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International Travel

English

Country Information

Angola

Country Information

Angola
Republic of Angola
Last Updated: December 13, 2016
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Embassy Messages

Luanda

 

Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months from date of entry

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

2 blank pages

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Yes

VACCINATIONS:

Yellow fever 

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

Declare amounts over $10,000

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

50,000 kwanzas + $10,000

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Luanda

Rua Houari Boumedienne #32
Miramar, Luanda
Angola

Telephone: +(244) 222-64-1000, +(244) 946-44-0977 , +(244) 946-44-0982
+(244) 946-44-0983, +(244) 946-44-0987
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(244) 222-641-000, +(244) 923-64-0154
+(244) 222-64-1000
Fax: +(244) 222-64-1232

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Destination Description

See our Fact Sheet on Angola for information on U.S. - Angola relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Requirements for Entry:

  • Passport
  • Visa
  • World Health Organization (WHO) card with yellow fever vaccination. Vaccination at the airport is available for a fee.

Obtain your visa before traveling. Visit the Embassy of Angola’s website for the most current visa information. You can also apply online. Overseas inquiries should be made at the nearest Angolan Embassy or Consulate. Allow several weeks for visa processing. If you are traveling with minor children to Angola via South Africa, be aware additional documentation is required.

Arrange reliable and secure ground transportation from the airport in advance.

Immigration and customs officials at the airport have detained foreigners without cause and demanded gratuities before allowing them to enter or depart Angola. If harassed at a port of entry, ask to speak with the U.S. Embassy/Airport supervisor et al.

Currency Regulations: Anything over $10,000 must be declared but you may enter with up to $15,000. Non-residents can leave with the equivalent of $10,000 in foreign currency and residents with $15,000. Non-residents and residents and may also take out 50,000 kwanzas ($300). Expect to be searched at the airport and any amount over those limits to be confiscated.

HIV/AIDS restrictions: The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Angola.

Find information on dual nationality, prevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

 

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Safety and Security

Landmines are a risk throughout the country outside major cities.

Cabinda City: Murders, kidnappings and sexual assaults targeting foreigners have occurred in years past. And while a heavy security presence now remains in the region, militant groups have indicated their intention to continue to conduct attacks on foreigners and occasionally attack police and Angolan Armed Forces convoys and outposts.

Lunda North and South: These diamond-producing provinces have the potential for civil unrest and crime. There have been reports of violent incidents against foreigners who require official permission and documentation from the government of Angola to travel there. Failure to meet these requirements may result in detention.

  • Refrain from travel to Cabinda, Lunda Norte, and Lunda Sul.
  • Maintain caution at large gatherings and areas frequented by foreigners, including stadiums, markets, hotels, restaurants, bars, movie theaters, and places of worship.
  • Monitor local news broadcasts and consular messages.

Crime: Armed assailants have killed some victims of muggings, robberies, and car-jackings which occur frequently in all areas of the country. Two Portuguese citizens were murdered in Viana in 2016 and kidnappers held several foreigners near Luanda. Armed assailants stormed a bakery stealing money and in another an armed group raided a police station releasing prisoners and shooting two officers. Vehicle thefts, purse snatching, and theft from vehicles occur in areas frequented by foreigners.

  • Avoid walking alone, especially after dark, and displaying cash and valuable personal property.
  • Vary your routes and travel times and let someone know your daily routine.
  • Dress conservatively. 
  • Drive with doors and windows locked.
  • Keep valuables out of sight and do not use cell phones or laptops while in stopped in traffic; bandits often brandishing guns use smash and grab tactics to steal valuables.
  • Travel with a certified copy of your U.S. passport and Angolan visa to prevent the originals from being taken. Keep original documents in a secure location.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Angola for police is 113; for firefighters: 115, and for ambulance services: 112. Emergency numbers listed may not have an English-speaking operator available.

Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crime.

Due to the prevalence of HIV/AIDS, victims of violent crime, especially rape, are strongly encouraged to seek immediate medical assistance.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws.  If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. You may be taken in for questioning by the police if unable to produce an acceptable form of identification or passport. Convictions for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs result in long prison sentences and heavy fines. Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Photography: It is illegal to take pictures or use binoculars, maps, or GPS near government buildings, military installations, and key infrastructure. You could be fined, have your photographic equipment confiscated, and risk detention and arrest. Do not take photos of people without their permission.

Libel Laws/Slander: Disrespecting government officials is illegal and can lead to expulsion from the country. Angolan authorities confiscated the U.S. passports of a family for several weeks after they complained to immigration officials about the time it took to process their visas and passports at the airport.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Phone Service: Cellular phones are the norm, as landlines are non-existent. It is possible to purchase a SIM card locally and use a U.S.-compatible cell phone. The major cellular providers are Angola Telecom and Unitel.

Currency: The kwanza (AOA) is the official currency though U.S. dollars are accepted. Bills should be new and unblemished. ATMs dispense kwanzas only but frequently malfunction or run out of cash. Credit cards are accepted in a limited number of hotels and restaurants.

Currency Regulations:

  • Undeclared amounts over the equivalent of $10,000 - $15,000 may be seized.
  • Limits may change - verify with the Angolan Embassy or the National Bank. 
  • Declare in writing upon arrival to customs officials amounts in excess of $10,000.
  • Show your original declaration form to the airport customs officials to export currency over the $15,000 limit.
  • Obtain prior authorization from the National Bank to export currency over $15,000 that is acquired while in Angola.
  • Destruction of Kwanza notes is illegal.

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Angola, although it is not socially acceptable. Same-sex couples have been harassed.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Major hotels have ramps. Persons with disabilities face limited access to transportation, public buildings, hotels, and communication accommodations. There are few sidewalks and no curb-cuts, and most buildings lack elevators.

Students:  See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: Statistics on prosecutions for violence against women are not available. Most rape cases are not prosecuted. Domestic violence counseling centers, shelters, and various treatment centers and free legal assistance are available to abused women.

See our travel tips for Women Travelers

 

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Health

Consult the CDC website for Angola prior to travel.

Medical facilities and services, including emergency care, are limited outside of Luanda and do not meet U.S. standards. In the capital some private clinics offer international standard medical care and 24 hour emergency services including ambulances. Find a list of facilities on our medical information web page. Local pharmacies provide a limited supply of medications.

Carry prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. Bring preventative and over-the-counter medicines. Check with the Embassy of Angola to verify your medications are legal before you travel.

You are responsible for all medical costs. U.S. Medicare does not cover you overseas. Most care providers expect payment in cash AOA/U.S. dollars before treatment is performed. Few facilities accept credit cards.

Medical Insurance: If your health insurance plan does not provide coverage overseas, we strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

The following diseases are prevalent:

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

 

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Major roads between Luanda and the provincial capitals are improving, but some road conditions remain poor while the infrastructure for pedestrians is lacking. Drunk-driving is also a problem. Other hazards include potholes, lack of or attention to traffic signals, erratic driving habits, excessive speed, pedestrians, and roaming animals. During the rainy season, November-April, roads and bridges, already in poor condition, can become impassable and mines may become displaced and surface outside known mine fields.

When driving outside of Luanda on other than primary roads between major cities, a four-wheel-drive vehicle is useful. Secondary roads are often unpaved and nearly impassable. Major routes though are paved in most areas and feature gas stations and other roadside services.

Traffic Laws: You will need an international driving permit or Angolan license to drive. You may use a U.S. license for one month.

Checkpoints: Both inside and around Luanda, police set up spontaneous roadblocks to check for vehicle documentation. They may also solicit bribes or request immediate payment of "fines" for alleged minor infractions. Police and military officials are sometimes undisciplined and their authority should not be challenged. 

