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International Travel

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Country Information

Honduras

Country Information

Honduras
Republic of Honduras
Last Updated: November 8, 2016

The Department of State alerts U.S. citizens to postpone or cancel unnecessary travel to mainland Honduras due to ongoing political protests and the potential for violence. There is an increase in demonstrations and disruptions as a result of an election dispu

The Department of State alerts U.S. citizens to postpone or cancel unnecessary travel to mainland Honduras due to ongoing political protests and the potential for violence. There is an increase in demonstrations and disruptions as a result of an election dispute. The Bay Islands of Honduras (Roatan, Utila, and Guanaja) are not significantly impacted at this time. Though current demonstrations have largely remained peaceful, demonstrations can be volatile and dangerous, and have included rock throwing, assaults, and tire burning. Moreover, rioting and looting have occurred in many cities throughout Honduras. Road closures result in extreme traffic delays, thereby possibly limiting access to airports throughout mainland Honduras. This Travel Alert expires on December 31, 2017.  

U.S. citizens are reminded that large public gatherings may become unruly or violent quickly. U.S. citizens in Honduras should take extra precautions and follow instructions issued by local officials.

  • Avoid all demonstrations and large gatherings.
  • Have a communications plan that does not rely solely on cellular data.
  • If you cannot postpone or delay travel within Honduras, avoid crowds and remain alert when traveling in the country.
  • Contact your airline for the latest information regarding flights to and from Honduras.
  • Monitor media and local information sources regarding protest-related developments, and have flexible plans for personal travel and activities.
  • Report specific safety concerns to local law enforcement authorities.
  • Stay in touch with your family members and ensure they know how to reach you in the event of an emergency.

For further information:

... [READ MORE]

The Department of State warns U.S. citizens to carefully consider the risks of travel to the Department of Gracias a Dios in Honduras. In addition, the greater urban areas of San Pedro Sula, Tegucigalpa, and La Ceiba have notably high crime and violence r

The Department of State warns U.S. citizens to carefully consider the risks of travel to the Department of Gracias a Dios in Honduras. In addition, the greater urban areas of San Pedro Sula, Tegucigalpa, and La Ceiba have notably high crime and violence rates. This replaces the Honduras Travel Warning dated August 5, 2016.

The U.S. Embassy restricts U.S. government staff from traveling to the Department of Gracias a Dios due to frequent criminal and drug trafficking activity.  Infrastructure is weak, government services are limited, and police or military presence is scarce. Those who choose to travel to, or currently reside in, Gracias a Dios should remain alert to local conditions and signs of danger.

Criminals, acting both individually and in gangs, in and around certain areas of Tegucigalpa, San Pedro Sula, and La Ceiba engage in murder, extortion, and other violent crimes.  About 70% of U.S. citizen homicides since 2010 occurred in these urban areas.  San Pedro Sula and Tegucigalpa rank as two of the most violent cities in the world. 

With one of the highest murder rates in the world and criminals operating with a high degree of impunity, U.S. citizens are reminded to remain alert at all times when traveling in Honduras.

To be safe, you should review your personal security plans; remain aware of your surroundings and local events; and monitor local news stations for updates. Maintain a high level of vigilance, take appropriate steps to enhance your personal security, and follow instructions of local authorities. For more information on how to travel safely in Honduras, please review the Country Specific Information for Honduras.

For further information:

... [READ MORE]
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Passport must have six months validity

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required for entry stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

No

VACCINATIONS:

Required: yellow fever, if arriving from countries with a risk of yellow fever transmission.

Suggested: measles, rubella, rabies, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, typhoid.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

Travelers must declare any amount over $10,000.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

Travelers must declare any amount over $10,000.

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Tegucigalpa

Avenida La Paz
Tegucigalpa M.D.C.
Honduras
Telephone: +(504) 2236-9320 or +(504) 2238-5114
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(504) 2238-5114 or +(504) 2236-9320, extension 4100.
Fax: +(504) 2238-4357
Business Hours: Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Consulates

U.S. Consular Agent - San Pedro Sula
Banco Atlántida Building
11th Floor, across the street from Central Park
San Pedro Sula
Honduras
Telephone: +(504) 2558-1580
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: Please contact the U.S.
Embassy in Tegucigalpa: +(504) 2238-5114 or +(504) 2236-9320, extension 4100.
Business Hours: Monday through Thursday from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Honduras for information on U.S. - Honduras relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

To enter Honduras, you need:

  • A U.S. passport with at least six months validity.
  • Evidence of onward travel.  You do not need a visa for tourism.

Visit the Embassy of Honduras website or any of the Honduran consulate websites for the most current visa information.

Special Requirements for Minors: Under Honduran law, children under age 21 who are traveling unaccompanied or with only one parent must have written, notarized permission to travel from the non-traveling parent(s).

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors or residents of Honduras.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction, and customs information on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Crime: Honduras has one of the highest homicide rates in the world.  While crime and violence are serious problems throughout the country, the north coast and central portions of the country have historically had the country’s highest crime rates. In particular, San Pedro Sula has the second highest city murder rate in the world.

In particular, Gracias a Dios is a remote location where narcotics-trafficking is frequent, infrastructure is weak, government services are limited, and police or military presence is scarce. The U.S. Embassy has restricted U.S. government personnel travel to Gracias a Dios due to credible threat information against U.S. citizens by criminal and drug trafficking organizations. U.S. citizens traveling to Gracias a Dios should reconsider their travel.

The Honduran government conducts police and military patrols in major cities in an effort to reduce crime. However, the ability of Honduran law enforcement authorities to prevent, respond to, and investigate criminal incidents, and to prosecute criminals is limited.

Read the Travel Warning for Honduras for additional information.

See the  Department of State page for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: If you are a victim of crime, call the national police by dialing 911.  Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

Also contact the U.S. Embassy at 011-504-2236-9320 or 011-504-2238-5114 (and after-hours at 011-504-2238-5114, extension 4100). We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Victims of Domestic Violence or Sexual Assault: Contact the Embassy for assistance after contacting local autorities.

Severe Weather: Honduras is vulnerable to hurricanes, heavy rains, and flooding, especially between June and November.  For up-to-date information, visit Honduras’ National Emergency Management Commission (COPECO) website for current alerts, as well as the National Hurricane Center’s website.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some crimes are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or Consulate immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Special circumstances:

  • Marine Safety and Oversight: Honduran military personnel commonly board private vessels in Honduran territorial waters to verify crew and passenger documentation. 
    Criminals have been known to pose as fisherman and commit armed assaults. If your vessel is hailed by a suspicious vessel, contact the U.S. Coast Guard by radio or INMARSAT at (305) 415-6800.
  • Investment: Many U.S. firms and citizens operating in Honduras have found corruption to be a serious problem.  Due to poor regulation, financial investments pose high risks and have led to substantial losses.

    Exercise extreme caution before investing in real estate. Fraudulent deeds are common and have led to numerous disputes.  In addition, threats and violence have been used against U.S. citizens involved in property disputes. Numerous U.S. citizens have reported significant delays in resolving judicial cases and/or lack of cooperation from courts and the legal system.  

