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International Travel

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Country Information

Romania

Country Information

Romania
Romania
Last Updated: October 17, 2017
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Three months beyond departure date. We recommend a minimum of six months validity after entry date 

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page per stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Not required for stays under 90 days

VACCINATIONS:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

10,000 Euros or equivalent

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

10,000 Euros or equivalent

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Bucharest

B-dul, Dr. Liviu Librescu Nr. 4-6,
Sector 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania

Telephone: +(40) (21) 200-3300 and/or +(40) (21) 270-6000

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(40) (21) 200-3300

Fax: +(40) (21) 200-3578

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on U.S.-Romania relations for information on U.S. – Romania relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Visit the Embassy of Romania website for most current entry and visa information. 

  • You must have a U.S. passport that is valid for at least three months beyond your departure date from Romania.  
  • U.S. citizens may enter and remain in Romania without a visa for up to 90 days total in any 180-day period. Departing Romania and attempting to re-enter Romania does not “restart the clock”.  U.S. citizens who depart Romania and return after spending less than 90 days in the 180-day period prior to their return will be admitted for the remainder of the 90 days. U.S. citizens attempting to re-enter Romania after having already spent 90 days in Romania in the 180-day period prior to return may be denied re-entry to Romania. 
  • U.S. citizens who wish to stay longer than 90 days must obtain an extension from Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • U.S.-Romanian dual nationals should consult the Romanian Border Police website for information on exit requirements. 
  • If you have a temporary or permanent Romanian residence permit, be ready to present it upon request from local competent authorities.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Romania.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Credible information indicates terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Europe.  All European countries remain potentially vulnerable to attacks from transnational terrorist organizations.

Check the U.S. Embassy webpage for the latest safety and security messages.

Crime:

  • Robbery, pick pocketing, internet scams, and credit card fraud are the most commonly reported crimes. 
  • Organized groups of criminals, sometimes including minors, operate in train stations, trains, subways, and busses.
  • Money exchange schemes often involve individuals posing as plainclothes policemen who approach you, flash a badge, and ask for your passport and wallet.  Insist on the presence of a uniformed police officer and request that any issues be resolved at the police station.
  • If traveling on an overnight train, travel with a companion and in the highest class available.
  • Do not leave your personal belongings unattended; stow them securely out of sight.
  • Use ATMs located inside banks.  You should check ATM machines for any evidence of tampering before use.
  • Be extra cautious of your surroundings if using an internet café.
  • Use cash wherever possible in lieu of credit cards.

Be cautious about entering into contracts with Romanian businesses and/or organizations without legal assistance. Both official and societal corruption remains problematic in Romania.  The Romanian legal system is difficult for foreigners to navigate, making the assistance of a local attorney nearly essential.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on common scams.

Victims of Crime: 

U.S. citizen victims of sexual assault should first contact the U.S. Embassy.  Report crimes to the local police at 112 and contact the U.S. Embassy at (40) 21 200-3300.

Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends (with your written consent)
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and help you arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Special Circumstances:

  • Romania is situated in a seismically active region and has a history of devastating earthquakes, with the greatest risk occurring in Bucharest.
  • Mountainous areas of the country can be subject to torrential rains and flash floods, especially in the spring and summer months.
  • Streets and sidewalks are often icy and hazardous during winter.
  • Avoid contact with stray dogs.
  • Travelers’ checks are of limited use, but ATMs (“bancomats” in Romanian) are widely available. 

Faith-Based Travelers: See the following webpages for details:

LGBT Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Romania. However, the annual gay pride parades in Bucharest have been the scene of violent protests in past years.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and Section 6 of the Department of State's Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Romanian laws and regulations require public places, the outdoor environment, transportation, and housing to be accessible for persons with mobility issues. Although there has been progress, accessibility varies greatly. While large cultural institutions and supermarkets are generally properly equipped for persons with mobility issues, accessibility on sidewalks, hotels, and public transportation remains problematic. 

  • Sidewalks and streets are uneven, even in major cities.
  • Small hotels and tourist sites often do not have elevators or ramps.
  • Access to public transportation is not adequately marked for people with visual impairments and other disabilities.
  • Platforms at subway stations may be narrow, steep and slippery.

Students: See our Students Abroad webpage and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas.

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Romania and with the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs to ensure the medication is legal in Romania. Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription.

  • Basic medical supplies are limited in Romania, especially outside of major cities.
  • Hospitals often lack nursing care and assistance for the elderly.
  • Most prescription drugs and over-the-counter medications are available in Romania but are often sold under different names.
  • Response times for emergency services vary widely depending on the region of the country and nature of emergency.

Romania has helicopter services available for the most critical medical evacuation situations. We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Tuberculosis is an increasingly serious health concern in Romania. For further information, please consult the CDC's information on TB.

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Though Romanian traffic laws are very strict, road accidents are a real and dangerous threat for U.S. citizens visiting Romania. According to the European Union Road Federation, Romania has the highest per-vehicle rate of road fatalities of any country in the EU.

If you chose to drive in Romania, practice defensive driving techniques.

While major streets in larger cities and major inter-city roads are generally in fair to good condition, many secondary roads are in poor repair, unpaved, poorly lit, narrow, and lacking marked lanes.

  • Mountain roads are particularly dangerous when wet or covered with snow or ice. Winter snow removal is intermittent.
  • It is common for pedestrians, animals, cyclists, and horse-drawn carts to share a road with motor vehicles, especially in rural areas.
  • Parked vehicles often block sidewalks, forcing pedestrians to walk in the streets.
  • Cross only at crosswalks and exercise vigilance as crosswalks are generally poorly marked.
  • Local drivers often ignore traffic lights and crosswalk signs.

Maintain vigilance when driving to avoid hitting pedestrians in the streets.

Traffic Laws: Romanian traffic laws are very strict.

  • The traffic police can confiscate any form of a driver's license or permit for 1-3 months and request payment of fines at the time of the infraction.
  • Police are required to give all drivers involved in an accident a breathalyzer test on the scene.
  • Refusal to take a breathalyzer test may result in criminal penalties regardless of whether or not alcohol was involved.
  • Wearing a seat belt is mandatory.
  • Children under 12 years of age may not be transported in the front seat.
  • Use of mobile phones while driving is banned, with exception of hands free systems.

U.S. driver's licenses are only valid in Romania for up to 90 days. Before the 90-day period expires, U.S. citizens must either obtain an International Driving Permit in addition to their U.S. driver's license, or a Romanian driver's license.

For current traffic regulations and speed limits in Romania please visit the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

If entering Romania by vehicle you need to purchase a road tax badge known as “rovinieta” at the border crossing point. Proof of insurance and a car registration document are required when purchasing the "rovinieta." Drivers of vehicles registered abroad who are not in possession of a valid international insurance document must buy short-term insurance at the border.

Roadside help, vehicle assistance, towing services:  Dial 9271
Ambulance, fire brigade, police: Dial 112.

Public Transportation:  

Public transportation in Romania is inexpensive and reliable. Inter-city travel options include a variety of buses, trams, trolleybuses, and “maxitaxis” (shared taxis).  

  • You can purchase bus or tram tickets at newsstands or street kiosks before boarding and validate the ticket once aboard.
  • For “maxitaxis” you may buy a ticket directly from the driver.
  • Bucharest is the only Romanian city with an underground metro.  

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Visit Romania's National Tourist Office and Bucharest Metropolitan Police Department, which is responsible for road safety.   

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Romania’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Romania’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Romania should check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts at www.marad.dot.gov/msci. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website (https:homeport.uscg.mil), and the NGA broadcast warnings website https://msi.nga.mil/NGAPortal/MSI.portal select “broadcast warnings”.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Bucharest

B-dul, Dr. Liviu Librescu Nr. 4-6,
Sector 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania

Telephone: +(40) (21) 200-3300 and/or +(40) (21) 270-6000

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(40) (21) 200-3300

Fax: +(40) (21) 200-3578

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General Information

Romania and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) since June 1, 1993.

For information concerning travel to Romania, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Romania.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA). The report is located here.

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Romania.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone: 1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States: 1-202-501-4444
Fax: 1-202-485-6221
Website
Email: AskCI@state.gov

The Romanian Central Authority (RCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Ministry of Justice.  The RCA has an administrative role in processing Hague Abduction Convention applications.  The RCA receives and reviews Hague applications before sending petitions to the court.

The RCA can be reached at:

Ministry of Justice
Directorate of International Law and Judicial Co-operation
Service of judicial co-operation in civil and commercial matters
Strada Apolodor 17
Sector 5 BUCURESTI
Cod 050741
Romania
Tel.: +4037 204 1077
Fax: +4037 204 1079
E-mail: ddit@just.ro

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Romania, the USCA encourages a parent or legal guardian to review the eligibility criteria and instructions for completing the Hague application form located at the Department of State website and contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the RCA.  The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to the Romanian Central Authority, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the U.S. or Romanian central authorities.  Fees for privately retained attorneys are the responsibility of the applicant parent. Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Romania.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Romania.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Retaining an Attorney

Retaining a private attorney is not required in order to file a Hague Abduction Convention application with a court in Romania. The RCA will assign a litigator from the Department of Justice to present the case to the court. The RCA may also be able to assist the parent with finding an attorney, if the parent so wishes.  A parent who hires private counsel should notify both the Romanian and U.S. central authorities and will be responsible for paying all fees.

The U.S. Embassy in Bucharest, Romania posts a list of attorneysincluding those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The RCA encourages mediation in abduction and access cases. In both instances, the RCA will attempt to initiate mediation and provides a list of private mediators as an option to the parent in country. Because these are private mediators, they are responsible for setting up their own fees. The panel of authorized mediators is available on the Mediation Council website.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Romania is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, adoptions between Romania and the United States are governed by the requirements of the Convention and the laws and regulations implementing the Convention in both the United States and Romania. The amended Romanian adoption law went into effect on April 7, 2012. The new law allows for intercountry adoptions of Romanian children by relatives up to the fourth degree of kinship (up to first cousins) and Romanian citizens who are habitually resident abroad.  Romania also considers an adoption by the spouse of the child’s birth parent an intercountry adoption and may not permit U.S. citizen step-parents to complete a domestic adoption in Romania. However, under U.S. law, a step-parent adoption (which does not terminate the existing parent-child relationship with both birth parents) is not an intercountry adoption subject to the Convention, and the Convention process does not apply. Instead the child might qualify as a “step-child” under U.S. immigration law. For more information on how to file an immigrant visa petition for a step-child, please visit uscis.gov.

