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Country Information

Indonesia

Mt. Agung Volcanic Eruption in Bali, Indonesia
Mt. Agung Volcanic Eruption in Bali, Indonesia

Mt. Agung Volcanic Eruption in Bali, Indonesia

Country Information

Indonesia
Republic of Indonesia
Last Updated: April 17, 2017
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months beyond date of arrival

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

Two

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

No (for tourist travel under 30 days) 

VACCINATIONS:

Suggested

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

100,000,000 Indonesian rupiah (approx. $7,500 USD)

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

100,000,000 Indonesian rupiah (approx. $7,500 USD)

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Jakarta

Jl. Medan Merdeka Selatan No. 3 - 5
Jakarta 10110, Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(21) 3435-9000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(21) 3435-9000 ext. 0 (operator)
Fax: +(62)(21) 385-7189
JakartaACS@state.gov

Consulates

U.S. Consulate General Surabaya
Jl. Citra Raya Niaga No. 2
Surabaya 60217
Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(31) 297-5300
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(811) 334-183
Fax: +(62)(31) 567-4492
SurabayaACS@state.gov

U.S. Consular Agency Bali
Jalan Hayam Wuruk 310, Denpasar, Bali
Telephone: +(62)(361) 233-605
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Consulate in
Surabaya:+(62)(811) 334-183
Fax: +(62)(361) 222-426
Email: CABali@state.gov

American Consulate Medan, Sumatra
Uni Plaza Building
4th Floor (West Tower)
Jl. Let. Jend. MT Haryono A-1
Medan 20231, Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(61) 451-9000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(61) 451-9000
Fax: +(62)(61) 455-9033
The U.S. Consulate in Medan, provides only emergency assistance to
U.S. citizens and does not offer routine consular services.

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Indonesia for information on U.S. - Indonesia relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

You will need a passport with at least two blank pages valid for at least six months beyond the date of your arrival in Indonesia. If your passport does not meet these requirements, you will be denied entry into Indonesia. If you traveling on a limited validity passport, such as an emergency passport, you should obtain a visa prior to arriving in Indonesia.

If you are traveling on a full-validity regular passport for tourism purposes, there are three ways to enter Indonesia:

  1. Visa Exemption: This is a no-fee stamp placed in your passport upon arrival for tourists traveling less than 30 days; no extension allowed and no adjustment to another visa status permitted. You must enter and exit through an immigration checkpoint at major airports and seaports. You also must have a return or onward ticket to another country and have not been previously refused entry or blacklisted.   
  2. Visa-on-Arrival: This is a $35 USD visa issued upon arrival valid for up to 30 days for tourism, family visitation, and other purposes. See the Indonesian Immigration’s website for more information. You may extend a Visa-on-Arrival only once for a maximum of 30 days, for another $35 USD.  Diplomatic or official passport holders cannot apply for Visa-on-Arrival.
  3. Visa in advance: Travel for non-tourism purposes requires that the appropriate Indonesia visa be obtained before arrival. 

Entry requirements are subject to change at the sole discretion of Indonesian immigration authorities. If you overstay your visa, you are subject to a fine of 250,000 Indonesian rupiah (about $20 USD) per day and may be detained and deported. U.S. citizens have been jailed for visa overstays or obtaining the wrong visa class for their purpose of travel. 

While you are in Indonesia, always carry your passport, valid visa, and work or resident permit, if applicable. Travelers have been detained for questioning for not having their passports with them.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors or foreign residents in Indonesia. The Indonesian government screens incoming passengers in response to reported outbreaks of pandemic illnesses.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Extremists may target both official and private establishments, including hotels, bars, nightclubs, shopping areas, restaurants, and places of worship. Whether at work, pursuing daily activities, or traveling, you should be aware of your personal safety and security at all times. 

On January 14, 2016, terrorists using guns and explosives attacked near the Sarinah Plaza in Central Jakarta, killing four civilians, including a foreigner, and injuring 17 others. ISIL claimed responsibility and is believed to have inspired or provided support for a handful of small-scale attacks elsewhere in Indonesia since then. In 2002, more than 200 foreign tourists and Indonesian citizens were killed in Bali’s nightclub district. Since 2002, Indonesian police and security forces have disrupted a number of terrorist cells. Police have arrested more than 1,200 individuals on terrorism-related charges since 2002 and have greatly reduced the capacity of domestic terrorist organizations, though extremists in Indonesia continue to aspire to carry out violent attacks against Indonesian and Western targets. 

Demonstrations are very common in Jakarta and other cities. You should avoid demonstrations and other mass gatherings, since even those intended to be peaceful can become violent. 

Currently, travel by U.S. government personnel to the provinces of Central Sulawesi and Papua is restricted to mission-essential travel that is approved in advance by the Embassy security office.

Crime: Pick-pocketing, theft, armed car-jacking, and residential break-ins are common. Avoid travelling to isolated areas late at night. Beware of your surroundings, particularly vehicles or individuals that might be following you. 

Use a reputable taxi company or hire a taxi either at a major hotel or shopping center. Travelers have been robbed in taxis that have been painted to look like legitimate taxis.

Credit card fraud is a serious and growing problem in Indonesia.  Avoid using credit cards when possible. Criminals have “skimmed” credit/debit cards to access and drain bank accounts. Use an ATM in a secure location and check the machine for evidence of tampering. Monitor your account statements regularly.

Tourists and Indonesians have suffered from serious illness and have even died from "drink-spiking” and drink poisoning incidents, particularly in clubs and nightspots in urban and tourist areas. 

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: Victims of sexual assault should seek prompt medical assistance, contact the Embassy, and call the local police at 112. For a criminal investigation to be initiated by the police, the victim must make a full statement to the local police, in person.   

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care.
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police.
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent.
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms.
  • provide a list of local attorneys.
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution.
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home.
  • replace a stolen or lost passport.
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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.  Criminal cases can take months to resolve, and suspects can be held without charges for up to 60 days, and in some cases longer. If you are convicted of possession, use, or trafficking of illegal drugs in Indonesia, you can expect heavy fines and long jail sentences, including the death penalty. Indonesian prisons are harsh and do not meet Western standards. Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers: LGBTI status or conduct is not formally illegal, but local regulations in certain areas may effectively criminalize consensual adult same sex conduct. LGBT persons have been arrested in Aceh and face harassment and intimidation across the country. Same-sex marriages or civil unions are prohibited. See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Sharia Law: Sharia law is enforced in Aceh and may exist unofficially or through local legislation in other areas. The law is intended for Muslims and should not apply to non-Muslims or foreign visitors. You should be respectful of local traditions, dress modestly, and seek guidance from local police if confronted by Sharia authorities. 

Earthquakes and Tsunamis: There are approximately 4,000 earthquakes per year. Sometimes these earthquakes can trigger tsunamis. Tsunami warning systems may not be operable or reports of tremors and tsunamis may be delayed. 

Volcanoes: There are 127 active volcanoes in Indonesia. Eruptions frequently cause travel delays, displace local populations and disrupt economic activities. 

Environmental Quality: Air quality in Indonesia’s major cities can range from "unhealthy for sensitive groups" to "unhealthy." Current air quality data for Jakarta can be found on the Embassy’s Air Quality page. Tap water is not potable throughout Indonesia. 

Papua and Central Sulawesi: All travelers to Papua and West Papua provinces (including Raja Ampat) and Poso in Central Sulawesi province must obtain a travel permit (surat jalan) from the Indonesian government. 

Mountain Hiking: When mountain hiking, obtain current information on local conditions, travel with a reputable guide, have overseas medical insurance, and carry a local mobile phone. Hikers on Puncak Jaya in Papua should have realistic primary and backup plans for climbing down the mountain. Tour operators have abandoned climbers. Taking shortcuts through private property is considered trespassing and is not a safe or legal alternative to a proper plan.   

Dual Nationality: Indonesian law does not recognize dual nationality for adults over 18 years of age. U.S. citizens who are also Indonesian nationals may experience immigration difficulties in Indonesia.  Please visit our Dual Nationality page.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Persons with disabilities will face severe difficulties in Indonesia as most public places and transportation facilities do not accommodate disabled people. 

Women Travelers: Please review our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Students: See our  Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

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Health

Medical Facilities: Sanitation and health care conditions in Indonesia are far below U.S. standards. Routine medical care is available in all major cities, although most expatriates leave the country for all but basic medical procedures. Psychological and psychiatric services are limited throughout Indonesia.  Physicians and hospitals often expect payment or sizable deposits before providing medical care.  See our Embassy's website for a list of English-speaking doctors and hospitals.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Always carry prescription medication in their original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. Local pharmacies carry a range of products of variable quality, availability, and cost.  Counterfeit pharmaceuticals are a significant risk; patronize only reputable pharmacies.

Malaria, dengue, Japanese encephalitis and Zika virus are mosquito borne diseases in Indonesia. Prevention of mosquito bites is strongly encouraged; malaria preventive medication is needed in some areas. Pregnant women should be aware that Indonesia is a CDC Zika risk area and that Zika can be spread by mosquitos as well as sexually.

Diarrheal diseases are very common throughout Indonesia and food and water precautions are recommended. Rabies is prevalent in animals and animal contact should be avoided.

Vaccinations: Update all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Traffic in Indonesia is dangerous, congested, and undisciplined. Traffic signals are frequently ignored and often in disrepair.  Motor vehicles share the roads with other forms of transportation, such as pedicabs and pushcarts. Buses and trucks are often dangerously overloaded and travel at high speeds. Accidents between a car and a motorcycle are invariably viewed as the fault of the driver of the car. Consider these risks before driving your own vehicle, especially if you are unaccustomed to Indonesian road conditions. When an accident results in personal injury, Indonesian law requires both drivers to await the arrival of a police officer to report the accident. 

See our Road Safety page for more information. Also, visit Indonesia's national tourist office online for road safety information.

Public Transportation: Air, ferry, and road accidents that result in fatalities, injuries, and significant damage are common. While all forms of transportation are regulated in Indonesia, oversight is spotty, maintenance may not be properly performed, and rescue and emergency capacity is limited. Indonesia has experienced several fatal plane crashes and non-fatal runway overruns in recent years.  Also in recent years, several ferry accidents and a train collision resulted in dozens of fatalities and even more injuries because of over-crowding and unsafe conditions.

See our Road Safety page for more information. 

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Indonesia’s Directorate General of Civil Aviation as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Indonesia’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA's safety assessment page.