  • Make sure all vehicle documentation is available for inspection.
  • Resist paying bribes. Politely ask for a ticket or for the officer’s name and badge number if no violation is alleged. Ask to contact the embassy if you are not let go.
  • Remain inside your vehicle with doors locked and open the window slightly to communicate.
  • Carry color photocopies of your passport and other identity documents to give to security or police officials.
  • Report any incident to the U.S. Embassy in Luanda.

Accidents: In the event of an automobile accident, remain at the scene until the police arrive. If a hostile mob forms or you feel your safety is in danger, leave the scene and proceed directly to the nearest police station to report the incident. Do not stop at the scene of an accident where people have gathered, as mobs can develop quickly.

Landmines: Use caution in remote areas or off main roads outside of Luanda. Landmines are most common in the southern provinces. The provinces of Benguela, Bie, Cubango, Cuando, Huambo, and Huila, have a higher number of landmines than other areas of the country.

Public Transportation: Avoid all use of public transportation known as “candongueiros” or “taxistas,” (multi-passenger vans) and hire private transport from a reliable source. Any form of public transportation is unregulated, unreliable, and generally unsafe. The U.S. Embassy has determined Allo Taxi, Morvic, Transcoop SA, Divisao, and Universal are acceptable.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Angola, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Angola’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards.  Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Luanda

Rua Houari Boumedienne #32
Miramar, Luanda
Angola

Telephone: +(244) 222-64-1000, +(244) 946-44-0977 , +(244) 946-44-0982
+(244) 946-44-0983, +(244) 946-44-0987
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(244) 222-641-000, +(244) 923-64-0154
+(244) 222-64-1000
Fax: +(244) 222-64-1232

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General Information

For information concerning travel to Angola, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Angola.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

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Hague Abduction Convention

Angola is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between Angola and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

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Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country. 

Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Angola and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction. For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children’s Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children’s Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children. Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, Floor 9
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Fax:  202-736-9132
Website:  childabduction.state.gov
Email: AskCI@state.gov

Parental child abduction is not a specific crime in Angola.  

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court. Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information.

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Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Angola and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children’s Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States.  Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the U.S. Embassy in Angola for information and possible assistance.

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Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children’s Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy in Angola are authorized to provide legal advice.

The U.S. Embassy in Luanda, Angola posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms.  Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

Under the laws of Angola, mediation is a possible remedy for both abduction and access cases.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Both adoptions to the United States from Angola and from the United States to Angola are possible.
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Angola is not a party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention or Convention). Under the Intercountry Adoption Universal Accreditation Act (UAA), which became effective on July 14, 2014, the accreditation requirement and standards, which previously only applied in Convention cases, now also apply in non-Convention or “orphan” cases. The UAA requires that an accredited or approved adoption service provider acts as a primary provider in every case, and that adoption service providers providing adoption services on behalf of prospective adoptive parents be accredited or approved, or be a supervised or exempted provider. Adoption service providers and prospective adoptive parents should review the State Department’s Universal Accreditation Act of 2012webpage for further information. Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Convention countries continue to be processed under the Orphan Process with the filing of the Forms I-600A and I-600. However, adoption service providers should be aware of the information on the USCIS website on the impact on Form I-600A and Form I-600 adjudications under the UAA, including the requirement that all home studies, including home study updates and amendments, comply with the Convention home study requirements, which differ from the orphan home study requirements that were in effect before July 14, 2014.

Adopting in Angola is a complex process. It can take years to identify a child for adoption and to complete all of the required steps and takes an Act of the National Assembly to approve each intercountry adoption. Prospective adoptive parents should note that Angolan adoption laws, which are currently being revised, are very strict. To ensure that the adoption process is completed successfully and in a timely manner, the U.S. Embassy in Angola strongly suggests that prospective adoptive parents consult an Angolan attorney.

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Angola, you must meet certain suitability and eligibility requirements. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt a child from another country and bring that child to live in the United States under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States with an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to being found suitable and eligible to adopt by USCIS, prospective adoptive parents seeking to adopt from Angola must meet the following requirements:

  •  Residency: None.
  • Age of Adopting Parents:  Prospective adoptive parents must be at least 25 years old and at least 16 years older than the prospective adoptive child.
  • Marriage: Prospective adoptive parents may be married, single, or in a common-law relationship.
  • Income: None.
  • Other: Prospective adoptive parent(s) must be in good physical and mental health, and financially capable of supporting and providing an education for the adopted child.
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Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to qualifying as an orphan under U.S. immigration law, the child must meet the following requirements of Angola:

  • Relinquishment: Adoption requires the consent of the prospective adoptive child’s birth parent(s) or the legal guardian.  Consent will be waived with regard to a child or adolescent whose parents are unknown or who have been stripped of their parental rights.
  • Abandonment: None.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: Less than 18 years old. Please note that for a child to meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law, a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, must be filed on the child’s behalf while the child is under the age of 16 (or under the age of 18 if the child is the birth sibling of another adopted child who has immigrated or will immigrate based on adoption by the same adoptive parent(s)).
  • Sibling Adoptions: None.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: None.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Two years.

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are eligible for adoption. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to the adoption of their child(ren).

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How to Adopt

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Angola generally includes the following steps:

Angola’s Adoption Authority

National Office of Children and Adolescents of the Ministry of Social Assistance and Reintegration (MINARS); Ministry of Justice; and the National Parliament.

  1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt (Form I-600A)
  3. Apply to Angola’s Authorities to Adopt and be Matched with a Child
  4. Adopt the Child in Angola
  5. Apply for Your Child to be Found Eligible to Immigrate to the United States as an Orphan (Form I-600)
  6. Apply for a U.S. Immigrant Visa for Your Child and Bring Your Child Home

1.  Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

Before taking steps to adopt a child from Angola, you should select a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider to be the primary provider in your case. As of July 14, 2014, a primary provider is required in every intercountry adoption case under the UAA, unless an exception applies. The primary provider is responsible for:

  • Ensuring that all six adoption services defined at 22 CFR 96.2 are provided;
  • Supervising and being responsible for supervised providers where used (see 22 CFR 96.14); and
  • Developing and implementing a service plan in accordance with 22 CFR 96.44.

For more information on primary providers and the UAA, please see Universal Accreditation Act of 2012.

There are no specific adoption agencies in Angola. Prospective adoptive children can be selected from an orphanage or foster center. There are orphanages and foster children centers in all 18 provinces of Angola. After the selection of the child, prospective adoptive parents should inform MINARS and request assistance in completing the adoption process. A list of adoption attorneys in Angola may be found at the U.S. Embassy in Angola’s website.

2.  Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt

In order to adopt a child from Angola, you will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Angola and U.S. immigration law. 

To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also choose to file a Form I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition, with USCIS to be found suitable and eligible to adopt before you identify a child to adopt. You may also choose to file the Form I-600 petition along with all the required Form I-600A application supporting documentation, including an approved home study, once you have been matched with a child and have obtained all the necessary documentation. Please see the USCIS website for more information about filing options. Regardless of which approach you take, the home study must meet the same requirements. As of July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, the home study must comply with the requirements in 8 CFR 204.311 and 22 CFR Part 96.47.

3.  Apply to Angola’s Authorities to Adopt and be Matched with a Child

If you are found suitable and eligible to adopt under U.S. law, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, MINARS will provide you with a referral to be presented to the Ministry of Justice, Department of Social Assistance of the Family Court. 

If a child is eligible for intercountry adoption, the competent adoption authority or other authorized entity in Angola will review your adoption dossier and, if an appropriate match is found, will provide you with a referral. We encourage families to consult with a medical professional and their adoption service provider to understand the needs of the specific child but each family must decide for itself whether it will be able to meet the needs of, and provide a permanent home for, a specific child, and must conform to the recommendations in the home study for the number of children and capacity to deal with any special needs of an adoptive child. Learn more about Health Considerations.

