclusion Letter

If you are eligible to adopt and a child is available for intercountry adoption, the guardianship and trusteeship bodies in Uzbekistan, after reviewing the court determination letter, will conduct a careful review of your family.  The list of documents for such review will be required.  The conclusion letter on adoption will be provided to the court.  Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of and provide a permanent home for a particular child.

The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Uzbekistan’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section.  The child must also meet the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law.

5.  Adopt or Obtain Legal Custody of Child in Uzbekistan

The process for finalizing the adoption (or obtain legal custody) in Uzbekistan generally includes the following:

  • Adoption Application to the Court:  Prospective adoptive parents or their legal representatives submit an application to adopt and supporting documents directly to the Regional or City Courts.  
  • Information/Documents Required with Application to the Court:
  • Prospective parents' names
  • Consent of the second spouse to adopt
  • Passport copies
  • Marital information
  • Medical records (must include reference letters from psychiatric, counter TB, drug treatment facilities and HIV clinics)
  • Letter from the employer and income statements
  • Police checks
  • Information about the child prospective parents intend to adopt: name, age, and sex
  • Adoptive child’s name change request
  • Consent of the legal guardian of the child and competent authority of that country
  • Home study report 
  • Letter from the U.S. Embassy in Tashkent, based on the approved Form I-600A, which states that the U.S. government is aware of the family, and that relevant authorities have approved the family for an adoption of an orphan
  • Notarized statement of the prospective adoptive parents about providing information to the representatives of the diplomatic mission of the Republic of Uzbekistan abroad about the adopted child and possibility to communicate with such child

Foreign public documents, such as vital records, notarized documents, etc., must be authenticated with Apostiles  For information on authenticating U.S. documents. Uzbek law also requires that both prospective parents appear at court. The application for adoption must be signed by the adoptive parent(s).

  • Role of the Court:  The Regional or City Courts grant the final decrees on adoptions after reviewing the conclusion letter of the guardianship and trusteeship bodies.  To receive this conclusion letter after an application to the court has been filed, the judge issues a letter to the guardianship and trusteeship bodies requesting a review of the prospective adoptive family and conclusion. The court may request additional documents.
  • Role of Adoption Authority:  The guardianship and trusteeship bodies are responsible for placement of orphans.  The conclusion letter will be issued to the court after the guardianship and trusteeship organ determines that the orphan is eligible for adoption by the prospective adoptive parents.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies:  There are no public or private adoption agencies.  Instead families hire attorneys or facilitators who help them file the appropriate paperwork with the various government offices.
  • Documents Required:  After the conclusion of the guardianship and trusteeship bodies is finalized, the following documents must be submitted with the conclusion to the court:
    • Prospective parents’ home study
    • Excerpt of the birth record of the adoptive child
    • Medical report of the adoptive child
    • Consent of the adoptive child if under the age of 10
    • Consent of the adoptive child’s parents for adoption
    • A document confirming the inclusion of the adoptee child in the database of children without the custody of parents or adoption candidates; as well as documents, confirming that the child could not possibly be transferred to a family of the citizens of the Republic of Uzbekistan or adopted by his/her relatives regardless of those relatives’ citizenship and domicile.

Please note: All U.S. public documents must be translated into Uzbek or Russian by a certified translator, and when requested, authenticated with an Apostile

Note:  Additional documents may be requested.

  • Time Frame:  Foreign adoption in Uzbekistan is a time-consuming process.  It can take from six months to two years. Moreover, prior to issuing an immigrant visa to the adopted child, the U.S. Embassy may have to conduct a field investigation.  Prospective adoptive parents should be prepared to make additional trips to Uzbekistan before the adoption is complete.
  • Adoption Fees:  The fees for the submission and processing of the adoption application and corresponding documents are about $10 USD per document.
  • Authentication of Documents:  You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic.  If so, the Department of State, Authentications Office may be able to assist.

6.  Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Orphan Status

After you finalize the adoption (or gain legal custody) in Uzbekistan, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services must determine whether the child meets the definition oforphan under U.S. immigration law.  You will need to file a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative.

7.  Bring Your Child Home

Once your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), you need to apply for several documents for your child before you can apply for a U.S. immigrant visa to bring your child home to the United States:

Birth Certificate
If you have finalized the adoption in Uzbekistan, you will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child.  Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

Following adoption, the Uzbekistan Vital Records Office should provide you with a new birth certificate for the child.

Uzbekistan Passport
Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Uzbekistan.

Adoptive parents can obtain a new biometric passport and exit permission for the child from the Department of Entry, Exit and Citizenship.  You will need to present the court decree on adoption and the child's new birth certificate.  There is no residency requirement for prospective parents before they can apply for the child's passport.

U.S. Immigrant Visa
After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child and you have filed Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, you then need to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa for your child from the U.S. Embassy in Tashkent.  This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you.  As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child.

You can find instructions for applying for an immigrant visa on the U.S. Embassy in Tashkent’s website.

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States:  A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States:  An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible.  Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport
U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy.  The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Uzbekistan
In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa.  A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit.  Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.  To find information about obtaining a visa for Uzbekistan, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip
Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country.  The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip
When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State.  Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary.  Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Uzbekistan, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

Uzbek law requires that adoptive parents submit annual reports to the Ministry of Public Education until the adopted child reaches age 16.  Parents should contact their adoption service providers in the United States for more information on post-adoption requirements.

We strongly urge you to comply with Uzbekistan’s post-adoption requirements in a timely manner.  Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process.  Your cooperation will contribute to that country’s positive experiences with U.S. citizen parents.

