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International Travel

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Country Information

Grenada

Country Information

Grenada
Grenada
Last Updated: July 13, 2016
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months beyond the date of entry.

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

Sufficient space is necessary for a standard quarter-page entry stamp. 

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Not required. However evidence of return/onward travel arrangements is required.

VACCINATIONS:

None; except traveling  from regions where Yellow Fever is endemic.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

None

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Grenada

L’Anse aux Epines Main Road
St. George, Grenada

Telephone: +(1)(473) 444-1174, +(1)(473) 444-1175

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(1)(473) 407-2495

Fax: +(1)(473) 444-4820

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Destination Description

See our Fact Sheet on Grenada for additional information on U.S – Grenada relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

See the Embassy of Grenada’s website for visa information

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction, and customs information on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Potential for Terrorist Activity: While there has been no known terrorist activity in Grenada, travelers should be aware and excersise due caution.

Crime: Crime in Grenada is mostly opportunistic. Tourists have been the victims of robbery, especially in isolated areas. Thieves frequently steal credit cards, jewelry, cameras, U.S. passports, and money. Muggings, purse snatchings, and other robberies may occur in areas near hotels, beaches and restaurants, particularly after dark.

Visitors should exercise appropriate caution when walking after dark or when using the local bus system or taxis hired on the road. It is advisable to hire taxis to and from restaurants and to ask whether the driver is a member of the Grenada Taxi Association (GTA). Members of the GTA are required to pass additional driving tests and receive training from the Grenada Tourism Board. They are generally reliable and knowledgeable about the country and its attractions.

Victims of Crime: U.S. Citizen victims of crime should contact the local police first by dialing ‘911’, and the U.S. Embassy on emergency number (473) 407-2495.  We can:

  • Replace a stolen passport.
  • Help you find appropriate medical care if you are the victim of violent crimes such as assault or rape.
  • Put you in contact with the appropriate police authorities, and if you want us to, contact family members or friends.
  • Help you understand the local criminal justice process and direct you to local attorneys, although it is important to remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.  

Please see the information for victims of crime webpage, including possible victim compensation programs in the United States.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

To stay connected:

 

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws even if you are a U.S. citizen.

Persons violating Grenada laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Grenada are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.

Please note that a person can be prosecuted for using foul language in the presence of an officer of the law.

Some things might be legal in the country you visit, but still illegal in the United States. You can be prosecuted in the United States for engaging in sexual conduct with children or for using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country regardless of the legality of these activities under that country’s laws. Counterfeit and pirated goods are illegal in the United States and if you purchase them in a foreign country, you may be breaking local laws as well. 

Arrest notifications in host country:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately.

Money: It is difficult to cash personal U.S. checks in Grenada. If accepted, they will take approximately six weeks to clear by a local bank. Major credit cards are widely accepted, and ATM facilities are available at all banks. Most hotels and restaurants take U.S. currency; however, change will be in local currency.

Customs: Please see our Customs webpage for information on import restrictions.

Climate: Grenada experiences tropical storms and hurricanes during the hurricane season, from June through November. Sea surges occasionally flood low lying areas, including parts of downtown St. George’s and Hillsborough on the island of Carriacou. Heavy winds periodically close local beaches to swimming. Grenada is also located in a zone of seismic activity where earthquakes and tsunamis are possible, General information about natural disaster preparedness is available from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

LGBTI Rights: Grenadian law criminalizes consensual same-sex sexual activities between men, providing penalties of up to 10 years imprisonment. Prosecutions based on these laws are exceedingly rare, and have not targeted visitors. The Grenadian society is generally intolerant of same-sex sexual conduct, and many churches condemn it. The Embassy has received no reports of violence linked to real or perceived sexual orientation.  

For more information about LGBT rights in Grenada, you may review the State Department’s Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2014.  For further information on LGBT travel, please read our LGBTI Travel Information page.

Women Travelers: Please review our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Accessibility: While in Grenada, individuals with disabilities may find accessibility relatively easy. Although the law does not mandate access to public buildings or services, building owners increasingly have incorporated disabled access into new construction and renovated premises.

Since public transportation is privately owned, the law does not mandate any special consideration for individuals with disabilities.

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Health

Medical care in Grenada is below U.S. standards. Citizens requiring medical treatment may contact the U.S Embassy in St. George’s for a list of local doctors, dentists, pharmacies and hospitals. Serious medical problems requiring hospitalization and/or medical evacuation to the U.S. can cost thousands of dollars. Doctors and hospitals often expect immediate cash payment for health services. Ambulance service is available but response times vary greatly. Pharmacies are usually well stocked and prescription medicine is available. Travelers are advised to bring with them sufficient prescription medicine for the length of their stay.

Malaria is not found in Grenada, but there are low levels of dengue fever. The government periodically fogs public areas to reduce the mosquito population.

You can find detailed information on vaccinations and other health precautions on the CDC website. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the World Health Organization (WHO), which contains additional health information for travelers, including detailed country-specific health information.