The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Angola’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law.

4.  Adopt the Child in Angola

The process for finalizing the adoption in Angola generally includes the following:

  • Role of Adoption Authority: There is no single adoption authority in Angola. The National Office of Children and Adolescents accepts adoption requests on behalf of MINARS.  MINARS then processes and evaluates applications to be forwarded to the Family Court Room (a department of the Ministry of Justice).
  • Role of the Court: The Family Court Room reviews MINARS evaluations, provides permission for the prospective adoptive child be adopted, and forwards the file to the Assembleia Nacional (National Parliament) for final approval of the adoption.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: There are no adoption service providers in Angola.

Starting July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, there must be a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider acting as the primary provider in every case. Also, any agency or person providing an adoption service on behalf of prospective adoptive parents in any Convention or non-Convention case must be accredited or approved, or be a supervised or exempted provider. Adoption service means any one of the following six services:

  1. Identifying a child for adoption and arranging an adoption;
  2. Securing the necessary consent to termination of parental rights and to adoption;
  3. Performing a background study on a child or a home study on a prospective adoptive parent(s), and reporting on such a study;
  4. Making non-judicial determinations of the best interests of a child and the appropriateness of an adoptive placement for the child;
  5. Monitoring a case after a child has been placed with prospective adoptive parent(s) until final adoption; or
  6. When necessary because of a disruption before final adoption, assuming custody and providing (including facilitating the provision of) child care or any other social service pending an alternative placement.  22 CFR 96.2 Definitions.
  • Adoption Application: The following sections outline the major provisions of the law that apply to adoptions:
    • Adoption by proxy is prohibited;
    • Adoption requires the consent of the prospective adoptive child's birth parent(s) or the legal guardian. Consent will be waived with regard to a child or adolescent whose birth parents are unknown or who have forfeited their parental rights;
    • A home study is required and will be evaluated by a Judge of the Family Court Room from the Provincial Court beforethe approval of the Parliament (National Assembly)
    • Prospective adoptive parent(s) should contact a local orphanage to identify a child for adoption through the National Office of Children and Adolescents. After a prospective adoptive child is identified, the orphanage contacts MINARS. If the prospective adoptive child is eligible for adoption, MINARS issues a document giving permission for the prospective adoptive child to be adopted. The process of identifying the child for adoption and receiving approval from MINARS can take 6-12 months.
    • The prospective adoptive parent(s) then submit a request to the Family Court Room requesting approval from the National Assembly to adopt the child. Along with this request, the prospective adoptive parent attaches the following:
    • A copy of the MINARS document giving permission for the child to be adopted;
    • Birth certificates of the prospective adoptive parent(s);
    • Marriage (and prior divorce) certificate of the prospective adoptive parents(s) (if applicable);
    • Police clearance from home country and from Angola;
    • Medical exam attesting good physical and mental health;
    • Proof of financial support.

The process of approval from the Parliament can take between 12-18 months.

Note:  Prospective adoptive parents should expect to submit certified copies of all documents.

During the adoption process, the prospective adoptive parent(s) can submit a separate request to the Family Court Room requesting guardianship of the child. The request for guardianship can be submitted at the same time the request to the National Assembly is submitted. The request must be accompanied by the same documents listed above. A hearing will be scheduled at which the prospective adoptive parent(s) must be present. If the child is ten years of age or older, he/she will also be heard by the Trustee at the Family Court Room. This process may take three to six months to be completed.

If the child is not an orphan, the prospective adoptive parent (s) will have to note that on their request and the Trustee of the Family Court Room will send a notification to the birth parents to appear in person and consent to the adoption of the child. Their consent will effectively permanently sever their parental rights.

Once the National Assembly (Parliament) approves the adoption and the adoptive parent(s) receive the determination, that document must be submitted to the Family Court Room, and the Family Court Judge must issue the adoption decree.

  • Time Frame: An intercountry adoption in Angola can take anywhere from two to three years to complete from the time the prospective adoptive child is identified.
  • Adoption Fees: Prospective adopting parents can expect to pay as much as U.S. $3,000.00 in government fees to complete the adoption.  Attorney’s fees are estimated to be an additional U.S. $10,000.

Prospective adoptive parents are advised to obtain detailed receipts for all fees and donations paid, either by themselves directly or through their U.S. adoption service provider, and to raise any concerns regarding any payment that you believe may be contrary to U.S. law, or the law of Angola, with your adoption service provider. Please also refer to information concerning the Hague Complaint Registry. Improper payments may have the appearance of buying achild, violate applicable law, and could put all future adoptions in Angola at risk. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, for instance, makes it unlawful to bribe foreign government officials to obtain or retain business. Further, the UAA and IAA make it unlawful to improperly influence relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing Central Authority functions.

  • Documents Required:
    • Initial application can be made by a letter and should include the personal data of the prospective adoptive parents and the personal data of the prospective adoptive child. This letter does not need to be notarized;
    • Criminal background check and clearance (The USCIS FBI background check is sufficient);
    • Medical evaluation can be conducted in the U.S. or Angola;
    • Proof of income;
    • Birth certificate of the prospective adoptive parent(s);
    • Birth certificate (if available) for the prospective adoptive child or a statement from the institution where the child has been cared for;
    • Marriage certificate and divorce decree(s) of prospective adoptive parent(s), if applicable;
    • Consent from any living biological parent(s) of the child to adopt.

All documents must be translated into Portuguese. The translation must be done in Angola. Any translator in Angola can do the translation. A list of translators is available from the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy. The court will ask the translator to appear in court and swear that the translation is correct.

Note: Additional documents may be requested.

  • Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic. The U.S Department of State’s Authentications Office has information on the subject.
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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

U.S. citizens are required to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Once your child has acquired U.S. citizenship, s/he will need a U.S. passport for any international travel. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Department of State’s Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Angola

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.  To find information about obtaining a visa for Angola, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country in the world about various issues, including health conditions, crime, currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State through our Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive important information from the Embassy about safety conditions in your destination country. Enrollment makes it possible for the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Angola, to contact you in an emergency, whether natural disaster, civil unrest, or family emergency. Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler. Enrollment Program (STEP)

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After Adoption

Post-Adoption/Post-Placement Reporting Requirements

Angola has no post-adoption or post-placement reporting requirements.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.  Your primary provider can provide or point you to post- placement/post-adoption services to help your adopted child and your family transition smoothly and deal effectively with the many adjustments required in an intercountry adoption. 

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

COMPLAINTS

If you have concerns about your adoption process, we ask that you share this information with the Embassy in Luanda, particularly if it involves possible fraud or misconduct specific to your child’s case. The Department of State takes all allegations of fraud or misconduct seriously. Our Adoption Comment Page provides several points of contact for adoptive families to comment on their adoption service provider, their experience applying for their child’s visa, or about the Form I-600 petition process.