    For further information, review the State Department’s Investment Climate Statement and the U.S. Embassy’s information page on purchasing property in Honduras.
  • Customs Regulations: Strict regulations apply to the import-export of items such as vehicles, medications, and business equipment.  Honduran law prohibits the export of artifacts from pre-colonial civilizations, as well as certain birds and other flora and fauna.  For specific information, contact the Embassy of Honduras in Washington, DC and see our Customs Regulations
  • Firearms: No one may bring firearms into Honduras, except for diplomats or individuals participating in sporting events who have obtained a firearm permit from the Honduran Ministry of Security or Ministry of Defense prior to travel.  
  • Adventure Sports: There is little to no oversight of safety standards in Honduras.  You should research service providers to ensure they are using internationally acceptable or certified equipment, guides, safety measures, and instruction.

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Honduras.  However, many activists report that crimes committed against the LGBTI community go unpunished. There have also been cases of police harassment of patrons in LGBTI nightclubs.  LGBTI travelers should exercise caution, especially when expressing affection in public.

See our LGBTI travel information page and section 6 of the Department of State's Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Honduran law requires access to buildings for persons with disabilities; however, few buildings are accessible.  Please review the information on the State Department’s Traveling with Disabilities website.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

Staff, facilities, and supplies in Honduras are not necessarily up to U.S. medical standards. There are adequate facilities for advanced surgical procedures in case of non-elective emergencies.

Honduras lacks the infrastructure to maintain water purity and food safety.  Diarrheal illness is very common even in large cities and luxury accommodations. Only sealed commercial water containers (bottles) are considered safe to drink.

Air pollution can aggravate or lead to respiratory problems during the dry season due to widespread forest fires and agricultural burning.

We do not pay medical bills: Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage. We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation. 

Prescription medication: If traveling with prescription medication, check with the Embassy of Honduras in Washington, DC to ensure the medication is legal in Honduras.  Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. Always ensure you have enough medicine to cover your travel time, and research its availability in Honduras, or whether there is a viable replacement.

The following diseases are prevalent in Honduras:

  • Chikungunya
  • Dengue Fever
  • Malaria
  • Zika

Please review the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website for further information.

Vaccinations:  Honduras requires proof of Yellow Fever immunization if coming from another country endemic with Yellow Fever.  Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Because of crime, poor road conditions, and heavy commercial truck traffic, driving in Honduras can be dangerous. The U.S. Embassy discourages car and bus travel after dark.  

  • Honduran roads are poorly lit and poorly marked.
  • Traffic signs are often inadequate or non-existent.  
  • Drivers don’t always use headlights at night.
  • Animals and people wander onto the roads.
  • Rockslides are common, especially in the rainy season (May through December) and can cause closure of major highways.  

Dangerous stretches of road include:

  • The road between Tegucigalpa to Choluteca: Be aware of mountain curves.
  • The road from El Progreso to La Ceiba: Animals frequently enter the road, and bridges are in poor condition due to flooding.
  • CA-5 and the highway between San Pedro Sula and Tela, particularly near the palm tree plantations near El Progreso: Carjackings and robberies target SUVs and usually occur at night.
  • The road from Juticalpa to Telica, and from the turn off to Gualaco on Route 39 to San Esteban and Bonito Oriental: Rival criminal elements engage in violent acts against one another. Avoid this road and stay on the main Tegucigalpa-Juticalpa-Catacamas road while traveling in Olancho.

While Honduras and the United States have signed and ratified a Stolen Vehicle Treaty, existing Honduran laws protect good faith buyers (even of stolen vehicles), so the recovery and return of these vehicles to their original owners is not guaranteed. Vehicle insurance may mitigate loss; please check with the National Insurance Crime Bureau or with private insurance carriers about coverage details.

Traffic Laws: In an accident, contact the Honduran Transit Authority (“Transito”) by dialing 911.  

  • Honduran law requires all vehicles involved in an accident to remain in place until Transit Authority agents arrive. 
  • Notify your car insurance company as soon as possible, preferably right after the accident. 
  • Carry personal identification documents, including your driver’s license, copies of passports, and vehicle registration cards while driving.

Public Transportation: Avoid public transportation in Honduras.  

  • If you plan to travel by bus, always travel during daylight hours and on first-class conveyances, not economy buses. 
  • Choose taxis carefully, and note the driver’s name and license number.  Instruct the driver not to pick up other passengers, agree on the fare before you enter the vehicle, and have small bills available for payment, as taxi drivers often do not make change.  Use Radio-Taxi services (companies that operate by phone) rather than hailing a taxi on the street.
  • When possible, travel in groups.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Honduras, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Honduras’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

 

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Tegucigalpa

Avenida La Paz
Tegucigalpa M.D.C.
Honduras
Telephone: +(504) 2236-9320 or +(504) 2238-5114
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(504) 2238-5114 or +(504) 2236-9320, extension 4100.
Fax: +(504) 2238-4357
Business Hours: Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Consulates

U.S. Consular Agent - San Pedro Sula
Banco Atlántida Building
11th Floor, across the street from Central Park
San Pedro Sula
Honduras
Telephone: +(504) 2558-1580
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: Please contact the U.S.
Embassy in Tegucigalpa: +(504) 2238-5114 or +(504) 2236-9320, extension 4100.
Business Hours: Monday through Thursday from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

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General Information

Honduras and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction Convention (Hague Abduction Convention) since June 1, 1994.

For information concerning travel to Honduras, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Honduras.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizen Services, Office of Children's Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Honduras.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State 
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website:  travel.state.gov

The Honduran Central Authority for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Dirección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia (DINAF) and is responsible for processing Hague applications. 

Contact Information:

Dirección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia (DINAF)
Programa de Migración y Sustracción Internacional de Niños, Niñas y Adolescentes
Colonia Humuya
Calle La Salud, No 1101 frente a puente desnivel de El Prado
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Telephone number: +504 2239 3131 
Website: www.dinaf.gob.hn  
Email: convenciondelahayadinaf@gmail.com

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Honduras, the left-behind parent must submit a Hague application to DINAF through the USCA.  The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to DINAF, and to monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes.

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the United States or Honduran Central Authority.  Attorney fees, if necessary, are the sole responsibility of the person hiring the attorney.  Additional costs may include, among others, airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Honduras.  The U.S. Department of State can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Honduras. The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country. The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application for access.

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Retaining an Attorney

Retaining a private attorney is not required to file Hague Convention applications with courts in Honduras.  For Hague return/access applications, public defenders are assigned to represent the Hague Abduction application in the court at no cost.  Public defenders only represent the Hague Abduction Convention applications; they do not represent the interests of a parent. Therefore, parents may want to consider hiring a private attorney to follow up on cases, provide information to courts, and advise on courses of action appropriate for their individual circumstances.  A privately-hired attorney should contact DINAF, the Honduran Central Authority, as soon as possible after the Hague Abduction Convention application has been filed.   

The U.S. Embassy in Tegucigalpa, Honduras posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms on the list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

Mediation may be available for both abduction and access cases.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Honduras is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008, intercountry adoption processing for Honduras did not change.

The adoption process in Honduras is currently in flux. Policies regarding eligibility requirements for prospective adoptive parents, residency requirements, and time frame are under review by the Honduran Family Court (DINAF). Any change on the family code regarding all the above must be done by the Congress, not the family court, they can only give their opinion. This has been under review for more than 8 years, they have been studying many law projects, and however, it remains the same.

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Who Can Adopt

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Honduras, you must be found eligible to adopt by both the U.S. and Honduran governments. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn more.