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Travel and Transportation

Traffic Safety and Road Conditions:

Traffic moves on the left in Grenada; the majority of vehicles are right-hand drive. Grenada’s roads, paved and unpaved, are mostly narrow and winding, with many blind corners, narrow or no shoulders, and steep drops into the sea on Grenada’s three islands. There are few sidewalks, and vehicles vie with pedestrians for road space. Road lighting varies on all three islands, which compounds the dangers at night. Driving conditions in Grenada, including road conditions, increased numbers of vehicles, and sometimes aggressive minibus drivers all require caution and reduced speed for safety. The Government of Grenada has a seat belt law; drivers and passengers found not wearing seat belts are subject to a fine of EC$1,000 (US$400).

Before you drive in Grenada, a local temporary driver’s license, based on a valid U.S. driver’s license and costing EC$30 (US$12), is highly recommended. In the event of an accident, not having a valid local driver’s license will result in a fine, regardless of who is at fault. Rental vehicle companies are available; most of them will assist in applying for temporary driver’s licenses. The adequacy of road signage varies, but is generally poor to nonexistent.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. Also, we suggest that you visit the website of Grenada’s national tourist office and national authority responsible for road safety.

Travel from Grenada to the sister isles Carriacou and Petite Martinique is possible by sea and by air. Petite Martinique can only be reached by sea. The Osprey ferry service, with two boats, travels every day between the three islands and is reliable with a good safety record. The trip takes about 1 ½ hours in the large boat and 2 hours in the smaller one. SVG Airline flies a small propeller plane (4-6 passengers) to and from Carriacou daily. Small boat owners may offer to take tourists to the other islands. Before accepting, travelers should check to be sure that the boat carries life preservers and a radio. Though now required, many small boats do not carry this equipment.

Grenada has several qualified dive operations. Travelers should check with the Grenada Tourism Authority at 473-444-4279 or their hotels for further information. At present, there is no hyperbaric chamber in Grenada.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Grenada’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Grenada’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Grenada

L’Anse aux Epines Main Road
St. George, Grenada

Telephone: +(1)(473) 444-1174, +(1)(473) 444-1175

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(1)(473) 407-2495

Fax: +(1)(473) 444-4820

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General Information

For information concerning travel to Grenada, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Grenada. 

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

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Hague Abduction Convention

Grenada is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between Grenada and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

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Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country. Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney in Grenada who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction. For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children’s Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child. The Office of Children’s Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children. Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance. 

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709

Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website:  childabduction.state.gov
Email: AskCI@state.gov

Child abduction is not a criminal offense under the laws of Grenada. The Government of Grenada does not maintain a website specifically regarding custody, family law and visitation.

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court. Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information.    

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Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country. Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney in Grenada who can provide legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children’s Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States. Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the U.S. Embassy in Barbados, which serves Grenada, for information.

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Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children’s Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy in Barbados are authorized to provide legal advice.  

The American Citizens Services (ACS) office of U.S. Embassy Bridgetown serves U.S. citizens living in and visiting Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, the British Virgin Islands, Dominica, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Montserrat, St. Barthélemy, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, French St. Martin, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The U.S. Embassy in Barbados posts a list of attorneys here.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The U.S. Department of State is not aware of any government agencies or non-governmental organizations that offer mediation programs.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Grenada is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008, intercountry adoption processing for Grenada did not change.

Note: If you are not resident or domiciled in Grenada, you may not adopt. Furthermore, no adoption is possible for children who are not resident in Grenada.

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Who Can Adopt

To bring an adopted child to United States from Grenada, you must be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn more.

In addition to these U.S. requirements for adoptive parents, Grenada also has the following requirements for adoptive parents:

  • RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS: Grenada requires that applicants for adoption be resident and domiciled in Grenada. The child must also be in the continuous physical care of the applicant for at least three consecutive months immediately preceding the adoption order.
  • AGE REQUIREMENTS: The government of Grenada requires that the adoptive parent(s) must be age twenty-five or at least twenty-one years older than the child.
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Who Can Be Adopted

Grenada has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption. You cannot adopt a child in Grenada unless he or she meets these requirements.

In addition to these requirements, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. law for you to bring him or her back to the United States. Learn more about these U.S. requirements.

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How to Adopt

GRENADA'S ADOPTION AUTHORITY

Grenada Adoption Board, Ministry of Social Services

THE PROCESS

The process for adopting a child from Grenada generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be Matched with a Child
  4. Adopt the Child in Grenada
  5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption
  6. Bring Your Child Home
  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider

    The first step in adopting a child through intercountry adoption is usually to select a licensed agency in the United States that can help with your adoption. Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate. Learn more about choosing the right adoption service provider.

  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt

    To bring an adopted child from Grenada to the United States, you must apply to be found eligible to adopt (Form I-600A) by the U.S. Government, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn how.

    An initial adoption request is done through a local attorney in Grenada. Subject to the provisions of the Grenada Adoption Act, the court may make an order authorizing the applicant to adopt a child upon an application made in the prescribed manner.

    In addition to meeting the U.S. requirements for adoptive parents, prospective adoptive parents need to meet the requirements of Grenada as described in the Who Can Adopt section.

  3. Be Matched with a Child 

    If you are eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, the central adoption authority in Grenada will provide you with a referral to a child. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of a particular child and provide a permanent family placement for the referred child.

    The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Grenada's requirements, as described in the Who Can be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. law. Learn more.