Since 2014, a number of private pilots have inadvertently crossed into Indonesian airspace and have been detained and paid heavy fines. If you intend to fly on private aircraft through Indonesian airspace, get correct clearances from Indonesian aviation authorities before you depart. 

Maritime Safety and Security:  Inter-island travel by boat or ferry can be dangerous: storms can appear quickly, vessels may be over-crowded and lack basic safety equipment, and safety standards vary between providers.  A number of ferries have sunk, resulting in loss of life. The Indonesian Search and Rescue Agency records boat and ferry accidents resulting in injuries and deaths, yearly.  Make sure you are satisfied with safety standards before travelling, including safety equipment and life jackets. 

Piracy: Maritime piracy and other related crimes in and around Indonesian waters continue. Recent reports include thefts of valuables or cargo from boats that are in port and out at sea. Before traveling by sea, especially in the Strait of Malacca between Riau Province and Singapore, and in the waters north of Sulawesi and Kalimantan, review the current security situation with local authorities. Be vigilant, reduce opportunities for theft, establish secure areas on board, and report all incidents to the coastal and flag state authorities.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Haiti should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts on the Maritime Administration website. Information may also be posted to the websites of the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Geospace Intelligence Agency (select “broadcast warnings”).

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Jakarta

Jl. Medan Merdeka Selatan No. 3 - 5
Jakarta 10110, Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(21) 3435-9000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(21) 3435-9000 ext. 0 (operator)
Fax: +(62)(21) 385-7189
JakartaACS@state.gov

Consulates

U.S. Consulate General Surabaya
Jl. Citra Raya Niaga No. 2
Surabaya 60217
Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(31) 297-5300
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(811) 334-183
Fax: +(62)(31) 567-4492
SurabayaACS@state.gov

U.S. Consular Agency Bali
Jalan Hayam Wuruk 310, Denpasar, Bali
Telephone: +(62)(361) 233-605
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Consulate in
Surabaya:+(62)(811) 334-183
Fax: +(62)(361) 222-426
Email: CABali@state.gov

American Consulate Medan, Sumatra
Uni Plaza Building
4th Floor (West Tower)
Jl. Let. Jend. MT Haryono A-1
Medan 20231, Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(61) 451-9000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(61) 451-9000
Fax: +(62)(61) 455-9033
The U.S. Consulate in Medan, provides only emergency assistance to
U.S. citizens and does not offer routine consular services.

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General Information

For information concerning travel to Indonesia, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Indonesia.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

Indonesia is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between Indonesia and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

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Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Indonesia and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction.  For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children’s Issues can provide information and resources about Indonesia-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children’s Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children’s Issues
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor  
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Fax:  1-202-485-6221
Website: travel.state.gov  

Parental child abduction is not a crime in Indonesia if the parents are legally married.  Generally, parental child abduction is considered a crime in Indonesia if the parents are divorced and one parent has a court order granting him or her legal custody, or if the child was born out of wedlock and the abducting parent is not listed on the birth certificate.

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court.  Please see Pressing Criminal Charges for more information. 

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Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Indonesia and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children’s Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States.   Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the appropriate U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Indonesia for information and possible assistance.

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Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children’s Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy or Consulates in Indonesia are authorized to provide legal advice.

The U.S. Embassy in Jakarta posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The Indonesian Child Protection Commission (KPAI) is available for mediation.  An English version of the website is unavailable.  KPAI determines fees on a case-by-case basis, which may also include any travel costs for the mediator. 

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Indonesia is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section  204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F). Under the Intercountry Adoption Universal Accreditation Act (UAA), which became effective on July 14, 2014, the accreditation requirement and standards, which previously only applied in Convention cases, now also apply in non-Convention or “orphan” cases. The UAA requires that an accredited or approved adoption service provider acts as a primary provider in every case, and that adoption service providers providing adoption services on behalf of prospective adoptive parents be accredited or approved, or be a supervised or exempted provider. Adoption service providers and prospective adoptive parents should review the State Department’s Universal Accreditation Act of 2012 webpage for further information. Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Convention countries continue to be processed under the Orphan Process with the filing of the Forms I-600A and I-600. However, adoption service providers should be aware of the information on the USCIS website on the impact on Form I-600A and Form I-600 adjudications under the UAA, including the requirement that all home studies, including home study updates and amendments, comply with the Convention home study requirements, which differ from the orphan home study requirements that were in effect before July 14, 2014.

The Indonesian government stipulates that an adoptive child must be of the same religion as the adoptive parents. In the case of a child of unknown origin, it is believed that the Indonesian government will make a determination that the child’s religion will be deemed to be the same as the religious majority in the neighborhood or community where the child was discovered.

There have been a number of instances in which U.S. citizens have been advised by legal practitioners to enter into fostering or adoption arrangements which, even though endorsed by local Indonesian courts, do not meet the requirements of Indonesian adoption law. Adoptions that do not meet these requirements will not meet the requirements for the issuance of U.S. immigrant visas for the children. U.S. citizens intending to adopt a child in Indonesia should not attempt to circumvent proper processes.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Indonesia, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determine who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States on an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, you must also meet the following requirements in order to adopt a child from Indonesia:

  • Residency: Prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) must be residents of Indonesia for at least two years with a permit issued by the local authorities (Rukun Tetangga - RT, Rukun Warga - RW, and Kelurahan). The U.S. Embassy in Jakarta can also notarize a sworn statement provided by PAPs in which they provide their address and length of residency in Indonesia.

    Foreign national PAPs must be resident in Indonesia and must have been working and living in Indonesia for at least two years prior to the application to adopt. Past experience has shown that if one foreign national parent is resident in Indonesia before the other, s/he may initiate the process as long as s/he has already been resident in Indonesia for at least two years.

    In cases where one PAP is a foreign national and the other is an Indonesian citizen, the residency requirement has not applied as long as the Indonesian national has resided in Indonesia to see the adoption process through completion. Such cases are more complicated, and different courts may interpret the law differently.

    The U.S. Embassy in Jakarta strongly recommends that PAPs contact the Immigrant Visa Unit at the embassy or Yayasan Sayap Ibu, an Indonesian organization that facilitates inter-country adoptions in Indonesia, for further details. Please note that regardless of residency, both PAPs must appear at the court hearing. Also, PAPs need to obtain separate domicile statements issued by the local authorities (RT, RW, and Kelurahan) and must have a sworn statement notarized at the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta providing their Indonesian address and length of residence.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: PAPs must be between 30 and 55 years of age at the time of applying for adoption.
  • Marriage: Individuals wanting to adopt must be married for a minimum of five years. PAPs can be either:
    1. Childless (PAPs need to present a statement issued by an obstetrician or physician appointed by the Department of Health),
    2. Have only one child of their own, or
    3. Have previously adopted an Indonesian child.

    If the prospective adoptive mother has borne children in the past, she must no longer be capable of bearing children.

    Please note that single persons and same-sex couples are explicitly prohibited from adopting in Indonesia.

  • Income: The Indonesian government stipulates that an adoptive child must be of the same religion as the adoptive parents. In the case of a child of unknown origin, it is believed that the Indonesian government will make a determination that the child's religion will be deemed to be the same as the religious majority in the neighborhood or community where the child was discovered. PAPs must state their belief in God and both must appear at the court hearing.
  • Other: The Indonesian government stipulates that an adoptive child must be of the same religion as the adoptive parents. In the case of a child of unknown origin, it is believed that the Indonesian government will make a determination that the child's religion will be deemed to be the same as the religious majority in the neighborhood or community where the child was discovered. PAPs must state their belief in God and both must appear at the court hearing.

    If PAPs do not meet all the above requirements, they may be able to apply for a special dispensation, which must be approved by Yayasan Sayap Ibu. It is advisable for PAPs to process all required documents and to obtain approval prior to locating a potential child for adoption.
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Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, Indonesia has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption:

  • Relinquishment: PAPs need to obtain the following statements:
    1. Letter of voluntary relinquishment from the child’s biological parent(s) or legal guardian(s);
    2. Statement from PAPs stating that the adoption is in the child’s best interest and is for his/her protection;
    3. Statement from the prospective adoptive child, in cases where the child is able to express his/her opinion as determined by the Department of Social Affairs; 
    4. Letter of submission from the child’s biological mother or legal guardian to either a hospital, local police or a local community, followed by handover of the child to a social welfare organization in Indonesia. Note: The letter must be written on Indonesian stamped duty paper (special paper which is used in Indonesia for legal documents or statements); and
    5. Handover letter of the child from a social welfare organization to Yayasan Sayap Ibu.
  • Abandonment: The prospective adoptive child must be in the care of a registered and authorized social welfare organization that has been licensed by the Department of Social Affairs to process intercountry adoptions. All U.S. PAPs should contact either the Department of Social Affairs or Yayasan Sayap Ibu in Jakarta Province for more information on these organizations.
  • Yayasan Sayap Ibu
    Jalan Barito II No. 55
    Kebayoran Baru
    Jakarta Selatan

  • Age of Adoptive Child: The adoptive child must be under 18 years old and fall  into one of three categories:
    1. Children under six years old are priorities, (i.e. neglected children who are in an urgent situation and require special protection);
    2. Six years old to 12 years old, on the condition that there are compelling reasons based on social reporting stating that the neglected child is in an emergency situation; and
    3. 12 to 18 years old (neglected children who need special protection).
  • Sibling Adoptions: No requirements.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: No requirements.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Once all required documents have been submitted to Yayasan Sayap Ibu, officers of Yayasan Sayap Ibu and the Ministry of Social Affairs will conduct a home visit. If the PAPs are deemed to be qualified, the Minister of Social Affairs through the Director of Children’s Social Services will issue a Child Custody Consent Decree to the PAPs. PAPs must then sign a six-month foster care agreement so that the child can be taken to the PAPs’ residence in Indonesia. (Note: The child must be a least three months old before he/she can be taken home). The entire process, from the time the PAPs submit their documents until they can take their adopted child home, generally takes around six to nine months.

Caution: PAPs should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

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How to Adopt

INDONESIA'S ADOPTION AUTHORITY

The Ministry of Social Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia, Directorate of Child Social Service Development

Additionally, Yayasan Sayap Ibu is the only agency in Jakarta licensed by the Ministry of Social Affairs to facilitate inter-country adoptions. In areas of Indonesia where Yayasan Sayap Ibu is not represented, the first point of contact should be the Ministry of Social Affairs. 