Dirección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia (DINAF) is the Honduran government agency responsible for handling adoptions in Honduras.

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Who Can Be Adopted

Honduras has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption. You cannot adopt a child in Honduras unless he or she meets the requirements.

Only children under 14 years of age can be adopted and need to be adopted through DINAF. Children older than 14 only have to go through the family courts.

In addition to these requirements, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. law for you to bring him or her home back to the United States. Learn more about U.S. immigration requirements.

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How to Adopt

HONDURAS' ADOPTION AUTHORITY

Dirección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia  (DINAF) and Honduran Family Court

THE PROCESS

The process for adopting a child from Honduras generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be Matched with a Child
  4. Adopt the Child in Honduras
  5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption
  6. Bring Your Child Home
  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider:

    The first step in adopting a child from Honduras is usually to select a licensed agency in the United States that can help with your adoption. Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate. Learn more about choosing the right adoption service provider.

    Additionally, all agencies operating in Honduras must be accredited by the government. DINAF maintains a list of these agencies and information on registration and accreditation to operate. The U.S. Embassy in Tegucigalpa maintains a listing of attorneys in Honduras who may be able to help you on the embassy's website.

  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt:

    To bring an adopted child from Honduras to the United States, you must apply to be found eligible to adopt (Form I-600A) by the U.S. Government, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). 

    In addition to meeting the U.S. requirements for adoptive parents, you need to meet the requirements of Honduras set out by DINAF.

  3. Be Matched with a Child: 

    If you are eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, DINAF in Honduras will provide you with a referral to a child. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of a particular child and provide a permanent family placement for the referred child. Learn more about making this critical decision.

    The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Honduras' requirements, as described in the "Who" tab. The child must also meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. law. Learn more about U.S. immigration requirements.

  4. Adopt the Child or gain legal custody in Honduras:

    The process for finalizing the adoption (or gaining legal custody) in Honduras generally includes the following:

    • ROLE OF THE ADOPTION AUTHORITY: The Honduran Family Court acts as the adoption authority for children 14 years of age and older. The Dirección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia (DINAF) is the adoption authority representing children under 14 years of age. The Honduran Family Court and the DINAF review the petitions submitted for adoptions.
    • ROLE OF THE COURT: The Honduran Family Court is responsible for processing intercountry adoptions for children 14 years of age or older.
    • ROLE OF ADOPTION AGENCIES: The adoption agency forwards the required petition and documentation to the appropriate adoption authority.
    • ADOPTION APPLICATION: If the child is 14 years of age and older, the adoption agency sends the adoption application (petition) to the Honduran Family Court. If the child is younger than 14 years of age, the adoption agency sends the adoption application (petition) to the DINAF.
    • TIME FRAME: The timeframe for intercountry adoptions of Honduran children is currently under review by the Honduran Family Court. This is not accurate
    • ADOPTION FEES: The adoption fees are between $3,000 and $10,000 USD for attorney fees. Please be aware the Honduran attorney's required fee is Lps. 25,000.00.
    • DOCUMENTS REQUIRED: The documents necessary to adopt a Honduran child are currently under review by the Honduran Family Court (DINAF). Please contact the DINAF for more specific information.

      Our current family code has been under review for 8 years, but right know the requirements have not change.

      NOTE: If you are asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic, we can help. Learn how to get documents authenticated for use abroad. 
  5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption:

    After you finalize the adoption, USCIS must determine whether the child is eligible under U.S. law to be adopted (Form I-600). Learn more to file a Form I-600.

  6. Bring Your Child Home Now that your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child)following both requirements: Honduran law & US law, there are a few more steps to take in applying for a visa. Specifically, you need to apply for several documents for your child before he or she can travel to the United States:
    • Birth Certificate 
      You will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child, so that you can later apply for a passport for the child. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

    • Honduran Passport 
      Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or Passport from Honduras.

    • U.S. Immigrant Visa 
      After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to apply for an U.S. visa from the U.S. Embassy for your child. After the adoption (or custody for purpose of adoption) is granted, contact the U.S Embassy for final review and approval of the child's I-600 petition and to obtain a visa appointment for the child. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the Panel Physician's medical report on the child if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage. Learn more about obtaining a visa from the embassy. Please note that visas may not be granted immediately following the interview, if documents are pending or missing.

CHILD CITIZENSHIP ACT

For adoptions finalized abroad: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your new child to acquire American citizenship automatically when he or she enters the United States as lawful permanent residents.

For adoptions finalized in the United States: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your new child to acquire American citizenship automatically when the court in the United States issues the final adoption decree.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible. Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting. 

Learn more about the Child Citizenship Act.

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Traveling Abroad

APPLYING FOR YOUR U.S. PASSPORT

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Honduras. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print-all in one place.

OBTAINING YOUR VISA

In addition to a U.S. passport, you also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are attached to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.

To find information about obtaining a visa for Honduras, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information.

STAYING SAFE ON YOUR TRIP

Before you travel, it's always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The State Department is a good place to start.

The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

STAYING IN TOUCH ON YOUR TRIP

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to register your trip with the Department of State. Travel registration makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there's a family emergency in the United States, or a crisis in Honduras, registration assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Registration is free and can be done online

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After Adoption

What does Honduras require of the adoptive parents after the adoption?

Currently, there are no specified post-adoption requirements. This may change as the intercountry adoption process is being reviewed by the Honduran Family Court. The family code already establishes that the adoptive parents must send the adoptive child follow ups, until the age of 14.

What resources are available to assist families after the adoption? 

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it's another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some good places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Honduras 
Avenida La Paz 
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Tel: (504) 238-5114 ext. 4400
Email: usahonduras@state.gov
Website: hn.usembassy.gov

Honduras’s Adoption Authority
DIrección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia (DINAF)
Colonia Humuya, Calle la salud, casa 1101
Semaforo entre la colonia El Prado y Blvd. Kuwait
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Tel:  (504) 2239-7900
Email: consolidacionfamiliar@dinaf.gob.hn
Internet: http://dinaf.gob.hn/

Embassy of Honduras 
3007 Tilden Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20008
Tel: (202) 966-7702
Email: embassy@hondurasemb.org
Website: http://www.hondurasemb.org

NOTE: Honduras also has consulates in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Jacksonville, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, Phoenix, San Francisco, San Juan, and Tampa.

Office of Children's Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
E-mail: AskCI@state.gov
Internet: http://adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) 
For questions about immigration procedures, contact the National Customer Service Center (NCSC) at
1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).

Or, contact USCIS in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, at:

Tel: 011-504-236-9320 ext. 4500
Email: USCISTGU.Inquiries@dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 $35.00 Multiple 60 Months
L-2 $35.00 Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

General Document Information: N/A

 

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available

Fees: No Fee

Document Name: Copy of Birth Folio (Copia de Folio del Libro de Nacimientos).

Issuing Authority:  Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Certified copy of Folio (original seal and signature from the registrar of the issuance RNP’s office)

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Registrar

Registration Criteria: if a child is not registered on his/her first year of age, parents will need a Resolution from the RPN’s “Oficialía Civil”. The procedure is called a “Reposición por Omisión”

Procedure for Obtaining: Walk in person at any Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Certified Copies Available: Yes

Alternate Documents: No

Exceptions: No

Comments: For immigration purposes the Immigrant Visa Unit requires the Copy of Birth Folio. An example of the copy of birth folio can be found here.