The Hague Complaint Registry is an internet based registry for filing complaints about U.S. accredited or approved adoption service providers. If you think your provider's conduct may have been out of substantial compliance with accreditation standards, first submit your complaint in writing directly to your provider. If the complaint is not resolved through the provider's complaint process, you may file the complaint through the Hague Complaint Registry

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Angola
Rua Houari Boumedienne #32, Miramar
Luanda, Angola
C.P. 6468
Tel:  (244)(222) 641-000
Fax:  (244)(222) 641-259
Email:  consularluanda@state.gov 
Internet:  https://ao.usembassy.gov/

Angola’s Adoption Authorities
Ministry of Justice, Family Court Room
Sala da Familia, Tribunal Provincial de Luanda
Rua Amilcar Cabral No. 17,  5th and 7th Floor
Luanda, Angola
Tel:  No telephone numbers for the public are available
MINARS - National Institute of the Child and Adolescent 
Rua N’Gola M’Bambi 
Luanda, Angola 
Tel:  244-222 322 611; 222 323 683; 222 322 753
Assembleia Nacional (Parliament)
Rua 1 Congresso do MPLA
Luanda, Angola
Tel:  +244 222 391691; 222 394541

Embassy of the Republic of Angola
2100-2108 16th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C.  20009
Tel:  202-785-1156
Fax:  202-785-1258
Internet:  angola.org
Angola also has consulates in: New York, NY; Houston, TX.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Email:  Adoption@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov
For questions about filing a Form I-600A application or I-600 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel:  1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email:  NBC.Adoptions@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
 
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 24 Months
A-2 None Multiple 24 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
B-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
B-1/B-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
C-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
C-1/D $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
C-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
C-3 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
F-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
G-1 None Multiple 24 Months
G-2 None Multiple 24 Months
G-3 None Multiple 24 Months
G-4 None Multiple 24 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-1C $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-2A $10.00 N/A N/A3
H-2B $10.00 N/A N/A3
H-2R $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-3 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-4 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
I $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
J-1 4 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
J-2 4 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
L-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
M-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
M-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
N-8 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
N-9 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
O-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
O-3 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
P-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
P-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
P-3 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
P-4 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
Q-1 6 $10.00 Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
R-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None One 1 Month
U-2 None One 1 Month
U-3 None One 1 Month
U-4 None One 1 Month
U-5 None One 1 Month
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

A decades-long civil war severely disrupted bureaucratic operations in Angola. Many records storage facilities, especially in the provinces, were destroyed or abandoned during the conflict. The UNITA rebel movement, which has controlled various portions of Angolan territory over differing lengths of time, initiated its own record-keeping system; applicants whose vital information was recorded by UNITA officials will likely experience severe difficulties in obtaining documents.

Angola's runaway inflation prevents an up to date list of prices for document retrieval services. Official prices are nominal, but requested "gratuities" can run as high as USD 100.00, depending on the urgency of the request or the difficulty in obtaining the document.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth

(Certidao de Nascimento, Certidao de Casamento, Certidao de Divorcio e Certidao de Obito). Available. These certificates are issued by the Conservatory of Records (Conservatoria dos Registos) where the applicant lived or was registered while in Angola. There are seven Conservatorias in Luanda. Each of the 18 provinces of Angola also has at least one Conservatoria. There is no Central Records facility. To contact the oldest and largest Conservatoria in Luanda, applicants may write to or visit: Primeira Conservatoria de Luanda, Largo Kinaxixe 3 Ave Lenine, Luanda, Angola. Applicants should include full name, date and place of birth, and full names of father and mother. Angolan applicants may contact the U.S. Embassy (Consular Section) for the address of other Conservatorias in Luanda. They should state the district where they resided while in Luanda. However, during the long period of civil war not all Conservatorias were able to maintain civil records. Thus, posts processing Angolans should be aware that not all records may be available.

Death/Burial

(Certidao de Nascimento, Certidao de Casamento, Certidao de Divorcio e Certidao de Obito). Available. These certificates are issued by the Conservatory of Records (Conservatoria dos Registos) where the applicant lived or was registered while in Angola. There are seven Conservatorias in Luanda. Each of the 18 provinces of Angola also has at least one Conservatoria. There is no Central Records facility. To contact the oldest and largest Conservatoria in Luanda, applicants may write to or visit: Primeira Conservatoria de Luanda, Largo Kinaxixe 3 Ave Lenine, Luanda, Angola. Applicants should include full name, date and place of birth, and full names of father and mother. Angolan applicants may contact the U.S. Embassy (Consular Section) for the address of other Conservatorias in Luanda. They should state the district where they resided while in Luanda. However, during the long period of civil war not all Conservatorias were able to maintain civil records. Thus, posts processing Angolans should be aware that not all records may be available.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage

(Certidao de Nascimento, Certidao de Casamento, Certidao de Divorcio e Certidao de Obito). Available. These certificates are issued by the Conservatory of Records (Conservatoria dos Registos) where the applicant lived or was registered while in Angola. There are seven Conservatorias in Luanda. Each of the 18 provinces of Angola also has at least one Conservatoria. There is no Central Records facility. To contact the oldest and largest Conservatoria in Luanda, applicants may write to or visit: Primeira Conservatoria de Luanda, Largo Kinaxixe 3 Ave Lenine, Luanda, Angola. Applicants should include full name, date and place of birth, and full names of father and mother. Angolan applicants may contact the U.S. Embassy (Consular Section) for the address of other Conservatorias in Luanda. They should state the district where they resided while in Luanda. However, during the long period of civil war not all Conservatorias were able to maintain civil records. Thus, posts processing Angolans should be aware that not all records may be available.

Divorce

(Certidao de Nascimento, Certidao de Casamento, Certidao de Divorcio e Certidao de Obito). Available. These certificates are issued by the Conservatory of Records (Conservatoria dos Registos) where the applicant lived or was registered while in Angola. There are seven Conservatorias in Luanda. Each of the 18 provinces of Angola also has at least one Conservatoria. There is no Central Records facility. To contact the oldest and largest Conservatoria in Luanda, applicants may write to or visit: Primeira Conservatoria de Luanda, Largo Kinaxixe 3 Ave Lenine, Luanda, Angola. Applicants should include full name, date and place of birth, and full names of father and mother. Angolan applicants may contact the U.S. Embassy (Consular Section) for the address of other Conservatorias in Luanda. They should state the district where they resided while in Luanda. However, during the long period of civil war not all Conservatorias were able to maintain civil records. Thus, posts processing Angolans should be aware that not all records may be available.

Adoption Certificates

Unavailable.

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Identity Card

Unavailable.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Police Certificates are available to citizens of Angola only.
Requests for a Certidao de Registo Criminal must be made in person at:

Sector de Identificacao Criminal
Rua Rainha Ginga, Predio No. 49,
Primeiro Andar, Luanda, Angola.

If unable to appear in person, the applicant may authorize a third party to appear for them to request the information but only with a power of attorney.

The power of attorney must:

  • Specify the documentation that is requested and not be a general power of attorney.
  • Be notarized.
  • Be written in the Portuguese language or include a Portuguese translation attached.
  • Include all the biographical information that is found on the bio-page for their Angolan passport.
  • Have a certified copy of the bio-page of the current Angolan passport attached.

Court Records

Unavailable.

Prison Records

Unavailable.

Military Records

Certidao de Passagem a Disponibilidade, Reserva Militar our Reforma). Available. Applicants may write or visit Divisao de Pessoal do Estado Maior General das Forcas Armadas Angolanas (FAA), Rua Amilcar Cabral, Luanda, Angola..

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Unavailable.

Other Records

Not applicable.