  4. Adopt the Child (or Gain Legal Custody) in-country

    The process for finalizing the adoption (or gaining legal custody) in Grenada generally includes the following:

    • Role of the Adoption Authority: The government office responsible for adoptions in Grenada is the Grenada Adoption Board:

      Ministry of Social Services
      Tanteen, St. George's
      Grenada
      Tel: (473) 440-6575, (473) 440-8717
      Fax: (473) 440-4780

      Secretary of the Adoption Board is Ms. Jeanine Sylvester. A free information booklet is supplied upon request.

    • Role of The Court: An initial adoption request is done through a local attorney in Grenada. Subject to the provisions of the Grenada Adoption Act, the court may make an order authorizing the applicant to adopt a child upon an application made in the prescribed manner by a person domiciled in Grenada if the applicant:
      • Has attained the age of twenty five and is at least twenty one years older than the infant
      • Has attained the age of twenty one and is a relative of the infant; or
      • Is the biological mother or biological father of the infant.
    • Adoption Application: An initial adoption request is done through a local attorney in Grenada.
    • Time Frame: Adoptions in Grenada can vary greatly in timeframe, depending on the number of cases before the courts. Adoptions can take from three months to a year.
    • Adoption Fees: The cost for adoptions in Grenada is approximately $2,000.00 USD, though this can vary depending on the fees charged by the local attorney.
    • Documents Required: The prospective parents are required to have:
      • Valid passports;
      • Naturalization certificate;
      • Marriage certificate;
      • Divorce certificate;
      • Birth certificate;
      • Bank statements; and
      • Medical history

      The child will need a:

      • Valid passport;
      • Original birth certificate; and
      • Naturalization certificate

      Grenada is not a party of the Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement for Legalization of Foreign Public Documents, so the Legalization Convention "apostille" certificate should not be used for documents to be presented in Grenada.

      Instead, the "chain authentication method" will be used to authenticate documents for Grenada. This process involves seeking the proper authorities to attest to the validity of a succession of seals or signatures beginning with the seal on your document, proceeding to the U.S. Department of State Authentications Office, and ending with the seal of the Grenada Embassy or Consulate in the United States. Documents for authentication include civil records and notarized documents, state court records, federal documents, and U.S. Department of State/Passport records.

      NOTE: Additional documents may be requested. If you are asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic, we can help. Learn how .

  5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption

    After you finalize the adoption (or gain legal custody) in Grenada, the U.S Government, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) MUST determine whether the child is eligible under U.S. law to be adopted (Form I-600). Learn how.

  6. Bring Your Child Home Now that your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), there are a few more steps to take before you can head home. Specifically, you need to apply for several documents for your child before he or she can travel to the United States:
    • Birth Certificate 
      You will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child, so that you can later apply for a passport. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

    • Grenada Passport
      Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or Passport from Grenada. [How to obtain a Passport for the child in Grenada.]

    • U.S. Immigrant Visa 
      After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to apply for an U.S. visa from the United States Embassy for your child. After the adoption (or custody for purpose of adoption) is granted, visit the U.S. Embassy for final review and approval of the child's I-600 petition and to obtain a visa for the child. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the "Panel Physician's" medical report on the child if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage. Learn more.

    The U.S. Embassy in Grenada does not issue visas. All visas for Grenadians are reviewed and issued in the American Embassy in Bridgetown, Barbados. All questions concerning adoption and visas should be addressed to the Consular Section in Bridgetown, Barbados. Their e-mail address: ConsularBridge2@state.gov

    They can also be reached at:

    Tel: (246) 431-0225
    Fax: (246) 431-0179

    Note: Visa issuance after the final interview now generally takes 24 hours and it will not normally be possible to provide the visa to adoptive parents on the day of the interview.

    CHILD CITIZENSHIP ACT

    For adoptions finalized abroad: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your new child to acquire American citizenship automatically when he or she enters the United States as lawful permanent residents.

    For adoptions finalized in the United States: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your new child to acquire American citizenship automatically when the court in the United States issues the final adoption decree.

    * Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible. Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

    Learn more about the Child Citizenship Act.

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Traveling Abroad

APPLYING FOR YOUR U.S. PASSPORT

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Grenada. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print-all in one place.

OBTAINING YOUR VISA

In addition to a U.S. passport, you also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are attached to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.

To find information about obtaining a visa for Grenada, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information.

STAYING SAFE ON YOUR TRIP

Before you travel, it's always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The State Department is a good place to start.

The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

STAYING IN TOUCH ON YOUR TRIP

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to register your trip with the Department of State. Travel registration makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there's a family emergency in the United States, or a crisis in Grenada registration assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Registration is free and can be done online.

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After Adoption

What does Grenada require of the adoptive parents after the adoption?

There are no post-adoption requirements for Grenada.

What resources are available to assist families after the adoption?

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it's another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some good places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Grenada 
Lance Aux Epines Main Road
St. George's, Grenada

Mailing address:
P.O. Box 54
St. George's, Grenada
Tel: (473) 444-1173;
Fax: (473) 444-4820;
Email: usemb_gd@caribsurf.com

Grenada's Adoption Authority 
Grenada Adoption Board
Ministry of Social Services
Tanteen, St. George's
Grenada
Tel: (473) 440-6575, (473) 440-8717
Fax: (473) 440-4780

A free information booklet is supplied on request.