 

Death Certificates

Available

Fees: L200.00 (USD $10.00)

Document Name: Certificación de Acta de Defunción. Exhibit D

Issuing Authority: Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Registrar

Registration Criteria: N/A

Procedure for Obtaining: Walk in person at any Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Certified Copies Available: No

Alternate Documents: No

Exceptions: N/A

Comments: N/A

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available

Fees: No fee

Document Name: Copy of Marriage Folio (Copia de Folio del Libro de Matrimonios)

Issuing Authority: Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP) where the marriage occurred

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Certified copy of folio (original seal and signature from the registrar of the issuance RNP's office)

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: RNP Registrar

Registration Criteria: N/A

Procedure for Obtaining: Walk in at the RNP offices

Certified Copies Available: Yes, required

Alternate Documents: No

Exceptions: N/A

Comments: 

  • Only civil marriage is legally recognized; religious documents have no civil value.

  • The office of the ‘Registro Nacional de las Personas’ has two variations of the marriage certificate.  For immigrant purposes, the Immigrant Visa Unit requires the long-form marriage certificate, also known as the Folio de Matrimonio’.

 

Divorce Certificates

Available

Fees: No fee

Document Name: Copy of Marriage Folio (Copia de Folio del Libro de Matrimonios)

Issuing Authority: Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Certified copy of folio (original seal and signature from the registrar of the issuance RNP's office)

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Registrar

Registration Criteria: it is only registered by family court order. Marginal annotations of divorces if any, should be annotated in the marriage folio.

Procedure for Obtaining: Walk in person at the RNP offices

Certified Copies Available: Yes

Alternate Documents: None

Exceptions: None

Comments: According to Honduran law, only divorces communicated and registered in the Registro Nacional de las Personas are valid. This includes foreign divorces of Honduran marriages, which are not considered valid unless they are either:

A) Notarized by a Honduran consulate. Submit the notarized divorce decree to the RPN’s “Secretaria General” who will subsequently issue a resolution to register the divorce at the local RNP office where the marriage took place; or

B) Petition an “Auto de Pariatis” to the Honduran Supreme Court, which is akin to the U.S process for domesticating foreign judgements.

Adoption Certificates

Unavailable

Comments: There is no registration of adoptions for the public to obtain, as the original birth certificate of an adopted child is cancelled and a new one is issued with no marginal annotation that it's an adoption.

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Identity Card

National ID Cards

Available

Fees: No Fee the first time.

Document Name: Tarjeta de Identidad

Issuing Authority: Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Plastic card

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Registrar

Registration Criteria: it is obtained when the person reached the age of 18

Procedure for Obtaining: Request it in person at any Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Certified Copies Available: N/A

Alternate Documents: None

Exceptions: None

Comments: National ID cards have no fee until December 2017.  Possible fees may apply in 2018.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Court/Prison Records

Available

Fees: L200.00 (USD $10.00)

Document Name: Antecedentes Judiciales

Issuing Authority: Criminal Courts

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Supreme Court with official logo paper

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The Criminal Court Secretary

Registration Criteria: The records display only in case of a conviction

Procedure for Obtaining: Pay the fee at Banco Atlantida and go with the receipt at the Court.

Certified Copies Available: No

Alternate Documents: None

Exceptions: None

Comments: This document will be required only by the Consular Officer at the time of the interview, if necessary.

 

Police Certificates

Available

Fees: L200.00 (USD $10.00)

Document Name: Constancia de Antecedentes Policiales Exhibit H

  • Dirección Policial de Investigaciones (DPI) Headquarters in Comayaguela/Tegucigalpa (please see the comment below)

Issuing Authority: Police with logo official paper

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Secretary of Security, Department of Police Records

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Chief of the Court Archive

Registration Criteria: All criminal complaints filed against individuals remain in the police record system until either the complaining party formally drops the charges or the case has been formally adjudicated.

Procedure for Obtaining: The Applicant must request the document in person and present a Honduran identification card, a copy of the card, and a letter of request addressed to the Director of the DPI. Applicants under 18 years of age must present their birth certificate in lieu of the identification card. Payable at the DPI cashier, it will be issued immediately.

Certified Copies Available: No

Alternate Documents: No

Exceptions: No

Comments: For persons living outside of Honduras, a lawyer or close family member can apply for the record by presenting a copy of the applicant's identification, a notarized form from a Honduran consulate granting the lawyer or family member permission to collect the documents, and a letter of request. Normal processing time is less than one week. Police records from before 1995 may not be available. There may be a fee for this service.

Military Records

Unavailable.

 

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Travel Documents

Types Available: Regular, Diplomatic, Official

Fees:

  • Regular: L189.00 (USD $35.00)for 5 years andL1169.00 (USD $50.00) for 10 years;

  • Diplomatic: L475.00 (USD $20.00)

  • Official: L475.00 (USD $20.00)

Document Name: Passport

Issuing Government Authority:

  • Regular: INS

  • Diplomatic: Foreign Affairs Ministry

  • Official: Foreign Affairs Ministry

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Regular: Blue; Diplomatic and Official: Black

  • Regular: The two versions of the regular passport have soft blue covers and have either the Seal of Honduras or a map of Central America embossed in gold. It has 50 blue pages.

  • Diplomatic:  There are two versions of the diplomatic passport. Both have a soft black cover embossed in gold with "Pasaporte Diplomatico" inscribed at the bottom. One has the seal of Honduras on the cover and 50 blue pages while the other version has a map of Central America on the cover and 50 blue pages. Validity is normally for three years or "for however long the bearer is carrying out his duties".

  • Official: The official passport has a soft blue cover, "Pasaporte Oficial" inscribed at the bottom and either the Seal of Honduras or a map of Central America, all embossed in gold. The passport has 50 blue pages. Validity is either for three years or "for however long the bearer is carrying out his duties."

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

  • Regular: INS Chief

  • Diplomatic: Foreign Minister Secretary

  • Official: Foreign Minister Secretary

Registration Criteria: N/A

Procedure for Obtaining:

  • Regular: Pay the fee at Banco Atlantida and the bank will issue the receipt with the appointment date, on the day you go to Honduras' INS.

  • Diplomatic: N/A

  • Official: N/A

Alternate Documents: N/A

Exceptions: None

Comments: To obtain a passport if older than 21 needs to present the Honduran ID card, if younger needs to present the birth certificate and be accompany by both parents.

There are two versions of the diplomatic passport. Both have a soft black cover embossed in gold with "Pasaporte Diplomatico" inscribed at the bottom. One has the seal of Honduras on the cover and 50 blue pages while the other version has a map of Central America on the cover and 50 blue pages. Validity is normally for three years or "for however long the bearer is carrying out his duties".

The official passport has a soft blue cover, "Pasaporte Oficial" inscribed at the bottom and either the Seal of Honduras or a map of Central America, all embossed in gold. The passport has 50 blue pages. Validity is either for three years or "for however long the bearer is carrying out his duties."

The two versions of the regular passport have soft blue covers and have either the Seal of Honduras or a map of Central America embossed in gold. It has 50 blue pages.

Other Documents Available: White page (8"x14") sheet with the seal and heading of the Honduran Immigration Office (Direccion General de Poblacion). The permit has a photo of the bearer affixed with the immigration office wet seal. It is usually issued to refugees and persons paroled into Honduras and who do not have residency status. The permit is good for one trip only, it notes specifically the countries for which it is valid for travel, and its validity is rarely for more than six months. Salvo conducto, is issued for one time travel, expires in 90 days from the date it is issued.