 

Visa Issuing Posts

Luanda, Angola (Embassy)

Rua Houari Boumedienne in the Miramar area of Luanda
P.O. Box 6468

Tel: 244-2-447-028

Fax: 244-2-446-924

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Angola.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 452-1042 (202) 452-1043

Houston, TX (713) 212-3840 (713) 212-3841

Los Angeles, CA (323) 219-0014

New York, NY (212) 223-3588 ext. 154, 155, 156(212) 980-9606

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Luanda
Rua Houari Boumedienne #32
Miramar, Luanda
Angola
Telephone
+(244) 946-64-1000
Emergency
+(244) 222-64-1000
Fax
+(244) 222-64-1232
Angola Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Angola
Republic of Angola
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Embassy Messages

Luanda

 

Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months from date of entry

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

2 blank pages

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Yes

VACCINATIONS:

Yellow fever 

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

Declare amounts over $10,000

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

50,000 kwanzas + $10,000

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Luanda

Rua Houari Boumedienne #32
Miramar, Luanda
Angola

Telephone: +(244) 222-64-1000, +(244) 946-44-0977 , +(244) 946-44-0982
+(244) 946-44-0983, +(244) 946-44-0987
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(244) 222-641-000, +(244) 923-64-0154
+(244) 222-64-1000
Fax: +(244) 222-64-1232

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Destination Description

See our Fact Sheet on Angola for information on U.S. - Angola relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Requirements for Entry:

  • Passport
  • Visa
  • World Health Organization (WHO) card with yellow fever vaccination. Vaccination at the airport is available for a fee.

Obtain your visa before traveling. Visit the Embassy of Angola’s website for the most current visa information. You can also apply online. Overseas inquiries should be made at the nearest Angolan Embassy or Consulate. Allow several weeks for visa processing. If you are traveling with minor children to Angola via South Africa, be aware additional documentation is required.

Arrange reliable and secure ground transportation from the airport in advance.

Immigration and customs officials at the airport have detained foreigners without cause and demanded gratuities before allowing them to enter or depart Angola. If harassed at a port of entry, ask to speak with the U.S. Embassy/Airport supervisor et al.

Currency Regulations: Anything over $10,000 must be declared but you may enter with up to $15,000. Non-residents can leave with the equivalent of $10,000 in foreign currency and residents with $15,000. Non-residents and residents and may also take out 50,000 kwanzas ($300). Expect to be searched at the airport and any amount over those limits to be confiscated.

HIV/AIDS restrictions: The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Angola.

Find information on dual nationality, prevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

 

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Safety and Security

Landmines are a risk throughout the country outside major cities.

Cabinda City: Murders, kidnappings and sexual assaults targeting foreigners have occurred in years past. And while a heavy security presence now remains in the region, militant groups have indicated their intention to continue to conduct attacks on foreigners and occasionally attack police and Angolan Armed Forces convoys and outposts.

Lunda North and South: These diamond-producing provinces have the potential for civil unrest and crime. There have been reports of violent incidents against foreigners who require official permission and documentation from the government of Angola to travel there. Failure to meet these requirements may result in detention.

  • Refrain from travel to Cabinda, Lunda Norte, and Lunda Sul.
  • Maintain caution at large gatherings and areas frequented by foreigners, including stadiums, markets, hotels, restaurants, bars, movie theaters, and places of worship.
  • Monitor local news broadcasts and consular messages.

Crime: Armed assailants have killed some victims of muggings, robberies, and car-jackings which occur frequently in all areas of the country. Two Portuguese citizens were murdered in Viana in 2016 and kidnappers held several foreigners near Luanda. Armed assailants stormed a bakery stealing money and in another an armed group raided a police station releasing prisoners and shooting two officers. Vehicle thefts, purse snatching, and theft from vehicles occur in areas frequented by foreigners.

  • Avoid walking alone, especially after dark, and displaying cash and valuable personal property.
  • Vary your routes and travel times and let someone know your daily routine.
  • Dress conservatively. 
  • Drive with doors and windows locked.
  • Keep valuables out of sight and do not use cell phones or laptops while in stopped in traffic; bandits often brandishing guns use smash and grab tactics to steal valuables.
  • Travel with a certified copy of your U.S. passport and Angolan visa to prevent the originals from being taken. Keep original documents in a secure location.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Angola for police is 113; for firefighters: 115, and for ambulance services: 112. Emergency numbers listed may not have an English-speaking operator available.

Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crime.

Due to the prevalence of HIV/AIDS, victims of violent crime, especially rape, are strongly encouraged to seek immediate medical assistance.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws.  If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. You may be taken in for questioning by the police if unable to produce an acceptable form of identification or passport. Convictions for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs result in long prison sentences and heavy fines. Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Photography: It is illegal to take pictures or use binoculars, maps, or GPS near government buildings, military installations, and key infrastructure. You could be fined, have your photographic equipment confiscated, and risk detention and arrest. Do not take photos of people without their permission.

Libel Laws/Slander: Disrespecting government officials is illegal and can lead to expulsion from the country. Angolan authorities confiscated the U.S. passports of a family for several weeks after they complained to immigration officials about the time it took to process their visas and passports at the airport.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Phone Service: Cellular phones are the norm, as landlines are non-existent. It is possible to purchase a SIM card locally and use a U.S.-compatible cell phone. The major cellular providers are Angola Telecom and Unitel.

Currency: The kwanza (AOA) is the official currency though U.S. dollars are accepted. Bills should be new and unblemished. ATMs dispense kwanzas only but frequently malfunction or run out of cash. Credit cards are accepted in a limited number of hotels and restaurants.

Currency Regulations:

  • Undeclared amounts over the equivalent of $10,000 - $15,000 may be seized.
  • Limits may change - verify with the Angolan Embassy or the National Bank. 
  • Declare in writing upon arrival to customs officials amounts in excess of $10,000.
  • Show your original declaration form to the airport customs officials to export currency over the $15,000 limit.
  • Obtain prior authorization from the National Bank to export currency over $15,000 that is acquired while in Angola.
  • Destruction of Kwanza notes is illegal.

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Angola, although it is not socially acceptable. Same-sex couples have been harassed.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Major hotels have ramps. Persons with disabilities face limited access to transportation, public buildings, hotels, and communication accommodations. There are few sidewalks and no curb-cuts, and most buildings lack elevators.

Students:  See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: Statistics on prosecutions for violence against women are not available. Most rape cases are not prosecuted. Domestic violence counseling centers, shelters, and various treatment centers and free legal assistance are available to abused women.

See our travel tips for Women Travelers

 

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Health

Consult the CDC website for Angola prior to travel.

Medical facilities and services, including emergency care, are limited outside of Luanda and do not meet U.S. standards. In the capital some private clinics offer international standard medical care and 24 hour emergency services including ambulances. Find a list of facilities on our medical information web page. Local pharmacies provide a limited supply of medications.

Carry prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. Bring preventative and over-the-counter medicines. Check with the Embassy of Angola to verify your medications are legal before you travel.

You are responsible for all medical costs. U.S. Medicare does not cover you overseas. Most care providers expect payment in cash AOA/U.S. dollars before treatment is performed. Few facilities accept credit cards.

Medical Insurance: If your health insurance plan does not provide coverage overseas, we strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

The following diseases are prevalent:

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

 

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Major roads between Luanda and the provincial capitals are improving, but some road conditions remain poor while the infrastructure for pedestrians is lacking. Drunk-driving is also a problem. Other hazards include potholes, lack of or attention to traffic signals, erratic driving habits, excessive speed, pedestrians, and roaming animals. During the rainy season, November-April, roads and bridges, already in poor condition, can become impassable and mines may become displaced and surface outside known mine fields.

When driving outside of Luanda on other than primary roads between major cities, a four-wheel-drive vehicle is useful. Secondary roads are often unpaved and nearly impassable. Major routes though are paved in most areas and feature gas stations and other roadside services.

Traffic Laws: You will need an international driving permit or Angolan license to drive. You may use a U.S. license for one month.

Checkpoints: Both inside and around Luanda, police set up spontaneous roadblocks to check for vehicle documentation. They may also solicit bribes or request immediate payment of "fines" for alleged minor infractions. Police and military officials are sometimes undisciplined and their authority should not be challenged. 

