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International Travel

English

Country Information

Mozambique

Country Information

Mozambique
Republic of Mozambique
Last Updated: August 8, 2017
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months from entry into Mozambique

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

3 for visa and entry/exit stamps

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Yes

VACCINATIONS:

Yellow Fever if endemic country recently visited (although sometimes applied more broadly to travelers from other places)

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

USD $5000 and 10,000 Mozambican Meticais (without declaration)

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

USD $5000 and 10,000 Mozambican Meticais (without declaration)

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Maputo

Avenida Kenneth Kaunda, 193
Maputo, Mozambique

Telephone: +(258) 21-49-2797

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(258) 21-49-0723

Fax: +(258) 21-49-0448

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Mozambique for information on U.S. - Mozambique relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements
  • U.S. citizens are required to have a visa to enter Mozambique. U.S. citizens have been denied entry for not having obtained a visa in advance.
  • Mozambican Immigration may issue one-entry visas at country points of entry, including airports, particularly if you are arriving from a country without a Mozambican consulate or embassy. However, this is never guaranteed.  For this reason, all travelers recommended to obtain a visa prior to arrival.
  • Please pay attention to the authorized period of stay on your visa ("Autorizado a permaneçer pelo período de [number of days]"). This is the maximum number of days you may remain in the country before you must depart Mozambique. This is distinct from the validity of the visa which indicates when you may enter Mozambique.
  • If you enter without a valid visa, or overstay, you will be fined for each day you were in Mozambique illegally.
  • Your passport must be valid for at least six months after arrival and must contain at least three clean (unstamped) visa pages each time entry is sought. This does not include endorsement pages.
  • Visit the Embassy of Mozambique at 1525 New Hampshire Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036 or call (202) 293-7146 between the hours of 3-5 p.m. for the most current visa information.
  • Travel to Mozambique often requires transit through South Africa. If traveling with minors, please visit the South African Department of Home Affairs website for the most up-to-date requirements as the requirements are particularly stringent.

Vaccinations:

  • A valid certification of vaccination for Yellow Fever is required if you are coming from a country where Yellow Fever is present.
  • Border authorities can require all travelers to present a yellow vaccination books.  See the CDC website for further information on suggested vaccinations for travel to Mozambique.
  • If you cannot present a certificate at the port of entry, you will be vaccinated at your own expense.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Mozambique.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Road travel outside the city after dark is dangerous. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling outside the major cities after dark by car, and are encouraged not to travel outside the city alone. You should be vigilant when you travel in Mozambique and if you travel to/from South Africa, as both countries have high crime rates.

Crime: Street crimes, including mugging, purse-snatching, and pick-pocketing are common in Maputo and in secondary cities. Carjackings are rare, but still occur.

  • Pedestrians have been mugged at all hours of the day.  Avoid isolated areas and walking at night, even in well-known tourist areas.
  • Avoid walking along the Marginal south of the Southern Sun Hotel and Avenida Friedrich Engels and Rua Caracol.
  • Avoid walking along roads bordered by wooded areas, as criminals may hide there.

Johannesburg International Airport:

  • Secure your bags. Use an airport plastic wrapping service.
  • Avoid placing currency and high value items in checked luggage when transiting.

Landmines: Mozambique was declared free of all known landmines in 2015; however, there could remain unknown mines in very rural areas. Seek local information before going off-road outside major cities.

Information about specific safety and security issues can be found on the U.S. Embassy Maputo’s website under “Messages for U.S. Citizen.”

Victims of Crime:

Report crimes to the local police and contact the U.S. Embassy at +258 21-49-0723. Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.
See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help find appropriate medical care
  • assist in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • help explain the local criminal justice process
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a lost/stolen passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to host country laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be deported, arrested or imprisoned.  It’s very important to know what’s legal and what’s not wherever you go.

  • Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in are severe. Convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
  • Some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.
  • Carry your passport with you at all times. You can be taken in for questioning if you cannot present your passport. 
  • Photography of some government buildings may be illegal. Ask before taking pictures.
  • Driving under the influence can land you immediately in jail.
  • Your U.S. passport will not help avoid arrest or prosecution.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

LGBTI Travelers: Mozambique is a very tolerant society. Consensual same-sex relations are not criminalized and there is increasing space in public conversation regarding LGBTI issues. There remains, however, some societal stigmatization and room for progress in terms of full equal treatment, such as in the registration of LGBTI groups. See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Although the government legislatively mandates access to public buildings, transportation, and government services for persons with disabilities, few buildings are accessible.

  • Restaurants, hotels, and residential buildings have stairs at the entrance without wheelchair ramps, except perhaps at a few major hotels and retail areas.
  • Pedestrian paths and transportation are extremely difficult for persons with disabilities.
  • Sidewalks are not commonplace and, if they exist, are poorly maintained and dangerous to walk on at night.
  • Pedestrian crossings are infrequent and drivers seldom obey traffic signals.
  • Buses and taxis do not have special accommodations for disabled persons.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers:

  • Rape - The law prohibits rape, including spousal rape, but it is not effectively enforced and is largely unknown in rural areas where the majority of rapes take place. Penalties range from two to eight years’ imprisonment if the victim is 12 years of age or older and 20 to 24 years’ imprisonment if the victim is under 12, according to the new penal code.
  • Domestic Violence - The law prohibits violence against women. Domestic violence against women, particularly spousal rape and beatings, remain widespread. Abuse of a spouse or unmarried partner is punishable with one to two years in prison, or a greater penalty if in conjunction with another crime.
  • See our travel tips for Women Travelers.
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Health

Consult the CDC website for the Mozambique prior to travel.

Medical facilities are rudimentary, and most medical providers do not speak fluent English. Medications are not always available.  Public and private medical facilities exist in the city of Maputo and most provincial capitals.

  • All health care providers require payment at the time of or before providing service. Most do not accept credit cards.
  • You are responsible for all medical costs. U.S. Medicare does not cover you overseas.
  • Prescriptions Medications: Check with Ministry of Foreign Affairs to ensure the medication is legal to bring into the country.  Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage. We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation. 