Under the new law, prospective adoptive parents are required to finalize their adoption in Romania.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Romania, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee under U.S. law in order to immigrate to the United States on an IH-3 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

A child habitually resident in Romania who is on the registry of the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption may be adopted by a person habitually resident abroad, if: 

  • The adoptive parent is related within the fourth degree of kinship to the child for whom the domestic adoption proceeding has been approved; or
  • The adoptive parent is a Romanian citizen.

Romania prioritizes domestic placements (the prospective who habitually reside in Romania) and placements with relatives (relatives up to the fourth degree of kinship with the child as described in “a)” above) over intercountry placements.

Romania applies the following criteria for selection in intercountry adoption:

  • The previous adoption of the child’s brother or sister;
  • The adoption of another child from Romania;
  • The child’s age for which the prospective adoptive parents are certified;
  • The number of children for which they are certified;
  • The child’s gender for which they are certified;
  • The ethnicity mentioned in the adoption application;
  • The prospective adoptive parents’ ability to meet the needs of a child with health issues or special needs;
  • The language(s) spoken by the prospective adoptive family.

In addition to the U.S. requirements, Romania requires prospective adoptive parents to meet the following requirements in order to adopt a child from Romania:

  • Residency: Before the granting of intercountry adoption by the court, the prospective adoptive parent(s) are required to travel to Romania and effectively reside there for a period of time (a minimum of 30 days) in order to interact with the child they seek to adopt.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: There is no age limit for the prospective adoptive parents; however, there is a minimum age difference between prospective adoptive parents and the adoptive child of 18 years and in special circumstances 16 years.
  • Marriage: Prospective adoptive parents may adopt as a married couple, or as single parents. Two individuals may not adopt together, simultaneously, or subsequently, except if they are husband and wife. Under that rule, same sex couples cannot adopt jointly.
  • Income: There is no minimum income required. However, the ability of prospective adoptive parents to adequately support (including financial support) the child they seek to adopt is taken into account as part of the evaluation process.
  • Other: Under Romanian law, an individual who was convicted for an intentional offense against another individual, or against family, as well as for trafficking in persons, or sale or use of illegal drugs, may not adopt. The individual or family whose child is under special protection measures or who was deprived of parental rights to their natural children may not adopt. The prohibition applies also to individuals who wish to adopt alone, but who are mentally ill or mentally challenged, or were convicted of an intentional offense against person, of trafficking in persons, or of the sale or use of illegal drugs.
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Who Can Be Adopted

Because Romania is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, children from Romania must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. For example, the adoption may take place only if the competent authorities of Romania have determined that placement of the child within Romania has been given due consideration and that an intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interests. In addition to Romania’s requirements, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee to be eligible for an immigrant visa that will allow you to bring the child to the United States.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Relinquishment: Consent must be obtained from any living birth parents, or legal guardians. Any child who is 10 years of age or older is required to give consent to his/her adoption. Any birth parent who is 14 years of age or older must give his/her consent assisted by his/her legal guardian. The consent to adoption is given by the birth parents in court at the time the adoption is granted. The consent of the prospective adoptive parents is also given in court at the hearing to grant the adoption. The court may overturn the refusal of a birth parent or legal guardian of the child to consent to adoption if it is demonstrated that the party has unreasonably withheld consent, and the court deems that the adoption is in the child’s best interest. An example of unreasonably withheld consent to adoption would be when the birth parent or the legal guardian, although legally served by the court, repeatedly failed to appear in court for the hearings.
  • Abandonment: The Abandonment Law, No. 47/1993 published in the Official Bulletin of Romania on July 8, 1993, was repealed by Law 273/2004.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: Only children under 18 are eligible for adoption. A child may be declared eligible for intercountry adoption in the limited circumstances described above only after first being registered as available for domestic adoption for a period of two years. This means that most children placed for intercountry adoption are at least three years old because younger children are often adopted domestically. 
  • Sibling Adoptions: Under Romanian law, siblings may only be adopted by different individuals or families if the placement is deemed in the child’s best interests, as determined by the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption, Romania’s Central adoption Authority.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: There are no specific procedures relating to children with medical conditions or the adoption of special needs children in the amended adoption law.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: A child may be declared eligible for intercountry adoption in the limited circumstances described above only after first being registered as available for domestic adoption for a period of two years. A child is registered as eligible for domestic adoption under one of the three timeframes:
    • When a child is placed under a special protective measure and the child’s parents and relatives up to fourth degree of kinship declare in writing that they do not wish to raise the child then the child should be declared eligible for domestic adoption after 60 days have passed since the family gave their consent. The family may withdraw their consent at any point during the 60 day period.
    •  If a child is placed under special protective measure and the child’s parents and relatives up to the fourth degree of kinship cannot be located or do not give their consent for an adoption, then a court may declare the child to be eligible for domestic adoption after one year has passed since the special protective measure was put in place.
    •  If a child is born to unknown parents it should be declared eligible for domestic adoption within 30 days of being issued a birth certificate.

If after being registered as eligible for domestic adoption for two years no adoptive parents habitually residing in Romania can be found, then the child will be considered for limited intercountry adoption as detailed above.

If the prospective adoptive parent is related to, or is the spouse of a relative of the child, then the two year waiting period does not apply.

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How to Adopt

WARNING: Romania is party to the Hague Adoption Convention. Do not adopt a child in Romania before a U.S. consular officer issues an “Article 5 Letter” in the case. Read on for more information.

ROMANIA'S ADOPTION AUTHORITY

National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights
(Autoritatea Nationala pentru Protectia Drepturilor Copilului si Adoptie)
Minitry of Labor, Family, Social Protection and Elderly Persons
(Ministerul Muncii, Familiei, Protectiei Sociale si Persoanelor Varstnice)

THE PROCESS

Because Romania is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adopting from Romania must follow a specific process designed to meet the Convention’s requirements. A brief summary of the Convention adoption process is given below. You must complete these steps in the following order so that your adoption meets all necessary legal requirements.  Adoptions completed out of order may result in the child not being eligible for an immigrant visa to the United States.

  1. Choose a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider.
  2. Apply to USCIS to be found eligible to adopt.
  3. Be matched with a child by authorities in Romania.
  4. Apply to USCIS for the child to be found eligible for immigration to the United States and receive U.S. agreement to proceed with the adoption.
  5. Adopt a child in Romania.
  6. Obtain a U.S. immigrant visa for your child and bring your child home.

Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

The recommended first step in adopting a child from Romania is to select an adoption service provider in the United States that has been accredited or approved to provide services to U.S. citizens in Convention cases. Only accredited or approved adoption service providers may provide adoption services between the United States and Romania. The U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider will act as the primary provider in your case. The primary adoption service provider is responsible for ensuring that all adoption services in the case are done in accordance with the Hague Adoption Convention and U.S. laws and regulations. Learn more about Agency Accreditation.

Additionally, Romanian law requires that U.S. adoption service providers be licensed by the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption. Prospective adoptive parents may obtain a list of the licensed U.S. adoption service providers from the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption by calling the office or visiting its website.

Apply to USCIS to be Found Eligible to Adopt

After you choose an accredited or approved adoption service provider, you must apply to be found eligible to adopt by the responsible U.S. government agency, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), by submitting Form I-800A. Read more about Eligibility Requirements.

Once USCIS determines that you are “eligible” and “suited” to adopt by approving the Form I-800A, your adoption service provider will send your approval notice, home study, and any other required information to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption as part of your adoption dossier. The Romanian Office of Adoptions will then review your application to determine whether you are also eligible to adopt under Romanian law.

Be Matched with a Child in Romania

If both the United States and Romania determine that you are eligible to adopt, and the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption has determined that a child is available for adoption, and that intercountry adoption is in that child’s best interests, the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption may provide you with a referral for a child. The referral is a proposed match between you and a specific child based on a review of your dossier and the needs of a specific child in Romania. The National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption will send a background study and other information, if available, about the child to help you decide whether to accept the referral or not. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs and provide a permanent home for a particular child. The National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption will allow you 45 days from the time you receive the referral to make a decision on the proposed match, file the I-800 petition, and obtain the Article 5 letter as detailed in the following section. If you accept the proposed referral, the adoption service provider communicates your acceptance to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption, and the I-800 petition should be filed as soon as possible in order to obtain the Article 5 letter within the 45 day timeframe. Additionally, there is a 30 day residency requirement, detailed below, that prospective adoptive parents must meet before the match can be finalized. Learn more about this critical decision.

Apply to USCIS for the Child to be Found Eligible for Immigration to the United States and Receive U.S. Agreement to Proceed with the Adoption

After you accept the finalized match with a child, you will apply to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for provisional approval for the child to immigrate to the United States (Form I-800). USCIS will make a provisional determination whether the child meets the definition of a Convention Adoptee and will be eligible to enter the United States and reside there permanently as an immigrant.

After provisional approval of Form I-800, your adoption service provider or you will submit a visa application to the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy located in Bucharest, Romania. The U.S. Embassy in Romania is responsible for issuing immigrant visas to children from Romania. A consular officer will conduct an initial review of the Form I-800 and the visa application for possible visa ineligibilities and advise you of options for the waiver of any noted ineligibilities. Following this interview if there are no evident visa ineligibilities, the consular officer will issue the Article 5 letter which is forwarded to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption.