  • Make sure all vehicle documentation is available for inspection.
  • Resist paying bribes. Politely ask for a ticket or for the officer’s name and badge number if no violation is alleged. Ask to contact the embassy if you are not let go.
  • Remain inside your vehicle with doors locked and open the window slightly to communicate.
  • Carry color photocopies of your passport and other identity documents to give to security or police officials.
  • Report any incident to the U.S. Embassy in Luanda.

Accidents: In the event of an automobile accident, remain at the scene until the police arrive. If a hostile mob forms or you feel your safety is in danger, leave the scene and proceed directly to the nearest police station to report the incident. Do not stop at the scene of an accident where people have gathered, as mobs can develop quickly.

Landmines: Use caution in remote areas or off main roads outside of Luanda. Landmines are most common in the southern provinces. The provinces of Benguela, Bie, Cubango, Cuando, Huambo, and Huila, have a higher number of landmines than other areas of the country.

Public Transportation: Avoid all use of public transportation known as “candongueiros” or “taxistas,” (multi-passenger vans) and hire private transport from a reliable source. Any form of public transportation is unregulated, unreliable, and generally unsafe. The U.S. Embassy has determined Allo Taxi, Morvic, Transcoop SA, Divisao, and Universal are acceptable.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Angola, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Angola’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards.  Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Luanda

Rua Houari Boumedienne #32
Miramar, Luanda
Angola

Telephone: +(244) 222-64-1000, +(244) 946-44-0977 , +(244) 946-44-0982
+(244) 946-44-0983, +(244) 946-44-0987
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(244) 222-641-000, +(244) 923-64-0154
+(244) 222-64-1000
Fax: +(244) 222-64-1232

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General Information

For information concerning travel to Angola, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Angola.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

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Hague Abduction Convention

Angola is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between Angola and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

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Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country. 

Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Angola and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction. For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children’s Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children’s Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children. Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, Floor 9
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Fax:  202-736-9132
Website:  childabduction.state.gov
Email: AskCI@state.gov

Parental child abduction is not a specific crime in Angola.  

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court. Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information.

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Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Angola and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children’s Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States.  Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the U.S. Embassy in Angola for information and possible assistance.

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Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children’s Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy in Angola are authorized to provide legal advice.

The U.S. Embassy in Luanda, Angola posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms.  Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

Under the laws of Angola, mediation is a possible remedy for both abduction and access cases.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Both adoptions to the United States from Angola and from the United States to Angola are possible.
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Angola is not a party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention or Convention). Under the Intercountry Adoption Universal Accreditation Act (UAA), which became effective on July 14, 2014, the accreditation requirement and standards, which previously only applied in Convention cases, now also apply in non-Convention or “orphan” cases. The UAA requires that an accredited or approved adoption service provider acts as a primary provider in every case, and that adoption service providers providing adoption services on behalf of prospective adoptive parents be accredited or approved, or be a supervised or exempted provider. Adoption service providers and prospective adoptive parents should review the State Department’s Universal Accreditation Act of 2012webpage for further information. Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Convention countries continue to be processed under the Orphan Process with the filing of the Forms I-600A and I-600. However, adoption service providers should be aware of the information on the USCIS website on the impact on Form I-600A and Form I-600 adjudications under the UAA, including the requirement that all home studies, including home study updates and amendments, comply with the Convention home study requirements, which differ from the orphan home study requirements that were in effect before July 14, 2014.

Adopting in Angola is a complex process. It can take years to identify a child for adoption and to complete all of the required steps and takes an Act of the National Assembly to approve each intercountry adoption. Prospective adoptive parents should note that Angolan adoption laws, which are currently being revised, are very strict. To ensure that the adoption process is completed successfully and in a timely manner, the U.S. Embassy in Angola strongly suggests that prospective adoptive parents consult an Angolan attorney.

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Angola, you must meet certain suitability and eligibility requirements. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt a child from another country and bring that child to live in the United States under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States with an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to being found suitable and eligible to adopt by USCIS, prospective adoptive parents seeking to adopt from Angola must meet the following requirements:

  •  Residency: None.
  • Age of Adopting Parents:  Prospective adoptive parents must be at least 25 years old and at least 16 years older than the prospective adoptive child.
  • Marriage: Prospective adoptive parents may be married, single, or in a common-law relationship.
  • Income: None.
  • Other: Prospective adoptive parent(s) must be in good physical and mental health, and financially capable of supporting and providing an education for the adopted child.
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Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to qualifying as an orphan under U.S. immigration law, the child must meet the following requirements of Angola:

  • Relinquishment: Adoption requires the consent of the prospective adoptive child’s birth parent(s) or the legal guardian.  Consent will be waived with regard to a child or adolescent whose parents are unknown or who have been stripped of their parental rights.
  • Abandonment: None.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: Less than 18 years old. Please note that for a child to meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law, a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, must be filed on the child’s behalf while the child is under the age of 16 (or under the age of 18 if the child is the birth sibling of another adopted child who has immigrated or will immigrate based on adoption by the same adoptive parent(s)).
  • Sibling Adoptions: None.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: None.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Two years.

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are eligible for adoption. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to the adoption of their child(ren).

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How to Adopt

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Angola generally includes the following steps:

Angola’s Adoption Authority

National Office of Children and Adolescents of the Ministry of Social Assistance and Reintegration (MINARS); Ministry of Justice; and the National Parliament.

  1. Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt (Form I-600A)
  3. Apply to Angola’s Authorities to Adopt and be Matched with a Child
  4. Adopt the Child in Angola
  5. Apply for Your Child to be Found Eligible to Immigrate to the United States as an Orphan (Form I-600)
  6. Apply for a U.S. Immigrant Visa for Your Child and Bring Your Child Home

1.  Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

Before taking steps to adopt a child from Angola, you should select a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider to be the primary provider in your case. As of July 14, 2014, a primary provider is required in every intercountry adoption case under the UAA, unless an exception applies. The primary provider is responsible for:

  • Ensuring that all six adoption services defined at 22 CFR 96.2 are provided;
  • Supervising and being responsible for supervised providers where used (see 22 CFR 96.14); and
  • Developing and implementing a service plan in accordance with 22 CFR 96.44.

For more information on primary providers and the UAA, please see Universal Accreditation Act of 2012.

There are no specific adoption agencies in Angola. Prospective adoptive children can be selected from an orphanage or foster center. There are orphanages and foster children centers in all 18 provinces of Angola. After the selection of the child, prospective adoptive parents should inform MINARS and request assistance in completing the adoption process. A list of adoption attorneys in Angola may be found at the U.S. Embassy in Angola’s website.

2.  Apply to USCIS to be Found Suitable and Eligible to Adopt

In order to adopt a child from Angola, you will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Angola and U.S. immigration law. 

To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also choose to file a Form I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition, with USCIS to be found suitable and eligible to adopt before you identify a child to adopt. You may also choose to file the Form I-600 petition along with all the required Form I-600A application supporting documentation, including an approved home study, once you have been matched with a child and have obtained all the necessary documentation. Please see the USCIS website for more information about filing options. Regardless of which approach you take, the home study must meet the same requirements. As of July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, the home study must comply with the requirements in 8 CFR 204.311 and 22 CFR Part 96.47.

3.  Apply to Angola’s Authorities to Adopt and be Matched with a Child

If you are found suitable and eligible to adopt under U.S. law, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, MINARS will provide you with a referral to be presented to the Ministry of Justice, Department of Social Assistance of the Family Court. 

If a child is eligible for intercountry adoption, the competent adoption authority or other authorized entity in Angola will review your adoption dossier and, if an appropriate match is found, will provide you with a referral. We encourage families to consult with a medical professional and their adoption service provider to understand the needs of the specific child but each family must decide for itself whether it will be able to meet the needs of, and provide a permanent home for, a specific child, and must conform to the recommendations in the home study for the number of children and capacity to deal with any special needs of an adoptive child. Learn more about Health Considerations.