 

 

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts


Tegucigalpa (Embassy)

Mailing Address:
3480 Tegucigalpa Place
Washington, DC  20521-3480

Street Address: 
Immigrant Visa Section, Avenida La Paz, Tegucigalpa, Honduras

Phone Number: 011 504 2238-5114 x 4287

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Honduras.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 506-4995 (202) 450-3146 (202) 525-4004

Atlanta, GA (770) 608-6255 (404) 844-4970 (770) 645-8808

Chicago, IL (773) 342-8281 (773) 342-8289 (773) 342-8293

Houston, TX (713) 785-5932 (713) 785-5625 (713) 785-5931

Los Angeles, CA (213) 995-6406 (213) 383-9306

Miami, FL (305) 269-9322 (305) 269-9345 (305) 269-3131 (305) 269-9445

New Orleans, LA (504) 522-3118 (504) 522-3119 (504) 523-0544

New York, NY (212) 714-9451 (212) 714-9452 (212) 714-9453

San Francisco, CA (415) 392-0076 (415) 392-6726

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Tegucigalpa
Avenida La Paz
Tegucigalpa M.D.C.
Honduras
Telephone
+(504) 2236-9320 or +(504) 2238-5114
Emergency
 +(504) 2238-5114 or +(504) 2236-9320, extension 4100.
Fax
+(504) 2238-4357
Honduras Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Honduras
Republic of Honduras
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Passport must have six months validity

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required for entry stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

No

VACCINATIONS:

Required: yellow fever, if arriving from countries with a risk of yellow fever transmission.

Suggested: measles, rubella, rabies, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, typhoid.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

Travelers must declare any amount over $10,000.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

Travelers must declare any amount over $10,000.

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Tegucigalpa

Avenida La Paz
Tegucigalpa M.D.C.
Honduras
Telephone: +(504) 2236-9320 or +(504) 2238-5114
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(504) 2238-5114 or +(504) 2236-9320, extension 4100.
Fax: +(504) 2238-4357
Business Hours: Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Consulates

U.S. Consular Agent - San Pedro Sula
Banco Atlántida Building
11th Floor, across the street from Central Park
San Pedro Sula
Honduras
Telephone: +(504) 2558-1580
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: Please contact the U.S.
Embassy in Tegucigalpa: +(504) 2238-5114 or +(504) 2236-9320, extension 4100.
Business Hours: Monday through Thursday from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Honduras for information on U.S. - Honduras relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

To enter Honduras, you need:

  • A U.S. passport with at least six months validity.
  • Evidence of onward travel.  You do not need a visa for tourism.

Visit the Embassy of Honduras website or any of the Honduran consulate websites for the most current visa information.

Special Requirements for Minors: Under Honduran law, children under age 21 who are traveling unaccompanied or with only one parent must have written, notarized permission to travel from the non-traveling parent(s).

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors or residents of Honduras.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction, and customs information on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Crime: Honduras has one of the highest homicide rates in the world.  While crime and violence are serious problems throughout the country, the north coast and central portions of the country have historically had the country’s highest crime rates. In particular, San Pedro Sula has the second highest city murder rate in the world.

In particular, Gracias a Dios is a remote location where narcotics-trafficking is frequent, infrastructure is weak, government services are limited, and police or military presence is scarce. The U.S. Embassy has restricted U.S. government personnel travel to Gracias a Dios due to credible threat information against U.S. citizens by criminal and drug trafficking organizations. U.S. citizens traveling to Gracias a Dios should reconsider their travel.

The Honduran government conducts police and military patrols in major cities in an effort to reduce crime. However, the ability of Honduran law enforcement authorities to prevent, respond to, and investigate criminal incidents, and to prosecute criminals is limited.

Read the Travel Warning for Honduras for additional information.

See the  Department of State page for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: If you are a victim of crime, call the national police by dialing 911.  Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

Also contact the U.S. Embassy at 011-504-2236-9320 or 011-504-2238-5114 (and after-hours at 011-504-2238-5114, extension 4100). We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Victims of Domestic Violence or Sexual Assault: Contact the Embassy for assistance after contacting local autorities.

Severe Weather: Honduras is vulnerable to hurricanes, heavy rains, and flooding, especially between June and November.  For up-to-date information, visit Honduras’ National Emergency Management Commission (COPECO) website for current alerts, as well as the National Hurricane Center’s website.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some crimes are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or Consulate immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Special circumstances:

  • Marine Safety and Oversight: Honduran military personnel commonly board private vessels in Honduran territorial waters to verify crew and passenger documentation. 
    Criminals have been known to pose as fisherman and commit armed assaults. If your vessel is hailed by a suspicious vessel, contact the U.S. Coast Guard by radio or INMARSAT at (305) 415-6800.
  • Investment: Many U.S. firms and citizens operating in Honduras have found corruption to be a serious problem.  Due to poor regulation, financial investments pose high risks and have led to substantial losses.

    Exercise extreme caution before investing in real estate. Fraudulent deeds are common and have led to numerous disputes.  In addition, threats and violence have been used against U.S. citizens involved in property disputes. Numerous U.S. citizens have reported significant delays in resolving judicial cases and/or lack of cooperation from courts and the legal system.  

    For further information, review the State Department’s Investment Climate Statement and the U.S. Embassy’s information page on purchasing property in Honduras.
  • Customs Regulations: Strict regulations apply to the import-export of items such as vehicles, medications, and business equipment.  Honduran law prohibits the export of artifacts from pre-colonial civilizations, as well as certain birds and other flora and fauna.  For specific information, contact the Embassy of Honduras in Washington, DC and see our Customs Regulations
  • Firearms: No one may bring firearms into Honduras, except for diplomats or individuals participating in sporting events who have obtained a firearm permit from the Honduran Ministry of Security or Ministry of Defense prior to travel.  
  • Adventure Sports: There is little to no oversight of safety standards in Honduras.  You should research service providers to ensure they are using internationally acceptable or certified equipment, guides, safety measures, and instruction.

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Honduras.  However, many activists report that crimes committed against the LGBTI community go unpunished. There have also been cases of police harassment of patrons in LGBTI nightclubs.  LGBTI travelers should exercise caution, especially when expressing affection in public.

See our LGBTI travel information page and section 6 of the Department of State's Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Honduran law requires access to buildings for persons with disabilities; however, few buildings are accessible.  Please review the information on the State Department’s Traveling with Disabilities website.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

Staff, facilities, and supplies in Honduras are not necessarily up to U.S. medical standards. There are adequate facilities for advanced surgical procedures in case of non-elective emergencies.

Honduras lacks the infrastructure to maintain water purity and food safety.  Diarrheal illness is very common even in large cities and luxury accommodations. Only sealed commercial water containers (bottles) are considered safe to drink.

Air pollution can aggravate or lead to respiratory problems during the dry season due to widespread forest fires and agricultural burning.

We do not pay medical bills: Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage. We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation. 

Prescription medication: If traveling with prescription medication, check with the Embassy of Honduras in Washington, DC to ensure the medication is legal in Honduras.  Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. Always ensure you have enough medicine to cover your travel time, and research its availability in Honduras, or whether there is a viable replacement.