After the Article 5 letter is received by the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption, you are required by the Romanian adoption law to reside in Romania for a minimum period of 30 consecutive days in order to interact with the child. At the end of this period of time, the Department for Child Protection in the county where the child is domiciled will prepare and forward to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption a report describing the interaction between the child and the prospective adoptive parent(s). The National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption will notify the Central Authority or the accredited adoption service provider from the receiving country of the finalized selection of the prospective adoptive parent(s). 

WARNING: The consular officer will send a letter (referred to as an “Article 5 Letter”) to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption in any intercountry adoption involving U.S. citizen parents and a child from Romania where all Convention requirements are met and the consular officer determines that the child appears eligible to immigrate to the United States. This letter will inform the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption that the parents are eligible and suited to adopt, that all indications are that the child may enter and reside permanently in the United States, and that the U.S. Central Authority agrees the adoption may proceed.

Do not attempt to adopt or obtain custody of a child in Romania before a U.S. consular officer issues the Article 5 Letter in any adoption case.

Remember: The consular officer will make a final decision about a child’s eligibility for an immigrant visa later in the adoption process.

Adopt a Child in Romania

Remember: Before you adopt a child in Romania you must have completed the above four steps. Only after completing these steps, can you proceed to finalize the adoption in Romania.

The process for finalizing adoption in Romania can last anywhere from two to five months in total, and prospective adoptive parents should be prepared to be physically present at all court dates throughout this time period. The process generally includes the following:

  • Role of Adoption Authority: Romania’s Central Authority is the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption. The National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption:
    • Proposes a match of the child with the prospective adoptive family.
    • Reviews Article 16 reports on the child to be adopted.
    • Reviews the report prepared by the local department for child protection regarding the interaction between the child and the prospective adoptive parents at the conclusion of the mandatory 30 day period they must spend in Romania with the child.
    • Forwards to the competent courts the applications for adoption of the individuals and families who wish to adopt Romanian children cases of intercountry adoption; takes part in the cases, which entail the granting of intercountry adoption in court. 
    • Issues Article 23 Certificates of Conformity, which attest that the adoption was granted according to the provisions of the Hague Convention.
    • Follows up on the development of the adopted child and the relationship between the child and the adoptive family for at least two years from the date an intercountry adoption by corresponding with the foreign Central Authority or adoption service provider.
  • Role of the Court: The adoption of a Romanian child is granted by the competent Romanian court in the county where the child is habitually resident.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: The U.S. adoption service provider conducts or oversees the prospective adoptive parents’ home study to ensure it complies with U.S. and state law where the family resides. After the adoption is complete, the visa is issued, and the adoptive parents and the child travel to the United States, the U.S. adoption service provider prepares post-adoption reports on the child’s development, which are forwarded to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption as required by the Romanian adoption law.
  • Adoption Application: The application for adoption, along with accompanying documentation required by the Romanian adoption law, is forwarded by the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption to the appropriate Romanian court. 

Within 5 days after the date on which the adoption order becomes final, the Department in whose area the child lives should communicate this final order in writing to the biological parents, as well as to Romanian authorities competent to issue identity or travel documents to the adoptee.

At the request of the adoptive family, the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption should issue the Article 23 Certificate, attesting that the adoption was completed according to the provisions of the Convention, within 5 days after the family submits the application for such certificate along with an authenticated copy of the final adoption order.

  • Adoption Fees: In the adoption services contract that you sign at the beginning of the adoption process, your agency will itemize the fees and estimated expenses related to your adoption process.

According to the Romanian adoption law, there are no legal fees involved in the adoption process. However, if the prospective adoptive parents wish to hire an attorney to assist them in court, they must be prepared to pay the attorney’s fees. 

There is no fee for the issuance of the child’s new birth certificate after the adoption is granted by the court. 

  • Passport fees for Romanian passports are as follows:
    • Two hundred and seventy (270) RON for individuals twelve years of age or older;
    • Two hundred and forty four (244) RON for minors under twelve years of age. 

The total fees for a temporary passport are 200 RON. This passport fee is payable at the CEC Bank, along with a consular surcharge (32 RON) payable at the CEC Bank or at the Treasury Office. 

  • Documents Required: See section “Adoption Application” above.

Note: Additional documents may be requested.

Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic. If so, the Department of State, Authentications office may be able to assist. Read more about Authenticating U.S. Documents.

Note: All documents submitted to the Central Authority must be presented in original and must be accompanied by notarized translations in the Romanian language. The notarizations must be performed by a notary licensed in Romania. Fees for notary services vary in Romania, but, in general, tend to be higher than notary fees charged in the United States.   

Obtain an Immigrant Visa for your Child and Bring Your Child Home

Now that your adoption is complete, there are a few more steps to take before you can head home. Specifically, you need to apply for three documents before your child can travel to the United States:

Birth Certificate

Once the adoption is completed in Romania, you will have to apply for a birth certificate for your child in order to later apply for a Romanian passport. To register the adoption and obtain the new birth certificate for the child you must submit the following documents to the Vital Statistics office in the town/city where the child lived:

  • the final adoption decree in original and a court certified copy,
  • the child’s birth certificate in original,
  • the marriage certificate of the adoptive parent(s) in original and a copy,                 
  • the adoptive parent(s’) identity documents in original and a copy.

Please note that the adoptive parent(s) with dual Romanian and U.S. citizenship should ensure that any marriages, divorces, and name changes done in the US are properly recorded with the appropriate Romanian authorities so that both the U.S. and Romanian identity documents bear the same name.

Romanian Passport

Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Romania.

The application for a Romanian passport must be filed in person. The documents that must be presented are the child’s birth certificate in original, identifying documents for the parents, proof that all fees have been paid, and the child’s previous passport, if applicable. The presence of the child is mandatory due to the collection of biometric information.  However, children under twelve are not fingerprinted.

U.S. Immigrant Visa

After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to finalize your application for a U.S. visa for your child at the U.S. Embassy in Bucharest, Romania. After the adoption is granted, visit the U.S. Embassy in Bucharest for a final review of the case, issuance of a U.S. Hague Adoption Certificate, final approval of Form I-800, and to obtain your child’s immigrant visa. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the consular officer must be provided the “Panel Physician’s” medical report on the child if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage. Read more about the Medical Examination.

Note: According to the provisions of the Romanian adoption law, the adopted child may leave Romania only if accompanied by his/her adoptive parent(s).

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States: A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

APPLYING FOR YOUR U.S. PASSPORT

U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. U.S. citizens are not required to obtain visas if their intended period of stay in Romania is 90 days or less. To find information about obtaining a visa for Romania, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

STAYING SAFE ON YOUR TRIP

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

STAYING IN TOUCH ON YOUR TRIP

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Romania enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

We strongly urge you to comply with Romanian post-adoption requirements in a timely manner. Your adoption agency should be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to Romania’s history of positive experiences with U.S. citizen parents.

Note: According to the provisions of the Romanian adoption law, in the case of intercountry adoption of a child habitually resident in Romania by a person or family habitually resident abroad, the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption is required to follow the child’s development and his/her relationship with his/her adoptive parent(s) for a period of at least two years after the adoption is granted. To comply with this requirement, the adoption service provider will be expected to send the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption a report of the child’s progress every four months until the two year period is completed.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy Bucharest 
4-6, Dr. Liviu Librescu Blvd.
District 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania
Tel: (+40) 21 200-3300
Fax: (+40) 21 200-3442
Internet: ro.usembassy.gov

Consulate of the United States of America
4-6, Dr. Liviu Librescu Blvd.
District 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania
Tel: (+40) 21 270-6000
Fax: (+40) 21 200-3505
E-mail Visas:  VisasBucharest@state.gov
E-mail American Citizens:  acsbucharest@state.gov
Consular Section

Romanian Adoption Authority
National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights
(Autoritatea Nationala pentru Protectia Drepturilor Copilului si Adoptie)
Minitry of Labor, Family, Social Protection and Elderly Persons
(Ministerul Muncii, Familiei, Protectiei Sociale si Persoanelor Varstnice)
Bd. Gral. Ghe. Magheru nr. 7
Sector 1
Bucharest 010322
Romania
Tel: +40213100789; Fax: +40213127474
E-mail: secretariat@adoptiiromania.ro or office@anpfdc.ro
Internet:  www.copii.ro

Contact person: Andreea Dinica,
Email: andreea.dinica@adoptiiromania.ro

Embassy of Romania
1607 23rd Street NW
Washington, DC 20008
Tel: 202-332-4846, 4848, 4851, 4852, 2879; 202-232-4747
Fax: 202-232-4748
Email:  consular@roembus.org
Internet  http://washington.mae.ro/en

Note:  Romania also has consulates in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Email:  AdoptionUSCA@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-800A or I-800 petition:
National Benefits Center
Tel:  1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email:  NBC.Adoptions@DHS.go

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None One 3 Months
C-3 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-6 10 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO-7 1 None Multiple 12 Months
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificate

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees:  11 Romanian Lei
  • Document name:  “Certificat de nastere” 
  • Issuing Authority:  Office of Vital Statistics (“Oficiul Starii Civile”) of the local Mayor’s Office, available in three languages: Romanian, French and English.
  • Color/Format/Special Seal(s): Blue, 7.5 inches by 9 inches, plus one ink stamp and bearing the signature of the Vital Statistics officer.
  • Procedure for Obtaining:
    • The deadline for declaring and registering the child's birth is 15 days from the date of birth for children born alive and still alive. If the declaration of birth was made after the expiry of 15 days, recording of the birth certificate is done with the approval of the Director at the Local Directorate for Vital Records and Personal Database and a written statement whereby he/she shall state the reason for the delay.
    • Required documents (original and photocopy), depending on the situation:
      1. If the parents are married, you must present:
        • Medical certificate of birth with the registration number, date, seal/stamp of the health unit, doctor's stamp and signature.
        • Marriage certificate (original and photocopy).
        • Parents' identity documents (original and photocopy).
      2. If the parents are not married and the child is recognized by the father:
        • Medical certificate of birth with the registration number, date, seal/stamp of the health unit, doctor's stamp and signature.
        • Mother's birth certificate (original and photocopy).
        • Proof of identity of the mother (original and photocopy).
        • Proof of identity of the father (original and photocopy).
        • If the child is recognized by the father, both parents shall complete and sign before the Vital Statistics Officer who recorded the birth a statement showing the family name of the baby.
        • Note:  Declaration on the surname of the child shall be given and signed before the Vital Statistics Officer. Statement on recognition by the father of the child can be given before a Notary Public.
      3. If the child's mother is not married and the child is not recognized by the father:
        • Medical certificate of birth must bear the registration number, date certain, seal/stamp of the health unit, doctor's stamp and signature.
        • Mother's birth certificate (original and photocopy).
        • Proof of identity of the mother (original and photocopy).
        • In this case the child's birth certificate may be requested only by the mother.
    • Obtaining a duplicate of birth certificate
      • Romanian citizens residing abroad may request a duplicate birth certificate as follows:
        • Diplomatically at the Romanian Embassy or Consulate in the country of residence.
        • By proxy through third party with notarized power of attorney.
      • Required documents:
        • Application form (obtained at the counter).
        • Identity document, original and photocopy.
        • 11 Romanian lei.
      • If the holder cannot make a request in person, the request for a duplicate birth certificate can be made by another person with notarized power of attorney with apostile which shall state expressly: “To obtain the birth certificate / marriage / death certificate from the Local Directorate for Vital Records and Personal Database.”
 