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Indonesia generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose a U.S Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be found eligible to adopt
  3. Be matched with a child
  4. Adopt [or gain custody of] the child in Indonesia
  5. Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status
  6. Bring your child home
  1. Choose a U.S Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

    The recommended first step in adopting a child from Indonesia is to decide whether or not to use a licensed adoption service provider in the United States that can help you with your adoption. Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate. The Department of State provides information on selecting an adoption service provider on its website.

    The Ministry of Social Affairs (DEPSOS) has designated a limited number of Indonesian agencies through which all foreign adoptions must be channeled. In Jakarta, the designated agency is Yayasan Sayap Ibu.

    Foreigners may also seek private legal assistance to facilitate the process of adoption and seek advice and information from certain orphanages.

Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt

In order to adopt a child from Indonesia, you will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Indonesia and U.S. immigration law.

PAPs are strongly encouraged to consider contacting Yayasan Sayap Ibu if they are interested in adopting an Indonesian child from anywhere within Indonesia. PAPs can make an appointment with Yayasan Sayap Ibu (Jalan Barito II, No 55, Kebayaron Baru; Phone: 021 722 1763 / 726 6317) for a consultation on adoption. Both PAPs should attend the consultation. During the consultation, PAPs will meet with a social worker to discuss their motivation, qualifications, and eligibility to adopt.

If Yayasan Sayap Ibu determines that the PAPs are suitable to adopt, both PAPs will have to submit the following paperwork:

1. PAPs' health certificate from an Indonesian government hospital.
2. Health certificate from the Indonesian Government Mental Health Specialist describing the PAPs' mental health.
3. Statement from an Indonesian government hospital gynecologist regarding involuntary childlessness.
4. Copy of both PAPs' birth certificates, authenticated by the Indonesian Embassy in the country of issuance. If there is no Indonesian Embassy in the country of issuance, the PAPs must contact the Indonesian Embassy responsible for providing consular services to that country.
5. Copy of both PAPs' Passports and Residency Permits (KIMS / KITAS).
6. Copy of ID cards for the prospective adoptive child and his/her biological parent(s) and/or a copy of the family card of the child's biological parent(s) and/or proof of religious affiliation of the child's biological parent(s) and/or a court decision regarding the child's religion.
7. Certificate of Good Conduct for the PAPs from Indonesian National Police.
8. Copy of PAPs' marriage certificate, authenticated by the Indonesian Embassy in the country in which they were married, by the Embassy in Jakarta of the country in which they were married, and by the Embassy in Jakarta of their country of origin. (For example if U.S. citizens were married in Singapore, their marriage certificate will need to be authenticated by the Singapore Embassy in Jakarta as well as by the Indonesian Embassy in Singapore. They must also execute a sworn statement certifying their marriage certificate before a consular officer at the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta.)
9. Copy of birth certificates of PAPs' previous children authenticated by the Indonesian Embassy in the country of issuance.
10. Income statement from the PAPs' employers, notarized at the embassy of the PAPs' country or origin, and reviewed and recorded by the Indonesian Department of Foreign Affairs and Department of Law and Human Rights, which has authority to accept or reject such income statements.
11. Family photos of the PAPs and photos of their home and surroundings.
12. Three photos (3x4cm) of each PAP.
13. Statement from the prospective adoptive child, in cases where the child is able to express his/her opinion as determined by DEPSOS.
14. Letter of permission from the prospective adoptive child's biological parent(s) or legal guardian(s).
15. Statement that the adoption is in the child's best interests and is for his/her protection.
16. Statement by the PAPs that they will report the development of the child to the Indonesian Embassy every year until the child is 18 years old.
17. Statement by the PAPs that they will contact the Indonesian Embassy when they move, both within a country or to another country. PAPs need to inform the appropriate Indonesian Embassy of any change of address.
18. Statement by the PAPs that they agree to be visited by a representative from the Indonesian Embassy to monitor and report on the child's development until the child is 18 years old.
19. Statement from the PAPs stating that all documents submitted in connection with the application to adopt are valid and factual.
20. Statement by the PAPS that they will raise the child as if s/he were their own child, with no discrimination, in accordance with the child's rights and needs.
21. Statement by the PAPs that they will notify their adopted child of his/her origins and biological parents based on the readiness of the child.
22. A letter issued by the PAPs' embassy, stating that the PAPs' country of residence has found the PAPs eligible and suitable to adopt intercountry. The U.S. Embassy in Jakarta provides this letter when USCIS has approved the PAPs' Form I-600A.
23. A sworn statement provided by PAPs and notarized at the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta that provides the PAPs' address and length of residency in Indonesia and separate statements of domicile from the local Indonesian authorities (RT, RW and Kelurahan).
24. Letters from close relatives (parents, siblings, aunts, uncles) of the PAPs supporting their intention to adopt an Indonesian child.
25. Social report about the child written by a social worker from the child care agency.
26. Letter of relinquishment from the child's biological mother or legal guardian to a hospital, local police, or a local community. The letter terminates the mother's or legal guardian's parental rights to the child.
27. Handover letter of the child from the social welfare organization to a child care agency (orphanage).
28. Social report about the PAPs written by a social worker from the DEPSOS.

NOTE: All statements must be written on Indonesian stamped duty paper (special paper which is used in Indonesia for legal documents or statements).

When all required paperwork is complete, PAPs can submit the application for adoption to Yayasan Sayap Ibu, which will then forward it to DEPSOS. DEPSOS usually grants permission for the child to be released into the PAPs’ foster care.

To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also file an I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition with U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to be found eligible and suitable to adopt.

  1. Be Matched with a Child

    If you are found eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, the central adoption authority or other authorized entity in Indonesia will provide you with a referral. Each family must decide for itself whether it will be able to meet the needs of and provide a permanent home for a particular child.

    The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Indonesia’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law.

    Once the PAPs submit their adoption application to Yayasan Sayap Ibu, officers of Yayasan Sayap Ibu and DEPSOS will conduct a home visit. If the PAPs are determined to be eligible to adopt, PAPs will sign a six-month foster care agreement so that the child can be taken to the PAPs’ residence in Indonesia. (Note: The child must be a least three months old before he/she can be taken home.)  The entire process, from the time the PAPs submit their documents until they can take the child home, generally takes around six to nine months.

    During the six-month foster care period, another home visit may be conducted. Monitoring by an Indonesian social worker appointed by DEPSOS is also a part of this fostering process. 

    At the end of the six-month foster care period, the final home visit will be conducted, after which an inter-departmental committee meeting will be held. Members of the Inter-Departmental Committee are: DEPSOS, Department of Justice, Department of Health, Department of Home Affairs, Department of Foreign Affairs, Department of Religious Affairs, Police Headquarters, Office of the Attorney General, and Office of the Coordinating Minister for People’s Welfare. The Inter-Departmental Committee (known as Tim PIPA) is a forum for cross-agency coordination that advises DEPSOS on granting adoption permits to foreign nationals in a comprehensive and integrated manner. All necessary documents must be submitted to Tim PIPA and if all conditions have been satisified, approval to proceed to court is obtained. Please note that this Tim PIPA only meets twice per year.

    Note: If the child is at an orphanage other than Yayasan Sayap Ibu, the child must be transferred to Yayasan Sayap Ibu and must spend a minimum of two weeks at Yayasan Sayap Ibu before becoming available for intercountry adoption. In these cases, we suggest that PAPs transfer the prospective adoptive child to Yayasan Sayap Ibu as soon as possible.

  2. Adopt or Gain Legal Custody of Child in Indonesia

    The process for finalizing the adoption (or gaining legal custody) in Indonesia includes the following:

    • Role of Adoption Authority: The Ministry of Social Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia, Directorate of Child Social Service Development is the agency designated by the Indonesian government to manage the administration of Indonesian adoption law and regulations.
    • Role of the Court: One to three months after Tim PIPA approves (see the section “Be Matched with a Child” above), a final court date will be set. Both PAPs are required to attend the court session.

      The court hearing will officially establish the PAPs as the child's adoptive parents. Approximately three weeks after the court has approved the adoption, the PAPs will receive the official adoption decree.

    • Role of Adoption Agencies: Yayasan Sayap Ibu has been designated by the Ministry of Social Affairs to handle intercountry adoptions. In areas of Indonesia where Yayasan Sayap Ibu is not represented, the first point of contact should be the Ministry of Social Affairs. 
    • Adoption Application: U.S. citizens wishing to adopt a child in Indonesia should start by contacting Yayasan Sayap Ibu or DEPSOS.

      There are several required documents that prospective adoptive parents must complete before directing their application through Yayasan Sayap Ibu or another designated social organization to DEPSOS.

      In order to obtain a valid adoption decree, all intercountry adoptions must be vetted and authorized by Tim PIPA. The final court decision must refer to the approval decision made by this committee.
    • Time Frame: Adoption procedures can take from 12 to 18 months.
    • Adoption Fees: The legal fees paid to Yayasan Sayap Ibu for adoption are approximately US$ 800.00. Please note that the fee does not include passport fees, document translation fees, court fees, and document authentication fees. Further, the UAA and IAA make it unlawful to improperly influence relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing Central Authority functions.
    • Documents Required: See list of documents in Section 2 “Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt” above.

      All documents must be translated into Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia) by an official sworn translator. PAPs may obtain the list of sworn translators from the U.S. Embassy Jakarta’s website. Yayasan Sayap Ibu can assist with translation if necessary. 

      Note: Additional documents may be requested.

    • Authentication of Documents: Authentication of signatures of Indonesian officials who notarize original documents:   
      1. The original document must first be authenticated by the District Court having jurisdiction over the office issuing the document.
      2. The Department of Justice & Human Rights must then authenticate the signature of the District Court Judge or person authorized to authenticate the document.
      3. The Department of Foreign Affairs then authenticates the signature of the officer from the Department of Justice and Human Rights.
      4. After the above steps are completed, the original document with these authenticating signatures can be brought to the American Citizen’s Services Unit in the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta for authentication. The Embassy’s authentication certificate will be securely attached to the original document, bearing the consular officer's signature and seal.  Appointments for this authentication/notary service may be made online through the U.S. Embassy’s website at: jakarta.usembassy.gov/us-service/acs-appts.html.
      5. The fee for this service is US $50.00 per seal, only payable in Rupiah or by credit card.
  3. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Orphan Status

    After you finalize the adoption (or gain legal custody) in Indonesia, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services must determine whether the child meets the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law. You will need to file a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative.The home study must meet the same requirements. As of July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, the home study must comply with the requirements in 8 CFR 204.311 and 22 CFR Part 96.47.