Embassy of Grenada 
1701 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20009
Tel: (202) 265-2561
Email: grenada@oas.org

* Grenada also has a consulate in New York.

Office of Children's Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
E-mail: AskCI@state.gov
Internet: http://adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) 
For questions about immigration procedures, call the National Customer Service Center (NCSC)

1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 120 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 120 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 One Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates
 

Available

Fees: EC $5.00 Stamps, $1.00 Search, $1.00 Certificate - Total EC $7.00.

Document Name: Births Registered

Issuing Authority: Available from the Registrar General's Office, St. George's, Grenada.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:
 

Death Certificates
 

Available

Fees: EC $5.00, Search $1.00, Certificate $1.00. Total Fee: EC $7.00

Document Name: Deaths Registered

Issuing Authority: Available from the Registrar General's Office, St. Georges, Grenada. Records are complete since 1866.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:
 

Burial Certificates
 

Unavailable.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates
 

Available

Fees: EC $5.00 Stamp, $1.00 Search, $1.00 Certificate. Total: EC $7.00

Document Name: Marriage Register

Issuing Authority: Available from the Registrar General's Office, St. George's, Grenada. Records are complete since 1903.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

Divorce Certificates
 

Available

Fees: EC $2.50 for a Decree Nisi and EC $1.00 for a Decree Absolute.

Document Name:

Issuing Authority: Available from the Registrar General's Office, St. George's, Grenada. Records are complete since 1900.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

Adoption Certificates

Available

Fees:

Document Name:

Issuing Authority: Available from the Registrar’s office.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

 

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Identity Card

Available

Fees:

Document Name:

Issuing Authority: The Royal Grenada Police Force issues drivers’ licenses out of the Treasury Office, St. George’s, Grenada.  Parliamentary Elections Offices located through the island issue Voter Identification Cards.  Both are considered reliable forms of identity on the island.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

 

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police
 

Available

Fees: EC $10.00

Document Name:

Issuing Authority: Available from the Commissioner of Police – Criminal Records Office, Police Headquarters, St. George's, Grenada.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:  Application must be accompanied by a set of fingerprints and three passport-size photographs.

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

 

Court/Prison
 

Available

Fees:

Document Name:

Issuing Authority:

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining: Prison sentence data is included in police record.

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

Military Records

Unavailable

Fees: N/A

Document Name: N/A

Issuing Authority: N/A

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A

Registration Criteria: N/A

Procedure for Obtaining: N/A

Certified Copies Available: N/A

Alternate Documents: N/A

Exceptions:  N/A

Comments: N/A

 

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Types Available: (Regular, Diplomatic, Official, etc.):

Grenada is a member of the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM) and issues standard CARICOM passports, which are ICAO compliant. 

Grenada operates a citizenship by investment program whereby foreigners may obtain Grenada citizenship and a full validity Grenada passport for an investment of $250,000.  There is no residency requirement for foreigners who obtain citizenship through this program.

The Department has determined passports issued under the Grenada Citizenship by Investment Program are valid under INA 101(a)(30).  Although a visa may be placed in such passports, applicants must still establish their identity to the satisfaction of a consular officer.  Applicants may need to present other supporting documents (a passport issued by another foreign government, school ID, identity certificate) to establish both identity and nationality.  During the course of the interview, officers should pay close attention to where the applicant was born and if the individual is potential dual national. Consular officers should contact the consular section in Embassy Bridgetown or the Visa Office with any questions regarding the Grenada Citizenship by Investment Program.

Fees:

Document Name:

Issuing Government Authority:

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

Other Documents Available: 

 

Other Records

Baptismal Certificates
 

Unavailable

Fees: N/A

Document Name: N/A

Issuing Authority: N/A

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A

Registration Criteria: N/A

Procedure for Obtaining: N/A

Certified Copies Available: N/A

Alternate Documents: N/A

Exceptions:  N/A

Comments: N/A

 

Visa Issuing Posts

Post Title:  Embassy of the United States Barbados, the Eastern Caribbean and the OECS

Address:

Wildey Business Park
Wildey
St. Michael BB 14006
Barbados, W.I.

Phone Number:

Main switchboard: (246) 227-4000

Consular Section (Questions): (246) 227-4399

Consular Section Fax: (246) 431-0179

Visa Appointment Hotline (Only): (246) 227-4227

Public Affairs Section Fax: (246) 429-5316

Visa Services: Nonimmigrant and immigrant visa applications for nationals of Antigua and Barbuda are processed by the U.S. Embassy in Bridgetown, Barbados.

Comments / Additional Information:

Consular Section Email:
 Non-Immigrant Visas - bridgetownniv@state.gov
 Immigrant Visas - bridgetowniv@state.gov
 American Citizen Services - bridgetownacs@state.gov

Visa Services

Immigrant and nonimmigrant visa applications for nationals of Grenada are processed by the U.S. Embassy in Bridgetown, Barbados.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 265-2561 (202) 265-2468

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Grenada
L’Anse aux Epines Main Road
St. George, Grenada
Telephone
+(1)(473) 444-1174, +(1)(473) 444-1175
Emergency
+(1)(473) 407-2495
Fax
+(1)(473) 444-4820
Grenada Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Grenada
Grenada
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months beyond the date of entry.