Post-Adoption Resources
Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption.  There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin.  Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

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Contact Information

CONTACT INFORMATION

U.S. Embassy in Uzbekistan
U.S. Embassy, Tashkent
Moyqorghon street, 5thBlock,
Yunusobod District
Tashkent-700093
Uzbekistan
Phone:(998)(71)120-5450
Fax:(998)(71)120-5448
internet:  https://uz.usembassy.gov/embassy/tashkent/
Immigrant Visa Unit E-mail: TashkentIV@state.gov

Ministry of Justice 
5, Sayilgoh Street, Yunusabad District,
Tashkent, Uzbekistan, 100047
Phone: +998-71-233-13-05

Uzbekistan's Guardianship and Trusteeship Body
Ministry of Public Education
Department of Social Support and Rehabilitation
5, Independence Square
Tashkent, Uzbekistan 100021
Phone:  +99871-239-1735
Fax:  +99871-239-4214

Embassy of Uzbekistan
Embassy of the Republic of Uzbekistan
1746 MassachusettsAve., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-887-5300
Fax: 202--293-6804
Email: info@uzbekistan.org
internet: uzbekistan.org/

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor  
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Email:  AskCI@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-600A or I-600 petition:
National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email:  NBC.Adoptions@DHS.gov

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple A 24 Months A
A-2 None Multiple A 24 Months A
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-2 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 12 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 12 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 12 Months
F-1 None Multiple 12 Months
F-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-1 None Multiple 24 Months
G-2 None Multiple 24 Months
G-3 None Multiple 24 Months
G-4 None Multiple 24 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A None N/A N/A 3
H-2B None N/A N/A 3
H-2R None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 12 Months
K-4 None Multiple 12 Months
L-1 None Multiple 12 Months
L-2 None Multiple 12 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 12 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 12 Months
R-2 None Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 12 Months
V-2 None Multiple 12 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 12 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

 

Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Applications
Validity
Period
A-1 [TDY] None One 3 Months
A-2 [TDY] None One 3 Months

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Civil documents from Uzbekistan are generally made available to the person to whom the record pertains. He or she must submit a request through the appropriate Office for Registry of Civil Status (ZAGS), or through an Embassy or Consulate of Uzbekistan. The U.S. Embassy cannot assist in obtaining civil documents or verifying the accuracy of civil records in Uzbekistan.

Documents can be requested through the Embassy of Uzbekistan in Washington, DC or the Consulate in New York by submitting an application requesting the document. The embassy or the consulate will send a document search request to the MFA's Legal Assistance Department, which will initiate the search. This process can take several months to complete.

Uzbekistan is a signatory to the Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement of Legalization for Foreign Public Documents. Copies of the documents obtained directly from the ZAGS archives should beauthenticated at the Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Uzbekistan with an Apostille. The Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Uzbekistan cannot authenticate documents issued in Uzbekistan.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificate

Available. Copies of these documents can be obtained by a written request to the Registry of Civil Status (ZAGS) archives at the district, city or regional level, depending on where the civil act was registered.

Death/Burial Certificate

Available. Copies of these documents can be obtained by a written request to the Registry of Civil Status (ZAGS) archives at the district, city or regional level, depending on where the civil act was registered.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificate

Available. Copies of these documents can be obtained by a written request to the Registry of Civil Status (ZAGS) archives at the district, city or regional level, depending on where the civil act was registered.

Divorce Certificate

Available. Copies of these documents can be obtained by a written request to the Registry of Civil Status (ZAGS) archives at the district, city or regional level, depending on where the civil act was registered.

Adoption Certificates

Unavailable.

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Identity Card

Unavailable.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Uzbek citizens should apply for a police certificate at Information Center of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Uzbekistan. Non-Uzbek citizens should apply at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Uzbekistan. Applicants, both Uzbek and non-Uzbek citizens, residing outside Uzbekistan may submit the request through the Uzbek Mission in the country of residence.

Prison Records

Uzbek citizens should apply for a police certificate at Information Center of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Uzbekistan. Non-Uzbek citizens should apply at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Uzbekistan. Applicants, both Uzbek and non-Uzbek citizens, residing outside Uzbekistan may submit the request through the Uzbek Mission in the country of residence.

Military Records

Available. Certificates are issued at regional and district branches of the Department of Defense Affairs.

Passports & Other Travel Documents
  1. There are three types of Uzbek travel documents. Diplomatic passports are issued at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. This is a machine-readable style, biometric passport with a dark-blue cover.
  2. The green (citizen's) passport is considered a joint internal-external document. It is a travel document only if it contains an exit visa. An exit visa is granted by regional EE&C offices and is valid for worldwide travel for a period of two years. This passport is a mandatory document for Uzbek citizens. The passport can be issued at any age. Minors up to two years old obtain passport with a maximum validity of two years. After the child turns two, the minor's passport is issued with a validity period of five years. Citizens of Uzbekistan 16 years of age and older obtain biometric passports with a ten-year validity.
  3. Stateless residents are issued a dark gray identification booklet as their travel document (Fuqaroligi yo'q shaxsning xorijga chiqish hujjati). These identification booklets are essentially passports being almost identical to the Uzbek citizen's passport. A US visa may be placed in the booklet. They are usually issued for a two-year period if issued to minors under the age of one, for a five year period if issued to stateless persons under the age of sixteen and stateless subjects over the age of 16 will be issued a travel document with ten-year validity. This document is always issued with exit permission, so no other document is needed for the bearer to leave or enter Uzbekistan.

An intending emigrant needs to obtain special exit permission to reside abroad. By law, a request for such permission is processed within 30 work days.

Uzbekistan law does not recognize dual citizenship.

Other Records

Internal Residence Documents

There are several types of documents with which a person may reside in Uzbekistan. The Uzbek passport is a machine-readable, biometric style passport with a green cover. It has identifying information about the bearer and specifies a residential address. As an option, the passport may also contain information about the bearer's children and the bearer's blood type. This joint internal-external passport can be issued at any age. Minors up to two years old obtain a passport with a validity of maximum two years. After the child turns two, the minor's passport is issued with a validity period of five years. Citizens of Uzbekistan 16 years of age and older obtain biometric passports with a ten-year validity.

Note: According to the decree of the Cabinet of Ministers of the Republic of Uzbekistan, effective July 1, 2014, all citizens of Uzbekistan, as well as individuals without citizenship resident in Uzbekistan, must use the biometric passports (biometric travel documents for stateless persons) in order to depart Uzbekistan. The old-style, non-biometric passports are still valid for travel if the bearer has left Uzbekistan before July 1, 2014. These old-style passports can be used for travel outside of Uzbekistan to all countries (given that the bearer had departed Uzbekistan before July 1, 2014) and these passports will remain valid until December 31, 2015.

Foreigners who have stayed in Uzbekistan for more than one year and who plan to stay longer may apply for a residency permit (vid na zhitel'stvo dyla inostrantsa). It is a dark blue, machine readable, biometric-type booklet, which is issued at the city EE&C (Entry, Exit & Citizenship) office for a period of five years, but not exceeding the validity period of the foreigner's passport.

Uzbekistan also issues a residence permit for stateless persons (vid na zhitel'stvo dyla litsa bez grazhdanstva, or in Uzbek, Fuqaroligi yo'q shakhs uchun Uzbekiston Respublikasida yashah guvohnomasi). It is a brown, biometric, machine readable-type booklet with the bio page at the end. It is issued for a period of five years for stateless individuals at the city EE&C office.