The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Angola’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law.

4.  Adopt the Child in Angola

The process for finalizing the adoption in Angola generally includes the following:

  • Role of Adoption Authority: There is no single adoption authority in Angola. The National Office of Children and Adolescents accepts adoption requests on behalf of MINARS.  MINARS then processes and evaluates applications to be forwarded to the Family Court Room (a department of the Ministry of Justice).
  • Role of the Court: The Family Court Room reviews MINARS evaluations, provides permission for the prospective adoptive child be adopted, and forwards the file to the Assembleia Nacional (National Parliament) for final approval of the adoption.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: There are no adoption service providers in Angola.

Starting July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, there must be a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider acting as the primary provider in every case. Also, any agency or person providing an adoption service on behalf of prospective adoptive parents in any Convention or non-Convention case must be accredited or approved, or be a supervised or exempted provider. Adoption service means any one of the following six services:

  1. Identifying a child for adoption and arranging an adoption;
  2. Securing the necessary consent to termination of parental rights and to adoption;
  3. Performing a background study on a child or a home study on a prospective adoptive parent(s), and reporting on such a study;
  4. Making non-judicial determinations of the best interests of a child and the appropriateness of an adoptive placement for the child;
  5. Monitoring a case after a child has been placed with prospective adoptive parent(s) until final adoption; or
  6. When necessary because of a disruption before final adoption, assuming custody and providing (including facilitating the provision of) child care or any other social service pending an alternative placement.  22 CFR 96.2 Definitions.
  • Adoption Application: The following sections outline the major provisions of the law that apply to adoptions:
    • Adoption by proxy is prohibited;
    • Adoption requires the consent of the prospective adoptive child's birth parent(s) or the legal guardian. Consent will be waived with regard to a child or adolescent whose birth parents are unknown or who have forfeited their parental rights;
    • A home study is required and will be evaluated by a Judge of the Family Court Room from the Provincial Court beforethe approval of the Parliament (National Assembly)
    • Prospective adoptive parent(s) should contact a local orphanage to identify a child for adoption through the National Office of Children and Adolescents. After a prospective adoptive child is identified, the orphanage contacts MINARS. If the prospective adoptive child is eligible for adoption, MINARS issues a document giving permission for the prospective adoptive child to be adopted. The process of identifying the child for adoption and receiving approval from MINARS can take 6-12 months.
    • The prospective adoptive parent(s) then submit a request to the Family Court Room requesting approval from the National Assembly to adopt the child. Along with this request, the prospective adoptive parent attaches the following:
    • A copy of the MINARS document giving permission for the child to be adopted;
    • Birth certificates of the prospective adoptive parent(s);
    • Marriage (and prior divorce) certificate of the prospective adoptive parents(s) (if applicable);
    • Police clearance from home country and from Angola;
    • Medical exam attesting good physical and mental health;
    • Proof of financial support.

The process of approval from the Parliament can take between 12-18 months.

Note:  Prospective adoptive parents should expect to submit certified copies of all documents.

During the adoption process, the prospective adoptive parent(s) can submit a separate request to the Family Court Room requesting guardianship of the child. The request for guardianship can be submitted at the same time the request to the National Assembly is submitted. The request must be accompanied by the same documents listed above. A hearing will be scheduled at which the prospective adoptive parent(s) must be present. If the child is ten years of age or older, he/she will also be heard by the Trustee at the Family Court Room. This process may take three to six months to be completed.

If the child is not an orphan, the prospective adoptive parent (s) will have to note that on their request and the Trustee of the Family Court Room will send a notification to the birth parents to appear in person and consent to the adoption of the child. Their consent will effectively permanently sever their parental rights.

Once the National Assembly (Parliament) approves the adoption and the adoptive parent(s) receive the determination, that document must be submitted to the Family Court Room, and the Family Court Judge must issue the adoption decree.

  • Time Frame: An intercountry adoption in Angola can take anywhere from two to three years to complete from the time the prospective adoptive child is identified.
  • Adoption Fees: Prospective adopting parents can expect to pay as much as U.S. $3,000.00 in government fees to complete the adoption.  Attorney’s fees are estimated to be an additional U.S. $10,000.

Prospective adoptive parents are advised to obtain detailed receipts for all fees and donations paid, either by themselves directly or through their U.S. adoption service provider, and to raise any concerns regarding any payment that you believe may be contrary to U.S. law, or the law of Angola, with your adoption service provider. Please also refer to information concerning the Hague Complaint Registry. Improper payments may have the appearance of buying achild, violate applicable law, and could put all future adoptions in Angola at risk. The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, for instance, makes it unlawful to bribe foreign government officials to obtain or retain business. Further, the UAA and IAA make it unlawful to improperly influence relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing Central Authority functions.

  • Documents Required:
    • Initial application can be made by a letter and should include the personal data of the prospective adoptive parents and the personal data of the prospective adoptive child. This letter does not need to be notarized;
    • Criminal background check and clearance (The USCIS FBI background check is sufficient);
    • Medical evaluation can be conducted in the U.S. or Angola;
    • Proof of income;
    • Birth certificate of the prospective adoptive parent(s);
    • Birth certificate (if available) for the prospective adoptive child or a statement from the institution where the child has been cared for;
    • Marriage certificate and divorce decree(s) of prospective adoptive parent(s), if applicable;
    • Consent from any living biological parent(s) of the child to adopt.

All documents must be translated into Portuguese. The translation must be done in Angola. Any translator in Angola can do the translation. A list of translators is available from the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy. The court will ask the translator to appear in court and swear that the translation is correct.

Note: Additional documents may be requested.

  • Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic. The U.S Department of State’s Authentications Office has information on the subject.
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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport

U.S. citizens are required to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Once your child has acquired U.S. citizenship, s/he will need a U.S. passport for any international travel. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Department of State’s Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Angola

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.  To find information about obtaining a visa for Angola, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country in the world about various issues, including health conditions, crime, currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State through our Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive important information from the Embassy about safety conditions in your destination country. Enrollment makes it possible for the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Angola, to contact you in an emergency, whether natural disaster, civil unrest, or family emergency. Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler. Enrollment Program (STEP)

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After Adoption

Post-Adoption/Post-Placement Reporting Requirements

Angola has no post-adoption or post-placement reporting requirements.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.  Your primary provider can provide or point you to post- placement/post-adoption services to help your adopted child and your family transition smoothly and deal effectively with the many adjustments required in an intercountry adoption. 

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

COMPLAINTS

If you have concerns about your adoption process, we ask that you share this information with the Embassy in Luanda, particularly if it involves possible fraud or misconduct specific to your child’s case. The Department of State takes all allegations of fraud or misconduct seriously. Our Adoption Comment Page provides several points of contact for adoptive families to comment on their adoption service provider, their experience applying for their child’s visa, or about the Form I-600 petition process.