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

Sufficient space is necessary for a standard quarter-page entry stamp. 

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Not required. However evidence of return/onward travel arrangements is required.

VACCINATIONS:

None; except traveling  from regions where Yellow Fever is endemic.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

None

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Grenada

L’Anse aux Epines Main Road
St. George, Grenada

Telephone: +(1)(473) 444-1174, +(1)(473) 444-1175

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(1)(473) 407-2495

Fax: +(1)(473) 444-4820

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Destination Description

See our Fact Sheet on Grenada for additional information on U.S – Grenada relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

See the Embassy of Grenada’s website for visa information

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction, and customs information on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Potential for Terrorist Activity: While there has been no known terrorist activity in Grenada, travelers should be aware and excersise due caution.

Crime: Crime in Grenada is mostly opportunistic. Tourists have been the victims of robbery, especially in isolated areas. Thieves frequently steal credit cards, jewelry, cameras, U.S. passports, and money. Muggings, purse snatchings, and other robberies may occur in areas near hotels, beaches and restaurants, particularly after dark.

Visitors should exercise appropriate caution when walking after dark or when using the local bus system or taxis hired on the road. It is advisable to hire taxis to and from restaurants and to ask whether the driver is a member of the Grenada Taxi Association (GTA). Members of the GTA are required to pass additional driving tests and receive training from the Grenada Tourism Board. They are generally reliable and knowledgeable about the country and its attractions.

Victims of Crime: U.S. Citizen victims of crime should contact the local police first by dialing ‘911’, and the U.S. Embassy on emergency number (473) 407-2495.  We can:

  • Replace a stolen passport.
  • Help you find appropriate medical care if you are the victim of violent crimes such as assault or rape.
  • Put you in contact with the appropriate police authorities, and if you want us to, contact family members or friends.
  • Help you understand the local criminal justice process and direct you to local attorneys, although it is important to remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.  

Please see the information for victims of crime webpage, including possible victim compensation programs in the United States.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

To stay connected:

 

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws even if you are a U.S. citizen.

Persons violating Grenada laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Grenada are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.

Please note that a person can be prosecuted for using foul language in the presence of an officer of the law.

Some things might be legal in the country you visit, but still illegal in the United States. You can be prosecuted in the United States for engaging in sexual conduct with children or for using or disseminating child pornography in a foreign country regardless of the legality of these activities under that country’s laws. Counterfeit and pirated goods are illegal in the United States and if you purchase them in a foreign country, you may be breaking local laws as well. 

Arrest notifications in host country:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately.

Money: It is difficult to cash personal U.S. checks in Grenada. If accepted, they will take approximately six weeks to clear by a local bank. Major credit cards are widely accepted, and ATM facilities are available at all banks. Most hotels and restaurants take U.S. currency; however, change will be in local currency.

Customs: Please see our Customs webpage for information on import restrictions.

Climate: Grenada experiences tropical storms and hurricanes during the hurricane season, from June through November. Sea surges occasionally flood low lying areas, including parts of downtown St. George’s and Hillsborough on the island of Carriacou. Heavy winds periodically close local beaches to swimming. Grenada is also located in a zone of seismic activity where earthquakes and tsunamis are possible, General information about natural disaster preparedness is available from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

LGBTI Rights: Grenadian law criminalizes consensual same-sex sexual activities between men, providing penalties of up to 10 years imprisonment. Prosecutions based on these laws are exceedingly rare, and have not targeted visitors. The Grenadian society is generally intolerant of same-sex sexual conduct, and many churches condemn it. The Embassy has received no reports of violence linked to real or perceived sexual orientation.  

For more information about LGBT rights in Grenada, you may review the State Department’s Country Reports on Human Rights Practices for 2014.  For further information on LGBT travel, please read our LGBTI Travel Information page.

Women Travelers: Please review our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Accessibility: While in Grenada, individuals with disabilities may find accessibility relatively easy. Although the law does not mandate access to public buildings or services, building owners increasingly have incorporated disabled access into new construction and renovated premises.

Since public transportation is privately owned, the law does not mandate any special consideration for individuals with disabilities.

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Health

Medical care in Grenada is below U.S. standards. Citizens requiring medical treatment may contact the U.S Embassy in St. George’s for a list of local doctors, dentists, pharmacies and hospitals. Serious medical problems requiring hospitalization and/or medical evacuation to the U.S. can cost thousands of dollars. Doctors and hospitals often expect immediate cash payment for health services. Ambulance service is available but response times vary greatly. Pharmacies are usually well stocked and prescription medicine is available. Travelers are advised to bring with them sufficient prescription medicine for the length of their stay.

Malaria is not found in Grenada, but there are low levels of dengue fever. The government periodically fogs public areas to reduce the mosquito population.

You can find detailed information on vaccinations and other health precautions on the CDC website. For information about outbreaks of infectious diseases abroad, consult the World Health Organization (WHO), which contains additional health information for travelers, including detailed country-specific health information.