Visa Issuing Posts

Tashkent, Republic of Uzbekistan (Embassy)

Address:
#3, Morgorghon Street, 5th Block, Yunusobod District,
Tashkent- 700093, Republic of Uzbekistan

Tel:
ACS unit- 998-71-120-5450
NIV unit- 998-71-140-2215/16
IV unit- 998-71-140-2217

Fax:
998-71-120-6335
998-71-120-5448

ConsularTashkent@state.gov

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Uzbekistan.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 887-5300 (202) 293-9633

New York. NY (212) 754-7403, ext. 100, 107, 108 or 109 (212) 754-6178 ext. 100, 107, 108 or 109 (212) 838-9812

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Tashkent
3 Moyqorghon Street, 5th block
Yunusobod District  100093
Tashkent
Uzbekistan
Telephone
+(998) (71) 120-5450
Emergency
+(998) (71) 120-5450
Fax
+(998) (71) 120-5448
Uzbekistan Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Uzbekistan
Republic of Uzbekistan
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Must be valid at time of entry 

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required for entry stamp  

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Yes

VACCINATIONS:

None required. Vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

The amount of U.S. dollars or any foreign currency may not exceed the total declared by the traveler upon entry. If it does, the traveler must present bank documents showing the source of the additional currency.

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Tashkent

3 Moyqorghon Street, 5th block
Yunusobod District  100093
Tashkent
Uzbekistan

Telephone: +(998) (71) 120-5450

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(998) (71) 120-5450

Fax: +(998) (71) 120-5448

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Uzbekistan for additional information on U.S.-Uzbekistan relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Uzbek Immigration Law: Uzbek immigration laws and regulations are complex and often enforced in a discretionary, arbitrary manner. In some cases, U.S. citizen travelers have received contradictory guidance from Uzbek officials. The Department of State strives to provide accurate information but has no authority over Uzbek entry and exit controls or visa requirements. For more information, contact the Uzbek Embassy in the United States, the Uzbek Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Uzbek Ministry of Interior (page in Russian and Uzbek only).

Visas: All U.S. citizen travelers must possess a valid Uzbek visa in a valid U.S. passport. Visitors may not enter Uzbekistan with a valid Uzbek visa in a canceled or expired U.S. passport, even if they present another valid U.S. passport at the port of entry. Visit the visa information page of the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C., for current visa information.

U.S. citizens should apply for visas well in advance of their travel. Visitors coming from countries in which Uzbekistan does not have diplomatic or consular representation should obtain visas in a third country. A list of Uzbekistan’s consular missions abroad is available on the official website of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Visas cannot be obtained upon arrival at Uzbek airports.

Visitors most often apply for three types of visas:

Tourist Visas (T):

  • Apply at an Uzbek embassy or consulate by filling out the required application form.
  • Provide any other requested information.

Visitors who will stay at hotels should apply for tourist (T) visas. Such visitors are required to stay at hotels and may not legally stay at private residences. Hotels are responsible for registering guests with T visas with the Office of Entry, Exit, and Citizenship Issues of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, commonly known as OVIR, and will ask guests to turn over their passports so that hotel staff may perform this task. Tourist visas cannot be extended after arriving in Uzbekistan.

Private Visitor Visas (PV):

  • Apply at an Uzbek embassy or consulate by filling out the required application form.
  • Invitation Letter: The inviting party must file an official invitation letter in Uzbekistan with OVIR. The inviting party should obtain approval, which includes a “telex number,” and then send the approved invitation letter to the U.S. citizen. This approved letter with the “telex number” must then be included with the visa application.

Visitors who will stay at private residences (e.g., with friends or family) should apply for private visitor (PV) visas. Official invitation letters are required in order to apply for a PV visa. PV visa holders are responsible for registering at OVIR offices within three days of arrival in country. PV visa holders who stay at multiple residences are responsible for re-registering each time they move to another address and need to plan accordingly to provide for an uninterrupted registration between moves. If PV visa holders decide to stay at hotels, the hotel staff will then complete the guest’s registration with OVIR for the hotel stay.

Business Visas (B):

  • Apply at an Uzbek embassy or consulate by filling out the required application form.
  • The inviting party must file an official business invitation letter in Uzbekistan with OVIR. The inviting party should obtain approval, which includes a “telex number,” and then send the approved invitation letter to the U.S. citizen. This approved letter with the “telex number” must then be included with the visa application.

Please note, that U.S. citizens may request business visas with validity of up to one year and allowing multiple entries. This should be noted both on the invitation letter and the visa application. The U.S. Embassy is committed to visa reciprocity for U.S. citizens and welcomes any feedback on the validity of the visas U.S. citizen business travelers are receiving.

Please visit the visa information page of the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C., for details about these visa categories.

Visa Validity and Duration of Stay: Uzbek visas not only indicate the validity of the visa but also the period of time a person is allowed to stay in Uzbekistan on a given trip. A visitor must leave the country before passage of the number of days listed as the authorized duration of stay on the visa. Include precise dates for your planned period of stay on your Uzbek visa application.

Overstay Penalties: Overstaying your visa by any time at all may result in a USD 2,000 fine and a delay of a week or more before the Uzbek authorities allow you to exit the country. Travel agencies and tour companies may also be fined if customers overstay their visas or for visa application errors.

Exit Visa: Tourist visa holders who are unable to depart Uzbekistan by the visa expiration date or end date of their authorized period of stay must apply for an exit visa from the OVIR office at the Tashkent International Airport. The application must be submitted before the anticipated overstay. The service normally costs USD 160, and there is no guarantee OVIR will approve the request. Private visitor visa holders must apply for extensions at the district OVIR office at which they are registered. Again, the application must be filed before any overstay, the cost is normally USD 160, and there is no guarantee of approval.   

Registering Your Temporary Residence in Uzbekistan: All travelers present in Uzbekistan for more than three business days must register with OVIR in the district or city in which they are staying. All foreign nationals are required to obtain valid registration by their third day in Uzbekistan (excluding Sundays and national holidays). From the date of the initial registration, travelers are responsible for maintaining uninterrupted registration, and the initial three-day grace period no longer applies for subsequent moves. This means travelers must apply for registration at the new residence in advance of their intended move. The three-day grace period does not apply to tourist visa holders, who must register at a hotel as soon as they arrive in Uzbekistan. Therefore, it is important to apply for this registration as soon as possible to avoid a fine and other penalties. Registration fees vary depending on length of stay, ranging from USD 20 for a one-month stay to USD 200 for a stay of up to a year. Visitors without proper registration are subject to fines, imprisonment, and deportation; the fines range from USD 1,000 to USD 12,000.