Death Certificate

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: 11 Romanian Lei
  • Document name:  “Certificat de deces” 
  • Issuing Authority:  Office of Vital Statistics (“Oficiul Starii Civile”) of the local Mayor’s Office.  Issued in three languages: Romanian, French and English.
  • Color/Format/Special Seal(s): Gray, 7.5 inches by 9 inches, plus one ink stamp and the signature of the Vital Statistics officer.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Applicant should present the following documents:
    • Medical report ascertaining death.
    • The identity card of the deceased (original and photocopy).
    • The identity card of the person declaring the death (original and photocopy).
    • The deceased's birth certificate (original and photocopy).
    • The marriage certificate of the deceased (if applicable - original and photocopy).
Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificate

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: See TAXE PERCEPUTE
  • Document name: Certificat de Căsătorie
  • Issuing Government Authority: The document is issued by the Officer of Vital Statistics (Ofițer de Stare Civilă) of the local Mayor's Office in three languages: Romanian, French and English.
  • Color/Format/Special Seal(s): Round seal of the municipality with the Vital Statistics Officer’s signature.  Document background color is light pink and is letter format.
  • Comments:
    • The marriage certificate is registered by the local municipality. If the marriage was contracted abroad, to obtain a Romanian marriage certificate the marriage must be registered in Romania at the Mayor’s Office in the applicant’s last domicile in Romania.
    • Once the marriage is terminated by divorce, the marriage certificate is retained at the Office of Vital Statistics.  A certified copy of the marriage certificate may be requested mentioning all the changes after the divorce (i.e. name change, the civil sentence or death terminating the marriage).
    • Same-sex marriages are not recognized in Romania.
 

Divorce Certificate

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: See TAXE PERCEPUTE
  • Issuing Government Authority: The divorce may be in the form of:
    • A divorce decree issued by a court, registered and archived by the regional court; or
    • A certificate of divorce issued by the Officer of Vital Statistics or by a Public Notary when both spouses are in agreement with the dissolution of marriage and clauses.
  • Comments:
Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update

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Identity Card

Identity Card

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: See link below
  • Document name: “Carte de identitate”
  • Issuing Government Authority: Document issued by the Directorate for Persons Record and Databases Management within the Ministry of Administration and Interior to Romanian citizens upon reaching age 14. Website: http://depabd.mai.gov.ro.
  • Color/Format/Special Seal(s): Issued in three languages – Romanian, French and English. It is laminated and has the bearer’s color photo, personal identification number, last and first names, nationality, place of birth, address of current domicile, issuing authority, and validity (from-to dates).  It is machine-readable.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The application for the identity card is filed in person, and is issued to the bearer.  If the applicant is abroad, a third party may apply in his/her name, with a special power-of-attorney on which the picture of the applicant is affixed, notarized by the Romanian embassy or consulate in the country where the applicant is present, stating the exact object of the mandate.
    • The identity card is issued with a validity period as follows:
      • 4 years for individuals with ages between 14 and 18 years
      • 7 years for individuals with ages between 18 and 25 years
      • 10 years for individuals over the age of 25
      • Permanent for individuals over the age of 55
  • Comments:
    • Information on obtaining the identity card, the required documents and fees, and the various situations where a new identity card is required may be found online at  http://depabd.mai.gov.ro/cadru_legal.html.
Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Certificates

  • Available/Unavailable: Available
  • Fees: 10 RON (Romanian lei) plus 2 RON for a fiscal stamp (total at current exchange rate is 3 USD).
  • Document Name: Cazier Judiciar
  • Issuing Authority: Ministry of Internal Affairs
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: 8.25 inches by 6 inches, has blue falcon crest watermark and Romanian green fiscal stamp in upper right corner.  Plus two ink stamps over fiscal stamp and bearing signature of issuing officer.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Comisar Sef de Politie (Police Chief Commissioner)
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Issued same day for applicants without prior criminal history.  Issued in 3 days for those with penal records.  The police certificates may be obtained by Romanian citizens at the police precincts in Bucharest, regardless of the applicant’s residence/domicile or place of birth.  They are also available at local police precincts in the city of residence or city of birth.
  • Certified Copies Available: The stamped original is certified by the issuing authority, but only this format is available and accepted.
  • Alternate Documents: None
  • Exceptions: None known
  • Comments: Romanian citizens residing abroad and aliens who lived in Romania for more than a year may apply for a police certificate in one of two ways. They may apply at the Romanian Embassy in the country of their residence by filling out an application form, submitting a copy of the applicant's passport, and paying a 40 USD consular fee. The processing time for this is 90 days. Alternatively, they may sign a power of attorney at the Romanian Embassy for a third party to apply in person in Romania on their behalf. If notarized by a notary public in a member country of the Hague Convention on Legalization of Foreign Public Documents, the power of attorney must bear the Hague Convention Apostille. 
  • Police certificates are issued by the local police authorities.
  • Individuals residing in Romania may apply for a police certificate in person in Bucharest at the Inspectoratul General, or at their local police station.
  • For detailed information regarding the application and required documents, please visit the Police web site at https://b.politiaromana.ro and then look under “Utile” and then “Cazier Judiciar”.


Prison Record

Documents are issued to the individual concerned at the time of release from jail. These documents may be obtained from the State Archives (Arhivele Nationale ale Romaniei, B-dul Regina Elisabeta, nr. 49, sector 5, Bucuresti, cod postal 050013, tel. 313.9295 or 312.5841).

Military Records

Military Record

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: N/A  
  • Document name: “Livret Militar”
  • Issuing authority: Romanian Ministry of Defense.  Given to individuals who have served in the armed forces of Romania at the end of their service.  Not available otherwise.
  • Special Seal(s)/Color/Format: Hard-cover booklet, 4.25” x 3” with brown cover and light green pages. Inside is biographical data to include family information and occupation of bearer with photograph, stamps, service dates, rank and military specialty.
  • Comments:
    • Please note that as of January 1, 2007, mandatory military service was suspended.  Therefore, Romanian men under the age of 18 in 2007 would not have been required to serve in the military. However, in times of war, in an emergency mobilization of the armed forces, or curfew, completion of military service becomes mandatory according to the law.
Passports & Other Travel Documents

Travel Documents

  • Types available: Regular, Diplomatic and Official passports
  • Fees: Vary between $55 and $75 depending on the type of passport.
  • Issuing Government Authority: The Romanian Ministry of Interior has sole authority for the issuance of all simple and electronic passports with the exception of diplomatic (Pașaport Diplomatic) and official (Pașaport de Serviciu) passports, which are issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
  • Document Names: PAȘAPORT, PAȘAPORT DIPLOMATIC, PAȘAPORT DE SERVICIU
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The Regular Passport has a burgundy cover and is issued by the Ministry of Interior. The Diplomatic Passport has a black cover and is issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The Official Passport has a dark blue cover and is issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. All passports have gold lettering on the front that says “UNIUNEA EUROPEANĂ” and “ROMÂNIA” and the type of passport.
  • Validity:
    • 3 years for persons under 12 years of age
    • 5 years for persons over 12 years of age
    • 12 months for a temporary simple passport
  • Comments:
    • A Romanian citizen abroad without a valid passport may be issued a travel document (Titlu de călătorie) by the nearest Romanian consulate. This travel document is valid for 30 days and only for return to Romania.
    • For more details, please visit the Romanian Ministry of Administration and Interior’s website at http://www.pasapoarte.mai.gov.ro/indexActe.html, or the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ website at http://www.mae.ro/taxonomy/term/450/2.
Other Records

Not applicable

Visa Issuing Posts

Bucharest, Romania (Embassy)

Mailing Address:
American Embassy Bucharest
C/O Department of State
Washington, D.C. 20521-5260

Street Address:
The United States Embassy
4-6, Dr. Liviu Librescu Blvd.,
District 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania

Telephone: (+40) 21 200-3300
Fax: (+40) 21 200-3442

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Romania.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 232-6634 (202) 420-8350 (202) 232-4748

Chicago, IL (312) 573-1315 (312) 573-1436 (312) 573-1181 (312) 573-9771

Los Angeles, CA (310) 444-0043 (310) 445-0043

New York, NY (212) 682-9120 (212) 682-9121 (212) 972-8463

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Bucharest
B-dul, Dr. Liviu Librescu Nr. 4-6,
Sector 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania
Telephone
+(40) (21) 200-3300 and/or +(40) (21) 270-6000
Emergency
+(40) (21) 200-3300
Fax
+(40) (21) 200-3578
Romania Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Romania
Romania
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Three months beyond departure date. We recommend a minimum of six months validity after entry date 

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page per stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Not required for stays under 90 days

VACCINATIONS:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

10,000 Euros or equivalent

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

10,000 Euros or equivalent

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Bucharest

B-dul, Dr. Liviu Librescu Nr. 4-6,
Sector 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania

Telephone: +(40) (21) 200-3300 and/or +(40) (21) 270-6000

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(40) (21) 200-3300

Fax: +(40) (21) 200-3578

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on U.S.-Romania relations for information on U.S. – Romania relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Visit the Embassy of Romania website for most current entry and visa information. 