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Travel and Transportation

Traffic Safety and Road Conditions:

Traffic moves on the left in Grenada; the majority of vehicles are right-hand drive. Grenada’s roads, paved and unpaved, are mostly narrow and winding, with many blind corners, narrow or no shoulders, and steep drops into the sea on Grenada’s three islands. There are few sidewalks, and vehicles vie with pedestrians for road space. Road lighting varies on all three islands, which compounds the dangers at night. Driving conditions in Grenada, including road conditions, increased numbers of vehicles, and sometimes aggressive minibus drivers all require caution and reduced speed for safety. The Government of Grenada has a seat belt law; drivers and passengers found not wearing seat belts are subject to a fine of EC$1,000 (US$400).

Before you drive in Grenada, a local temporary driver’s license, based on a valid U.S. driver’s license and costing EC$30 (US$12), is highly recommended. In the event of an accident, not having a valid local driver’s license will result in a fine, regardless of who is at fault. Rental vehicle companies are available; most of them will assist in applying for temporary driver’s licenses. The adequacy of road signage varies, but is generally poor to nonexistent.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information. Also, we suggest that you visit the website of Grenada’s national tourist office and national authority responsible for road safety.

Travel from Grenada to the sister isles Carriacou and Petite Martinique is possible by sea and by air. Petite Martinique can only be reached by sea. The Osprey ferry service, with two boats, travels every day between the three islands and is reliable with a good safety record. The trip takes about 1 ½ hours in the large boat and 2 hours in the smaller one. SVG Airline flies a small propeller plane (4-6 passengers) to and from Carriacou daily. Small boat owners may offer to take tourists to the other islands. Before accepting, travelers should check to be sure that the boat carries life preservers and a radio. Though now required, many small boats do not carry this equipment.

Grenada has several qualified dive operations. Travelers should check with the Grenada Tourism Authority at 473-444-4279 or their hotels for further information. At present, there is no hyperbaric chamber in Grenada.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Grenada’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Grenada’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Grenada

L’Anse aux Epines Main Road
St. George, Grenada

Telephone: +(1)(473) 444-1174, +(1)(473) 444-1175

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(1)(473) 407-2495

Fax: +(1)(473) 444-4820

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General Information

For information concerning travel to Grenada, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Grenada. 

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

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Hague Abduction Convention

Grenada is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between Grenada and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

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Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country. Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney in Grenada who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction. For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children’s Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child. The Office of Children’s Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children. Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance. 

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709

Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website:  childabduction.state.gov
Email: AskCI@state.gov

Child abduction is not a criminal offense under the laws of Grenada. The Government of Grenada does not maintain a website specifically regarding custody, family law and visitation.

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court. Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information.    

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Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country. Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney in Grenada who can provide legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children’s Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States. Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the U.S. Embassy in Barbados, which serves Grenada, for information.

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Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children’s Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy in Barbados are authorized to provide legal advice.  

The American Citizens Services (ACS) office of U.S. Embassy Bridgetown serves U.S. citizens living in and visiting Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, the British Virgin Islands, Dominica, Guadeloupe, Martinique, Montserrat, St. Barthélemy, St. Kitts and Nevis, St. Lucia, French St. Martin, and St. Vincent and the Grenadines. The U.S. Embassy in Barbados posts a list of attorneys here.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The U.S. Department of State is not aware of any government agencies or non-governmental organizations that offer mediation programs.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Grenada is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008, intercountry adoption processing for Grenada did not change.

Note: If you are not resident or domiciled in Grenada, you may not adopt. Furthermore, no adoption is possible for children who are not resident in Grenada.

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Who Can Adopt

To bring an adopted child to United States from Grenada, you must be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn more.

In addition to these U.S. requirements for adoptive parents, Grenada also has the following requirements for adoptive parents:

  • RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS: Grenada requires that applicants for adoption be resident and domiciled in Grenada. The child must also be in the continuous physical care of the applicant for at least three consecutive months immediately preceding the adoption order.
  • AGE REQUIREMENTS: The government of Grenada requires that the adoptive parent(s) must be age twenty-five or at least twenty-one years older than the child.
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Who Can Be Adopted

Grenada has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption. You cannot adopt a child in Grenada unless he or she meets these requirements.

In addition to these requirements, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. law for you to bring him or her back to the United States. Learn more about these U.S. requirements.

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How to Adopt

GRENADA'S ADOPTION AUTHORITY

Grenada Adoption Board, Ministry of Social Services

THE PROCESS

The process for adopting a child from Grenada generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be Matched with a Child
  4. Adopt the Child in Grenada
  5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption
  6. Bring Your Child Home
  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider

    The first step in adopting a child through intercountry adoption is usually to select a licensed agency in the United States that can help with your adoption. Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate. Learn more about choosing the right adoption service provider.

  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt

    To bring an adopted child from Grenada to the United States, you must apply to be found eligible to adopt (Form I-600A) by the U.S. Government, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn how.

    An initial adoption request is done through a local attorney in Grenada. Subject to the provisions of the Grenada Adoption Act, the court may make an order authorizing the applicant to adopt a child upon an application made in the prescribed manner.

    In addition to meeting the U.S. requirements for adoptive parents, prospective adoptive parents need to meet the requirements of Grenada as described in the Who Can Adopt section.

  3. Be Matched with a Child 

    If you are eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, the central adoption authority in Grenada will provide you with a referral to a child. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of a particular child and provide a permanent family placement for the referred child.

    The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Grenada's requirements, as described in the Who Can be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. law. Learn more.