Border Crossings: Travel within Uzbekistan by rail or land sometimes requires brief entries into neighboring countries. Travelers should obtain multiple-entry Uzbek visas as well as proper visas for the relevant neighboring countries if needed.  

Many of Uzbekistan’s land border crossings are restricted to use by Uzbek citizens and nationals of the country sharing that particular border. For more information on bordering countries see the Travel Warning for Afghanistan and Country Specific Information for Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan and Turkmenistan. Land crossings by U.S. citizens and other third country nationals are often restricted to specific border posts. U.S. citizen travelers planning an overland border crossing should ensure they will cross at an authorized point.

In certain areas of Fergana Valley, many direct routes are along roads that may temporarily cross poorly demarcated or disputed borders. These so-called transit roads are used daily by locals without incident. U.S. citizens traveling in the region, however, are advised that crossing the border in this manner, even inadvertently, may be considered an immigration violation. Taking photos or filming in border areas is prohibited and doing so may result in detainment and questioning by border guards. Please contact the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C., for the most up-to-date information.

Customs Restrictions: Foreigners must complete a customs declaration in duplicate upon entering Uzbekistan through an airport or overland crossing. Customs officials will review and stamp both copies. One will be retained by the Uzbek Customs Authority; the other must be kept by the traveler and presented at the time of departure from Uzbekistan. The amount of U.S. dollars or any foreign currency taken out of Uzbekistan cannot exceed the amount indicated on the customs declaration at the time of entry. In order to export more cash than was imported, one must obtain special permission from the National Bank of Uzbekistan. Those who understate the amount of currency on the declaration form upon departure from Uzbekistan face fines and confiscation of their unreported money.   

Uzbek customs authorities may enforce strict regulations concerning the temporary import to or export from Uzbekistan of items such as armaments and ammunition, space technology, encryption devices, X-ray and isotope equipment, nuclear materials, poisons, drugs, precious and semi-precious metals, cancelled securities, pieces of art, and antiques of historical value.

Uzbek customs authorities also strictly control the importation of controlled pharmaceuticals and psychotropic medicine for personal use while in or transiting through the territory of Uzbekistan. Customs authorities routinely analyze the length of stay of all visitors and ensure that the amount of controlled narcotics and psychotropic prescription pharmaceuticals does not exceed a quantity which they consider within lawful guidelines. Under Uzbek law, for foreign citizens transiting Uzbekistan, the amount of prescription narcotics may not exceed the dose required for seven days, and the amount of psychotropic substances may not exceed the dose required for a fifteen-day period (please note that Lorazepam-based medicine, regardless of the brand name, is considered a controlled substance by Uzbek law).

All visitors who expect to visit or transit through Uzbekistan with restricted types of prescription medicines should declare their prescription medicines in item 6 of the customs declaration form and present all medicines to a customs official, in addition to a letter from their physician (preferably translated into Russian and/or Uzbek) which declares the diagnosis of the traveler, the name(s) of the prescription(s), dosage, and the duration of consumption and a copy of the actual prescription/script for each medicine.

Finally, travelers are advised that Uzbek customs laws and regulations are complex and often enforced in a discretionary, arbitrary manner. Regardless of compliance with the aforementioned procedures, the importation of any quantity of prescription medication may result in fines, arrest, and/or detention by the Uzbek authorities. Visit the U.S. Embassy's website for specific information and the text of the actual legislation.

HIV/AIDS: Some HIV/AIDS entry restrictions exist for visitors to and foreign residents of Uzbekistan. Long-term visitors may be required to submit HIV test results along with their visa application. For more information, contact the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C., before you travel.

Dual Nationals:

Biometric Passport Requirement: Obtaining a biometric Uzbek passport and a new exit permit in that passport takes several months and may significantly delay dual nationals’ departure from Uzbekistan. Please see the website of the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C. for more information.

Travel on a Biometric Passport:

  • Uzbek citizens, including dual nationals, departing the Republic of Uzbekistan must exit using a biometric passport and a valid Uzbek exit permit, regardless of age.
  • To depart for the United States, dual nationals should be prepared to present a valid U.S. passport in addition to an Uzbek biometric passport with a valid exit permit.   

Travel on a Non-Biometric Passport:  Uzbek citizens may use their non-biometric Uzbek passport as a travel document solely to re-enter Uzbekistan, and to transit through the territory of third countries, if the validity period specified therein has not expired. This provision is valid until July 1, 2018.

Restrictions on Travel of a Minor of an Uzbek Citizen Parent:

Uzbek diplomatic missions will refuse to issue a visa to a U.S. citizen minor if at least one of the minor’s parents is an Uzbek citizen who has registered a permanent residence (“propiska”) in Uzbekistan. In these cases, the Uzbek Embassy in Washington, D.C., or the Consulate General in New York will either issue an Uzbek birth certificate or a certificate for return to Uzbekistan.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites. U.S. Embassy Tashkent also has a webpage dedicated to issues faced by dual nationals.

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Safety and Security

The Department of State advises U.S. citizens that the potential for a terrorist attack or localized civil disturbance still exists in Uzbekistan. Supporters of terrorist groups such as the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, al-Qai’da, ISIS, and the Islamic Jihad Union are active in the Central Asian region. Members of these groups have expressed anti-U.S. sentiments and have attacked U.S. government interests in the past. They may attempt to target U.S. government or private U.S. citizen interests in Uzbekistan. In the past, these groups have conducted kidnappings, assassinations, and suicide bombings in the broader region. In recent years, Uzbek nationals abroad have allegedly been linked to terrorist or extremist groups, and more recently, participated in terrorist attacks against the Istanbul airport and a nightclub.   

Uzbek authorities maintain a high level of alert and aggressive security measures to thwart terrorist attacks. High security at official facilities may lead terrorists and their sympathizers to seek softer targets. These may include facilities where U.S. citizens and other foreigners congregate or visit such as residential areas, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, schools, hotels, outdoor recreation events, and resorts. U.S. Embassy Tashkent continues to employ heightened security precautions. U.S. citizens should report any unusual activity to local authorities and then inform the Embassy.