  • You must have a U.S. passport that is valid for at least three months beyond your departure date from Romania.  
  • U.S. citizens may enter and remain in Romania without a visa for up to 90 days total in any 180-day period. Departing Romania and attempting to re-enter Romania does not “restart the clock”.  U.S. citizens who depart Romania and return after spending less than 90 days in the 180-day period prior to their return will be admitted for the remainder of the 90 days. U.S. citizens attempting to re-enter Romania after having already spent 90 days in Romania in the 180-day period prior to return may be denied re-entry to Romania. 
  • U.S. citizens who wish to stay longer than 90 days must obtain an extension from Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • U.S.-Romanian dual nationals should consult the Romanian Border Police website for information on exit requirements. 
  • If you have a temporary or permanent Romanian residence permit, be ready to present it upon request from local competent authorities.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Romania.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Credible information indicates terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Europe.  All European countries remain potentially vulnerable to attacks from transnational terrorist organizations.

Check the U.S. Embassy webpage for the latest safety and security messages.

Crime:

  • Robbery, pick pocketing, internet scams, and credit card fraud are the most commonly reported crimes. 
  • Organized groups of criminals, sometimes including minors, operate in train stations, trains, subways, and busses.
  • Money exchange schemes often involve individuals posing as plainclothes policemen who approach you, flash a badge, and ask for your passport and wallet.  Insist on the presence of a uniformed police officer and request that any issues be resolved at the police station.
  • If traveling on an overnight train, travel with a companion and in the highest class available.
  • Do not leave your personal belongings unattended; stow them securely out of sight.
  • Use ATMs located inside banks.  You should check ATM machines for any evidence of tampering before use.
  • Be extra cautious of your surroundings if using an internet café.
  • Use cash wherever possible in lieu of credit cards.

Be cautious about entering into contracts with Romanian businesses and/or organizations without legal assistance. Both official and societal corruption remains problematic in Romania.  The Romanian legal system is difficult for foreigners to navigate, making the assistance of a local attorney nearly essential.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on common scams.

Victims of Crime: 

U.S. citizen victims of sexual assault should first contact the U.S. Embassy.  Report crimes to the local police at 112 and contact the U.S. Embassy at (40) 21 200-3300.

Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends (with your written consent)
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and help you arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Special Circumstances:

  • Romania is situated in a seismically active region and has a history of devastating earthquakes, with the greatest risk occurring in Bucharest.
  • Mountainous areas of the country can be subject to torrential rains and flash floods, especially in the spring and summer months.
  • Streets and sidewalks are often icy and hazardous during winter.
  • Avoid contact with stray dogs.
  • Travelers’ checks are of limited use, but ATMs (“bancomats” in Romanian) are widely available. 

Faith-Based Travelers: See the following webpages for details:

LGBT Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Romania. However, the annual gay pride parades in Bucharest have been the scene of violent protests in past years.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and Section 6 of the Department of State's Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Romanian laws and regulations require public places, the outdoor environment, transportation, and housing to be accessible for persons with mobility issues. Although there has been progress, accessibility varies greatly. While large cultural institutions and supermarkets are generally properly equipped for persons with mobility issues, accessibility on sidewalks, hotels, and public transportation remains problematic. 

  • Sidewalks and streets are uneven, even in major cities.
  • Small hotels and tourist sites often do not have elevators or ramps.
  • Access to public transportation is not adequately marked for people with visual impairments and other disabilities.
  • Platforms at subway stations may be narrow, steep and slippery.

Students: See our Students Abroad webpage and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas.

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Romania and with the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs to ensure the medication is legal in Romania. Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription.

  • Basic medical supplies are limited in Romania, especially outside of major cities.
  • Hospitals often lack nursing care and assistance for the elderly.
  • Most prescription drugs and over-the-counter medications are available in Romania but are often sold under different names.
  • Response times for emergency services vary widely depending on the region of the country and nature of emergency.

Romania has helicopter services available for the most critical medical evacuation situations. We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Tuberculosis is an increasingly serious health concern in Romania. For further information, please consult the CDC's information on TB.

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Though Romanian traffic laws are very strict, road accidents are a real and dangerous threat for U.S. citizens visiting Romania. According to the European Union Road Federation, Romania has the highest per-vehicle rate of road fatalities of any country in the EU.

If you chose to drive in Romania, practice defensive driving techniques.

While major streets in larger cities and major inter-city roads are generally in fair to good condition, many secondary roads are in poor repair, unpaved, poorly lit, narrow, and lacking marked lanes.

  • Mountain roads are particularly dangerous when wet or covered with snow or ice. Winter snow removal is intermittent.
  • It is common for pedestrians, animals, cyclists, and horse-drawn carts to share a road with motor vehicles, especially in rural areas.
  • Parked vehicles often block sidewalks, forcing pedestrians to walk in the streets.
  • Cross only at crosswalks and exercise vigilance as crosswalks are generally poorly marked.
  • Local drivers often ignore traffic lights and crosswalk signs.

Maintain vigilance when driving to avoid hitting pedestrians in the streets.

Traffic Laws: Romanian traffic laws are very strict.

  • The traffic police can confiscate any form of a driver's license or permit for 1-3 months and request payment of fines at the time of the infraction.
  • Police are required to give all drivers involved in an accident a breathalyzer test on the scene.
  • Refusal to take a breathalyzer test may result in criminal penalties regardless of whether or not alcohol was involved.
  • Wearing a seat belt is mandatory.
  • Children under 12 years of age may not be transported in the front seat.
  • Use of mobile phones while driving is banned, with exception of hands free systems.

U.S. driver's licenses are only valid in Romania for up to 90 days. Before the 90-day period expires, U.S. citizens must either obtain an International Driving Permit in addition to their U.S. driver's license, or a Romanian driver's license.

For current traffic regulations and speed limits in Romania please visit the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

If entering Romania by vehicle you need to purchase a road tax badge known as “rovinieta” at the border crossing point. Proof of insurance and a car registration document are required when purchasing the "rovinieta." Drivers of vehicles registered abroad who are not in possession of a valid international insurance document must buy short-term insurance at the border.

Roadside help, vehicle assistance, towing services:  Dial 9271
Ambulance, fire brigade, police: Dial 112.

Public Transportation:  

Public transportation in Romania is inexpensive and reliable. Inter-city travel options include a variety of buses, trams, trolleybuses, and “maxitaxis” (shared taxis).  

  • You can purchase bus or tram tickets at newsstands or street kiosks before boarding and validate the ticket once aboard.
  • For “maxitaxis” you may buy a ticket directly from the driver.
  • Bucharest is the only Romanian city with an underground metro.  

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Visit Romania's National Tourist Office and Bucharest Metropolitan Police Department, which is responsible for road safety.   

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Romania’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Romania’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Romania should check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts at www.marad.dot.gov/msci. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website (https:homeport.uscg.mil), and the NGA broadcast warnings website https://msi.nga.mil/NGAPortal/MSI.portal select “broadcast warnings”.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Bucharest

B-dul, Dr. Liviu Librescu Nr. 4-6,
Sector 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania

Telephone: +(40) (21) 200-3300 and/or +(40) (21) 270-6000

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(40) (21) 200-3300

Fax: +(40) (21) 200-3578

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General Information

Romania and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) since June 1, 1993.

For information concerning travel to Romania, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Romania.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA). The report is located here.

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Romania.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone: 1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States: 1-202-501-4444
Fax: 1-202-485-6221
Website
Email: AskCI@state.gov

The Romanian Central Authority (RCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Ministry of Justice.  The RCA has an administrative role in processing Hague Abduction Convention applications.  The RCA receives and reviews Hague applications before sending petitions to the court.

The RCA can be reached at:

Ministry of Justice
Directorate of International Law and Judicial Co-operation
Service of judicial co-operation in civil and commercial matters
Strada Apolodor 17
Sector 5 BUCURESTI
Cod 050741
Romania
Tel.: +4037 204 1077
Fax: +4037 204 1079
E-mail: ddit@just.ro

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Romania, the USCA encourages a parent or legal guardian to review the eligibility criteria and instructions for completing the Hague application form located at the Department of State website and contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the RCA.  The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to the Romanian Central Authority, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the U.S. or Romanian central authorities.  Fees for privately retained attorneys are the responsibility of the applicant parent. Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Romania.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Romania.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Retaining an Attorney

Retaining a private attorney is not required in order to file a Hague Abduction Convention application with a court in Romania. The RCA will assign a litigator from the Department of Justice to present the case to the court. The RCA may also be able to assist the parent with finding an attorney, if the parent so wishes.  A parent who hires private counsel should notify both the Romanian and U.S. central authorities and will be responsible for paying all fees.

The U.S. Embassy in Bucharest, Romania posts a list of attorneysincluding those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The RCA encourages mediation in abduction and access cases. In both instances, the RCA will attempt to initiate mediation and provides a list of private mediators as an option to the parent in country. Because these are private mediators, they are responsible for setting up their own fees. The panel of authorized mediators is available on the Mediation Council website.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Romania is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, adoptions between Romania and the United States are governed by the requirements of the Convention and the laws and regulations implementing the Convention in both the United States and Romania. The amended Romanian adoption law went into effect on April 7, 2012. The new law allows for intercountry adoptions of Romanian children by relatives up to the fourth degree of kinship (up to first cousins) and Romanian citizens who are habitually resident abroad.  Romania also considers an adoption by the spouse of the child’s birth parent an intercountry adoption and may not permit U.S. citizen step-parents to complete a domestic adoption in Romania. However, under U.S. law, a step-parent adoption (which does not terminate the existing parent-child relationship with both birth parents) is not an intercountry adoption subject to the Convention, and the Convention process does not apply. Instead the child might qualify as a “step-child” under U.S. immigration law. For more information on how to file an immigrant visa petition for a step-child, please visit uscis.gov.