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

 

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: The EN4 toll road between Maputo and South Africa is well-maintained. The road network connecting provincial capitals is in fair condition, but can be riddled with potholes and other obstacles. Vehicles on certain sections of the EN1 roadway in Sofala and Manica provinces and the EN6 between Beira and Chimoio have been shot at and the Government of Mozambique has instituted convoys on some stretches of the road. U.S. Embassy officials are restricted from traveling in Sofala or Manica on the EN1 between the Save River (in the south) and the city of Caia (in the north) and on the EN6 between Beira and Chimoio. Restrictions are also in place on the EN7 from Nova Vanduzi to Luenha.    

  • U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling outside cities after dark because of the increased risk of banditry, poor road conditions in some areas, poor maintenance of many vehicles in the country (e.g., no headlights or rear lights), as well as the threat imposed by livestock grazing on roadsides and intoxicated drivers.
  • Travel outside Maputo often requires a four-wheel drive vehicle, which creates an additional security risk since these vehicles are high-theft items. Public transportation is limited and often has poor safety standards.   

Accidents Serious traffic accidents are one of the greatest threats to U.S. citizens in Mozambique. Accidents involving drivers and pedestrians are common and sometimes fatal. The potential for accidents increases at night due to unseen holes and obstructions, poor lighting conditions, pedestrians on the highways, and other vehicles driving without headlights. If a serious accident occurs or if a driver hits a pedestrian, crowds quickly gather.

  • Mozambican law requires parties to an accident to render assistance; however, you should exercise your best judgment. Render assistance if necessary and practical, but only if you feel you can do so without placing yourself at risk.
  • Report the accident to the nearest police station and contact the U.S. Embassy immediately.

Traffic Laws: Drivers should obey police signals to stop at checkpoints, which are common throughout Mozambique. Foreigners visiting Mozambique for more than 90 days are required to have an International Driver’s License or to obtain a Mozambican driver’s license.

Public Transportation: The U.S. Embassy advises U.S. citizens not to use “chapas” (local minibuses) as a method of transportation due to frequent, often fatal accidents involving these vehicles.

See our Road Safety page for more information. Visit the website of Mozambique’s national tourist office.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Mozambique, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Mozambique’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Maputo

Avenida Kenneth Kaunda, 193
Maputo, Mozambique

Telephone: +(258) 21-49-2797

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(258) 21-49-0723

Fax: +(258) 21-49-0448

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General Information

For information concerning travel to Mozambique, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Mozambique.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

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Hague Abduction Convention

Mozambique is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between Mozambique and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

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Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  The government of Mozambique does not maintain information about custody, visitation, and family law on the Internet.  

 

Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Mozambique and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.  

 

The Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction.  For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children’s Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children’s Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

U.S. Department of State 
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website:  travel.state.gov
Email: AfricaIPCA@state.gov

Parental child abduction is a crime in Mozambique. 

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court.  Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information.  

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Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Mozambique and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children’s Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States.  Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the appropriate U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Mozambique for information and possible assistance.

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Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children’s Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy or Consulates in Mozambique are authorized to provide legal advice.

The U.S. Embassy in Maputo, Mozambique posts list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law. 

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The institution responsible for mediating all children related issues is the Tribunal dos Menores (juvenile court). Mediation may be proposed as a remedy in custody disputes, although the court would not be able to provide much assistance in access cases for a left behind parent because parental abduction is not discussed as a crime in the Family Law.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Mozambique is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (the Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section  204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F).

Prospective adoptive parents must be legal residents of Mozambique and must be present in the country for the duration of the adoption process. This includes a six month integration period after a prospective adoptive child is placed in the home, and before the adoption can be finalized by the court. (Visit the Embassy of Mozambique website for current visa information.) Additionally, married prospective adoptive parents must be married for three years prior to the initiation of the adoption process. The marriage can be civil, religious, or traditional, as long as it is registered. Civil marriages are registered with the civil registrar. Religious marriages are registered with the office of the religious denomination chosen by the given couple. This is done by having the community leader, married couple, and their witnesses sign a declaration and taking it to the relevant district office. Traditional marriages require the presence of the community leader and at least two witnesses. This is done by presenting witnesses to the appropriate district official. In cases in which the marriage took place at least three years prior to the initiation of the adoption, but was not registered, the prospective adoptive parents may invoke common law.

The Government of Mozambique requires post-adoption monitoring until the child reaches 21 years of age. This requirement may be waived at the judge’s discretion. However, the courts may not grant an adoption if the child will be immediately taken out of Mozambique.

Changes to Mozambique’s intercountry adoption laws are under consideration by Unidade Technica da Reforma Legal (UTREL), which drafts and proposes laws for the Government of Mozambique. To date, no substantial amendments have been made to the existing laws.  Mozambican law does not make a distinction between intercountry and domestic adoption. This may mean that foreigners will be expected to meet the same pre- and post-adoption monitoring requirements as Mozambican families, which may become an obstacle if the court decides the child cannot be monitored outside of Mozambique.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Mozambique, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines Who Can Adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of orphan under U.S. law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States on an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, you must also meet the following requirements in order to adopt a child from Mozambique:

  • Residency: Prospective adoptive parents must be legal residents of Mozambique and must be physically present in Mozambique for the duration of the adoption process, including a six-month integration period after a prospective adoptive child is placed in the home and before the adoption can be finalized by the court.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: Prospective adoptive parents must be over 25 years of age and less than 50 on the date the child is entrusted to them, unless the child is the biological son or daughter of one of the prospective adoptive parents.
  • Marriage: Prospective adoptive parents must be married for three years prior to the initiation of the adoption process. Single people are not eligible to adopt. The Government of Mozambique does not legally permit same-sex couples to adopt.
  • Income: None.
  • Other: Prospective adoptive parents must undergo a home study evaluation by Mozambican social and health workers from the country’s child welfare office and must be certified approved for adoption.
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Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, Mozambique has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption:

  • Relinquishment: In order to be eligible for adoption, a child must be relinquished by both parents. However, there is an exception if the prospective adoptive parent is the spouse of a biological parent or a partner with whom the biological parent has been living for at least three years. In these situations, only the biological parent who is not living with the minor child and the prospective adoptive parent must relinquish parental rights.
  • Abandonment: A child of unknown parents.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: The prospective adoptive child must be a minor under 14 years of age, or 18 years of age if s/he has been fostered by the prospective adoptive parents since 12 years of age.
  • Sibling Adoptions: None
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: None
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: The adoption is generally preceded by a minimum adaptation period of six months, in which the prospective adopted child is integrated into the family via foster care before the legal adoption is finalized in the court. This process must take place in Mozambique.