Depending upon security conditions, travelers may experience restricted personal movement, including the closing of roads to traffic in addition to frequent document, vehicle, and personal identification checks. The Uzbek government has intermittently restricted travel to certain parts of the country in response to security concerns.

Crime: The rate of violent crime in Uzbekistan, including violent crime against foreigners, has increased in recent years. In urban areas, travelers are urged to take the same precautions they would take in any large U.S. city. If traveling at night, stay in well-lit areas, travel in groups, maintain a low profile, and do not display large amounts of cash. Beware of pickpockets in public places, such as tourist destinations, train stations, and local markets. Although using private cars as taxis is common in Uzbekistan, U.S. citizens, especially women, should not consider this a safe practice. U.S. citizens are encouraged to use clearly marked taxis, such as those at hotels, and should avoid riding in taxis alone.

Counterfeit Goods: It is recommended that travelers not buy counterfeit and pirated goods, even if they are widely available. Not only are they illegal in the United States, you may also be breaking local law if you purchase them.

Scams: See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: Contact the local police and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the embassy for assistance.       

We can:

  • Replace a stolen passport.
  • Help you find appropriate medical care if you are the victim of violent crimes such as assault or rape.
  • Put you in contact with the appropriate police authorities, and, if you want us to, contact family members or friends.
  • Help you understand the local criminal justice process and direct you to local attorneys, although it is important to remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.   

The local equivalent of the 911 emergency line in most areas of Uzbekistan is 01 for fire, 02 for police, 03 for an ambulance, and 050 for the Ministry of Emergency Situations. Please note that in Tashkent city these numbers are 101, 102, 103, and 1050, respectively.   

For Further Information:   

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.   

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Illicit Narcotics and Alcohol: Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Uzbekistan are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. Uzbekistan has a zero-tolerance policy for driving under the influence of alcohol.

Photography: Taking photographs of military or security installations or other locations of strategic significance (ministries, border and other checkpoints, bridges, tunnels, reservoirs, mountain passes, the subway system, etc.) is prohibited in Uzbekistan. Uzbek authorities enforce these regulations strictly. Obey all signs restricting photography and remember that the absence of such a sign does not mean you may take a picture.

Financial Transactions: Most transactions are conducted on a cash-only, local-currency (soum) basis. Some merchants accept dollars for larger tourist handicraft purchases. Credit cards are accepted only at the main hotels and a few shops and restaurants, and traveler’s checks can be cashed into dollars at the National Bank of Uzbekistan. The commission fee is two percent. Old U.S. bills (prior to 1997) and/or those in poor condition (with tears, writing, or stamps) will not be accepted. Payment in U.S. dollars is required for all hotel charges, airline tickets, and visa fees, but other dollar transactions, as well as black market currency exchanges, are prohibited.

Religious Activities: In Uzbekistan, religious congregation is only allowed by registered religious communities. The registration process for religious organizations and groups is strict and complex. Activities such as proselytizing, importing and disseminating religious literature, and offering private religious instruction are subject to criminal penalties and/or deportation. Carrying religious literature such as religious books, and/or open displays of worship can quickly catch the attention of security authorities as well.     

Public Speeches: Foreign citizens should not give public speeches or engage in other public events, regardless of size, unless their participation in the event has been authorized by the Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Uzbekistan or its branch that covers the region where the event is being held. The Uzbek government is strict about public events, especially when a foreigner is present.

Earthquakes: Uzbekistan is an earthquake-prone country. General information about natural disaster preparedness is available from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Visitors to Uzbekistan should evaluate their own emergency preparedness and plan accordingly.

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

Women Travelers: Please review our travel tips for women travelers.

LGBTI: Sexual relations between men are against Uzbek law and punishable by up to three years’ imprisonment. The law does not specifically address same-sex sexual activity between women. Same-sex sexual activity is generally a taboo subject in Uzbek society, and there are no known LGBTI organizations. For further information, see our LGBTI Travel Information page and section six of our Human Rights report.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Local public transportation and the majority of buildings in Uzbekistan are not easily accessible for disabled individuals.

Special Circumstances: Travelers to Uzbekistan are subject to frequent document inspections. Therefore, U.S. citizens are strongly encouraged to carry their U.S. passports with their Uzbek visas, or certified copies, with them at all times.

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Health

Medical Care: Medical care in Uzbekistan is below Western standards, with shortages of basic medical supplies, including disposable needles, anesthetics, and antibiotics. A large percentage of medication sold in local pharmacies is known to be counterfeit. Elderly travelers and those with pre-existing health problems may be at particular risk due to inadequate medical facilities. Most resident U.S. citizens travel to North America or Western Europe for their medical needs. U.S. Embassy Tashkent’s Consular Section maintains a list of medical contacts on the Embassy website.

Avoiding Traveler’s Diarrhea: Drink only boiled or bottled water, peel fruits and vegetables, and avoid undercooked meat. Avoid eating unpasteurized dairy products and most food sold in the street.

Prevalent Diseases:

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further Health Information:

Trauma care in Uzbekistan is far below Western trauma care standards, and therefore emergency medical conditions and issues often require medical evacuation. Aeromedical evacuation can take days and is very expensive. Travelers are urged to purchase medical evacuation insurance before traveling to Uzbekistan.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare and Medicaid do not apply overseas.   

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.    

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Uzbekistan has a developed but inconsistently maintained traffic infrastructure. Although main roads in central Tashkent are relatively well maintained, many secondary roads inside and outside Tashkent, and particularly those in the Tien Shan Mountains, are in poor condition and may be passable only by four-wheel-drive vehicles. Driving at night can be dangerous because only the main roads in Tashkent and a few other major cities have streetlights; rural roads and highways generally are not lit. Visitors are urged to avoid driving at night outside Tashkent. The fuel supply can be sporadic; therefore, travelers should expect occasional difficulty finding gasoline or diesel, particularly outside Tashkent.

Livestock, as well as farm equipment and animal-drawn carts that lack lights or reflectors, are found on both urban and rural roads at any hour. Local drivers are unfamiliar with safe driving techniques. Pedestrians cross streets unexpectedly and often without looking for oncoming traffic.

Traffic Laws: Uzbekistan has a large traffic police force, which frequently stops drivers for minor infractions or simple document checks. There have been reports of traffic police harassing foreign drivers and asking them for bribes.   