The following diseases are prevalent in Honduras:

  • Chikungunya
  • Dengue Fever
  • Malaria
  • Zika

Please review the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website for further information.

Vaccinations:  Honduras requires proof of Yellow Fever immunization if coming from another country endemic with Yellow Fever.  Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Because of crime, poor road conditions, and heavy commercial truck traffic, driving in Honduras can be dangerous. The U.S. Embassy discourages car and bus travel after dark.  

  • Honduran roads are poorly lit and poorly marked.
  • Traffic signs are often inadequate or non-existent.  
  • Drivers don’t always use headlights at night.
  • Animals and people wander onto the roads.
  • Rockslides are common, especially in the rainy season (May through December) and can cause closure of major highways.  

Dangerous stretches of road include:

  • The road between Tegucigalpa to Choluteca: Be aware of mountain curves.
  • The road from El Progreso to La Ceiba: Animals frequently enter the road, and bridges are in poor condition due to flooding.
  • CA-5 and the highway between San Pedro Sula and Tela, particularly near the palm tree plantations near El Progreso: Carjackings and robberies target SUVs and usually occur at night.
  • The road from Juticalpa to Telica, and from the turn off to Gualaco on Route 39 to San Esteban and Bonito Oriental: Rival criminal elements engage in violent acts against one another. Avoid this road and stay on the main Tegucigalpa-Juticalpa-Catacamas road while traveling in Olancho.

While Honduras and the United States have signed and ratified a Stolen Vehicle Treaty, existing Honduran laws protect good faith buyers (even of stolen vehicles), so the recovery and return of these vehicles to their original owners is not guaranteed. Vehicle insurance may mitigate loss; please check with the National Insurance Crime Bureau or with private insurance carriers about coverage details.

Traffic Laws: In an accident, contact the Honduran Transit Authority (“Transito”) by dialing 911.  

  • Honduran law requires all vehicles involved in an accident to remain in place until Transit Authority agents arrive. 
  • Notify your car insurance company as soon as possible, preferably right after the accident. 
  • Carry personal identification documents, including your driver’s license, copies of passports, and vehicle registration cards while driving.

Public Transportation: Avoid public transportation in Honduras.  

  • If you plan to travel by bus, always travel during daylight hours and on first-class conveyances, not economy buses. 
  • Choose taxis carefully, and note the driver’s name and license number.  Instruct the driver not to pick up other passengers, agree on the fare before you enter the vehicle, and have small bills available for payment, as taxi drivers often do not make change.  Use Radio-Taxi services (companies that operate by phone) rather than hailing a taxi on the street.
  • When possible, travel in groups.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Honduras, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Honduras’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

 

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Tegucigalpa

Avenida La Paz
Tegucigalpa M.D.C.
Honduras
Telephone: +(504) 2236-9320 or +(504) 2238-5114
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(504) 2238-5114 or +(504) 2236-9320, extension 4100.
Fax: +(504) 2238-4357
Business Hours: Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.

Consulates

U.S. Consular Agent - San Pedro Sula
Banco Atlántida Building
11th Floor, across the street from Central Park
San Pedro Sula
Honduras
Telephone: +(504) 2558-1580
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: Please contact the U.S.
Embassy in Tegucigalpa: +(504) 2238-5114 or +(504) 2236-9320, extension 4100.
Business Hours: Monday through Thursday from 12:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

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General Information

Honduras and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction Convention (Hague Abduction Convention) since June 1, 1994.

For information concerning travel to Honduras, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Honduras.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

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Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizen Services, Office of Children's Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Honduras.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State 
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website:  travel.state.gov

The Honduran Central Authority for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Dirección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia (DINAF) and is responsible for processing Hague applications. 

Contact Information:

Dirección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia (DINAF)
Programa de Migración y Sustracción Internacional de Niños, Niñas y Adolescentes
Colonia Humuya
Calle La Salud, No 1101 frente a puente desnivel de El Prado
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Telephone number: +504 2239 3131 
Website: www.dinaf.gob.hn  
Email: convenciondelahayadinaf@gmail.com

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Honduras, the left-behind parent must submit a Hague application to DINAF through the USCA.  The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to DINAF, and to monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes.

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the United States or Honduran Central Authority.  Attorney fees, if necessary, are the sole responsibility of the person hiring the attorney.  Additional costs may include, among others, airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

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Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Honduras.  The U.S. Department of State can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

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Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Honduras. The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country. The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application for access.

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Retaining an Attorney

Retaining a private attorney is not required to file Hague Convention applications with courts in Honduras.  For Hague return/access applications, public defenders are assigned to represent the Hague Abduction application in the court at no cost.  Public defenders only represent the Hague Abduction Convention applications; they do not represent the interests of a parent. Therefore, parents may want to consider hiring a private attorney to follow up on cases, provide information to courts, and advise on courses of action appropriate for their individual circumstances.  A privately-hired attorney should contact DINAF, the Honduran Central Authority, as soon as possible after the Hague Abduction Convention application has been filed.   

The U.S. Embassy in Tegucigalpa, Honduras posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms on the list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

Mediation may be available for both abduction and access cases.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Honduras is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore, when the Hague Adoption Convention entered into force for the United States on April 1, 2008, intercountry adoption processing for Honduras did not change.

The adoption process in Honduras is currently in flux. Policies regarding eligibility requirements for prospective adoptive parents, residency requirements, and time frame are under review by the Honduran Family Court (DINAF). Any change on the family code regarding all the above must be done by the Congress, not the family court, they can only give their opinion. This has been under review for more than 8 years, they have been studying many law projects, and however, it remains the same.

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Who Can Adopt

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Honduras, you must be found eligible to adopt by both the U.S. and Honduran governments. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn more.

Dirección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia (DINAF) is the Honduran government agency responsible for handling adoptions in Honduras.

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Who Can Be Adopted

Honduras has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption. You cannot adopt a child in Honduras unless he or she meets the requirements.

Only children under 14 years of age can be adopted and need to be adopted through DINAF. Children older than 14 only have to go through the family courts.

In addition to these requirements, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. law for you to bring him or her home back to the United States. Learn more about U.S. immigration requirements.

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How to Adopt

HONDURAS' ADOPTION AUTHORITY

Dirección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia  (DINAF) and Honduran Family Court

THE PROCESS

The process for adopting a child from Honduras generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be Matched with a Child
  4. Adopt the Child in Honduras
  5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption
  6. Bring Your Child Home
  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider:

    The first step in adopting a child from Honduras is usually to select a licensed agency in the United States that can help with your adoption. Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate. Learn more about choosing the right adoption service provider.

    Additionally, all agencies operating in Honduras must be accredited by the government. DINAF maintains a list of these agencies and information on registration and accreditation to operate. The U.S. Embassy in Tegucigalpa maintains a listing of attorneys in Honduras who may be able to help you on the embassy's website.

  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt:

    To bring an adopted child from Honduras to the United States, you must apply to be found eligible to adopt (Form I-600A) by the U.S. Government, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). 

    In addition to meeting the U.S. requirements for adoptive parents, you need to meet the requirements of Honduras set out by DINAF.

  3. Be Matched with a Child: 

    If you are eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, DINAF in Honduras will provide you with a referral to a child. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of a particular child and provide a permanent family placement for the referred child. Learn more about making this critical decision.

    The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Honduras' requirements, as described in the "Who" tab. The child must also meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. law. Learn more about U.S. immigration requirements.