  4. Bring Your Child Home

    Once your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), you need to apply for several documents for your child before you can apply for a U.S. immigrant visa to bring your child home to the United States:

    Birth Certificate
    If you have finalized the adoption in Indonesia, you will first need to apply for a new local birth certificate for your child. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

    If you have been granted custody for the purpose of adopting the child in the United States, the birth certificate you obtain will, in most cases, not yet include your name.

    Yayasan Sayap Ibu will assist PAPs in obtaining the birth certificate for their adopted child.

    Indonesia Passport
    Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Indonesia.

    With the adoption decree in hand, the parents can apply for the child's Indonesian passport. The child will not be able to depart Indonesia or be issued a U.S. visa until he/she has a passport.

    Requirements for an Indonesian passport include:

    1. The adopted child's birth certificate;
    2. Copies of both parents' passports and residence/work permits;
    3. Copy of the court adoption decree; and
    4. The fee of IDR 655,000.00.

    The process of getting an Indonesian passport can take up to two weeks.

    Once in possession of the child's Indonesian passport, the embassy can begin processing the child's immigrant visa.

    U.S. Immigrant Visa 
    After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child and you have filed Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, you then need to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa for your child from the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child.

    At the time you file your Form I-600 petition, the adjudicating officer will determine whether the UAA applies or if your case is UAA grandfathered. For more information on UAA grandfathering and transition cases, please see Universal Accreditation Act of 2012. Unless an exception applies, you must identify a primary provider in your case and the adjudicating officer may ask for the name and contact information of the primary provider if not provided in your Form I-600 petition. This information is required and, without it, your Form I-600 petition cannot be approved.

    You can find instructions for applying for an immigrant visa on the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta’s website:

CHILD CITIZENSHIP ACT

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States: A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States: An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible.  Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport
U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport.
Getting or renewing a U.S. passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Indonesia
In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Indonesia, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip
Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability. Please visit travel.state.gov for the latest information, including travel alerts and travel warnings. This information can also be obtained on your mobile device by downloading the Smart Traveler App for your iPhone or Android smartphone.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip
When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Indonesia, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

If PAPs return to their country of residence with their newly adopted child, they must:

  • Report the development of the child to the Indonesian Embassy every year until the child is 18 years old;
  • Contact the Indonesian Embassy about any future areas of residence; and
  • Agree to be visited by a representative from the Indonesian Embassy to monitor and report on the child’s development until the child is 18 years old.

We strongly urge you to comply with Indonesia’s post-adoption requirements in a timely manner. Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to that country’s positive experiences with U.S. citizen adoptive parents.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Jakarta
Jalan Medan Merdeka Selatan #4-5
Jakarta - 10110
Tel: 62-21-3435-9000
Fax: 62-21-385-7189
Email: JakIV@state.gov
Internet: id.usembassy.gov

U.S. Consulate Surabaya 
Jalan Dr. Sutomo No. 33
Surabaya
Tel: 62-31-297-5300
Fax: 62-31-297-5301
Email: consurabaya@state.gov

Consulate Agency Bali
Jl. Hayam Wuruk 188
Denpasar
Tel: 62-361-233-605
Fax: 62-361-222-426
Email: BaliConsularAgency@state.gov

Please note that U.S. Embassy Jakarta is the only U.S. government office in Indonesia that processes immigrant visas.

Indonesia’s Adoption Authority
The Ministry of Social Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia, Directorate of Child Social Service Development
Jalan Salemba Raya No. 28
Jakarta Pusat, Indonesia
Tel: 62-21-310-0375

Embassy of Indonesia
2020 Massachusetts Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036
Tel: 202-775-5200
Fax: 202-775-5365
Internet: embassyofindonesia.org

*Indonesia also has consulates in: Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
Email: Adoption@state.gov
Internet: adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-600A or I-600 petition:
National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email: NBC.Adoptions@DHS.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 24 Months
A-2 None Multiple 24 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 None Multiple 60 Months
B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1 None Multiple 48 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 48 Months
C-2 None Multiple 3 Months
C-3 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 48 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 12 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 12 Months
G-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-3 None Multiple 12 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A None N/A N/A3
H-2B None N/A N/A3
H-2R None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 12 Months
L-2 None Multiple 12 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 12 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 12 Months
R-2 None Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available. A birth certificate (Akte Kelahiran) may be obtained from the Civil Registry office (Dinas Kependudukan and Catatan Sipil) at the place within whose jurisdiction the birth took place. This certificate is available upon request throughout Indonesia.

Death Certificates

Available. A death certificate (Akte Kematian) may be obtained from the Civil Registry office (Dinas Kependudukan and Catatan Sipil) at the place within whose jurisdiction the death took place. This certificate is issued for Indonesian citizens as well as foreign nationals.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available. A marriage certificate (Akte Perkawinan or Surat Nikah) is issued by the following offices for the following population groups: 1) Moslem - the Kantor Urusan Agama (KUA - Office of Religious Affairs); 2) all other religions - a solemnization certificate must first be recorded with the Civil Registry office (Dinas Kependudukan and Catatan Sipil). Please note that the marriage is considered legally valid from the date of recording, not the date of solemnization.

Divorce Certificates

Available. Moslems of all nationalities may obtain a divorce decree (Surat Talak) from the Kantor Urusan Agama (KUA - Office of Religious Affairs) within whose jurisdiction the divorce (talak) took place. Members of other religious groups may obtain a divorce certificate from the Civil Registry office (Dinas Kependudukan and Catatan Sipil) at the place within whose jurisdiction the divorce took place.

Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update.

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Identity Card

Please check back for update.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Unavailable for applicants inside and outside Indonesia. Indonesian police certificates require initial processing at a local or village level, which is nonstandard in nature, can be subject to capricious decisions by officials and may require nonofficial payments to proceed further."

Prison Records

Available. Prison records for persons residing in Indonesia sentenced to prison terms of more than one year may be obtained from the Fingerprint Division, Pemasyarakatan, Department of Justice and Human Rights, Jalan Veteran No. 11, Jakarta Pusat, Indonesia. For applicants sentenced to prison terms of less than one year, records may be obtained from the warden of the prison where the imprisonment occurred.

Military Records

Available. Armed Forces records (including Police Force) for Indonesian citizens no longer in the military service are available. For those serving since 1950 with the rank of lieutenant and higher, records are issued by the General Personnel Office (Dan Jen Induk Personil) for either the Indonesian Army, Air Force, Navy and Marines, or the Police, in Jakarta. Records are not available for either enlisted personnel or officers who served before 1950. If required, however, the person concerned can execute an affidavit before the Bupati or Camat (under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Home Affairs). The affidavit must be verified and approved by the proper authorities of the Minister of Defense in Jakarta or the concerned Central Personnel Office. The military records of Dutch nationals and citizens formerly or presently residing in Indonesia ("the Uittreksel uit het Stamboek and de straflijst") can be obtained gratis only from The Hague, the Netherlands. The records of persons who had served in the "KL" (army and air force) are obtained from the Ministry of Admiralty, and those who had served in the "KNIL" from the Military Affairs Section of the Ministry of Union and Overseas Affairs.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

An Indonesian passport is currently valid for 5 years and cannot be extended. In September 1994, the Government of Indonesia changed the format of its "travel document in lieu of a passport" or "surat perjalanan laksana passpor". This document is now a passport type booklet consisting of sixteen pages with the bearer's photo and biographic data appearing on page one. It is light green in color with gold embossed writing. This document may be valid for a period of up to two years and can be considered a passport for visa issuing purposes. This document is usually issued to Indonesians who are going abroad to work, often as domestic employees or laborers. It may also be issued to persons who lose their passports overseas or in lieu of passports by immigration officers in remote areas of Indonesia, which are temporarily out of regular passport booklets. All previous versions of the "surat perjalanan laksana paspor" are considered no longer valid. There is also a travel document entitled "Paspor Untuk Orang Asing" (passport for alien) issued to a stateless permanent resident of Indonesia. This document is usually valid for one year, (although it may be issued valid for two years in certain cases, e.g. students) and may not be extended outside Indonesia. It is often endorsed good for travel to certain countries only.

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Jakarta (Java), Indonesia (Embassy) -- All Visa Categories

Unit 8129
FPO AP 96520-8129

Tel: (62)(21) 3435-9000

Surabaya (Java), Indonesia (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas only

Amconsul Surabaya
Box 1
APO AP 96520-4200

Tel: (62)(21) 567-2287/8

Visa Services

Jakarta processes immigrant visas for all of Indonesia. The following applies to NIV applications:

Area Post
Aceh Jakarta
Bali Surabaya
Bengkulu Jakarta
Jakarta-Raya Jakarta
Jambi Jakarta
Jawa Barat (West Java) Jakarta
Jawa Tengah (Central Java) Jakarta
Jawa Timur (East Java) Surabaya
Irian Jaya (West Irian) Jakarta
Kalimantan Barat (West Kalimantan) Jakarta
Kalimantan Selatan (South Kalimantan) Jakarta
Kalimantan Tengah (Central Kalimantan) Jakarta
Kalimantan Timur (East Kalimantan) Jakarta
Lampung Jakarta
Maluku (Moluccas) Surabaya
Nusa Tenggara Barat (West Nusa Tenggara) Surabaya
Nusa Tenggara Timur (East Nusa Tenggara) Surabaya
Riau Jakarta
Sulawesi Selatan (South Sulawesi) Surabaya
Sulawesi Tengah (Central Sulawesi) Surabaya
Sulawesi Tenggara (Southeast Sulawesi) Surabaya
Sulawesi Utara (North Sulawesi) Surabaya
Sumatera Barat (West Sumatra) Jakarta
Sumatera Selatan (South Sumatra) Jakarta
Sumatera Utara (North Sumatra) Jakarta
Timor Timur (East Timor) Jakarta
Yogyakarta Jakarta

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 775-5200 (202) 775-5365

Chicago, IL (312) 920-1880 (312) 920-1881

Houston, TX (713) 785-1691 (713) 780-9644

Los Angeles, CA (213) 383-5126 (213) 487-3971

New York, NY (212) 879-0600 (212) 570-6206

San Francisco, CA (415) 474-9571 (415) 441-4320

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Jakarta
Jl. Medan Merdeka Selatan No.
3 - 5
Jakarta 10110, Indonesia
Telephone
+(62)(21) 3435-9000
Emergency
+(62)(21) 3435-9000 ext. 0 (operator)
Fax
+(62)(21) 385-7189
Indonesia Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Indonesia
Republic of Indonesia
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months beyond date of arrival

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

Two

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

No (for tourist travel under 30 days) 

VACCINATIONS:

Suggested

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

100,000,000 Indonesian rupiah (approx. $7,500 USD)

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

100,000,000 Indonesian rupiah (approx. $7,500 USD)

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Jakarta

Jl. Medan Merdeka Selatan No. 3 - 5
Jakarta 10110, Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(21) 3435-9000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(21) 3435-9000 ext. 0 (operator)
Fax: +(62)(21) 385-7189
JakartaACS@state.gov

Consulates

U.S. Consulate General Surabaya
Jl. Citra Raya Niaga No. 2
Surabaya 60217
Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(31) 297-5300
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(811) 334-183
Fax: +(62)(31) 567-4492
SurabayaACS@state.gov

U.S. Consular Agency Bali
Jalan Hayam Wuruk 310, Denpasar, Bali
Telephone: +(62)(361) 233-605
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Consulate in
Surabaya:+(62)(811) 334-183
Fax: +(62)(361) 222-426
Email: CABali@state.gov

American Consulate Medan, Sumatra
Uni Plaza Building
4th Floor (West Tower)
Jl. Let. Jend. MT Haryono A-1
Medan 20231, Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(61) 451-9000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(61) 451-9000
Fax: +(62)(61) 455-9033
The U.S. Consulate in Medan, provides only emergency assistance to
U.S. citizens and does not offer routine consular services.