Uzbekistan has a zero-tolerance policy for driving under the influence of alcohol.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Uzbekistan’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Uzbekistan’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Tashkent

3 Moyqorghon Street, 5th block
Yunusobod District  100093
Tashkent
Uzbekistan

Telephone: +(998) (71) 120-5450

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(998) (71) 120-5450

Fax: +(998) (71) 120-5448

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General Information

 

For information concerning travel to Uzbekistan, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Uzbekistan.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

 

 

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Hague Abduction Convention


Uzbekistan acceded to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) on May 31, 1999; however, the United States and Uzbekistan are not yet treaty partners.  Until Uzbekistan and the United States establish a treaty relationship per Article 38 of the Convention, parents whose children have been abducted from the United States to Uzbekistan or wrongfully retained in Uzbekistan are unable to invoke the Convention to pursue their children's return or to seek access to them.

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Return

 

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  The government of Uzbekistan maintains information about custody, visitation, and family law on the Internet at www.lex.uz.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Uzbekistan and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children's Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction.  For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children's Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children's Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website
Email: AskCI@state.gov

Parental child abduction is not a crime in Uzbekistan.

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court.  Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information.

 

 

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Visitation/Access


Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country. Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Uzbekistan and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children's Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States. Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the appropriate U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Uzbekistan for information and possible assistance.

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Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children’s Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy or Consulates in Uzbekistan are authorized to provide legal advice.

The U.S. Embassy in Tashkent, Uzbekistan posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

We are not aware of any mediation programs in Uzbekistan.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Uzbekistan is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption(Hague Adoption Convention).  Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section 204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F).

Adopting in Uzbekistan is difficult.  Although legal changes made in 2007 led to a modest increase in the number of foreign parents seeking to adopt in Uzbekistan, there have been few successfully completed intercountry adoptions. 

May 2013

In May 2013, the Government of Uzbekistan issued a decree amending the Civil Procedural Code concerning Courts appointed as adoption authorities to review domestic and intercountry adoptions.  The changes will require the judicial system of Uzbekistan to implement certain procedural steps for reviewing adoption cases.  Because the details of these changes will not be available until the Cabinet of Ministers releases final procedural orders, prospective adoptive parents may face unexpected delays during the implementation of the new process.  Updated information about the new procedural steps will be added as soon as it becomes available.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Uzbekistan, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements.  The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States on an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, you must also meet the following requirements in order to adopt a child from Uzbekistan:

  • Residency:  None
  • Age of Adopting Parents:  Prospective adoptive parents must be at least 15 years older than the child (except in cases where the child is being adopted by a step-parent).
  • Marriage:  None
  • Income:  None
  • Other:  Prospective adoptive parents MUST appear in person in the beginning and at the final stage of the adoption process
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Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, Uzbekistan has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption:

  • Relinquishment:  Minimum legal requirements must be met prior to the issuance of an adoption decree by a court.  One such requirement is that a child who has been placed with social services by his or her parents must remain in an orphanage for at least one year before becoming eligible for adoption.  However, if there is a legal finding that the parents are “missing,” “deprived of parental rights,” “legally incapable,” or “deceased,” the one-year rule does not apply.  In the case of missing parents, a competent authority must make a reasonable effort to locate the birth parents to satisfy U.S. and Uzbek law.
  • Abandonment:  The Ministry of Internal Affairs (police) must document all instances of children reported as abandoned or found, including the party that claims to have found the child (often the director of a clinic or maternity hospital).  Following documentation of abandonment, the Ministry of Health (for children under age 3) or the Ministry of Public Education (for children over age 3) will assume tutelage of the child.
  • Age of Adoptive Child:  For the purposes of adoption in Uzbekistan, a child must be under 16 years of age by the time the adoption is completed.  Under the law of Uzbekistan, the age difference between the adoptive parent and the adoptive child must be at least 15 years, except in cases where the child is being adopted by a step-parent.
  • Sibling Adoptions:  Siblings generally must be adopted by one adoptive family, except in cases where health or other considerations prevent them from being raised together.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions:  There are no special requirements for children with special needs or medical conditions.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care:  Absent an earlier legal finding of abandonment, one year must pass from the date the child was found abandoned before s/he becomes eligible for adoption.

Caution:  Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable.  In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible.  In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

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How to Adopt

Uzbek Adoption Authority
Uzbek Regional and City Courts and the Department for Social Support and Rehabilitation of the Ministry of Public Education (Education Ministry)

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Uzbekistan generally includes the following steps:

1.  Choose an adoption service provider
2.  Apply to the court
3.  Obtain court determination letter
4.  Be matched with the child and obtain conclusion letter
5.  Adopt (or obtain custody of) the child in Uzbekistan
6.  Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status
7.  Bring your child home

1.  Choose an Adoption Service Provider

The recommended first step in adopting a child from Uzbekistan is to decide whether or not to use a licensed adoption service provider in the United States that can help you with your adoption.  Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate.  The Department of State provides information on selecting an adoption service provider on its website.

2.  Apply to the Court

In order to adopt a child from Uzbekistan, you will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Uzbekistan and U.S. immigration law.  You must submit an application to the Regional or City courts in the domicile of the adoptee.

To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also file an I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition with U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to be found eligible and suitable to adopt.

3.  Obtain Court Determination letter

During preparation of the case for judicial review, a judge will issue a determination letter obliging guardianship and trusteeship bodies in the domicile of the adoptee to issue a conclusion letter on justification of the adoption and how it will benefit the adoptee.  The guardianship and trusteeship body is the Department of Social Support and Rehabilitation of the Ministry of Public Education and its regional and local branches.

4.  Obtain Conclusion Letter

If you are eligible to adopt and a child is available for intercountry adoption, the guardianship and trusteeship bodies in Uzbekistan, after reviewing the court determination letter, will conduct a careful review of your family.  The list of documents for such review will be required.  The conclusion letter on adoption will be provided to the court.  Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of and provide a permanent home for a particular child.

The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Uzbekistan’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section.  The child must also meet the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law.