Under the new law, prospective adoptive parents are required to finalize their adoption in Romania.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Romania, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee under U.S. law in order to immigrate to the United States on an IH-3 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

A child habitually resident in Romania who is on the registry of the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption may be adopted by a person habitually resident abroad, if: 

  • The adoptive parent is related within the fourth degree of kinship to the child for whom the domestic adoption proceeding has been approved; or
  • The adoptive parent is a Romanian citizen.

Romania prioritizes domestic placements (the prospective who habitually reside in Romania) and placements with relatives (relatives up to the fourth degree of kinship with the child as described in “a)” above) over intercountry placements.

Romania applies the following criteria for selection in intercountry adoption:

  • The previous adoption of the child’s brother or sister;
  • The adoption of another child from Romania;
  • The child’s age for which the prospective adoptive parents are certified;
  • The number of children for which they are certified;
  • The child’s gender for which they are certified;
  • The ethnicity mentioned in the adoption application;
  • The prospective adoptive parents’ ability to meet the needs of a child with health issues or special needs;
  • The language(s) spoken by the prospective adoptive family.

In addition to the U.S. requirements, Romania requires prospective adoptive parents to meet the following requirements in order to adopt a child from Romania:

  • Residency: Before the granting of intercountry adoption by the court, the prospective adoptive parent(s) are required to travel to Romania and effectively reside there for a period of time (a minimum of 30 days) in order to interact with the child they seek to adopt.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: There is no age limit for the prospective adoptive parents; however, there is a minimum age difference between prospective adoptive parents and the adoptive child of 18 years and in special circumstances 16 years.
  • Marriage: Prospective adoptive parents may adopt as a married couple, or as single parents. Two individuals may not adopt together, simultaneously, or subsequently, except if they are husband and wife. Under that rule, same sex couples cannot adopt jointly.
  • Income: There is no minimum income required. However, the ability of prospective adoptive parents to adequately support (including financial support) the child they seek to adopt is taken into account as part of the evaluation process.
  • Other: Under Romanian law, an individual who was convicted for an intentional offense against another individual, or against family, as well as for trafficking in persons, or sale or use of illegal drugs, may not adopt. The individual or family whose child is under special protection measures or who was deprived of parental rights to their natural children may not adopt. The prohibition applies also to individuals who wish to adopt alone, but who are mentally ill or mentally challenged, or were convicted of an intentional offense against person, of trafficking in persons, or of the sale or use of illegal drugs.
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Who Can Be Adopted

Because Romania is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, children from Romania must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. For example, the adoption may take place only if the competent authorities of Romania have determined that placement of the child within Romania has been given due consideration and that an intercountry adoption is in the child’s best interests. In addition to Romania’s requirements, a child must meet the definition of Convention adoptee to be eligible for an immigrant visa that will allow you to bring the child to the United States.

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Relinquishment: Consent must be obtained from any living birth parents, or legal guardians. Any child who is 10 years of age or older is required to give consent to his/her adoption. Any birth parent who is 14 years of age or older must give his/her consent assisted by his/her legal guardian. The consent to adoption is given by the birth parents in court at the time the adoption is granted. The consent of the prospective adoptive parents is also given in court at the hearing to grant the adoption. The court may overturn the refusal of a birth parent or legal guardian of the child to consent to adoption if it is demonstrated that the party has unreasonably withheld consent, and the court deems that the adoption is in the child’s best interest. An example of unreasonably withheld consent to adoption would be when the birth parent or the legal guardian, although legally served by the court, repeatedly failed to appear in court for the hearings.
  • Abandonment: The Abandonment Law, No. 47/1993 published in the Official Bulletin of Romania on July 8, 1993, was repealed by Law 273/2004.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: Only children under 18 are eligible for adoption. A child may be declared eligible for intercountry adoption in the limited circumstances described above only after first being registered as available for domestic adoption for a period of two years. This means that most children placed for intercountry adoption are at least three years old because younger children are often adopted domestically. 
  • Sibling Adoptions: Under Romanian law, siblings may only be adopted by different individuals or families if the placement is deemed in the child’s best interests, as determined by the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption, Romania’s Central adoption Authority.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: There are no specific procedures relating to children with medical conditions or the adoption of special needs children in the amended adoption law.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: A child may be declared eligible for intercountry adoption in the limited circumstances described above only after first being registered as available for domestic adoption for a period of two years. A child is registered as eligible for domestic adoption under one of the three timeframes:
    • When a child is placed under a special protective measure and the child’s parents and relatives up to fourth degree of kinship declare in writing that they do not wish to raise the child then the child should be declared eligible for domestic adoption after 60 days have passed since the family gave their consent. The family may withdraw their consent at any point during the 60 day period.
    •  If a child is placed under special protective measure and the child’s parents and relatives up to the fourth degree of kinship cannot be located or do not give their consent for an adoption, then a court may declare the child to be eligible for domestic adoption after one year has passed since the special protective measure was put in place.
    •  If a child is born to unknown parents it should be declared eligible for domestic adoption within 30 days of being issued a birth certificate.

If after being registered as eligible for domestic adoption for two years no adoptive parents habitually residing in Romania can be found, then the child will be considered for limited intercountry adoption as detailed above.

If the prospective adoptive parent is related to, or is the spouse of a relative of the child, then the two year waiting period does not apply.

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How to Adopt

WARNING: Romania is party to the Hague Adoption Convention. Do not adopt a child in Romania before a U.S. consular officer issues an “Article 5 Letter” in the case. Read on for more information.

ROMANIA'S ADOPTION AUTHORITY

National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights
(Autoritatea Nationala pentru Protectia Drepturilor Copilului si Adoptie)
Minitry of Labor, Family, Social Protection and Elderly Persons
(Ministerul Muncii, Familiei, Protectiei Sociale si Persoanelor Varstnice)

THE PROCESS

Because Romania is party to the Hague Adoption Convention, adopting from Romania must follow a specific process designed to meet the Convention’s requirements. A brief summary of the Convention adoption process is given below. You must complete these steps in the following order so that your adoption meets all necessary legal requirements.  Adoptions completed out of order may result in the child not being eligible for an immigrant visa to the United States.

  1. Choose a U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider.
  2. Apply to USCIS to be found eligible to adopt.
  3. Be matched with a child by authorities in Romania.
  4. Apply to USCIS for the child to be found eligible for immigration to the United States and receive U.S. agreement to proceed with the adoption.
  5. Adopt a child in Romania.
  6. Obtain a U.S. immigrant visa for your child and bring your child home.

Choose a U.S. Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

The recommended first step in adopting a child from Romania is to select an adoption service provider in the United States that has been accredited or approved to provide services to U.S. citizens in Convention cases. Only accredited or approved adoption service providers may provide adoption services between the United States and Romania. The U.S. accredited or approved adoption service provider will act as the primary provider in your case. The primary adoption service provider is responsible for ensuring that all adoption services in the case are done in accordance with the Hague Adoption Convention and U.S. laws and regulations. Learn more about Agency Accreditation.

Additionally, Romanian law requires that U.S. adoption service providers be licensed by the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption. Prospective adoptive parents may obtain a list of the licensed U.S. adoption service providers from the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption by calling the office or visiting its website.

Apply to USCIS to be Found Eligible to Adopt

After you choose an accredited or approved adoption service provider, you must apply to be found eligible to adopt by the responsible U.S. government agency, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), by submitting Form I-800A. Read more about Eligibility Requirements.

Once USCIS determines that you are “eligible” and “suited” to adopt by approving the Form I-800A, your adoption service provider will send your approval notice, home study, and any other required information to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption as part of your adoption dossier. The Romanian Office of Adoptions will then review your application to determine whether you are also eligible to adopt under Romanian law.

Be Matched with a Child in Romania

If both the United States and Romania determine that you are eligible to adopt, and the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption has determined that a child is available for adoption, and that intercountry adoption is in that child’s best interests, the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption may provide you with a referral for a child. The referral is a proposed match between you and a specific child based on a review of your dossier and the needs of a specific child in Romania. The National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption will send a background study and other information, if available, about the child to help you decide whether to accept the referral or not. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs and provide a permanent home for a particular child. The National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption will allow you 45 days from the time you receive the referral to make a decision on the proposed match, file the I-800 petition, and obtain the Article 5 letter as detailed in the following section. If you accept the proposed referral, the adoption service provider communicates your acceptance to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption, and the I-800 petition should be filed as soon as possible in order to obtain the Article 5 letter within the 45 day timeframe. Additionally, there is a 30 day residency requirement, detailed below, that prospective adoptive parents must meet before the match can be finalized. Learn more about this critical decision.

Apply to USCIS for the Child to be Found Eligible for Immigration to the United States and Receive U.S. Agreement to Proceed with the Adoption

After you accept the finalized match with a child, you will apply to the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for provisional approval for the child to immigrate to the United States (Form I-800). USCIS will make a provisional determination whether the child meets the definition of a Convention Adoptee and will be eligible to enter the United States and reside there permanently as an immigrant.

After provisional approval of Form I-800, your adoption service provider or you will submit a visa application to the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy located in Bucharest, Romania. The U.S. Embassy in Romania is responsible for issuing immigrant visas to children from Romania. A consular officer will conduct an initial review of the Form I-800 and the visa application for possible visa ineligibilities and advise you of options for the waiver of any noted ineligibilities. Following this interview if there are no evident visa ineligibilities, the consular officer will issue the Article 5 letter which is forwarded to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption.

After the Article 5 letter is received by the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption, you are required by the Romanian adoption law to reside in Romania for a minimum period of 30 consecutive days in order to interact with the child. At the end of this period of time, the Department for Child Protection in the county where the child is domiciled will prepare and forward to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption a report describing the interaction between the child and the prospective adoptive parent(s). The National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption will notify the Central Authority or the accredited adoption service provider from the receiving country of the finalized selection of the prospective adoptive parent(s). 