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Indonesia for information on U.S. - Indonesia relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

You will need a passport with at least two blank pages valid for at least six months beyond the date of your arrival in Indonesia. If your passport does not meet these requirements, you will be denied entry into Indonesia. If you traveling on a limited validity passport, such as an emergency passport, you should obtain a visa prior to arriving in Indonesia.

If you are traveling on a full-validity regular passport for tourism purposes, there are three ways to enter Indonesia:

  1. Visa Exemption: This is a no-fee stamp placed in your passport upon arrival for tourists traveling less than 30 days; no extension allowed and no adjustment to another visa status permitted. You must enter and exit through an immigration checkpoint at major airports and seaports. You also must have a return or onward ticket to another country and have not been previously refused entry or blacklisted.   
  2. Visa-on-Arrival: This is a $35 USD visa issued upon arrival valid for up to 30 days for tourism, family visitation, and other purposes. See the Indonesian Immigration’s website for more information. You may extend a Visa-on-Arrival only once for a maximum of 30 days, for another $35 USD.  Diplomatic or official passport holders cannot apply for Visa-on-Arrival.
  3. Visa in advance: Travel for non-tourism purposes requires that the appropriate Indonesia visa be obtained before arrival. 

Entry requirements are subject to change at the sole discretion of Indonesian immigration authorities. If you overstay your visa, you are subject to a fine of 250,000 Indonesian rupiah (about $20 USD) per day and may be detained and deported. U.S. citizens have been jailed for visa overstays or obtaining the wrong visa class for their purpose of travel. 

While you are in Indonesia, always carry your passport, valid visa, and work or resident permit, if applicable. Travelers have been detained for questioning for not having their passports with them.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors or foreign residents in Indonesia. The Indonesian government screens incoming passengers in response to reported outbreaks of pandemic illnesses.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Extremists may target both official and private establishments, including hotels, bars, nightclubs, shopping areas, restaurants, and places of worship. Whether at work, pursuing daily activities, or traveling, you should be aware of your personal safety and security at all times. 

On January 14, 2016, terrorists using guns and explosives attacked near the Sarinah Plaza in Central Jakarta, killing four civilians, including a foreigner, and injuring 17 others. ISIL claimed responsibility and is believed to have inspired or provided support for a handful of small-scale attacks elsewhere in Indonesia since then. In 2002, more than 200 foreign tourists and Indonesian citizens were killed in Bali’s nightclub district. Since 2002, Indonesian police and security forces have disrupted a number of terrorist cells. Police have arrested more than 1,200 individuals on terrorism-related charges since 2002 and have greatly reduced the capacity of domestic terrorist organizations, though extremists in Indonesia continue to aspire to carry out violent attacks against Indonesian and Western targets. 

Demonstrations are very common in Jakarta and other cities. You should avoid demonstrations and other mass gatherings, since even those intended to be peaceful can become violent. 

Currently, travel by U.S. government personnel to the provinces of Central Sulawesi and Papua is restricted to mission-essential travel that is approved in advance by the Embassy security office.

Crime: Pick-pocketing, theft, armed car-jacking, and residential break-ins are common. Avoid travelling to isolated areas late at night. Beware of your surroundings, particularly vehicles or individuals that might be following you. 

Use a reputable taxi company or hire a taxi either at a major hotel or shopping center. Travelers have been robbed in taxis that have been painted to look like legitimate taxis.

Credit card fraud is a serious and growing problem in Indonesia.  Avoid using credit cards when possible. Criminals have “skimmed” credit/debit cards to access and drain bank accounts. Use an ATM in a secure location and check the machine for evidence of tampering. Monitor your account statements regularly.

Tourists and Indonesians have suffered from serious illness and have even died from "drink-spiking” and drink poisoning incidents, particularly in clubs and nightspots in urban and tourist areas. 

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: Victims of sexual assault should seek prompt medical assistance, contact the Embassy, and call the local police at 112. For a criminal investigation to be initiated by the police, the victim must make a full statement to the local police, in person.   

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care.
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police.
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent.
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms.
  • provide a list of local attorneys.
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution.
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home.
  • replace a stolen or lost passport.
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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.  Criminal cases can take months to resolve, and suspects can be held without charges for up to 60 days, and in some cases longer. If you are convicted of possession, use, or trafficking of illegal drugs in Indonesia, you can expect heavy fines and long jail sentences, including the death penalty. Indonesian prisons are harsh and do not meet Western standards. Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers: LGBTI status or conduct is not formally illegal, but local regulations in certain areas may effectively criminalize consensual adult same sex conduct. LGBT persons have been arrested in Aceh and face harassment and intimidation across the country. Same-sex marriages or civil unions are prohibited. See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Sharia Law: Sharia law is enforced in Aceh and may exist unofficially or through local legislation in other areas. The law is intended for Muslims and should not apply to non-Muslims or foreign visitors. You should be respectful of local traditions, dress modestly, and seek guidance from local police if confronted by Sharia authorities. 

Earthquakes and Tsunamis: There are approximately 4,000 earthquakes per year. Sometimes these earthquakes can trigger tsunamis. Tsunami warning systems may not be operable or reports of tremors and tsunamis may be delayed. 

Volcanoes: There are 127 active volcanoes in Indonesia. Eruptions frequently cause travel delays, displace local populations and disrupt economic activities. 

Environmental Quality: Air quality in Indonesia’s major cities can range from "unhealthy for sensitive groups" to "unhealthy." Current air quality data for Jakarta can be found on the Embassy’s Air Quality page. Tap water is not potable throughout Indonesia. 

Papua and Central Sulawesi: All travelers to Papua and West Papua provinces (including Raja Ampat) and Poso in Central Sulawesi province must obtain a travel permit (surat jalan) from the Indonesian government. 

Mountain Hiking: When mountain hiking, obtain current information on local conditions, travel with a reputable guide, have overseas medical insurance, and carry a local mobile phone. Hikers on Puncak Jaya in Papua should have realistic primary and backup plans for climbing down the mountain. Tour operators have abandoned climbers. Taking shortcuts through private property is considered trespassing and is not a safe or legal alternative to a proper plan.   

Dual Nationality: Indonesian law does not recognize dual nationality for adults over 18 years of age. U.S. citizens who are also Indonesian nationals may experience immigration difficulties in Indonesia.  Please visit our Dual Nationality page.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Persons with disabilities will face severe difficulties in Indonesia as most public places and transportation facilities do not accommodate disabled people. 

Women Travelers: Please review our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Students: See our  Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

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Health

Medical Facilities: Sanitation and health care conditions in Indonesia are far below U.S. standards. Routine medical care is available in all major cities, although most expatriates leave the country for all but basic medical procedures. Psychological and psychiatric services are limited throughout Indonesia.  Physicians and hospitals often expect payment or sizable deposits before providing medical care.  See our Embassy's website for a list of English-speaking doctors and hospitals.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Always carry prescription medication in their original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. Local pharmacies carry a range of products of variable quality, availability, and cost.  Counterfeit pharmaceuticals are a significant risk; patronize only reputable pharmacies.

Malaria, dengue, Japanese encephalitis and Zika virus are mosquito borne diseases in Indonesia. Prevention of mosquito bites is strongly encouraged; malaria preventive medication is needed in some areas. Pregnant women should be aware that Indonesia is a CDC Zika risk area and that Zika can be spread by mosquitos as well as sexually.

Diarrheal diseases are very common throughout Indonesia and food and water precautions are recommended. Rabies is prevalent in animals and animal contact should be avoided.

Vaccinations: Update all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Traffic in Indonesia is dangerous, congested, and undisciplined. Traffic signals are frequently ignored and often in disrepair.  Motor vehicles share the roads with other forms of transportation, such as pedicabs and pushcarts. Buses and trucks are often dangerously overloaded and travel at high speeds. Accidents between a car and a motorcycle are invariably viewed as the fault of the driver of the car. Consider these risks before driving your own vehicle, especially if you are unaccustomed to Indonesian road conditions. When an accident results in personal injury, Indonesian law requires both drivers to await the arrival of a police officer to report the accident. 

See our Road Safety page for more information. Also, visit Indonesia's national tourist office online for road safety information.

Public Transportation: Air, ferry, and road accidents that result in fatalities, injuries, and significant damage are common. While all forms of transportation are regulated in Indonesia, oversight is spotty, maintenance may not be properly performed, and rescue and emergency capacity is limited. Indonesia has experienced several fatal plane crashes and non-fatal runway overruns in recent years.  Also in recent years, several ferry accidents and a train collision resulted in dozens of fatalities and even more injuries because of over-crowding and unsafe conditions.

See our Road Safety page for more information. 

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Indonesia’s Directorate General of Civil Aviation as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Indonesia’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA's safety assessment page.

Since 2014, a number of private pilots have inadvertently crossed into Indonesian airspace and have been detained and paid heavy fines. If you intend to fly on private aircraft through Indonesian airspace, get correct clearances from Indonesian aviation authorities before you depart. 