5.  Adopt or Obtain Legal Custody of Child in Uzbekistan

The process for finalizing the adoption (or obtain legal custody) in Uzbekistan generally includes the following:

  • Adoption Application to the Court:  Prospective adoptive parents or their legal representatives submit an application to adopt and supporting documents directly to the Regional or City Courts.  
  • Information/Documents Required with Application to the Court:
  • Prospective parents' names
  • Consent of the second spouse to adopt
  • Passport copies
  • Marital information
  • Medical records (must include reference letters from psychiatric, counter TB, drug treatment facilities and HIV clinics)
  • Letter from the employer and income statements
  • Police checks
  • Information about the child prospective parents intend to adopt: name, age, and sex
  • Adoptive child’s name change request
  • Consent of the legal guardian of the child and competent authority of that country
  • Home study report 
  • Letter from the U.S. Embassy in Tashkent, based on the approved Form I-600A, which states that the U.S. government is aware of the family, and that relevant authorities have approved the family for an adoption of an orphan
  • Notarized statement of the prospective adoptive parents about providing information to the representatives of the diplomatic mission of the Republic of Uzbekistan abroad about the adopted child and possibility to communicate with such child

Foreign public documents, such as vital records, notarized documents, etc., must be authenticated with Apostiles  For information on authenticating U.S. documents. Uzbek law also requires that both prospective parents appear at court. The application for adoption must be signed by the adoptive parent(s).

  • Role of the Court:  The Regional or City Courts grant the final decrees on adoptions after reviewing the conclusion letter of the guardianship and trusteeship bodies.  To receive this conclusion letter after an application to the court has been filed, the judge issues a letter to the guardianship and trusteeship bodies requesting a review of the prospective adoptive family and conclusion. The court may request additional documents.
  • Role of Adoption Authority:  The guardianship and trusteeship bodies are responsible for placement of orphans.  The conclusion letter will be issued to the court after the guardianship and trusteeship organ determines that the orphan is eligible for adoption by the prospective adoptive parents.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies:  There are no public or private adoption agencies.  Instead families hire attorneys or facilitators who help them file the appropriate paperwork with the various government offices.
  • Documents Required:  After the conclusion of the guardianship and trusteeship bodies is finalized, the following documents must be submitted with the conclusion to the court:
    • Prospective parents’ home study
    • Excerpt of the birth record of the adoptive child
    • Medical report of the adoptive child
    • Consent of the adoptive child if under the age of 10
    • Consent of the adoptive child’s parents for adoption
    • A document confirming the inclusion of the adoptee child in the database of children without the custody of parents or adoption candidates; as well as documents, confirming that the child could not possibly be transferred to a family of the citizens of the Republic of Uzbekistan or adopted by his/her relatives regardless of those relatives’ citizenship and domicile.

Please note: All U.S. public documents must be translated into Uzbek or Russian by a certified translator, and when requested, authenticated with an Apostile

Note:  Additional documents may be requested.

  • Time Frame:  Foreign adoption in Uzbekistan is a time-consuming process.  It can take from six months to two years. Moreover, prior to issuing an immigrant visa to the adopted child, the U.S. Embassy may have to conduct a field investigation.  Prospective adoptive parents should be prepared to make additional trips to Uzbekistan before the adoption is complete.
  • Adoption Fees:  The fees for the submission and processing of the adoption application and corresponding documents are about $10 USD per document.
  • Authentication of Documents:  You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic.  If so, the Department of State, Authentications Office may be able to assist.

6.  Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Orphan Status

After you finalize the adoption (or gain legal custody) in Uzbekistan, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services must determine whether the child meets the definition oforphan under U.S. immigration law.  You will need to file a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative.

7.  Bring Your Child Home

Once your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), you need to apply for several documents for your child before you can apply for a U.S. immigrant visa to bring your child home to the United States:

Birth Certificate
If you have finalized the adoption in Uzbekistan, you will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child.  Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

Following adoption, the Uzbekistan Vital Records Office should provide you with a new birth certificate for the child.

Uzbekistan Passport
Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Uzbekistan.

Adoptive parents can obtain a new biometric passport and exit permission for the child from the Department of Entry, Exit and Citizenship.  You will need to present the court decree on adoption and the child's new birth certificate.  There is no residency requirement for prospective parents before they can apply for the child's passport.

U.S. Immigrant Visa
After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child and you have filed Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, you then need to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa for your child from the U.S. Embassy in Tashkent.  This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you.  As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child.

You can find instructions for applying for an immigrant visa on the U.S. Embassy in Tashkent’s website.

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States:  A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States:  An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible.  Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport
U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy.  The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Uzbekistan
In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa.  A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit.  Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.  To find information about obtaining a visa for Uzbekistan, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip
Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country.  The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip
When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State.  Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary.  Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Uzbekistan, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

Uzbek law requires that adoptive parents submit annual reports to the Ministry of Public Education until the adopted child reaches age 16.  Parents should contact their adoption service providers in the United States for more information on post-adoption requirements.

We strongly urge you to comply with Uzbekistan’s post-adoption requirements in a timely manner.  Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process.  Your cooperation will contribute to that country’s positive experiences with U.S. citizen parents.

Post-Adoption Resources
Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption.  There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin.  Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

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Contact Information

CONTACT INFORMATION

U.S. Embassy in Uzbekistan
U.S. Embassy, Tashkent
Moyqorghon street, 5thBlock,
Yunusobod District
Tashkent-700093
Uzbekistan
Phone:(998)(71)120-5450
Fax:(998)(71)120-5448
internet:  https://uz.usembassy.gov/embassy/tashkent/
Immigrant Visa Unit E-mail: TashkentIV@state.gov

Ministry of Justice 
5, Sayilgoh Street, Yunusabad District,
Tashkent, Uzbekistan, 100047
Phone: +998-71-233-13-05

Uzbekistan's Guardianship and Trusteeship Body
Ministry of Public Education
Department of Social Support and Rehabilitation
5, Independence Square
Tashkent, Uzbekistan 100021
Phone:  +99871-239-1735
Fax:  +99871-239-4214

Embassy of Uzbekistan
Embassy of the Republic of Uzbekistan
1746 MassachusettsAve., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-887-5300
Fax: 202--293-6804
Email: info@uzbekistan.org
internet: uzbekistan.org/

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor  
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Email:  AskCI@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-600A or I-600 petition:
National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email:  NBC.Adoptions@DHS.gov

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple A 24 Months A
A-2 None Multiple A 24 Months A
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-2 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 12 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 12 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 12 Months
F-1 None Multiple 12 Months
F-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-1 None Multiple 24 Months
G-2 None Multiple 24 Months
G-3 None Multiple 24 Months
G-4 None Multiple 24 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A None N/A N/A 3
H-2B None N/A N/A 3
H-2R None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 12 Months
K-4 None Multiple 12 Months
L-1 None Multiple 12 Months
L-2 None Multiple 12 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 12 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 12 Months
R-2 None Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 12 Months
V-2 None Multiple 12 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 12 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

 

Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Applications
Validity
Period
A-1 [TDY] None One 3 Months
A-2 [TDY] None One 3 Months

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Civil documents from Uzbekistan are generally made available to the person to whom the record pertains. He or she must submit a request through the appropriate Office for Registry of Civil Status (ZAGS), or through an Embassy or Consulate of Uzbekistan. The U.S. Embassy cannot assist in obtaining civil documents or verifying the accuracy of civil records in Uzbekistan.