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, with the intention of returning for the child when they are able to do so. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

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How to Adopt

Mozambique’s Adoption Authority
Social Services National Directorate (Direcção Nacional da Acçao Social)

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Mozambique generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose an adoption service provider
  2. Apply to be found eligible to adopt
  3. Be matched with a child
  4. Adopt the child in Mozambique
  5. Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status
  6. Bring your child home
  1. Choose an adoption service provider

    The recommended first step in adopting a child from Mozambique is to decide whether or not to use a licensed adoption service provider in the United States that can help you with your adoption. Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate. The Department of State provides information on selecting an adoption service provider on its website.

    U.S. adoption service providers do not usually play a role in the adoption process. The services of a private attorney in Mozambique are not normally required for the adoption process.  However, the U.S. Embassy in Mozambique maintains a list of attorneys that is available on request.

  2. Apply to be found eligible to adopt

    In order to adopt a child from Mozambique, prospective adoptive parents will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Mozambique and U.S. immigration law.  Prospective adoptive parents must submit an application to be found eligible to adopt with the municipal juvenile court (Tribunal de Menores) closest to the residence of the prospective adoptive parents.

    Prospective adoptions parents must provide an application addressed to the presiding judge of the court, stating:

    • Advantages of adoption for the adoptee;
    • Age of adoptee;
    • Age of the adoptive parents, and
    • Marital status of the adoptive parents.

    The prospective adoptive parents’ signature on the statement must be witnessed by three people.

    If the judge makes a positive decision on the adoption, the case is generally transferred to the Social Services National Directorate to conduct a home study.

    To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also file an I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition with U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to be found eligible and suitable to adopt.

  3. Be matched with a child

    If you are eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, Mozambique’s Social Services National Directorate will provide you with a referral.  Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of and provide a permanent home for a particular child.

    The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Mozambique’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section.  The child must also meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law.

  4. Adopt the child in Mozambique

    The process for finalizing the adoption in Mozambique generally includes the following:

    • Role of Adoption Authority:  Municipal authorities oversee adoptions within their respective geographic areas of jurisdiction.  U.S. citizens wishing to adopt in Maputo should contact Ana Maria Macuacua, the head of Maputo City’s Social Service National Directorate at  (258) 21 302613.  Numbers for offices in other provinces can be obtained by contacting the national directorate at +258 21 302613.
    • Role of the Court:  The Juvenile Court (Tribunal de Menores) grants official orders of adoption or guardianship.
    • Role of Adoption Agencies:  None.
    • Adoption Application:  The first step in the adoption process is submission of a formal adoption request to the Juvenile Court in the appropriate governing municipality.  Together with the initial application, prospective parents should submit a certified copy of their marriage certificate (translated into Portuguese) and photocopies of their passports and Mozambican residency permits (known as a “DIRE”).  A list of other supporting documents and required forms may be obtained from the court.  If the court grants the order of adoption, the Social Services Directorate (SSD) will then begin a lengthy investigation of the prospective adoptive parents’ lifestyle, economic means, mental and physical health, and other details associated with a home study evaluation. During this time, the process of identifying a child for adoption is also initiated by the SSD.

      As a final step, the SSD will pass the parents’ petition for adoption to the Juvenile Court (Tribunal de Menores), to issue a certificate of approval officially endorsing the adoption. The adoptive parents may then begin the process of registration, name change, and application for new identity and nationality documents for their child.

    • Time Frame:  The adoption process in Mozambique takes approximately six to nine months.  U.S. immigrant visa petitions filed at the U.S. Embassy in Mozambique on behalf of adopted minors are forwarded to the U.S. Consulate General in Johannesburg for adjudication.
    • Adoption Fees:  There is a court fee of 1,450 Meticais (approximately USD $50), in addition to minor fees for forms and documents.  Adoptive parents will also be responsible for acquiring official translations of both English- and Portuguese-language documents.  The U.S. Embassy in Mozambique maintains a list of Portuguese/en translators for the public use.
    • Documents Required:  Prospective adoptive parents should be prepared to submit certified copies of their marriage certificate, Mozambican residency cards, passports (all with official translations, if required), along with bank statements and health certificates to the SSD who then submits these documents to the Juvenile court.

      Note:  Additional documents may be requested.

    • Authentication of Documents:  You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic.  If so, the Department of State, Authentications Office may be able to assist.
  5. Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status

    After you finalize the adoption in Mozambique, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services must determine whether the child meets the definition of orphan under U.S. law.  You will need to file a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative.

  6. Bring your child home

    Once your adoption is complete, you need to apply for several documents for your child before you can apply for a U.S. immigrant visa to bring your child home to the United States:

    Birth Certificate
    If you have finalized the adoption in Mozambique, you will first need to apply for a new Mozambican birth certificate for your child, so that you can later apply for a Mozambican passport.  Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.  To obtain a new birth certificate, please contact Conservatória does Registo Civil, located at Av. Karl Max (Tel: (258) 21 33798).

    Mozambique Passport
    Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Mozambique.  Please contact the Direção Nacional de Migração, located at Av. Ho Chi Min 316, Maputo (Tel: (258) 21430782/21 303765), in order to obtain the passport.

    U.S. Immigrant Visa
    After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child and you have filed Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, you then need to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa for your child.  This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you.  As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child.

    The U.S. Embassy in Mozambique does not conduct immigrant visa interviews or make decisions in immigrant visa cases.  All immigrant visa applications for citizens of Mozambique, including adopted children, are adjudicated by the Consular Section at the U.S. Consulate General in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    APPLYING FOR A VISA AT THE U.S. CONSULATE GENERAL IN JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA:  All U.S. immigrant visas for citizens of Mozambique are processed by the Consular Section at the U.S. Consulate General in Johannesburg, South Africa.  Before traveling, please review the Consular Information Sheet for South Africa and be sure to comply with the Government of South Africa’s entry requirements, which stipulate that travelers to South Africa must have at least two blank pages in their foreign passport upon entry.