The Hague Complaint Registry is an internet based registry for filing complaints about U.S. accredited or approved adoption service providers. If you think your provider's conduct may have been out of substantial compliance with accreditation standards, first submit your complaint in writing directly to your provider. If the complaint is not resolved through the provider's complaint process, you may file the complaint through the Hague Complaint Registry

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Angola
Rua Houari Boumedienne #32, Miramar
Luanda, Angola
C.P. 6468
Tel:  (244)(222) 641-000
Fax:  (244)(222) 641-259
Email:  consularluanda@state.gov 
Internet:  https://ao.usembassy.gov/

Angola’s Adoption Authorities
Ministry of Justice, Family Court Room
Sala da Familia, Tribunal Provincial de Luanda
Rua Amilcar Cabral No. 17,  5th and 7th Floor
Luanda, Angola
Tel:  No telephone numbers for the public are available
MINARS - National Institute of the Child and Adolescent 
Rua N’Gola M’Bambi 
Luanda, Angola 
Tel:  244-222 322 611; 222 323 683; 222 322 753
Assembleia Nacional (Parliament)
Rua 1 Congresso do MPLA
Luanda, Angola
Tel:  +244 222 391691; 222 394541

Embassy of the Republic of Angola
2100-2108 16th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C.  20009
Tel:  202-785-1156
Fax:  202-785-1258
Internet:  angola.org
Angola also has consulates in: New York, NY; Houston, TX.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Email:  Adoption@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov
For questions about filing a Form I-600A application or I-600 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel:  1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email:  NBC.Adoptions@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
 
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 24 Months
A-2 None Multiple 24 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
B-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
B-1/B-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
C-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
C-1/D $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
C-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
C-3 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
F-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
G-1 None Multiple 24 Months
G-2 None Multiple 24 Months
G-3 None Multiple 24 Months
G-4 None Multiple 24 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-1C $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-2A $10.00 N/A N/A3
H-2B $10.00 N/A N/A3
H-2R $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-3 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
H-4 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
I $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
J-1 4 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
J-2 4 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
L-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
M-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
M-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
N-8 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
N-9 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
O-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
O-3 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
P-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
P-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
P-3 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
P-4 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months 3
Q-1 6 $10.00 Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
R-2 $10.00 Multiple 24 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None One 1 Month
U-2 None One 1 Month
U-3 None One 1 Month
U-4 None One 1 Month
U-5 None One 1 Month
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

A decades-long civil war severely disrupted bureaucratic operations in Angola. Many records storage facilities, especially in the provinces, were destroyed or abandoned during the conflict. The UNITA rebel movement, which has controlled various portions of Angolan territory over differing lengths of time, initiated its own record-keeping system; applicants whose vital information was recorded by UNITA officials will likely experience severe difficulties in obtaining documents.

Angola's runaway inflation prevents an up to date list of prices for document retrieval services. Official prices are nominal, but requested "gratuities" can run as high as USD 100.00, depending on the urgency of the request or the difficulty in obtaining the document.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth

(Certidao de Nascimento, Certidao de Casamento, Certidao de Divorcio e Certidao de Obito). Available. These certificates are issued by the Conservatory of Records (Conservatoria dos Registos) where the applicant lived or was registered while in Angola. There are seven Conservatorias in Luanda. Each of the 18 provinces of Angola also has at least one Conservatoria. There is no Central Records facility. To contact the oldest and largest Conservatoria in Luanda, applicants may write to or visit: Primeira Conservatoria de Luanda, Largo Kinaxixe 3 Ave Lenine, Luanda, Angola. Applicants should include full name, date and place of birth, and full names of father and mother. Angolan applicants may contact the U.S. Embassy (Consular Section) for the address of other Conservatorias in Luanda. They should state the district where they resided while in Luanda. However, during the long period of civil war not all Conservatorias were able to maintain civil records. Thus, posts processing Angolans should be aware that not all records may be available.

Death/Burial

(Certidao de Nascimento, Certidao de Casamento, Certidao de Divorcio e Certidao de Obito). Available. These certificates are issued by the Conservatory of Records (Conservatoria dos Registos) where the applicant lived or was registered while in Angola. There are seven Conservatorias in Luanda. Each of the 18 provinces of Angola also has at least one Conservatoria. There is no Central Records facility. To contact the oldest and largest Conservatoria in Luanda, applicants may write to or visit: Primeira Conservatoria de Luanda, Largo Kinaxixe 3 Ave Lenine, Luanda, Angola. Applicants should include full name, date and place of birth, and full names of father and mother. Angolan applicants may contact the U.S. Embassy (Consular Section) for the address of other Conservatorias in Luanda. They should state the district where they resided while in Luanda. However, during the long period of civil war not all Conservatorias were able to maintain civil records. Thus, posts processing Angolans should be aware that not all records may be available.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage

(Certidao de Nascimento, Certidao de Casamento, Certidao de Divorcio e Certidao de Obito). Available. These certificates are issued by the Conservatory of Records (Conservatoria dos Registos) where the applicant lived or was registered while in Angola. There are seven Conservatorias in Luanda. Each of the 18 provinces of Angola also has at least one Conservatoria. There is no Central Records facility. To contact the oldest and largest Conservatoria in Luanda, applicants may write to or visit: Primeira Conservatoria de Luanda, Largo Kinaxixe 3 Ave Lenine, Luanda, Angola. Applicants should include full name, date and place of birth, and full names of father and mother. Angolan applicants may contact the U.S. Embassy (Consular Section) for the address of other Conservatorias in Luanda. They should state the district where they resided while in Luanda. However, during the long period of civil war not all Conservatorias were able to maintain civil records. Thus, posts processing Angolans should be aware that not all records may be available.

Divorce

(Certidao de Nascimento, Certidao de Casamento, Certidao de Divorcio e Certidao de Obito). Available. These certificates are issued by the Conservatory of Records (Conservatoria dos Registos) where the applicant lived or was registered while in Angola. There are seven Conservatorias in Luanda. Each of the 18 provinces of Angola also has at least one Conservatoria. There is no Central Records facility. To contact the oldest and largest Conservatoria in Luanda, applicants may write to or visit: Primeira Conservatoria de Luanda, Largo Kinaxixe 3 Ave Lenine, Luanda, Angola. Applicants should include full name, date and place of birth, and full names of father and mother. Angolan applicants may contact the U.S. Embassy (Consular Section) for the address of other Conservatorias in Luanda. They should state the district where they resided while in Luanda. However, during the long period of civil war not all Conservatorias were able to maintain civil records. Thus, posts processing Angolans should be aware that not all records may be available.

Adoption Certificates

Unavailable.

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Identity Card

Unavailable.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Police Certificates are available to citizens of Angola only.
Requests for a Certidao de Registo Criminal must be made in person at:

Sector de Identificacao Criminal
Rua Rainha Ginga, Predio No. 49,
Primeiro Andar, Luanda, Angola.

If unable to appear in person, the applicant may authorize a third party to appear for them to request the information but only with a power of attorney.

The power of attorney must:

  • Specify the documentation that is requested and not be a general power of attorney.
  • Be notarized.
  • Be written in the Portuguese language or include a Portuguese translation attached.
  • Include all the biographical information that is found on the bio-page for their Angolan passport.
  • Have a certified copy of the bio-page of the current Angolan passport attached.

Court Records

Unavailable.

Prison Records

Unavailable.

Military Records

Certidao de Passagem a Disponibilidade, Reserva Militar our Reforma). Available. Applicants may write or visit Divisao de Pessoal do Estado Maior General das Forcas Armadas Angolanas (FAA), Rua Amilcar Cabral, Luanda, Angola..

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Unavailable.

Other Records

Not applicable.

 

Visa Issuing Posts

Luanda, Angola (Embassy)

Rua Houari Boumedienne in the Miramar area of Luanda
P.O. Box 6468

Tel: 244-2-447-028

Fax: 244-2-446-924

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Angola.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 452-1042 (202) 452-1043

Houston, TX (713) 212-3840 (713) 212-3841

Los Angeles, CA (323) 219-0014

New York, NY (212) 223-3588 ext. 154, 155, 156(212) 980-9606

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Luanda
Rua Houari Boumedienne #32
Miramar, Luanda
Angola
Telephone
+(244) 946-64-1000
Emergency
+(244) 222-64-1000
Fax
+(244) 222-64-1232
Angola Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.