  4. Adopt the Child or gain legal custody in Honduras:

    The process for finalizing the adoption (or gaining legal custody) in Honduras generally includes the following:

    • ROLE OF THE ADOPTION AUTHORITY: The Honduran Family Court acts as the adoption authority for children 14 years of age and older. The Dirección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia (DINAF) is the adoption authority representing children under 14 years of age. The Honduran Family Court and the DINAF review the petitions submitted for adoptions.
    • ROLE OF THE COURT: The Honduran Family Court is responsible for processing intercountry adoptions for children 14 years of age or older.
    • ROLE OF ADOPTION AGENCIES: The adoption agency forwards the required petition and documentation to the appropriate adoption authority.
    • ADOPTION APPLICATION: If the child is 14 years of age and older, the adoption agency sends the adoption application (petition) to the Honduran Family Court. If the child is younger than 14 years of age, the adoption agency sends the adoption application (petition) to the DINAF.
    • TIME FRAME: The timeframe for intercountry adoptions of Honduran children is currently under review by the Honduran Family Court. This is not accurate
    • ADOPTION FEES: The adoption fees are between $3,000 and $10,000 USD for attorney fees. Please be aware the Honduran attorney's required fee is Lps. 25,000.00.
    • DOCUMENTS REQUIRED: The documents necessary to adopt a Honduran child are currently under review by the Honduran Family Court (DINAF). Please contact the DINAF for more specific information.

      Our current family code has been under review for 8 years, but right know the requirements have not change.

      NOTE: If you are asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic, we can help. Learn how to get documents authenticated for use abroad. 
  5. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption:

    After you finalize the adoption, USCIS must determine whether the child is eligible under U.S. law to be adopted (Form I-600). Learn more to file a Form I-600.

  6. Bring Your Child Home Now that your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child)following both requirements: Honduran law & US law, there are a few more steps to take in applying for a visa. Specifically, you need to apply for several documents for your child before he or she can travel to the United States:
    • Birth Certificate 
      You will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child, so that you can later apply for a passport for the child. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

    • Honduran Passport 
      Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or Passport from Honduras.

    • U.S. Immigrant Visa 
      After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to apply for an U.S. visa from the U.S. Embassy for your child. After the adoption (or custody for purpose of adoption) is granted, contact the U.S Embassy for final review and approval of the child's I-600 petition and to obtain a visa appointment for the child. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the Panel Physician's medical report on the child if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage. Learn more about obtaining a visa from the embassy. Please note that visas may not be granted immediately following the interview, if documents are pending or missing.

CHILD CITIZENSHIP ACT

For adoptions finalized abroad: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your new child to acquire American citizenship automatically when he or she enters the United States as lawful permanent residents.

For adoptions finalized in the United States: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your new child to acquire American citizenship automatically when the court in the United States issues the final adoption decree.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible. Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting. 

Learn more about the Child Citizenship Act.

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Traveling Abroad

APPLYING FOR YOUR U.S. PASSPORT

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Honduras. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print-all in one place.

OBTAINING YOUR VISA

In addition to a U.S. passport, you also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are attached to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.

To find information about obtaining a visa for Honduras, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information.

STAYING SAFE ON YOUR TRIP

Before you travel, it's always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The State Department is a good place to start.

The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

STAYING IN TOUCH ON YOUR TRIP

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to register your trip with the Department of State. Travel registration makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there's a family emergency in the United States, or a crisis in Honduras, registration assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Registration is free and can be done online

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After Adoption

What does Honduras require of the adoptive parents after the adoption?

Currently, there are no specified post-adoption requirements. This may change as the intercountry adoption process is being reviewed by the Honduran Family Court. The family code already establishes that the adoptive parents must send the adoptive child follow ups, until the age of 14.

What resources are available to assist families after the adoption? 

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it's another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some good places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Honduras 
Avenida La Paz 
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Tel: (504) 238-5114 ext. 4400
Email: usahonduras@state.gov
Website: hn.usembassy.gov

Honduras’s Adoption Authority
DIrección de Niñez, Adolescencia y Familia (DINAF)
Colonia Humuya, Calle la salud, casa 1101
Semaforo entre la colonia El Prado y Blvd. Kuwait
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Tel:  (504) 2239-7900
Email: consolidacionfamiliar@dinaf.gob.hn
Internet: http://dinaf.gob.hn/

Embassy of Honduras 
3007 Tilden Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20008
Tel: (202) 966-7702
Email: embassy@hondurasemb.org
Website: http://www.hondurasemb.org

NOTE: Honduras also has consulates in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Houston, Jacksonville, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, Phoenix, San Francisco, San Juan, and Tampa.

Office of Children's Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
E-mail: AskCI@state.gov
Internet: http://adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) 
For questions about immigration procedures, contact the National Customer Service Center (NCSC) at
1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).

Or, contact USCIS in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, at:

Tel: 011-504-236-9320 ext. 4500
Email: USCISTGU.Inquiries@dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2 2 None Multiple 60 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 $35.00 Multiple 60 Months
L-2 $35.00 Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

General Document Information: N/A

 

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available

Fees: No Fee

Document Name: Copy of Birth Folio (Copia de Folio del Libro de Nacimientos).

Issuing Authority:  Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Certified copy of Folio (original seal and signature from the registrar of the issuance RNP’s office)

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Registrar

Registration Criteria: if a child is not registered on his/her first year of age, parents will need a Resolution from the RPN’s “Oficialía Civil”. The procedure is called a “Reposición por Omisión”

Procedure for Obtaining: Walk in person at any Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Certified Copies Available: Yes

Alternate Documents: No

Exceptions: No

Comments: For immigration purposes the Immigrant Visa Unit requires the Copy of Birth Folio. An example of the copy of birth folio can be found here.

 

Death Certificates

Available

Fees: L200.00 (USD $10.00)

Document Name: Certificación de Acta de Defunción. Exhibit D

Issuing Authority: Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: N/A

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Registrar

Registration Criteria: N/A

Procedure for Obtaining: Walk in person at any Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Certified Copies Available: No

Alternate Documents: No

Exceptions: N/A

Comments: N/A

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available

Fees: No fee

Document Name: Copy of Marriage Folio (Copia de Folio del Libro de Matrimonios)

Issuing Authority: Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP) where the marriage occurred

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Certified copy of folio (original seal and signature from the registrar of the issuance RNP's office)

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: RNP Registrar

Registration Criteria: N/A

Procedure for Obtaining: Walk in at the RNP offices

Certified Copies Available: Yes, required

Alternate Documents: No

Exceptions: N/A

Comments: 

  • Only civil marriage is legally recognized; religious documents have no civil value.

  • The office of the ‘Registro Nacional de las Personas’ has two variations of the marriage certificate.  For immigrant purposes, the Immigrant Visa Unit requires the long-form marriage certificate, also known as the Folio de Matrimonio’.

 

Divorce Certificates

Available

Fees: No fee

Document Name: Copy of Marriage Folio (Copia de Folio del Libro de Matrimonios)

Issuing Authority: Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Certified copy of folio (original seal and signature from the registrar of the issuance RNP's office)

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Registrar

Registration Criteria: it is only registered by family court order. Marginal annotations of divorces if any, should be annotated in the marriage folio.