    Once the Consular Section is in receipt of a family’s approved Form I-600 petition, the Consular Section will contact the family concerning their next steps.  Immigrant visa applicants must complete a series of forms—details of which will be provided to the prospective adoptive parents by the U.S, Consulate General in Johannesburg—before the immigrant visa interview may take place.  Once the family is documentarily ready for the immigrant visa interview, they must call the Consular Section to schedule an appointment.  A consular officer conducts the interview and, if the visa application is approved, issues the visa.  A consular officer must see the adopted child before the immigrant visa may be issued.  All adoption cases must include full judicial documentation that constitutes irrevocable release of the child for immigration and adoption, as well as permission to depart the country by the court that granted the adoption.

    Mailing Address:
    Consulate General of the United States of America
    P.O. Box 787197, Sandton, 2146
    Johannesburg, South Africa

    Physical Address:
    1 Sandton Drive, Sandhurst (opposite Sandton City Mall)
    Johannesburg, South Africa

    Tel:  (27 11) 290-3000
    Fax:  (27 11) (011) 884-0396
    Email:  consularjohannesburg@state.gov

    Note:  Visa issuance after the final interview now generally takes at least 24 working hours and it will not normally be possible to provide the visa to adoptive parents on the day of the interview.  Adoptive parents should not make final travel arrangements before they receive the visa.

    Child Citizenship Act

    For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States:  A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

    For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States:  An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

    *Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible.  Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

    Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport
U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Mozambique
In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit.  Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Mozambique and South Africa, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip
Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip
When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Mozambique or South Africa, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

The Government of Mozambique requires post-adoption monitoring until the child reaches 21 years of age. This requirement may be waived by the Juvenile court.  However, the courts may not grant an adoption if the child will be immediately taken out of Mozambique.

We strongly urge you to comply with Mozambique’s post-adoption requirements in a timely manner.  Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process.  Your cooperation will contribute to that country’s positive experiences with American parents.

Post-Adoption Resources
Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption.  There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin.  Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Mozambique
U.S. Embassy
Consular Section
Avenida Kenneth Kaunda 193
Maputo, Mozambique
Tel:  (258) 21 49 2797
Fax:  (258) 21 49 0448
Email:  ConsularMaputo@state.gov
Internet:  mz.usembassy.gov

Mozambique’s Adoption Authority
Adoption information may be requested from this office by postal mail, international courier or phone using the following contact information
Direcção Nacional de Acção Social
Departamento da Crianca (Social Services National Directorate, Children’s Department)
Av. Ahmed  Sékou Touré 908,
Tel:  +258 21 350300/301 064
Ms. Francisca Sales is the Director of the Social Services National Directorate at the federal level.

Embassy of Mozambique
Embassy of the Republic of Mozambique
1525 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W.
Suite 570
Washington, D.C.  20036
Tel:  (202) 293-7146
Email:  embamoc@aol.com

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Email:  AskCI@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-600A or I-600 petition:
National Benefits Center
Tel:  1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email:  NBC.Adoptions@DHS.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 12 Months
A-2 None Multiple 12 Months
A-3 1 None One 3 Months
B-1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-2 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 12 Months
C-2 None One 3 Months
C-3 None One 3 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 12 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 None Multiple 12 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 12 Months
F-1 None Multiple 12 Months
F-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-1 None Multiple 12 Months
G-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-3 None Multiple 12 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None One 3 Months
H-1B None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A None N/A N/A 3
H-2B None N/A N/A 3
H-2R None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 12 Months
L-2 None Multiple 12 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 None One 3 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 12 Months
R-2 None Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available. Birth Certificate (Certidao Narrativa Completa de Nascimento) is issued by Conservatoria dos Registos of city of birth. There may be a fee for this service.

Death Certificates

Available. Death Certificate (Certidao de Obito) is issued by Conservatoria dos Registos Civis where death occurred. A certificate can be obtained covering any death that occurred in the country regardless of the nationality of the deceased. There may be a fee for this service.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available. Marriage Certificate (Certidao Narrativa Completa de Casamento) is issued by Conservatoria dos Registos Civis of city of marriage. This certificate is applicable to any civil marriage performed in the country. There may be a fee for this service.

Divorce Certificates

Before 2004, divorce certificates were issued only by the court (Tribunal Judicial). As of 2004, the Civil Registry also issues divorce certificates. Therefore, both the court and the Civil Registry have the authority, as of 2004, to issue a divorce certificate. The Civil Registry issues certificates in divorce cases of mutual consent and the court (Tribunal Judicial) issues certificates in cases of contested divorce. There may be a fee for this service.

Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update

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Identity Card

Please check back for update

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Available. [See PRISON RECORD.]

Prison Records

Available. Certificado do Registo Criminal is issued by Registo Criminal, Rua Des Flores 113, Maputo. The applicant must apply in person, as fingerprints are required. The certificate is issued for persons born in Mozambique and for non-Mozambican residents who have resided in Mozambique for 6 months or more. There may be a fee for this service.

Military Records

Available from the Ministerio da Defensa. There may be a fee for this service.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Please check back for update

Other Records

Not applicable

Visa Issuing Posts

Maputo, Mozambique (Embassy)

193 Avenida Kenneth Kaunda Maputo

Tel: (258) 21 49 2797 (Emergencies after hours): (258) 21 49 0723

Fax: (258) 21 49 0448

Johannesburg, South Africa (Embassy)

Visa Services

Nonimmigrant visas for all of Mozambique. Immigrant visa applications for nationals of Mozambique are processed by the U.S. Consulate General, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 293-7146 ext. 230 for consular services (202) 835-0245

New York, NY (212) 644-6800 (212) 644-5972

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Maputo
Avenida Kenneth Kaunda, 193
Maputo, Mozambique
Telephone
+(258) 21-49-2797
Emergency
+(258) 21-49-0723
Fax
+(258) 21-49-0448
Mozambique Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Mozambique
Republic of Mozambique
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

6 months from entry into Mozambique

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

3 for visa and entry/exit stamps

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Yes

VACCINATIONS:

Yellow Fever if endemic country recently visited (although sometimes applied more broadly to travelers from other places)

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

USD $5000 and 10,000 Mozambican Meticais (without declaration)

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

USD $5000 and 10,000 Mozambican Meticais (without declaration)

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Maputo

Avenida Kenneth Kaunda, 193
Maputo, Mozambique

Telephone: +(258) 21-49-2797

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(258) 21-49-0723

Fax: +(258) 21-49-0448

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Mozambique for information on U.S. - Mozambique relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements
  • U.S. citizens are required to have a visa to enter Mozambique. U.S. citizens have been denied entry for not having obtained a visa in advance.
  • Mozambican Immigration may issue one-entry visas at country points of entry, including airports, particularly if you are arriving from a country without a Mozambican consulate or embassy. However, this is never guaranteed.  For this reason, all travelers recommended to obtain a visa prior to arrival.
  • Please pay attention to the authorized period of stay on your visa ("Autorizado a permaneçer pelo período de [number of days]"). This is the maximum number of days you may remain in the country before you must depart Mozambique. This is distinct from the validity of the visa which indicates when you may enter Mozambique.
  • If you enter without a valid visa, or overstay, you will be fined for each day you were in Mozambique illegally.
  • Your passport must be valid for at least six months after arrival and must contain at least three clean (unstamped) visa pages each time entry is sought. This does not include endorsement pages.
  • Visit the Embassy of Mozambique at 1525 New Hampshire Ave NW, Washington, DC 20036 or call (202) 293-7146 between the hours of 3-5 p.m. for the most current visa information.
  • Travel to Mozambique often requires transit through South Africa. If traveling with minors, please visit the South African Department of Home Affairs website for the most up-to-date requirements as the requirements are particularly stringent.

Vaccinations:

  • A valid certification of vaccination for Yellow Fever is required if you are coming from a country where Yellow Fever is present.
  • Border authorities can require all travelers to present a yellow vaccination books.  See the CDC website for further information on suggested vaccinations for travel to Mozambique.
  • If you cannot present a certificate at the port of entry, you will be vaccinated at your own expense.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Mozambique.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Road travel outside the city after dark is dangerous. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling outside the major cities after dark by car, and are encouraged not to travel outside the city alone. You should be vigilant when you travel in Mozambique and if you travel to/from South Africa, as both countries have high crime rates.

Crime: Street crimes, including mugging, purse-snatching, and pick-pocketing are common in Maputo and in secondary cities. Carjackings are rare, but still occur.

  • Pedestrians have been mugged at all hours of the day.  Avoid isolated areas and walking at night, even in well-known tourist areas.
  • Avoid walking along the Marginal south of the Southern Sun Hotel and Avenida Friedrich Engels and Rua Caracol.
  • Avoid walking along roads bordered by wooded areas, as criminals may hide there.

Johannesburg International Airport:

  • Secure your bags. Use an airport plastic wrapping service.
  • Avoid placing currency and high value items in checked luggage when transiting.

Landmines: Mozambique was declared free of all known landmines in 2015; however, there could remain unknown mines in very rural areas. Seek local information before going off-road outside major cities.

Information about specific safety and security issues can be found on the U.S. Embassy Maputo’s website under “Messages for U.S. Citizen.”

Victims of Crime:

Report crimes to the local police and contact the U.S. Embassy at +258 21-49-0723. Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.
See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help find appropriate medical care
  • assist in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • help explain the local criminal justice process
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a lost/stolen passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to host country laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be deported, arrested or imprisoned.  It’s very important to know what’s legal and what’s not wherever you go.

  • Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in are severe. Convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
  • Some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.
  • Carry your passport with you at all times. You can be taken in for questioning if you cannot present your passport. 
  • Photography of some government buildings may be illegal. Ask before taking pictures.
  • Driving under the influence can land you immediately in jail.
  • Your U.S. passport will not help avoid arrest or prosecution.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

LGBTI Travelers: Mozambique is a very tolerant society. Consensual same-sex relations are not criminalized and there is increasing space in public conversation regarding LGBTI issues. There remains, however, some societal stigmatization and room for progress in terms of full equal treatment, such as in the registration of LGBTI groups. See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Although the government legislatively mandates access to public buildings, transportation, and government services for persons with disabilities, few buildings are accessible.

  • Restaurants, hotels, and residential buildings have stairs at the entrance without wheelchair ramps, except perhaps at a few major hotels and retail areas.
  • Pedestrian paths and transportation are extremely difficult for persons with disabilities.
  • Sidewalks are not commonplace and, if they exist, are poorly maintained and dangerous to walk on at night.
  • Pedestrian crossings are infrequent and drivers seldom obey traffic signals.
  • Buses and taxis do not have special accommodations for disabled persons.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers:

  • Rape - The law prohibits rape, including spousal rape, but it is not effectively enforced and is largely unknown in rural areas where the majority of rapes take place. Penalties range from two to eight years’ imprisonment if the victim is 12 years of age or older and 20 to 24 years’ imprisonment if the victim is under 12, according to the new penal code.
  • Domestic Violence - The law prohibits violence against women. Domestic violence against women, particularly spousal rape and beatings, remain widespread. Abuse of a spouse or unmarried partner is punishable with one to two years in prison, or a greater penalty if in conjunction with another crime.
  • See our travel tips for Women Travelers.
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Health

Consult the CDC website for the Mozambique prior to travel.

Medical facilities are rudimentary, and most medical providers do not speak fluent English. Medications are not always available.  Public and private medical facilities exist in the city of Maputo and most provincial capitals.

  • All health care providers require payment at the time of or before providing service. Most do not accept credit cards.
  • You are responsible for all medical costs. U.S. Medicare does not cover you overseas.
  • Prescriptions Medications: Check with Ministry of Foreign Affairs to ensure the medication is legal to bring into the country.  Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage. We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation. 