WARNING: The consular officer will send a letter (referred to as an “Article 5 Letter”) to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption in any intercountry adoption involving U.S. citizen parents and a child from Romania where all Convention requirements are met and the consular officer determines that the child appears eligible to immigrate to the United States. This letter will inform the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption that the parents are eligible and suited to adopt, that all indications are that the child may enter and reside permanently in the United States, and that the U.S. Central Authority agrees the adoption may proceed.

Do not attempt to adopt or obtain custody of a child in Romania before a U.S. consular officer issues the Article 5 Letter in any adoption case.

Remember: The consular officer will make a final decision about a child’s eligibility for an immigrant visa later in the adoption process.

Adopt a Child in Romania

Remember: Before you adopt a child in Romania you must have completed the above four steps. Only after completing these steps, can you proceed to finalize the adoption in Romania.

The process for finalizing adoption in Romania can last anywhere from two to five months in total, and prospective adoptive parents should be prepared to be physically present at all court dates throughout this time period. The process generally includes the following:

  • Role of Adoption Authority: Romania’s Central Authority is the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption. The National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption:
    • Proposes a match of the child with the prospective adoptive family.
    • Reviews Article 16 reports on the child to be adopted.
    • Reviews the report prepared by the local department for child protection regarding the interaction between the child and the prospective adoptive parents at the conclusion of the mandatory 30 day period they must spend in Romania with the child.
    • Forwards to the competent courts the applications for adoption of the individuals and families who wish to adopt Romanian children cases of intercountry adoption; takes part in the cases, which entail the granting of intercountry adoption in court. 
    • Issues Article 23 Certificates of Conformity, which attest that the adoption was granted according to the provisions of the Hague Convention.
    • Follows up on the development of the adopted child and the relationship between the child and the adoptive family for at least two years from the date an intercountry adoption by corresponding with the foreign Central Authority or adoption service provider.
  • Role of the Court: The adoption of a Romanian child is granted by the competent Romanian court in the county where the child is habitually resident.
  • Role of Adoption Agencies: The U.S. adoption service provider conducts or oversees the prospective adoptive parents’ home study to ensure it complies with U.S. and state law where the family resides. After the adoption is complete, the visa is issued, and the adoptive parents and the child travel to the United States, the U.S. adoption service provider prepares post-adoption reports on the child’s development, which are forwarded to the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption as required by the Romanian adoption law.
  • Adoption Application: The application for adoption, along with accompanying documentation required by the Romanian adoption law, is forwarded by the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption to the appropriate Romanian court. 

Within 5 days after the date on which the adoption order becomes final, the Department in whose area the child lives should communicate this final order in writing to the biological parents, as well as to Romanian authorities competent to issue identity or travel documents to the adoptee.

At the request of the adoptive family, the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption should issue the Article 23 Certificate, attesting that the adoption was completed according to the provisions of the Convention, within 5 days after the family submits the application for such certificate along with an authenticated copy of the final adoption order.

  • Adoption Fees: In the adoption services contract that you sign at the beginning of the adoption process, your agency will itemize the fees and estimated expenses related to your adoption process.

According to the Romanian adoption law, there are no legal fees involved in the adoption process. However, if the prospective adoptive parents wish to hire an attorney to assist them in court, they must be prepared to pay the attorney’s fees. 

There is no fee for the issuance of the child’s new birth certificate after the adoption is granted by the court. 

  • Passport fees for Romanian passports are as follows:
    • Two hundred and seventy (270) RON for individuals twelve years of age or older;
    • Two hundred and forty four (244) RON for minors under twelve years of age. 

The total fees for a temporary passport are 200 RON. This passport fee is payable at the CEC Bank, along with a consular surcharge (32 RON) payable at the CEC Bank or at the Treasury Office. 

  • Documents Required: See section “Adoption Application” above.

Note: Additional documents may be requested.

Authentication of Documents: You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic. If so, the Department of State, Authentications office may be able to assist. Read more about Authenticating U.S. Documents.

Note: All documents submitted to the Central Authority must be presented in original and must be accompanied by notarized translations in the Romanian language. The notarizations must be performed by a notary licensed in Romania. Fees for notary services vary in Romania, but, in general, tend to be higher than notary fees charged in the United States.   

Obtain an Immigrant Visa for your Child and Bring Your Child Home

Now that your adoption is complete, there are a few more steps to take before you can head home. Specifically, you need to apply for three documents before your child can travel to the United States:

Birth Certificate

Once the adoption is completed in Romania, you will have to apply for a birth certificate for your child in order to later apply for a Romanian passport. To register the adoption and obtain the new birth certificate for the child you must submit the following documents to the Vital Statistics office in the town/city where the child lived:

  • the final adoption decree in original and a court certified copy,
  • the child’s birth certificate in original,
  • the marriage certificate of the adoptive parent(s) in original and a copy,                 
  • the adoptive parent(s’) identity documents in original and a copy.

Please note that the adoptive parent(s) with dual Romanian and U.S. citizenship should ensure that any marriages, divorces, and name changes done in the US are properly recorded with the appropriate Romanian authorities so that both the U.S. and Romanian identity documents bear the same name.

Romanian Passport

Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Romania.

The application for a Romanian passport must be filed in person. The documents that must be presented are the child’s birth certificate in original, identifying documents for the parents, proof that all fees have been paid, and the child’s previous passport, if applicable. The presence of the child is mandatory due to the collection of biometric information.  However, children under twelve are not fingerprinted.

U.S. Immigrant Visa

After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to finalize your application for a U.S. visa for your child at the U.S. Embassy in Bucharest, Romania. After the adoption is granted, visit the U.S. Embassy in Bucharest for a final review of the case, issuance of a U.S. Hague Adoption Certificate, final approval of Form I-800, and to obtain your child’s immigrant visa. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the consular officer must be provided the “Panel Physician’s” medical report on the child if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage. Read more about the Medical Examination.

Note: According to the provisions of the Romanian adoption law, the adopted child may leave Romania only if accompanied by his/her adoptive parent(s).

Child Citizenship Act

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States: A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

APPLYING FOR YOUR U.S. PASSPORT

U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. U.S. citizens are not required to obtain visas if their intended period of stay in Romania is 90 days or less. To find information about obtaining a visa for Romania, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

STAYING SAFE ON YOUR TRIP

Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

STAYING IN TOUCH ON YOUR TRIP

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Romania enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

We strongly urge you to comply with Romanian post-adoption requirements in a timely manner. Your adoption agency should be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to Romania’s history of positive experiences with U.S. citizen parents.

Note: According to the provisions of the Romanian adoption law, in the case of intercountry adoption of a child habitually resident in Romania by a person or family habitually resident abroad, the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption is required to follow the child’s development and his/her relationship with his/her adoptive parent(s) for a period of at least two years after the adoption is granted. To comply with this requirement, the adoption service provider will be expected to send the National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights and Adoption a report of the child’s progress every four months until the two year period is completed.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy Bucharest 
4-6, Dr. Liviu Librescu Blvd.
District 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania
Tel: (+40) 21 200-3300
Fax: (+40) 21 200-3442
Internet: ro.usembassy.gov

Consulate of the United States of America
4-6, Dr. Liviu Librescu Blvd.
District 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania
Tel: (+40) 21 270-6000
Fax: (+40) 21 200-3505
E-mail Visas:  VisasBucharest@state.gov
E-mail American Citizens:  acsbucharest@state.gov
Consular Section

Romanian Adoption Authority
National Authority for the Protection of the Child’s Rights
(Autoritatea Nationala pentru Protectia Drepturilor Copilului si Adoptie)
Minitry of Labor, Family, Social Protection and Elderly Persons
(Ministerul Muncii, Familiei, Protectiei Sociale si Persoanelor Varstnice)
Bd. Gral. Ghe. Magheru nr. 7
Sector 1
Bucharest 010322
Romania
Tel: +40213100789; Fax: +40213127474
E-mail: secretariat@adoptiiromania.ro or office@anpfdc.ro
Internet:  www.copii.ro

Contact person: Andreea Dinica,
Email: andreea.dinica@adoptiiromania.ro

Embassy of Romania
1607 23rd Street NW
Washington, DC 20008
Tel: 202-332-4846, 4848, 4851, 4852, 2879; 202-232-4747
Fax: 202-232-4748
Email:  consular@roembus.org
Internet  http://washington.mae.ro/en

Note:  Romania also has consulates in New York, Chicago, and Los Angeles.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Email:  AdoptionUSCA@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-800A or I-800 petition:
National Benefits Center
Tel:  1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email:  NBC.Adoptions@DHS.go

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None One 3 Months
C-3 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-6 10 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO-7 1 None Multiple 12 Months
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificate

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees:  11 Romanian Lei
  • Document name:  “Certificat de nastere” 
  • Issuing Authority:  Office of Vital Statistics (“Oficiul Starii Civile”) of the local Mayor’s Office, available in three languages: Romanian, French and English.
  • Color/Format/Special Seal(s): Blue, 7.5 inches by 9 inches, plus one ink stamp and bearing the signature of the Vital Statistics officer.
  • Procedure for Obtaining:
    • The deadline for declaring and registering the child's birth is 15 days from the date of birth for children born alive and still alive. If the declaration of birth was made after the expiry of 15 days, recording of the birth certificate is done with the approval of the Director at the Local Directorate for Vital Records and Personal Database and a written statement whereby he/she shall state the reason for the delay.
    • Required documents (original and photocopy), depending on the situation:
      1. If the parents are married, you must present:
        • Medical certificate of birth with the registration number, date, seal/stamp of the health unit, doctor's stamp and signature.
        • Marriage certificate (original and photocopy).
        • Parents' identity documents (original and photocopy).
      2. If the parents are not married and the child is recognized by the father:
        • Medical certificate of birth with the registration number, date, seal/stamp of the health unit, doctor's stamp and signature.
        • Mother's birth certificate (original and photocopy).
        • Proof of identity of the mother (original and photocopy).
        • Proof of identity of the father (original and photocopy).
        • If the child is recognized by the father, both parents shall complete and sign before the Vital Statistics Officer who recorded the birth a statement showing the family name of the baby.
        • Note:  Declaration on the surname of the child shall be given and signed before the Vital Statistics Officer. Statement on recognition by the father of the child can be given before a Notary Public.
      3. If the child's mother is not married and the child is not recognized by the father:
        • Medical certificate of birth must bear the registration number, date certain, seal/stamp of the health unit, doctor's stamp and signature.
        • Mother's birth certificate (original and photocopy).
        • Proof of identity of the mother (original and photocopy).
        • In this case the child's birth certificate may be requested only by the mother.
    • Obtaining a duplicate of birth certificate
      • Romanian citizens residing abroad may request a duplicate birth certificate as follows:
        • Diplomatically at the Romanian Embassy or Consulate in the country of residence.
        • By proxy through third party with notarized power of attorney.
      • Required documents:
        • Application form (obtained at the counter).
        • Identity document, original and photocopy.
        • 11 Romanian lei.
      • If the holder cannot make a request in person, the request for a duplicate birth certificate can be made by another person with notarized power of attorney with apostile which shall state expressly: “To obtain the birth certificate / marriage / death certificate from the Local Directorate for Vital Records and Personal Database.”
 