Procedure for Obtaining: Walk in person at the RNP offices

Certified Copies Available: Yes

Alternate Documents: None

Exceptions: None

Comments: According to Honduran law, only divorces communicated and registered in the Registro Nacional de las Personas are valid. This includes foreign divorces of Honduran marriages, which are not considered valid unless they are either:

A) Notarized by a Honduran consulate. Submit the notarized divorce decree to the RPN’s “Secretaria General” who will subsequently issue a resolution to register the divorce at the local RNP office where the marriage took place; or

B) Petition an “Auto de Pariatis” to the Honduran Supreme Court, which is akin to the U.S process for domesticating foreign judgements.

Adoption Certificates

Unavailable

Comments: There is no registration of adoptions for the public to obtain, as the original birth certificate of an adopted child is cancelled and a new one is issued with no marginal annotation that it's an adoption.

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Identity Card

National ID Cards

Available

Fees: No Fee the first time.

Document Name: Tarjeta de Identidad

Issuing Authority: Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Plastic card

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Registrar

Registration Criteria: it is obtained when the person reached the age of 18

Procedure for Obtaining: Request it in person at any Registro Nacional de las Personas (RNP)

Certified Copies Available: N/A

Alternate Documents: None

Exceptions: None

Comments: National ID cards have no fee until December 2017.  Possible fees may apply in 2018.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Court/Prison Records

Available

Fees: L200.00 (USD $10.00)

Document Name: Antecedentes Judiciales

Issuing Authority: Criminal Courts

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Supreme Court with official logo paper

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The Criminal Court Secretary

Registration Criteria: The records display only in case of a conviction

Procedure for Obtaining: Pay the fee at Banco Atlantida and go with the receipt at the Court.

Certified Copies Available: No

Alternate Documents: None

Exceptions: None

Comments: This document will be required only by the Consular Officer at the time of the interview, if necessary.

 

Police Certificates

Available

Fees: L200.00 (USD $10.00)

Document Name: Constancia de Antecedentes Policiales Exhibit H

  • Dirección Policial de Investigaciones (DPI) Headquarters in Comayaguela/Tegucigalpa (please see the comment below)

Issuing Authority: Police with logo official paper

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Secretary of Security, Department of Police Records

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Chief of the Court Archive

Registration Criteria: All criminal complaints filed against individuals remain in the police record system until either the complaining party formally drops the charges or the case has been formally adjudicated.

Procedure for Obtaining: The Applicant must request the document in person and present a Honduran identification card, a copy of the card, and a letter of request addressed to the Director of the DPI. Applicants under 18 years of age must present their birth certificate in lieu of the identification card. Payable at the DPI cashier, it will be issued immediately.

Certified Copies Available: No

Alternate Documents: No

Exceptions: No

Comments: For persons living outside of Honduras, a lawyer or close family member can apply for the record by presenting a copy of the applicant's identification, a notarized form from a Honduran consulate granting the lawyer or family member permission to collect the documents, and a letter of request. Normal processing time is less than one week. Police records from before 1995 may not be available. There may be a fee for this service.

Military Records

Unavailable.

 

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Travel Documents

Types Available: Regular, Diplomatic, Official

Fees:

  • Regular: L189.00 (USD $35.00)for 5 years andL1169.00 (USD $50.00) for 10 years;

  • Diplomatic: L475.00 (USD $20.00)

  • Official: L475.00 (USD $20.00)

Document Name: Passport

Issuing Government Authority:

  • Regular: INS

  • Diplomatic: Foreign Affairs Ministry

  • Official: Foreign Affairs Ministry

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Regular: Blue; Diplomatic and Official: Black

  • Regular: The two versions of the regular passport have soft blue covers and have either the Seal of Honduras or a map of Central America embossed in gold. It has 50 blue pages.

  • Diplomatic:  There are two versions of the diplomatic passport. Both have a soft black cover embossed in gold with "Pasaporte Diplomatico" inscribed at the bottom. One has the seal of Honduras on the cover and 50 blue pages while the other version has a map of Central America on the cover and 50 blue pages. Validity is normally for three years or "for however long the bearer is carrying out his duties".

  • Official: The official passport has a soft blue cover, "Pasaporte Oficial" inscribed at the bottom and either the Seal of Honduras or a map of Central America, all embossed in gold. The passport has 50 blue pages. Validity is either for three years or "for however long the bearer is carrying out his duties."

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

  • Regular: INS Chief

  • Diplomatic: Foreign Minister Secretary

  • Official: Foreign Minister Secretary

Registration Criteria: N/A

Procedure for Obtaining:

  • Regular: Pay the fee at Banco Atlantida and the bank will issue the receipt with the appointment date, on the day you go to Honduras' INS.

  • Diplomatic: N/A

  • Official: N/A

Alternate Documents: N/A

Exceptions: None

Comments: To obtain a passport if older than 21 needs to present the Honduran ID card, if younger needs to present the birth certificate and be accompany by both parents.

There are two versions of the diplomatic passport. Both have a soft black cover embossed in gold with "Pasaporte Diplomatico" inscribed at the bottom. One has the seal of Honduras on the cover and 50 blue pages while the other version has a map of Central America on the cover and 50 blue pages. Validity is normally for three years or "for however long the bearer is carrying out his duties".

The official passport has a soft blue cover, "Pasaporte Oficial" inscribed at the bottom and either the Seal of Honduras or a map of Central America, all embossed in gold. The passport has 50 blue pages. Validity is either for three years or "for however long the bearer is carrying out his duties."

The two versions of the regular passport have soft blue covers and have either the Seal of Honduras or a map of Central America embossed in gold. It has 50 blue pages.

Other Documents Available: White page (8"x14") sheet with the seal and heading of the Honduran Immigration Office (Direccion General de Poblacion). The permit has a photo of the bearer affixed with the immigration office wet seal. It is usually issued to refugees and persons paroled into Honduras and who do not have residency status. The permit is good for one trip only, it notes specifically the countries for which it is valid for travel, and its validity is rarely for more than six months. Salvo conducto, is issued for one time travel, expires in 90 days from the date it is issued.

 

 

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts


Tegucigalpa (Embassy)

Mailing Address:
3480 Tegucigalpa Place
Washington, DC  20521-3480

Street Address: 
Immigrant Visa Section, Avenida La Paz, Tegucigalpa, Honduras

Phone Number: 011 504 2238-5114 x 4287

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Honduras.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 506-4995 (202) 450-3146 (202) 525-4004

Atlanta, GA (770) 608-6255 (404) 844-4970 (770) 645-8808

Chicago, IL (773) 342-8281 (773) 342-8289 (773) 342-8293

Houston, TX (713) 785-5932 (713) 785-5625 (713) 785-5931

Los Angeles, CA (213) 995-6406 (213) 383-9306

Miami, FL (305) 269-9322 (305) 269-9345 (305) 269-3131 (305) 269-9445

New Orleans, LA (504) 522-3118 (504) 522-3119 (504) 523-0544

New York, NY (212) 714-9451 (212) 714-9452 (212) 714-9453

San Francisco, CA (415) 392-0076 (415) 392-6726

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Tegucigalpa
Avenida La Paz
Tegucigalpa M.D.C.
Honduras
Telephone
+(504) 2236-9320 or +(504) 2238-5114
Emergency
 +(504) 2238-5114 or +(504) 2236-9320, extension 4100.
Fax
+(504) 2238-4357
Honduras Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.