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

 

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: The EN4 toll road between Maputo and South Africa is well-maintained. The road network connecting provincial capitals is in fair condition, but can be riddled with potholes and other obstacles. Vehicles on certain sections of the EN1 roadway in Sofala and Manica provinces and the EN6 between Beira and Chimoio have been shot at and the Government of Mozambique has instituted convoys on some stretches of the road. U.S. Embassy officials are restricted from traveling in Sofala or Manica on the EN1 between the Save River (in the south) and the city of Caia (in the north) and on the EN6 between Beira and Chimoio. Restrictions are also in place on the EN7 from Nova Vanduzi to Luenha.    

  • U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling outside cities after dark because of the increased risk of banditry, poor road conditions in some areas, poor maintenance of many vehicles in the country (e.g., no headlights or rear lights), as well as the threat imposed by livestock grazing on roadsides and intoxicated drivers.
  • Travel outside Maputo often requires a four-wheel drive vehicle, which creates an additional security risk since these vehicles are high-theft items. Public transportation is limited and often has poor safety standards.   

Accidents Serious traffic accidents are one of the greatest threats to U.S. citizens in Mozambique. Accidents involving drivers and pedestrians are common and sometimes fatal. The potential for accidents increases at night due to unseen holes and obstructions, poor lighting conditions, pedestrians on the highways, and other vehicles driving without headlights. If a serious accident occurs or if a driver hits a pedestrian, crowds quickly gather.

  • Mozambican law requires parties to an accident to render assistance; however, you should exercise your best judgment. Render assistance if necessary and practical, but only if you feel you can do so without placing yourself at risk.
  • Report the accident to the nearest police station and contact the U.S. Embassy immediately.

Traffic Laws: Drivers should obey police signals to stop at checkpoints, which are common throughout Mozambique. Foreigners visiting Mozambique for more than 90 days are required to have an International Driver’s License or to obtain a Mozambican driver’s license.

Public Transportation: The U.S. Embassy advises U.S. citizens not to use “chapas” (local minibuses) as a method of transportation due to frequent, often fatal accidents involving these vehicles.

See our Road Safety page for more information. Visit the website of Mozambique’s national tourist office.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Mozambique, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Mozambique’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Maputo

Avenida Kenneth Kaunda, 193
Maputo, Mozambique

Telephone: +(258) 21-49-2797

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(258) 21-49-0723

Fax: +(258) 21-49-0448

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General Information

For information concerning travel to Mozambique, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Mozambique.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

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Hague Abduction Convention

Mozambique is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between Mozambique and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

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Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  The government of Mozambique does not maintain information about custody, visitation, and family law on the Internet.  

 

Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Mozambique and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.  

 

The Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction.  For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children’s Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children’s Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

U.S. Department of State 
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website:  travel.state.gov
Email: AfricaIPCA@state.gov

Parental child abduction is a crime in Mozambique. 

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court.  Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information.  

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Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Mozambique and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children’s Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States.  Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the appropriate U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Mozambique for information and possible assistance.

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Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children’s Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy or Consulates in Mozambique are authorized to provide legal advice.

The U.S. Embassy in Maputo, Mozambique posts list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law. 

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

The institution responsible for mediating all children related issues is the Tribunal dos Menores (juvenile court). Mediation may be proposed as a remedy in custody disputes, although the court would not be able to provide much assistance in access cases for a left behind parent because parental abduction is not discussed as a crime in the Family Law.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Mozambique is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (the Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section  204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F).

Prospective adoptive parents must be legal residents of Mozambique and must be present in the country for the duration of the adoption process. This includes a six month integration period after a prospective adoptive child is placed in the home, and before the adoption can be finalized by the court. (Visit the Embassy of Mozambique website for current visa information.) Additionally, married prospective adoptive parents must be married for three years prior to the initiation of the adoption process. The marriage can be civil, religious, or traditional, as long as it is registered. Civil marriages are registered with the civil registrar. Religious marriages are registered with the office of the religious denomination chosen by the given couple. This is done by having the community leader, married couple, and their witnesses sign a declaration and taking it to the relevant district office. Traditional marriages require the presence of the community leader and at least two witnesses. This is done by presenting witnesses to the appropriate district official. In cases in which the marriage took place at least three years prior to the initiation of the adoption, but was not registered, the prospective adoptive parents may invoke common law.

The Government of Mozambique requires post-adoption monitoring until the child reaches 21 years of age. This requirement may be waived at the judge’s discretion. However, the courts may not grant an adoption if the child will be immediately taken out of Mozambique.

Changes to Mozambique’s intercountry adoption laws are under consideration by Unidade Technica da Reforma Legal (UTREL), which drafts and proposes laws for the Government of Mozambique. To date, no substantial amendments have been made to the existing laws.  Mozambican law does not make a distinction between intercountry and domestic adoption. This may mean that foreigners will be expected to meet the same pre- and post-adoption monitoring requirements as Mozambican families, which may become an obstacle if the court decides the child cannot be monitored outside of Mozambique.

U.S. IMMIGRATION REQUIREMENTS FOR INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTIONS

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Mozambique, you must meet eligibility and suitability requirements. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) determines Who Can Adopt under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of orphan under U.S. law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States on an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

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Who Can Adopt

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, you must also meet the following requirements in order to adopt a child from Mozambique:

  • Residency: Prospective adoptive parents must be legal residents of Mozambique and must be physically present in Mozambique for the duration of the adoption process, including a six-month integration period after a prospective adoptive child is placed in the home and before the adoption can be finalized by the court.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: Prospective adoptive parents must be over 25 years of age and less than 50 on the date the child is entrusted to them, unless the child is the biological son or daughter of one of the prospective adoptive parents.
  • Marriage: Prospective adoptive parents must be married for three years prior to the initiation of the adoption process. Single people are not eligible to adopt. The Government of Mozambique does not legally permit same-sex couples to adopt.
  • Income: None.
  • Other: Prospective adoptive parents must undergo a home study evaluation by Mozambican social and health workers from the country’s child welfare office and must be certified approved for adoption.
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Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, Mozambique has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption:

  • Relinquishment: In order to be eligible for adoption, a child must be relinquished by both parents. However, there is an exception if the prospective adoptive parent is the spouse of a biological parent or a partner with whom the biological parent has been living for at least three years. In these situations, only the biological parent who is not living with the minor child and the prospective adoptive parent must relinquish parental rights.
  • Abandonment: A child of unknown parents.
  • Age of Adoptive Child: The prospective adoptive child must be a minor under 14 years of age, or 18 years of age if s/he has been fostered by the prospective adoptive parents since 12 years of age.
  • Sibling Adoptions: None
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions: None
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care: The adoption is generally preceded by a minimum adaptation period of six months, in which the prospective adopted child is integrated into the family via foster care before the legal adoption is finalized in the court. This process must take place in Mozambique.