Death Certificate

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: 11 Romanian Lei
  • Document name:  “Certificat de deces” 
  • Issuing Authority:  Office of Vital Statistics (“Oficiul Starii Civile”) of the local Mayor’s Office.  Issued in three languages: Romanian, French and English.
  • Color/Format/Special Seal(s): Gray, 7.5 inches by 9 inches, plus one ink stamp and the signature of the Vital Statistics officer.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Applicant should present the following documents:
    • Medical report ascertaining death.
    • The identity card of the deceased (original and photocopy).
    • The identity card of the person declaring the death (original and photocopy).
    • The deceased's birth certificate (original and photocopy).
    • The marriage certificate of the deceased (if applicable - original and photocopy).
Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificate

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: See TAXE PERCEPUTE
  • Document name: Certificat de Căsătorie
  • Issuing Government Authority: The document is issued by the Officer of Vital Statistics (Ofițer de Stare Civilă) of the local Mayor's Office in three languages: Romanian, French and English.
  • Color/Format/Special Seal(s): Round seal of the municipality with the Vital Statistics Officer’s signature.  Document background color is light pink and is letter format.
  • Comments:
    • The marriage certificate is registered by the local municipality. If the marriage was contracted abroad, to obtain a Romanian marriage certificate the marriage must be registered in Romania at the Mayor’s Office in the applicant’s last domicile in Romania.
    • Once the marriage is terminated by divorce, the marriage certificate is retained at the Office of Vital Statistics.  A certified copy of the marriage certificate may be requested mentioning all the changes after the divorce (i.e. name change, the civil sentence or death terminating the marriage).
    • Same-sex marriages are not recognized in Romania.
 

Divorce Certificate

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: See TAXE PERCEPUTE
  • Issuing Government Authority: The divorce may be in the form of:
    • A divorce decree issued by a court, registered and archived by the regional court; or
    • A certificate of divorce issued by the Officer of Vital Statistics or by a Public Notary when both spouses are in agreement with the dissolution of marriage and clauses.
  • Comments:
Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update

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Identity Card

Identity Card

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: See link below
  • Document name: “Carte de identitate”
  • Issuing Government Authority: Document issued by the Directorate for Persons Record and Databases Management within the Ministry of Administration and Interior to Romanian citizens upon reaching age 14. Website: http://depabd.mai.gov.ro.
  • Color/Format/Special Seal(s): Issued in three languages – Romanian, French and English. It is laminated and has the bearer’s color photo, personal identification number, last and first names, nationality, place of birth, address of current domicile, issuing authority, and validity (from-to dates).  It is machine-readable.
  • Procedure for Obtaining: The application for the identity card is filed in person, and is issued to the bearer.  If the applicant is abroad, a third party may apply in his/her name, with a special power-of-attorney on which the picture of the applicant is affixed, notarized by the Romanian embassy or consulate in the country where the applicant is present, stating the exact object of the mandate.
    • The identity card is issued with a validity period as follows:
      • 4 years for individuals with ages between 14 and 18 years
      • 7 years for individuals with ages between 18 and 25 years
      • 10 years for individuals over the age of 25
      • Permanent for individuals over the age of 55
  • Comments:
    • Information on obtaining the identity card, the required documents and fees, and the various situations where a new identity card is required may be found online at  http://depabd.mai.gov.ro/cadru_legal.html.
Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Certificates

  • Available/Unavailable: Available
  • Fees: 10 RON (Romanian lei) plus 2 RON for a fiscal stamp (total at current exchange rate is 3 USD).
  • Document Name: Cazier Judiciar
  • Issuing Authority: Ministry of Internal Affairs
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: 8.25 inches by 6 inches, has blue falcon crest watermark and Romanian green fiscal stamp in upper right corner.  Plus two ink stamps over fiscal stamp and bearing signature of issuing officer.
  • Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Comisar Sef de Politie (Police Chief Commissioner)
  • Registration Criteria: N/A
  • Procedure for Obtaining: Issued same day for applicants without prior criminal history.  Issued in 3 days for those with penal records.  The police certificates may be obtained by Romanian citizens at the police precincts in Bucharest, regardless of the applicant’s residence/domicile or place of birth.  They are also available at local police precincts in the city of residence or city of birth.
  • Certified Copies Available: The stamped original is certified by the issuing authority, but only this format is available and accepted.
  • Alternate Documents: None
  • Exceptions: None known
  • Comments: Romanian citizens residing abroad and aliens who lived in Romania for more than a year may apply for a police certificate in one of two ways. They may apply at the Romanian Embassy in the country of their residence by filling out an application form, submitting a copy of the applicant's passport, and paying a 40 USD consular fee. The processing time for this is 90 days. Alternatively, they may sign a power of attorney at the Romanian Embassy for a third party to apply in person in Romania on their behalf. If notarized by a notary public in a member country of the Hague Convention on Legalization of Foreign Public Documents, the power of attorney must bear the Hague Convention Apostille. 
  • Police certificates are issued by the local police authorities.
  • Individuals residing in Romania may apply for a police certificate in person in Bucharest at the Inspectoratul General, or at their local police station.
  • For detailed information regarding the application and required documents, please visit the Police web site at https://b.politiaromana.ro and then look under “Utile” and then “Cazier Judiciar”.


Prison Record

Documents are issued to the individual concerned at the time of release from jail. These documents may be obtained from the State Archives (Arhivele Nationale ale Romaniei, B-dul Regina Elisabeta, nr. 49, sector 5, Bucuresti, cod postal 050013, tel. 313.9295 or 312.5841).

Military Records

Military Record

  • Available: Yes
  • Fees: N/A  
  • Document name: “Livret Militar”
  • Issuing authority: Romanian Ministry of Defense.  Given to individuals who have served in the armed forces of Romania at the end of their service.  Not available otherwise.
  • Special Seal(s)/Color/Format: Hard-cover booklet, 4.25” x 3” with brown cover and light green pages. Inside is biographical data to include family information and occupation of bearer with photograph, stamps, service dates, rank and military specialty.
  • Comments:
    • Please note that as of January 1, 2007, mandatory military service was suspended.  Therefore, Romanian men under the age of 18 in 2007 would not have been required to serve in the military. However, in times of war, in an emergency mobilization of the armed forces, or curfew, completion of military service becomes mandatory according to the law.
Passports & Other Travel Documents

Travel Documents

  • Types available: Regular, Diplomatic and Official passports
  • Fees: Vary between $55 and $75 depending on the type of passport.
  • Issuing Government Authority: The Romanian Ministry of Interior has sole authority for the issuance of all simple and electronic passports with the exception of diplomatic (Pașaport Diplomatic) and official (Pașaport de Serviciu) passports, which are issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
  • Document Names: PAȘAPORT, PAȘAPORT DIPLOMATIC, PAȘAPORT DE SERVICIU
  • Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The Regular Passport has a burgundy cover and is issued by the Ministry of Interior. The Diplomatic Passport has a black cover and is issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The Official Passport has a dark blue cover and is issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. All passports have gold lettering on the front that says “UNIUNEA EUROPEANĂ” and “ROMÂNIA” and the type of passport.
  • Validity:
    • 3 years for persons under 12 years of age
    • 5 years for persons over 12 years of age
    • 12 months for a temporary simple passport
  • Comments:
    • A Romanian citizen abroad without a valid passport may be issued a travel document (Titlu de călătorie) by the nearest Romanian consulate. This travel document is valid for 30 days and only for return to Romania.
    • For more details, please visit the Romanian Ministry of Administration and Interior’s website at http://www.pasapoarte.mai.gov.ro/indexActe.html, or the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ website at http://www.mae.ro/taxonomy/term/450/2.
Other Records

Not applicable

Visa Issuing Posts

Bucharest, Romania (Embassy)

Mailing Address:
American Embassy Bucharest
C/O Department of State
Washington, D.C. 20521-5260

Street Address:
The United States Embassy
4-6, Dr. Liviu Librescu Blvd.,
District 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania

Telephone: (+40) 21 200-3300
Fax: (+40) 21 200-3442

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Romania.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 232-6634 (202) 420-8350 (202) 232-4748

Chicago, IL (312) 573-1315 (312) 573-1436 (312) 573-1181 (312) 573-9771

Los Angeles, CA (310) 444-0043 (310) 445-0043

New York, NY (212) 682-9120 (212) 682-9121 (212) 972-8463

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Bucharest
B-dul, Dr. Liviu Librescu Nr. 4-6,
Sector 1, Bucharest
015118 Romania
Telephone
+(40) (21) 200-3300 and/or +(40) (21) 270-6000
Emergency
+(40) (21) 200-3300
Fax
+(40) (21) 200-3578
Romania Country Map

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Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.