Documents can be requested through the Embassy of Uzbekistan in Washington, DC or the Consulate in New York by submitting an application requesting the document. The embassy or the consulate will send a document search request to the MFA's Legal Assistance Department, which will initiate the search. This process can take several months to complete.

Uzbekistan is a signatory to the Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement of Legalization for Foreign Public Documents. Copies of the documents obtained directly from the ZAGS archives should beauthenticated at the Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Uzbekistan with an Apostille. The Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Uzbekistan cannot authenticate documents issued in Uzbekistan.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificate

Available. Copies of these documents can be obtained by a written request to the Registry of Civil Status (ZAGS) archives at the district, city or regional level, depending on where the civil act was registered.

Death/Burial Certificate

Available. Copies of these documents can be obtained by a written request to the Registry of Civil Status (ZAGS) archives at the district, city or regional level, depending on where the civil act was registered.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificate

Available. Copies of these documents can be obtained by a written request to the Registry of Civil Status (ZAGS) archives at the district, city or regional level, depending on where the civil act was registered.

Divorce Certificate

Available. Copies of these documents can be obtained by a written request to the Registry of Civil Status (ZAGS) archives at the district, city or regional level, depending on where the civil act was registered.

Adoption Certificates

Unavailable.

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Identity Card

Unavailable.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Uzbek citizens should apply for a police certificate at Information Center of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Uzbekistan. Non-Uzbek citizens should apply at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Uzbekistan. Applicants, both Uzbek and non-Uzbek citizens, residing outside Uzbekistan may submit the request through the Uzbek Mission in the country of residence.

Prison Records

Uzbek citizens should apply for a police certificate at Information Center of the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Uzbekistan. Non-Uzbek citizens should apply at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Uzbekistan. Applicants, both Uzbek and non-Uzbek citizens, residing outside Uzbekistan may submit the request through the Uzbek Mission in the country of residence.

Military Records

Available. Certificates are issued at regional and district branches of the Department of Defense Affairs.

Passports & Other Travel Documents
  1. There are three types of Uzbek travel documents. Diplomatic passports are issued at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. This is a machine-readable style, biometric passport with a dark-blue cover.
  2. The green (citizen's) passport is considered a joint internal-external document. It is a travel document only if it contains an exit visa. An exit visa is granted by regional EE&C offices and is valid for worldwide travel for a period of two years. This passport is a mandatory document for Uzbek citizens. The passport can be issued at any age. Minors up to two years old obtain passport with a maximum validity of two years. After the child turns two, the minor's passport is issued with a validity period of five years. Citizens of Uzbekistan 16 years of age and older obtain biometric passports with a ten-year validity.
  3. Stateless residents are issued a dark gray identification booklet as their travel document (Fuqaroligi yo'q shaxsning xorijga chiqish hujjati). These identification booklets are essentially passports being almost identical to the Uzbek citizen's passport. A US visa may be placed in the booklet. They are usually issued for a two-year period if issued to minors under the age of one, for a five year period if issued to stateless persons under the age of sixteen and stateless subjects over the age of 16 will be issued a travel document with ten-year validity. This document is always issued with exit permission, so no other document is needed for the bearer to leave or enter Uzbekistan.

An intending emigrant needs to obtain special exit permission to reside abroad. By law, a request for such permission is processed within 30 work days.

Uzbekistan law does not recognize dual citizenship.

Other Records

Internal Residence Documents

There are several types of documents with which a person may reside in Uzbekistan. The Uzbek passport is a machine-readable, biometric style passport with a green cover. It has identifying information about the bearer and specifies a residential address. As an option, the passport may also contain information about the bearer's children and the bearer's blood type. This joint internal-external passport can be issued at any age. Minors up to two years old obtain a passport with a validity of maximum two years. After the child turns two, the minor's passport is issued with a validity period of five years. Citizens of Uzbekistan 16 years of age and older obtain biometric passports with a ten-year validity.

Note: According to the decree of the Cabinet of Ministers of the Republic of Uzbekistan, effective July 1, 2014, all citizens of Uzbekistan, as well as individuals without citizenship resident in Uzbekistan, must use the biometric passports (biometric travel documents for stateless persons) in order to depart Uzbekistan. The old-style, non-biometric passports are still valid for travel if the bearer has left Uzbekistan before July 1, 2014. These old-style passports can be used for travel outside of Uzbekistan to all countries (given that the bearer had departed Uzbekistan before July 1, 2014) and these passports will remain valid until December 31, 2015.

Foreigners who have stayed in Uzbekistan for more than one year and who plan to stay longer may apply for a residency permit (vid na zhitel'stvo dyla inostrantsa). It is a dark blue, machine readable, biometric-type booklet, which is issued at the city EE&C (Entry, Exit & Citizenship) office for a period of five years, but not exceeding the validity period of the foreigner's passport.

Uzbekistan also issues a residence permit for stateless persons (vid na zhitel'stvo dyla litsa bez grazhdanstva, or in Uzbek, Fuqaroligi yo'q shakhs uchun Uzbekiston Respublikasida yashah guvohnomasi). It is a brown, biometric, machine readable-type booklet with the bio page at the end. It is issued for a period of five years for stateless individuals at the city EE&C office.

Visa Issuing Posts

Tashkent, Republic of Uzbekistan (Embassy)

Address:
#3, Morgorghon Street, 5th Block, Yunusobod District,
Tashkent- 700093, Republic of Uzbekistan

Tel:
ACS unit- 998-71-120-5450
NIV unit- 998-71-140-2215/16
IV unit- 998-71-140-2217

Fax:
998-71-120-6335
998-71-120-5448

ConsularTashkent@state.gov

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Uzbekistan.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 887-5300 (202) 293-9633

New York. NY (212) 754-7403, ext. 100, 107, 108 or 109 (212) 754-6178 ext. 100, 107, 108 or 109 (212) 838-9812

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Tashkent
3 Moyqorghon Street, 5th block
Yunusobod District  100093
Tashkent
Uzbekistan
Telephone
+(998) (71) 120-5450
Emergency
+(998) (71) 120-5450
Fax
+(998) (71) 120-5448
Uzbekistan Country Map

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Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.