Maritime Safety and Security:  Inter-island travel by boat or ferry can be dangerous: storms can appear quickly, vessels may be over-crowded and lack basic safety equipment, and safety standards vary between providers.  A number of ferries have sunk, resulting in loss of life. The Indonesian Search and Rescue Agency records boat and ferry accidents resulting in injuries and deaths, yearly.  Make sure you are satisfied with safety standards before travelling, including safety equipment and life jackets. 

Piracy: Maritime piracy and other related crimes in and around Indonesian waters continue. Recent reports include thefts of valuables or cargo from boats that are in port and out at sea. Before traveling by sea, especially in the Strait of Malacca between Riau Province and Singapore, and in the waters north of Sulawesi and Kalimantan, review the current security situation with local authorities. Be vigilant, reduce opportunities for theft, establish secure areas on board, and report all incidents to the coastal and flag state authorities.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Haiti should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts on the Maritime Administration website. Information may also be posted to the websites of the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Geospace Intelligence Agency (select “broadcast warnings”).

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Jakarta

Jl. Medan Merdeka Selatan No. 3 - 5
Jakarta 10110, Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(21) 3435-9000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(21) 3435-9000 ext. 0 (operator)
Fax: +(62)(21) 385-7189
JakartaACS@state.gov

Consulates

U.S. Consulate General Surabaya
Jl. Citra Raya Niaga No. 2
Surabaya 60217
Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(31) 297-5300
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(811) 334-183
Fax: +(62)(31) 567-4492
SurabayaACS@state.gov

U.S. Consular Agency Bali
Jalan Hayam Wuruk 310, Denpasar, Bali
Telephone: +(62)(361) 233-605
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: Please contact the U.S. Consulate in
Surabaya:+(62)(811) 334-183
Fax: +(62)(361) 222-426
Email: CABali@state.gov

American Consulate Medan, Sumatra
Uni Plaza Building
4th Floor (West Tower)
Jl. Let. Jend. MT Haryono A-1
Medan 20231, Indonesia
Telephone: +(62)(61) 451-9000
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(62)(61) 451-9000
Fax: +(62)(61) 455-9033
The U.S. Consulate in Medan, provides only emergency assistance to
U.S. citizens and does not offer routine consular services.

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General Information

For information concerning travel to Indonesia, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Indonesia.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

Indonesia is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between Indonesia and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

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Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Indonesia and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction.  For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children’s Issues can provide information and resources about Indonesia-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children’s Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children’s Issues
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor  
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Fax:  1-202-485-6221
Website: travel.state.gov  

Parental child abduction is not a crime in Indonesia if the parents are legally married.  Generally, parental child abduction is considered a crime in Indonesia if the parents are divorced and one parent has a court order granting him or her legal custody, or if the child was born out of wedlock and the abducting parent is not listed on the birth certificate.

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court.  Please see Pressing Criminal Charges for more information. 

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Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Indonesia and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children’s Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States.   Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the appropriate U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Indonesia for information and possible assistance.

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Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children’s Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy or Consulates in Indonesia are authorized to provide legal advice.

The U.S. Embassy in Jakarta posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The Indonesian Child Protection Commission (KPAI) is available for mediation.  An English version of the website is unavailable.  KPAI determines fees on a case-by-case basis, which may also include any travel costs for the mediator. 

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Indonesia is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section  204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F). Under the Intercountry Adoption Universal Accreditation Act (UAA), which became effective on July 14, 2014, the accreditation requirement and standards, which previously only applied in Convention cases, now also apply in non-Convention or “orphan” cases. The UAA requires that an accredited or approved adoption service provider acts as a primary provider in every case, and that adoption service providers providing adoption services on behalf of prospective adoptive parents be accredited or approved, or be a supervised or exempted provider. Adoption service providers and prospective adoptive parents should review the State Department’s Universal Accreditation Act of 2012 webpage for further information. Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Convention countries continue to be processed under the Orphan Process with the filing of the Forms I-600A and I-600. However, adoption service providers should be aware of the information on the USCIS website on the impact on Form I-600A and Form I-600 adjudications under the UAA, including the requirement that all home studies, including home study updates and amendments, comply with the Convention home study requirements, which differ from the orphan home study requirements that were in effect before July 14, 2014.

The Indonesian government stipulates that an adoptive child must be of the same religion as the adoptive parents. In the case of a child of unknown origin, it is believed that the Indonesian government will make a determination that the child’s religion will be deemed to be the same as the religious majority in the neighborhood or community where the child was discovered.

There have been a number of instances in which U.S. citizens have been advised by legal practitioners to enter into fostering or adoption arrangements which, even though endorsed by local Indonesian courts, do not meet the requirements of Indonesian adoption law. Adoptions that do not meet these requirements will not meet the requirements for the issuance of U.S. immigrant visas for the children. U.S. citizens intending to adopt a child in Indonesia should not attempt to circumvent proper processes.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Indonesia, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determine who can adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States on an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, you must also meet the following requirements in order to adopt a child from Indonesia:

  • Residency: Prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) must be residents of Indonesia for at least two years with a permit issued by the local authorities (Rukun Tetangga - RT, Rukun Warga - RW, and Kelurahan). The U.S. Embassy in Jakarta can also notarize a sworn statement provided by PAPs in which they provide their address and length of residency in Indonesia.

    Foreign national PAPs must be resident in Indonesia and must have been working and living in Indonesia for at least two years prior to the application to adopt. Past experience has shown that if one foreign national parent is resident in Indonesia before the other, s/he may initiate the process as long as s/he has already been resident in Indonesia for at least two years.

    In cases where one PAP is a foreign national and the other is an Indonesian citizen, the residency requirement has not applied as long as the Indonesian national has resided in Indonesia to see the adoption process through completion. Such cases are more complicated, and different courts may interpret the law differently.

    The U.S. Embassy in Jakarta strongly recommends that PAPs contact the Immigrant Visa Unit at the embassy or Yayasan Sayap Ibu, an Indonesian organization that facilitates inter-country adoptions in Indonesia, for further details. Please note that regardless of residency, both PAPs must appear at the court hearing. Also, PAPs need to obtain separate domicile statements issued by the local authorities (RT, RW, and Kelurahan) and must have a sworn statement notarized at the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta providing their Indonesian address and length of residence.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: PAPs must be between 30 and 55 years of age at the time of applying for adoption.
  • Marriage: Individuals wanting to adopt must be married for a minimum of five years. PAPs can be either:
    1. Childless (PAPs need to present a statement issued by an obstetrician or physician appointed by the Department of Health),
    2. Have only one child of their own, or
    3. Have previously adopted an Indonesian child.

    If the prospective adoptive mother has borne children in the past, she must no longer be capable of bearing children.

    Please note that single persons and same-sex couples are explicitly prohibited from adopting in Indonesia.

  • Income: The Indonesian government stipulates that an adoptive child must be of the same religion as the adoptive parents. In the case of a child of unknown origin, it is believed that the Indonesian government will make a determination that the child's religion will be deemed to be the same as the religious majority in the neighborhood or community where the child was discovered. PAPs must state their belief in God and both must appear at the court hearing.
  • Other: The Indonesian government stipulates that an adoptive child must be of the same religion as the adoptive parents. In the case of a child of unknown origin, it is believed that the Indonesian government will make a determination that the child's religion will be deemed to be the same as the religious majority in the neighborhood or community where the child was discovered. PAPs must state their belief in God and both must appear at the court hearing.

    If PAPs do not meet all the above requirements, they may be able to apply for a special dispensation, which must be approved by Yayasan Sayap Ibu. It is advisable for PAPs to process all required documents and to obtain approval prior to locating a potential child for adoption.
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Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, Indonesia has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption:

  • Relinquishment: PAPs need to obtain the following statements:
    1. Letter of voluntary relinquishment from the child’s biological parent(s) or legal guardian(s);
    2. Statement from PAPs stating that the adoption is in the child’s best interest and is for his/her protection;
    3. Statement from the prospective adoptive child, in cases where the child is able to express his/her opinion as determined by the Department of Social Affairs; 
    4. Letter of submission from the child’s biological mother or legal guardian to either a hospital, local police or a local community, followed by handover of the child to a social welfare organization in Indonesia. Note: The letter must be written on Indonesian stamped duty paper (special paper which is used in Indonesia for legal documents or statements); and
    5. Handover letter of the child from a social welfare organization to Yayasan Sayap Ibu.
  • Abandonment: The prospective adoptive child must be in the care of a registered and authorized social welfare organization that has been licensed by the Department of Social Affairs to process intercountry adoptions. All U.S. PAPs should contact either the Department of Social Affairs or Yayasan Sayap Ibu in Jakarta Province for more information on these organizations.
  • Yayasan Sayap Ibu
    Jalan Barito II No. 55
    Kebayoran Baru
    Jakarta Selatan

  • Age of Adoptive Child: The adoptive child must be under 18 years old and fall  into one of three categories:
    1. Children under six years old are priorities, (i.e. neglected children who are in an urgent situation and require special protection);
    2. Six years old to 12 years old, on the condition that there are compelling reasons based on social reporting stating that the neglected child is in an emergency situation; and
    3. 12 to 18 years old (neglected children who need special protection).
  • Sibling Adoptions: No requirements.
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: No requirements.
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: Once all required documents have been submitted to Yayasan Sayap Ibu, officers of Yayasan Sayap Ibu and the Ministry of Social Affairs will conduct a home visit. If the PAPs are deemed to be qualified, the Minister of Social Affairs through the Director of Children’s Social Services will issue a Child Custody Consent Decree to the PAPs. PAPs must then sign a six-month foster care agreement so that the child can be taken to the PAPs’ residence in Indonesia. (Note: The child must be a least three months old before he/she can be taken home). The entire process, from the time the PAPs submit their documents until they can take their adopted child home, generally takes around six to nine months.

Caution: PAPs should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

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How to Adopt

INDONESIA'S ADOPTION AUTHORITY

The Ministry of Social Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia, Directorate of Child Social Service Development

Additionally, Yayasan Sayap Ibu is the only agency in Jakarta licensed by the Ministry of Social Affairs to facilitate inter-country adoptions. In areas of Indonesia where Yayasan Sayap Ibu is not represented, the first point of contact should be the Ministry of Social Affairs. 

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Indonesia generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose a U.S Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be found eligible to adopt
  3. Be matched with a child
  4. Adopt [or gain custody of] the child in Indonesia
  5. Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status
  6. Bring your child home
  1. Choose a U.S Accredited or Approved Adoption Service Provider

    The recommended first step in adopting a child from Indonesia is to decide whether or not to use a licensed adoption service provider in the United States that can help you with your adoption. Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate. The Department of State provides information on selecting an adoption service provider on its website.