  4. Adopt the Child (or Gain Legal Custody) in-country

    The process for finalizing the adoption (or gaining legal custody) in Grenada generally includes the following:

    • Role of the Adoption Authority: The government office responsible for adoptions in Grenada is the Grenada Adoption Board:

      Ministry of Social Services
      Tanteen, St. George's
      Grenada
      Tel: (473) 440-6575, (473) 440-8717
      Fax: (473) 440-4780

      Secretary of the Adoption Board is Ms. Jeanine Sylvester. A free information booklet is supplied upon request.

    • Role of The Court: An initial adoption request is done through a local attorney in Grenada. Subject to the provisions of the Grenada Adoption Act, the court may make an order authorizing the applicant to adopt a child upon an application made in the prescribed manner by a person domiciled in Grenada if the applicant:
      • Has attained the age of twenty five and is at least twenty one years older than the infant
      • Has attained the age of twenty one and is a relative of the infant; or
      • Is the biological mother or biological father of the infant.
    • Adoption Application: An initial adoption request is done through a local attorney in Grenada.
    • Time Frame: Adoptions in Grenada can vary greatly in timeframe, depending on the number of cases before the courts. Adoptions can take from three months to a year.
    • Adoption Fees: The cost for adoptions in Grenada is approximately $2,000.00 USD, though this can vary depending on the fees charged by the local attorney.
    • Documents Required: The prospective parents are required to have:
      • Valid passports;
      • Naturalization certificate;
      • Marriage certificate;
      • Divorce certificate;
      • Birth certificate;
      • Bank statements; and
      • Medical history

      The child will need a:

      • Valid passport;
      • Original birth certificate; and
      • Naturalization certificate

      Grenada is not a party of the Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement for Legalization of Foreign Public Documents, so the Legalization Convention "apostille" certificate should not be used for documents to be presented in Grenada.

      Instead, the "chain authentication method" will be used to authenticate documents for Grenada. This process involves seeking the proper authorities to attest to the validity of a succession of seals or signatures beginning with the seal on your document, proceeding to the U.S. Department of State Authentications Office, and ending with the seal of the Grenada Embassy or Consulate in the United States. Documents for authentication include civil records and notarized documents, state court records, federal documents, and U.S. Department of State/Passport records.

      NOTE: Additional documents may be requested. If you are asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic, we can help. Learn how .

  5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption

    After you finalize the adoption (or gain legal custody) in Grenada, the U.S Government, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) MUST determine whether the child is eligible under U.S. law to be adopted (Form I-600). Learn how.

  6. Bring Your Child Home Now that your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), there are a few more steps to take before you can head home. Specifically, you need to apply for several documents for your child before he or she can travel to the United States:
    • Birth Certificate 
      You will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child, so that you can later apply for a passport. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

    • Grenada Passport
      Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or Passport from Grenada. [How to obtain a Passport for the child in Grenada.]

    • U.S. Immigrant Visa 
      After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to apply for an U.S. visa from the United States Embassy for your child. After the adoption (or custody for purpose of adoption) is granted, visit the U.S. Embassy for final review and approval of the child's I-600 petition and to obtain a visa for the child. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the "Panel Physician's" medical report on the child if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage. Learn more.

    The U.S. Embassy in Grenada does not issue visas. All visas for Grenadians are reviewed and issued in the American Embassy in Bridgetown, Barbados. All questions concerning adoption and visas should be addressed to the Consular Section in Bridgetown, Barbados. Their e-mail address: ConsularBridge2@state.gov

    They can also be reached at:

    Tel: (246) 431-0225
    Fax: (246) 431-0179

    Note: Visa issuance after the final interview now generally takes 24 hours and it will not normally be possible to provide the visa to adoptive parents on the day of the interview.

    CHILD CITIZENSHIP ACT

    For adoptions finalized abroad: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your new child to acquire American citizenship automatically when he or she enters the United States as lawful permanent residents.

    For adoptions finalized in the United States: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your new child to acquire American citizenship automatically when the court in the United States issues the final adoption decree.

    * Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible. Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

    Learn more about the Child Citizenship Act.

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Traveling Abroad

APPLYING FOR YOUR U.S. PASSPORT

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Grenada. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print-all in one place.

OBTAINING YOUR VISA

In addition to a U.S. passport, you also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are attached to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.

To find information about obtaining a visa for Grenada, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information.

STAYING SAFE ON YOUR TRIP

Before you travel, it's always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The State Department is a good place to start.

The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

STAYING IN TOUCH ON YOUR TRIP

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to register your trip with the Department of State. Travel registration makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there's a family emergency in the United States, or a crisis in Grenada registration assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Registration is free and can be done online.

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After Adoption

What does Grenada require of the adoptive parents after the adoption?

There are no post-adoption requirements for Grenada.

What resources are available to assist families after the adoption?

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it's another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some good places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Grenada 
Lance Aux Epines Main Road
St. George's, Grenada

Mailing address:
P.O. Box 54
St. George's, Grenada
Tel: (473) 444-1173;
Fax: (473) 444-4820;
Email: usemb_gd@caribsurf.com

Grenada's Adoption Authority 
Grenada Adoption Board
Ministry of Social Services
Tanteen, St. George's
Grenada
Tel: (473) 440-6575, (473) 440-8717
Fax: (473) 440-4780

A free information booklet is supplied on request.