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, with the intention of returning for the child when they are able to do so. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

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How to Adopt

Mozambique’s Adoption Authority
Social Services National Directorate (Direcção Nacional da Acçao Social)

The Process

The process for adopting a child from Mozambique generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose an adoption service provider
  2. Apply to be found eligible to adopt
  3. Be matched with a child
  4. Adopt the child in Mozambique
  5. Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status
  6. Bring your child home
  1. Choose an adoption service provider

    The recommended first step in adopting a child from Mozambique is to decide whether or not to use a licensed adoption service provider in the United States that can help you with your adoption. Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate. The Department of State provides information on selecting an adoption service provider on its website.

    U.S. adoption service providers do not usually play a role in the adoption process. The services of a private attorney in Mozambique are not normally required for the adoption process.  However, the U.S. Embassy in Mozambique maintains a list of attorneys that is available on request.

  2. Apply to be found eligible to adopt

    In order to adopt a child from Mozambique, prospective adoptive parents will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Mozambique and U.S. immigration law.  Prospective adoptive parents must submit an application to be found eligible to adopt with the municipal juvenile court (Tribunal de Menores) closest to the residence of the prospective adoptive parents.

    Prospective adoptions parents must provide an application addressed to the presiding judge of the court, stating:

    • Advantages of adoption for the adoptee;
    • Age of adoptee;
    • Age of the adoptive parents, and
    • Marital status of the adoptive parents.

    The prospective adoptive parents’ signature on the statement must be witnessed by three people.

    If the judge makes a positive decision on the adoption, the case is generally transferred to the Social Services National Directorate to conduct a home study.

    To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also file an I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition with U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to be found eligible and suitable to adopt.

  3. Be matched with a child

    If you are eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, Mozambique’s Social Services National Directorate will provide you with a referral.  Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of and provide a permanent home for a particular child.

    The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Mozambique’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section.  The child must also meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law.

  4. Adopt the child in Mozambique

    The process for finalizing the adoption in Mozambique generally includes the following:

    • Role of Adoption Authority:  Municipal authorities oversee adoptions within their respective geographic areas of jurisdiction.  U.S. citizens wishing to adopt in Maputo should contact Ana Maria Macuacua, the head of Maputo City’s Social Service National Directorate at  (258) 21 302613.  Numbers for offices in other provinces can be obtained by contacting the national directorate at +258 21 302613.
    • Role of the Court:  The Juvenile Court (Tribunal de Menores) grants official orders of adoption or guardianship.
    • Role of Adoption Agencies:  None.
    • Adoption Application:  The first step in the adoption process is submission of a formal adoption request to the Juvenile Court in the appropriate governing municipality.  Together with the initial application, prospective parents should submit a certified copy of their marriage certificate (translated into Portuguese) and photocopies of their passports and Mozambican residency permits (known as a “DIRE”).  A list of other supporting documents and required forms may be obtained from the court.  If the court grants the order of adoption, the Social Services Directorate (SSD) will then begin a lengthy investigation of the prospective adoptive parents’ lifestyle, economic means, mental and physical health, and other details associated with a home study evaluation. During this time, the process of identifying a child for adoption is also initiated by the SSD.

      As a final step, the SSD will pass the parents’ petition for adoption to the Juvenile Court (Tribunal de Menores), to issue a certificate of approval officially endorsing the adoption. The adoptive parents may then begin the process of registration, name change, and application for new identity and nationality documents for their child.

    • Time Frame:  The adoption process in Mozambique takes approximately six to nine months.  U.S. immigrant visa petitions filed at the U.S. Embassy in Mozambique on behalf of adopted minors are forwarded to the U.S. Consulate General in Johannesburg for adjudication.
    • Adoption Fees:  There is a court fee of 1,450 Meticais (approximately USD $50), in addition to minor fees for forms and documents.  Adoptive parents will also be responsible for acquiring official translations of both English- and Portuguese-language documents.  The U.S. Embassy in Mozambique maintains a list of Portuguese/en translators for the public use.
    • Documents Required:  Prospective adoptive parents should be prepared to submit certified copies of their marriage certificate, Mozambican residency cards, passports (all with official translations, if required), along with bank statements and health certificates to the SSD who then submits these documents to the Juvenile court.

      Note:  Additional documents may be requested.

    • Authentication of Documents:  You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic.  If so, the Department of State, Authentications Office may be able to assist.
  5. Apply for the child to be found eligible for orphan status

    After you finalize the adoption in Mozambique, the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services must determine whether the child meets the definition of orphan under U.S. law.  You will need to file a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative.

  6. Bring your child home

    Once your adoption is complete, you need to apply for several documents for your child before you can apply for a U.S. immigrant visa to bring your child home to the United States:

    Birth Certificate
    If you have finalized the adoption in Mozambique, you will first need to apply for a new Mozambican birth certificate for your child, so that you can later apply for a Mozambican passport.  Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.  To obtain a new birth certificate, please contact Conservatória does Registo Civil, located at Av. Karl Max (Tel: (258) 21 33798).

    Mozambique Passport
    Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Mozambique.  Please contact the Direção Nacional de Migração, located at Av. Ho Chi Min 316, Maputo (Tel: (258) 21430782/21 303765), in order to obtain the passport.

    U.S. Immigrant Visa
    After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child and you have filed Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, you then need to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa for your child.  This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you.  As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child.

    The U.S. Embassy in Mozambique does not conduct immigrant visa interviews or make decisions in immigrant visa cases.  All immigrant visa applications for citizens of Mozambique, including adopted children, are adjudicated by the Consular Section at the U.S. Consulate General in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    APPLYING FOR A VISA AT THE U.S. CONSULATE GENERAL IN JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA:  All U.S. immigrant visas for citizens of Mozambique are processed by the Consular Section at the U.S. Consulate General in Johannesburg, South Africa.  Before traveling, please review the Consular Information Sheet for South Africa and be sure to comply with the Government of South Africa’s entry requirements, which stipulate that travelers to South Africa must have at least two blank pages in their foreign passport upon entry.