    The Ministry of Social Affairs (DEPSOS) has designated a limited number of Indonesian agencies through which all foreign adoptions must be channeled. In Jakarta, the designated agency is Yayasan Sayap Ibu.

    Foreigners may also seek private legal assistance to facilitate the process of adoption and seek advice and information from certain orphanages.

Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt

In order to adopt a child from Indonesia, you will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Indonesia and U.S. immigration law.

PAPs are strongly encouraged to consider contacting Yayasan Sayap Ibu if they are interested in adopting an Indonesian child from anywhere within Indonesia. PAPs can make an appointment with Yayasan Sayap Ibu (Jalan Barito II, No 55, Kebayaron Baru; Phone: 021 722 1763 / 726 6317) for a consultation on adoption. Both PAPs should attend the consultation. During the consultation, PAPs will meet with a social worker to discuss their motivation, qualifications, and eligibility to adopt.

If Yayasan Sayap Ibu determines that the PAPs are suitable to adopt, both PAPs will have to submit the following paperwork:

1. PAPs' health certificate from an Indonesian government hospital.
2. Health certificate from the Indonesian Government Mental Health Specialist describing the PAPs' mental health.
3. Statement from an Indonesian government hospital gynecologist regarding involuntary childlessness.
4. Copy of both PAPs' birth certificates, authenticated by the Indonesian Embassy in the country of issuance. If there is no Indonesian Embassy in the country of issuance, the PAPs must contact the Indonesian Embassy responsible for providing consular services to that country.
5. Copy of both PAPs' Passports and Residency Permits (KIMS / KITAS).
6. Copy of ID cards for the prospective adoptive child and his/her biological parent(s) and/or a copy of the family card of the child's biological parent(s) and/or proof of religious affiliation of the child's biological parent(s) and/or a court decision regarding the child's religion.
7. Certificate of Good Conduct for the PAPs from Indonesian National Police.
8. Copy of PAPs' marriage certificate, authenticated by the Indonesian Embassy in the country in which they were married, by the Embassy in Jakarta of the country in which they were married, and by the Embassy in Jakarta of their country of origin. (For example if U.S. citizens were married in Singapore, their marriage certificate will need to be authenticated by the Singapore Embassy in Jakarta as well as by the Indonesian Embassy in Singapore. They must also execute a sworn statement certifying their marriage certificate before a consular officer at the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta.)
9. Copy of birth certificates of PAPs' previous children authenticated by the Indonesian Embassy in the country of issuance.
10. Income statement from the PAPs' employers, notarized at the embassy of the PAPs' country or origin, and reviewed and recorded by the Indonesian Department of Foreign Affairs and Department of Law and Human Rights, which has authority to accept or reject such income statements.
11. Family photos of the PAPs and photos of their home and surroundings.
12. Three photos (3x4cm) of each PAP.
13. Statement from the prospective adoptive child, in cases where the child is able to express his/her opinion as determined by DEPSOS.
14. Letter of permission from the prospective adoptive child's biological parent(s) or legal guardian(s).
15. Statement that the adoption is in the child's best interests and is for his/her protection.
16. Statement by the PAPs that they will report the development of the child to the Indonesian Embassy every year until the child is 18 years old.
17. Statement by the PAPs that they will contact the Indonesian Embassy when they move, both within a country or to another country. PAPs need to inform the appropriate Indonesian Embassy of any change of address.
18. Statement by the PAPs that they agree to be visited by a representative from the Indonesian Embassy to monitor and report on the child's development until the child is 18 years old.
19. Statement from the PAPs stating that all documents submitted in connection with the application to adopt are valid and factual.
20. Statement by the PAPS that they will raise the child as if s/he were their own child, with no discrimination, in accordance with the child's rights and needs.
21. Statement by the PAPs that they will notify their adopted child of his/her origins and biological parents based on the readiness of the child.
22. A letter issued by the PAPs' embassy, stating that the PAPs' country of residence has found the PAPs eligible and suitable to adopt intercountry. The U.S. Embassy in Jakarta provides this letter when USCIS has approved the PAPs' Form I-600A.
23. A sworn statement provided by PAPs and notarized at the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta that provides the PAPs' address and length of residency in Indonesia and separate statements of domicile from the local Indonesian authorities (RT, RW and Kelurahan).
24. Letters from close relatives (parents, siblings, aunts, uncles) of the PAPs supporting their intention to adopt an Indonesian child.
25. Social report about the child written by a social worker from the child care agency.
26. Letter of relinquishment from the child's biological mother or legal guardian to a hospital, local police, or a local community. The letter terminates the mother's or legal guardian's parental rights to the child.
27. Handover letter of the child from the social welfare organization to a child care agency (orphanage).
28. Social report about the PAPs written by a social worker from the DEPSOS.

NOTE: All statements must be written on Indonesian stamped duty paper (special paper which is used in Indonesia for legal documents or statements).

When all required paperwork is complete, PAPs can submit the application for adoption to Yayasan Sayap Ibu, which will then forward it to DEPSOS. DEPSOS usually grants permission for the child to be released into the PAPs’ foster care.

To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also file an I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition with U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to be found eligible and suitable to adopt.

  1. Be Matched with a Child

    If you are found eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, the central adoption authority or other authorized entity in Indonesia will provide you with a referral. Each family must decide for itself whether it will be able to meet the needs of and provide a permanent home for a particular child.

    The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Indonesia’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law.

    Once the PAPs submit their adoption application to Yayasan Sayap Ibu, officers of Yayasan Sayap Ibu and DEPSOS will conduct a home visit. If the PAPs are determined to be eligible to adopt, PAPs will sign a six-month foster care agreement so that the child can be taken to the PAPs’ residence in Indonesia. (Note: The child must be a least three months old before he/she can be taken home.)  The entire process, from the time the PAPs submit their documents until they can take the child home, generally takes around six to nine months.

    During the six-month foster care period, another home visit may be conducted. Monitoring by an Indonesian social worker appointed by DEPSOS is also a part of this fostering process. 

    At the end of the six-month foster care period, the final home visit will be conducted, after which an inter-departmental committee meeting will be held. Members of the Inter-Departmental Committee are: DEPSOS, Department of Justice, Department of Health, Department of Home Affairs, Department of Foreign Affairs, Department of Religious Affairs, Police Headquarters, Office of the Attorney General, and Office of the Coordinating Minister for People’s Welfare. The Inter-Departmental Committee (known as Tim PIPA) is a forum for cross-agency coordination that advises DEPSOS on granting adoption permits to foreign nationals in a comprehensive and integrated manner. All necessary documents must be submitted to Tim PIPA and if all conditions have been satisified, approval to proceed to court is obtained. Please note that this Tim PIPA only meets twice per year.

    Note: If the child is at an orphanage other than Yayasan Sayap Ibu, the child must be transferred to Yayasan Sayap Ibu and must spend a minimum of two weeks at Yayasan Sayap Ibu before becoming available for intercountry adoption. In these cases, we suggest that PAPs transfer the prospective adoptive child to Yayasan Sayap Ibu as soon as possible.

  2. Adopt or Gain Legal Custody of Child in Indonesia

    The process for finalizing the adoption (or gaining legal custody) in Indonesia includes the following:

    • Role of Adoption Authority: The Ministry of Social Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia, Directorate of Child Social Service Development is the agency designated by the Indonesian government to manage the administration of Indonesian adoption law and regulations.
    • Role of the Court: One to three months after Tim PIPA approves (see the section “Be Matched with a Child” above), a final court date will be set. Both PAPs are required to attend the court session.

      The court hearing will officially establish the PAPs as the child's adoptive parents. Approximately three weeks after the court has approved the adoption, the PAPs will receive the official adoption decree.

    • Role of Adoption Agencies: Yayasan Sayap Ibu has been designated by the Ministry of Social Affairs to handle intercountry adoptions. In areas of Indonesia where Yayasan Sayap Ibu is not represented, the first point of contact should be the Ministry of Social Affairs. 
    • Adoption Application: U.S. citizens wishing to adopt a child in Indonesia should start by contacting Yayasan Sayap Ibu or DEPSOS.

      There are several required documents that prospective adoptive parents must complete before directing their application through Yayasan Sayap Ibu or another designated social organization to DEPSOS.

      In order to obtain a valid adoption decree, all intercountry adoptions must be vetted and authorized by Tim PIPA. The final court decision must refer to the approval decision made by this committee.
    • Time Frame: Adoption procedures can take from 12 to 18 months.
    • Adoption Fees: The legal fees paid to Yayasan Sayap Ibu for adoption are approximately US$ 800.00. Please note that the fee does not include passport fees, document translation fees, court fees, and document authentication fees. Further, the UAA and IAA make it unlawful to improperly influence relinquishment of parental rights, parental consent relating to adoption of a child, or a decision by an entity performing Central Authority functions.
    • Documents Required: See list of documents in Section 2 “Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt” above.

      All documents must be translated into Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia) by an official sworn translator. PAPs may obtain the list of sworn translators from the U.S. Embassy Jakarta’s website. Yayasan Sayap Ibu can assist with translation if necessary. 

      Note: Additional documents may be requested.

    • Authentication of Documents: Authentication of signatures of Indonesian officials who notarize original documents:   
      1. The original document must first be authenticated by the District Court having jurisdiction over the office issuing the document.
      2. The Department of Justice & Human Rights must then authenticate the signature of the District Court Judge or person authorized to authenticate the document.
      3. The Department of Foreign Affairs then authenticates the signature of the officer from the Department of Justice and Human Rights.
      4. After the above steps are completed, the original document with these authenticating signatures can be brought to the American Citizen’s Services Unit in the Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta for authentication. The Embassy’s authentication certificate will be securely attached to the original document, bearing the consular officer's signature and seal.  Appointments for this authentication/notary service may be made online through the U.S. Embassy’s website at: jakarta.usembassy.gov/us-service/acs-appts.html.
      5. The fee for this service is US $50.00 per seal, only payable in Rupiah or by credit card.
  3. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Orphan Status

    After you finalize the adoption (or gain legal custody) in Indonesia, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services must determine whether the child meets the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law. You will need to file a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative.The home study must meet the same requirements. As of July 14, 2014, unless an exception applies, the home study must comply with the requirements in 8 CFR 204.311 and 22 CFR Part 96.47.