Embassy of Grenada 
1701 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W.
Washington, DC 20009
Tel: (202) 265-2561
Email: grenada@oas.org

* Grenada also has a consulate in New York.

Office of Children's Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
E-mail: AskCI@state.gov
Internet: http://adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) 
For questions about immigration procedures, call the National Customer Service Center (NCSC)

1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 120 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 120 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 One Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates
 

Available

Fees: EC $5.00 Stamps, $1.00 Search, $1.00 Certificate - Total EC $7.00.

Document Name: Births Registered

Issuing Authority: Available from the Registrar General's Office, St. George's, Grenada.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:
 

Death Certificates
 

Available

Fees: EC $5.00, Search $1.00, Certificate $1.00. Total Fee: EC $7.00

Document Name: Deaths Registered

Issuing Authority: Available from the Registrar General's Office, St. Georges, Grenada. Records are complete since 1866.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:
 

Burial Certificates
 

Unavailable.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates
 

Available

Fees: EC $5.00 Stamp, $1.00 Search, $1.00 Certificate. Total: EC $7.00

Document Name: Marriage Register

Issuing Authority: Available from the Registrar General's Office, St. George's, Grenada. Records are complete since 1903.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

Divorce Certificates
 

Available

Fees: EC $2.50 for a Decree Nisi and EC $1.00 for a Decree Absolute.

Document Name:

Issuing Authority: Available from the Registrar General's Office, St. George's, Grenada. Records are complete since 1900.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

Adoption Certificates

Available

Fees:

Document Name:

Issuing Authority: Available from the Registrar’s office.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

 

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Identity Card

Available

Fees:

Document Name:

Issuing Authority: The Royal Grenada Police Force issues drivers’ licenses out of the Treasury Office, St. George’s, Grenada.  Parliamentary Elections Offices located through the island issue Voter Identification Cards.  Both are considered reliable forms of identity on the island.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

 

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police
 

Available

Fees: EC $10.00

Document Name:

Issuing Authority: Available from the Commissioner of Police – Criminal Records Office, Police Headquarters, St. George's, Grenada.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:  Application must be accompanied by a set of fingerprints and three passport-size photographs.

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

 

Court/Prison
 

Available

Fees:

Document Name:

Issuing Authority:

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining: Prison sentence data is included in police record.

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

Military Records

Unavailable

Fees: N/A

Document Name: N/A

Issuing Authority: N/A

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A

Registration Criteria: N/A

Procedure for Obtaining: N/A

Certified Copies Available: N/A

Alternate Documents: N/A

Exceptions:  N/A

Comments: N/A

 

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Types Available: (Regular, Diplomatic, Official, etc.):

Grenada is a member of the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM) and issues standard CARICOM passports, which are ICAO compliant. 

Grenada operates a citizenship by investment program whereby foreigners may obtain Grenada citizenship and a full validity Grenada passport for an investment of $250,000.  There is no residency requirement for foreigners who obtain citizenship through this program.

The Department has determined passports issued under the Grenada Citizenship by Investment Program are valid under INA 101(a)(30).  Although a visa may be placed in such passports, applicants must still establish their identity to the satisfaction of a consular officer.  Applicants may need to present other supporting documents (a passport issued by another foreign government, school ID, identity certificate) to establish both identity and nationality.  During the course of the interview, officers should pay close attention to where the applicant was born and if the individual is potential dual national. Consular officers should contact the consular section in Embassy Bridgetown or the Visa Office with any questions regarding the Grenada Citizenship by Investment Program.

Fees:

Document Name:

Issuing Government Authority:

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

Other Documents Available: 

 

Other Records

Baptismal Certificates
 

Unavailable

Fees: N/A

Document Name: N/A

Issuing Authority: N/A

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: N/A

Registration Criteria: N/A

Procedure for Obtaining: N/A

Certified Copies Available: N/A

Alternate Documents: N/A

Exceptions:  N/A

Comments: N/A

 

Visa Issuing Posts

Post Title:  Embassy of the United States Barbados, the Eastern Caribbean and the OECS

Address:

Wildey Business Park
Wildey
St. Michael BB 14006
Barbados, W.I.

Phone Number:

Main switchboard: (246) 227-4000

Consular Section (Questions): (246) 227-4399

Consular Section Fax: (246) 431-0179

Visa Appointment Hotline (Only): (246) 227-4227

Public Affairs Section Fax: (246) 429-5316

Visa Services: Nonimmigrant and immigrant visa applications for nationals of Antigua and Barbuda are processed by the U.S. Embassy in Bridgetown, Barbados.

Comments / Additional Information:

Consular Section Email:
 Non-Immigrant Visas - bridgetownniv@state.gov
 Immigrant Visas - bridgetowniv@state.gov
 American Citizen Services - bridgetownacs@state.gov

Visa Services

Immigrant and nonimmigrant visa applications for nationals of Grenada are processed by the U.S. Embassy in Bridgetown, Barbados.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 265-2561 (202) 265-2468

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Grenada
L’Anse aux Epines Main Road
St. George, Grenada
Telephone
+(1)(473) 444-1174, +(1)(473) 444-1175
Emergency
+(1)(473) 407-2495
Fax
+(1)(473) 444-4820
Grenada Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.