    Once the Consular Section is in receipt of a family’s approved Form I-600 petition, the Consular Section will contact the family concerning their next steps.  Immigrant visa applicants must complete a series of forms—details of which will be provided to the prospective adoptive parents by the U.S, Consulate General in Johannesburg—before the immigrant visa interview may take place.  Once the family is documentarily ready for the immigrant visa interview, they must call the Consular Section to schedule an appointment.  A consular officer conducts the interview and, if the visa application is approved, issues the visa.  A consular officer must see the adopted child before the immigrant visa may be issued.  All adoption cases must include full judicial documentation that constitutes irrevocable release of the child for immigration and adoption, as well as permission to depart the country by the court that granted the adoption.

    Mailing Address:
    Consulate General of the United States of America
    P.O. Box 787197, Sandton, 2146
    Johannesburg, South Africa

    Physical Address:
    1 Sandton Drive, Sandhurst (opposite Sandton City Mall)
    Johannesburg, South Africa

    Tel:  (27 11) 290-3000
    Fax:  (27 11) (011) 884-0396
    Email:  consularjohannesburg@state.gov

    Note:  Visa issuance after the final interview now generally takes at least 24 working hours and it will not normally be possible to provide the visa to adoptive parents on the day of the interview.  Adoptive parents should not make final travel arrangements before they receive the visa.

    Child Citizenship Act

    For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States:  A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

    For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States:  An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

    *Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible.  Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

    Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

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Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport
U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Mozambique
In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit.  Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Mozambique and South Africa, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip
Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip
When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Mozambique or South Africa, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

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After Adoption

The Government of Mozambique requires post-adoption monitoring until the child reaches 21 years of age. This requirement may be waived by the Juvenile court.  However, the courts may not grant an adoption if the child will be immediately taken out of Mozambique.

We strongly urge you to comply with Mozambique’s post-adoption requirements in a timely manner.  Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process.  Your cooperation will contribute to that country’s positive experiences with American parents.

Post-Adoption Resources
Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption.  There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin.  Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note:  Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Mozambique
U.S. Embassy
Consular Section
Avenida Kenneth Kaunda 193
Maputo, Mozambique
Tel:  (258) 21 49 2797
Fax:  (258) 21 49 0448
Email:  ConsularMaputo@state.gov
Internet:  mz.usembassy.gov

Mozambique’s Adoption Authority
Adoption information may be requested from this office by postal mail, international courier or phone using the following contact information
Direcção Nacional de Acção Social
Departamento da Crianca (Social Services National Directorate, Children’s Department)
Av. Ahmed  Sékou Touré 908,
Tel:  +258 21 350300/301 064
Ms. Francisca Sales is the Director of the Social Services National Directorate at the federal level.

Embassy of Mozambique
Embassy of the Republic of Mozambique
1525 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W.
Suite 570
Washington, D.C.  20036
Tel:  (202) 293-7146
Email:  embamoc@aol.com

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Email:  AskCI@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-600A or I-600 petition:
National Benefits Center
Tel:  1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email:  NBC.Adoptions@DHS.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 12 Months
A-2 None Multiple 12 Months
A-3 1 None One 3 Months
B-1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-2 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 12 Months
C-2 None One 3 Months
C-3 None One 3 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 12 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 None Multiple 12 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 12 Months
F-1 None Multiple 12 Months
F-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-1 None Multiple 12 Months
G-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-3 None Multiple 12 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None One 3 Months
H-1B None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A None N/A N/A 3
H-2B None N/A N/A 3
H-2R None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 12 Months
L-2 None Multiple 12 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 None One 3 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 12 Months
R-2 None Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available. Birth Certificate (Certidao Narrativa Completa de Nascimento) is issued by Conservatoria dos Registos of city of birth. There may be a fee for this service.

Death Certificates

Available. Death Certificate (Certidao de Obito) is issued by Conservatoria dos Registos Civis where death occurred. A certificate can be obtained covering any death that occurred in the country regardless of the nationality of the deceased. There may be a fee for this service.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available. Marriage Certificate (Certidao Narrativa Completa de Casamento) is issued by Conservatoria dos Registos Civis of city of marriage. This certificate is applicable to any civil marriage performed in the country. There may be a fee for this service.

Divorce Certificates

Before 2004, divorce certificates were issued only by the court (Tribunal Judicial). As of 2004, the Civil Registry also issues divorce certificates. Therefore, both the court and the Civil Registry have the authority, as of 2004, to issue a divorce certificate. The Civil Registry issues certificates in divorce cases of mutual consent and the court (Tribunal Judicial) issues certificates in cases of contested divorce. There may be a fee for this service.

Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update

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Identity Card

Please check back for update

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Available. [See PRISON RECORD.]

Prison Records

Available. Certificado do Registo Criminal is issued by Registo Criminal, Rua Des Flores 113, Maputo. The applicant must apply in person, as fingerprints are required. The certificate is issued for persons born in Mozambique and for non-Mozambican residents who have resided in Mozambique for 6 months or more. There may be a fee for this service.

Military Records

Available from the Ministerio da Defensa. There may be a fee for this service.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Please check back for update

Other Records

Not applicable

Visa Issuing Posts

Maputo, Mozambique (Embassy)

193 Avenida Kenneth Kaunda Maputo

Tel: (258) 21 49 2797 (Emergencies after hours): (258) 21 49 0723

Fax: (258) 21 49 0448

Johannesburg, South Africa (Embassy)

Visa Services

Nonimmigrant visas for all of Mozambique. Immigrant visa applications for nationals of Mozambique are processed by the U.S. Consulate General, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 293-7146 ext. 230 for consular services (202) 835-0245

New York, NY (212) 644-6800 (212) 644-5972

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Maputo
Avenida Kenneth Kaunda, 193
Maputo, Mozambique
Telephone
+(258) 21-49-2797
Emergency
+(258) 21-49-0723
Fax
+(258) 21-49-0448
Mozambique Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.