  4. Bring Your Child Home

    Once your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), you need to apply for several documents for your child before you can apply for a U.S. immigrant visa to bring your child home to the United States:

    Birth Certificate
    If you have finalized the adoption in Indonesia, you will first need to apply for a new local birth certificate for your child. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

    If you have been granted custody for the purpose of adopting the child in the United States, the birth certificate you obtain will, in most cases, not yet include your name.

    Yayasan Sayap Ibu will assist PAPs in obtaining the birth certificate for their adopted child.

    Indonesia Passport
    Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Indonesia.

    With the adoption decree in hand, the parents can apply for the child's Indonesian passport. The child will not be able to depart Indonesia or be issued a U.S. visa until he/she has a passport.

    Requirements for an Indonesian passport include:

    1. The adopted child's birth certificate;
    2. Copies of both parents' passports and residence/work permits;
    3. Copy of the court adoption decree; and
    4. The fee of IDR 655,000.00.

    The process of getting an Indonesian passport can take up to two weeks.

    Once in possession of the child's Indonesian passport, the embassy can begin processing the child's immigrant visa.

    U.S. Immigrant Visa 
    After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child and you have filed Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, you then need to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa for your child from the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child.

    At the time you file your Form I-600 petition, the adjudicating officer will determine whether the UAA applies or if your case is UAA grandfathered. For more information on UAA grandfathering and transition cases, please see Universal Accreditation Act of 2012. Unless an exception applies, you must identify a primary provider in your case and the adjudicating officer may ask for the name and contact information of the primary provider if not provided in your Form I-600 petition. This information is required and, without it, your Form I-600 petition cannot be approved.

    You can find instructions for applying for an immigrant visa on the U.S. Embassy in Jakarta’s website:

CHILD CITIZENSHIP ACT

For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States: A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States: An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible.  Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport
U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport.
Getting or renewing a U.S. passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Indonesia
In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Indonesia, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip
Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability. Please visit travel.state.gov for the latest information, including travel alerts and travel warnings. This information can also be obtained on your mobile device by downloading the Smart Traveler App for your iPhone or Android smartphone.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip
When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Indonesia, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

If PAPs return to their country of residence with their newly adopted child, they must:

  • Report the development of the child to the Indonesian Embassy every year until the child is 18 years old;
  • Contact the Indonesian Embassy about any future areas of residence; and
  • Agree to be visited by a representative from the Indonesian Embassy to monitor and report on the child’s development until the child is 18 years old.

We strongly urge you to comply with Indonesia’s post-adoption requirements in a timely manner. Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to that country’s positive experiences with U.S. citizen adoptive parents.

Post-Adoption Resources

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Jakarta
Jalan Medan Merdeka Selatan #4-5
Jakarta - 10110
Tel: 62-21-3435-9000
Fax: 62-21-385-7189
Email: JakIV@state.gov
Internet: id.usembassy.gov

U.S. Consulate Surabaya 
Jalan Dr. Sutomo No. 33
Surabaya
Tel: 62-31-297-5300
Fax: 62-31-297-5301
Email: consurabaya@state.gov

Consulate Agency Bali
Jl. Hayam Wuruk 188
Denpasar
Tel: 62-361-233-605
Fax: 62-361-222-426
Email: BaliConsularAgency@state.gov

Please note that U.S. Embassy Jakarta is the only U.S. government office in Indonesia that processes immigrant visas.

Indonesia’s Adoption Authority
The Ministry of Social Affairs of the Republic of Indonesia, Directorate of Child Social Service Development
Jalan Salemba Raya No. 28
Jakarta Pusat, Indonesia
Tel: 62-21-310-0375

Embassy of Indonesia
2020 Massachusetts Ave. N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036
Tel: 202-775-5200
Fax: 202-775-5365
Internet: embassyofindonesia.org

*Indonesia also has consulates in: Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C.  20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
Email: Adoption@state.gov
Internet: adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-600A or I-600 petition:
National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email: NBC.Adoptions@DHS.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 24 Months
A-2 None Multiple 24 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 None Multiple 60 Months
B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1 None Multiple 48 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 48 Months
C-2 None Multiple 3 Months
C-3 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 48 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 12 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 12 Months
G-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-3 None Multiple 12 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A None N/A N/A3
H-2B None N/A N/A3
H-2R None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 12 Months
L-2 None Multiple 12 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 12 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 12 Months
R-2 None Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available. A birth certificate (Akte Kelahiran) may be obtained from the Civil Registry office (Dinas Kependudukan and Catatan Sipil) at the place within whose jurisdiction the birth took place. This certificate is available upon request throughout Indonesia.

Death Certificates

Available. A death certificate (Akte Kematian) may be obtained from the Civil Registry office (Dinas Kependudukan and Catatan Sipil) at the place within whose jurisdiction the death took place. This certificate is issued for Indonesian citizens as well as foreign nationals.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available. A marriage certificate (Akte Perkawinan or Surat Nikah) is issued by the following offices for the following population groups: 1) Moslem - the Kantor Urusan Agama (KUA - Office of Religious Affairs); 2) all other religions - a solemnization certificate must first be recorded with the Civil Registry office (Dinas Kependudukan and Catatan Sipil). Please note that the marriage is considered legally valid from the date of recording, not the date of solemnization.

Divorce Certificates

Available. Moslems of all nationalities may obtain a divorce decree (Surat Talak) from the Kantor Urusan Agama (KUA - Office of Religious Affairs) within whose jurisdiction the divorce (talak) took place. Members of other religious groups may obtain a divorce certificate from the Civil Registry office (Dinas Kependudukan and Catatan Sipil) at the place within whose jurisdiction the divorce took place.

Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update.

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Identity Card

Please check back for update.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Unavailable for applicants inside and outside Indonesia. Indonesian police certificates require initial processing at a local or village level, which is nonstandard in nature, can be subject to capricious decisions by officials and may require nonofficial payments to proceed further."

Prison Records

Available. Prison records for persons residing in Indonesia sentenced to prison terms of more than one year may be obtained from the Fingerprint Division, Pemasyarakatan, Department of Justice and Human Rights, Jalan Veteran No. 11, Jakarta Pusat, Indonesia. For applicants sentenced to prison terms of less than one year, records may be obtained from the warden of the prison where the imprisonment occurred.

Military Records

Available. Armed Forces records (including Police Force) for Indonesian citizens no longer in the military service are available. For those serving since 1950 with the rank of lieutenant and higher, records are issued by the General Personnel Office (Dan Jen Induk Personil) for either the Indonesian Army, Air Force, Navy and Marines, or the Police, in Jakarta. Records are not available for either enlisted personnel or officers who served before 1950. If required, however, the person concerned can execute an affidavit before the Bupati or Camat (under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Home Affairs). The affidavit must be verified and approved by the proper authorities of the Minister of Defense in Jakarta or the concerned Central Personnel Office. The military records of Dutch nationals and citizens formerly or presently residing in Indonesia ("the Uittreksel uit het Stamboek and de straflijst") can be obtained gratis only from The Hague, the Netherlands. The records of persons who had served in the "KL" (army and air force) are obtained from the Ministry of Admiralty, and those who had served in the "KNIL" from the Military Affairs Section of the Ministry of Union and Overseas Affairs.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

An Indonesian passport is currently valid for 5 years and cannot be extended. In September 1994, the Government of Indonesia changed the format of its "travel document in lieu of a passport" or "surat perjalanan laksana passpor". This document is now a passport type booklet consisting of sixteen pages with the bearer's photo and biographic data appearing on page one. It is light green in color with gold embossed writing. This document may be valid for a period of up to two years and can be considered a passport for visa issuing purposes. This document is usually issued to Indonesians who are going abroad to work, often as domestic employees or laborers. It may also be issued to persons who lose their passports overseas or in lieu of passports by immigration officers in remote areas of Indonesia, which are temporarily out of regular passport booklets. All previous versions of the "surat perjalanan laksana paspor" are considered no longer valid. There is also a travel document entitled "Paspor Untuk Orang Asing" (passport for alien) issued to a stateless permanent resident of Indonesia. This document is usually valid for one year, (although it may be issued valid for two years in certain cases, e.g. students) and may not be extended outside Indonesia. It is often endorsed good for travel to certain countries only.

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Jakarta (Java), Indonesia (Embassy) -- All Visa Categories

Unit 8129
FPO AP 96520-8129

Tel: (62)(21) 3435-9000

Surabaya (Java), Indonesia (Consulate General) -- Nonimmigrant Visas only

Amconsul Surabaya
Box 1
APO AP 96520-4200

Tel: (62)(21) 567-2287/8

Visa Services

Jakarta processes immigrant visas for all of Indonesia. The following applies to NIV applications:

Area Post
Aceh Jakarta
Bali Surabaya
Bengkulu Jakarta
Jakarta-Raya Jakarta
Jambi Jakarta
Jawa Barat (West Java) Jakarta
Jawa Tengah (Central Java) Jakarta
Jawa Timur (East Java) Surabaya
Irian Jaya (West Irian) Jakarta
Kalimantan Barat (West Kalimantan) Jakarta
Kalimantan Selatan (South Kalimantan) Jakarta
Kalimantan Tengah (Central Kalimantan) Jakarta
Kalimantan Timur (East Kalimantan) Jakarta
Lampung Jakarta
Maluku (Moluccas) Surabaya
Nusa Tenggara Barat (West Nusa Tenggara) Surabaya
Nusa Tenggara Timur (East Nusa Tenggara) Surabaya
Riau Jakarta
Sulawesi Selatan (South Sulawesi) Surabaya
Sulawesi Tengah (Central Sulawesi) Surabaya
Sulawesi Tenggara (Southeast Sulawesi) Surabaya
Sulawesi Utara (North Sulawesi) Surabaya
Sumatera Barat (West Sumatra) Jakarta
Sumatera Selatan (South Sumatra) Jakarta
Sumatera Utara (North Sumatra) Jakarta
Timor Timur (East Timor) Jakarta
Yogyakarta Jakarta

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 775-5200 (202) 775-5365

Chicago, IL (312) 920-1880 (312) 920-1881

Houston, TX (713) 785-1691 (713) 780-9644

Los Angeles, CA (213) 383-5126 (213) 487-3971

New York, NY (212) 879-0600 (212) 570-6206

San Francisco, CA (415) 474-9571 (415) 441-4320

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Jakarta
Jl. Medan Merdeka Selatan No.
3 - 5
Jakarta 10110, Indonesia
Telephone
+(62)(21) 3435-9000
Emergency
+(62)(21) 3435-9000 ext. 0 (operator)
Fax
+(62)(21) 385-7189
Indonesia Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.