Emergency Alert
September 17, 2017
Hurricanes Irma and Jose
Emergency Alert
October 2, 2017
Hurricane Maria

International Travel

English

Country Information

Montenegro

Country Information

Montenegro
Montenegro
Last Updated: November 2, 2016
ALL /
ALL /
Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Must be valid at time of entry

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required for entry stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Not required for stays under 90 days

VACCINATIONS:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

10,000 Euros (or equivalent) must be declared

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

10,000 Euros (or equivalent) must be declared

ALL /
ALL /
Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Podgorica

Dzona Dzeksona 2
81000 Podgorica
Montenegro

Telephone: +(382)(20) 410-500

ALL /
ALL /
Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Montenegro for additional information on U.S.-Montenegro relations.

ALL /
ALL /
Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

U.S. citizen visitors (traveling with U.S. passports) do not need a visa to enter and stay in Montenegro for up to 90 days.

  • Visitors must register within the first 24 hours of arrival.
  • If you are staying in a hotel or tourist facility, the hotel will automatically register you; otherwise you are personally responsible to appear at the police station to register.
  • If you do not register, you may be subject to a fine, incarceration, expulsion, and/or difficulties in departing Montenegro.
  • The police registration form can be purchased at bookstores or is available online.

U.S. citizen visitors intending to stay longer than 90 days:

  • U.S. citizens wishing to extend their stay longer than 90 days must apply for a temporary residence permit at least one week before the 90-day period ends.
  • Due to lengthy administrative procedures, we advise you to apply as soon as you learn that you will be staying in Montenegro longer than 90 days.

You can contact the Embassy of Montenegro in Washington, D.C. for the most current visa information.  Montenegro’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs website contains additional contact information for its diplomatic posts in the United States.

Currency and Customs Restrictions:

  • Travelers are required to declare currency exceeding 10,000 euros (or equivalent) upon entry or exit.
  • To avoid customs charges, travelers must also declare luxury goods, jewelry, paintings, and computer equipment.
  • At the port of entry, travelers can obtain currency declaration forms that must be completed and presented at departure.
  • Failure to comply with these policies may result in confiscation of funds/goods and criminal proceedings.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Montenegro.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

ALL /
ALL /
Safety and Security

Credible information indicates terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Europe.  European governments are taking action to guard against terrorist attacks; however, all European countries remain potentially vulnerable to attacks from transnational terrorist organizations. 

Demonstrations: While most demonstrations are peaceful, even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can become confrontational and potentially escalate into violence. Montenegrins are generally open and hospitable to visitors; however, in isolated incidents, visitors might encounter anti-foreign sentiment.

Montenegrin nightclubs are popular with foreign tourists.  Patrons should be aware that these establishments can be crowded and may not comply with Western standards for occupancy control or fire safety.

Crime:  Residential break-ins present the greatest security concern for U.S. citizens in Montenegro.  Violent crime is infrequent.  There is a significant increase in theft at ATMs during the May to September tourist season.

  • Police have limited English ability.
  • Visitors should ensure that they protect their PINs at all times when using ATMs, and monitor card activity.

Victims of Crime: Report crimes to the local police by dialing 112 and contact the U.S. Embassy at +382 20 410 500. 

  • Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.We can:

  • Help you find appropriate medical care
  • Assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • Contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • Explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • Provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • Provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical
  • Support in cases of destitution
  • Help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • Replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

The local equivalents to the 911 emergency line in Montenegro are 122 for police, 123 for the fire department, and 124 for an ambulance.

For further information:

ALL /
ALL /
Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Carrying weapons in Montenegro is illegal.  If you break local laws in Montenegro, your U.S. passport won’t help you avoid arrest or prosecution.

Furthermore, some crimes are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Special Circumstances

Dual U.S.-Montenegrin citizens: Dual citizens may be subject to laws that impose special obligations on Montenegrin citizens, though, as of August 30, 2006, Montenegrin men are no longer required to perform military service. 

  • If you became a dual citizen after June 3, 2006, Montenegro will only recognize dual citizenship with countries it has signed a bilateral agreement with.
  • Montenegro still abides by the bilateral consular agreement between Yugoslavia and the United States.

LGBTI Rights:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Montenegro. LGBT individuals are protected by anti-discrimination laws in Montenegro.  However, LGBT individuals are subject to widespread societal discrimination, ostracism, and harassment.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights Report for further details.

Athletic Contract Disputes: U.S.-citizen athletes who are considering playing for professional teams in Montenegro, particularly outside the capital, should be aware of reports of disputes regarding contracts not being honored and treatment and living conditions not matching expectations.  We recommend that U.S.-citizen athletes carefully review proposed contracts and research the team, living arrangements, and city where they will be playing prior to accepting offers or commencing travel.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance:  Many public facilities are not fully accessible to individuals with disabilities.  Accessibility for those with disabilities, including on public transportation, is lacking throughout the country.  Outside of urban areas, accessibility is particularly limited. In 2008, Montenegro passed a law regulating the accessibility to public facilities; however, only newer buildings meet those standards.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

ALL /
ALL /
Health

Medical Facilities:  Hospitals and clinics are generally not equipped or maintained to U.S. standards.

  • Travelers may need to go to privately-owned pharmacies in order to obtain medicines and basic medical supplies.
  • Hospitals and private clinics usually require payment in cash for all services. Montenegro has only a small number of ambulances.
  • Emergency services are generally responsive in only the most severe cases. Otherwise, people must have their own transportation to hospitals and clinics.
  • We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare is not valid overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation. 

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the Government of Montenegro, and its Ministry of Foreign Affairs to ensure the medication is legal in Montenegro.  Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

ALL /
ALL /
Travel and Transportation

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: Roads in Montenegro are often poorly maintained, especially in rural areas. Roads leading to Montenegro’s coastal areas are in better condition, but are overcrowded during summer season. Drivers can be reckless and aggressive, and accidents are frequent. 

  • Dangerous areas for road travel include a road through the Moraca Canyon, north of Podgorica. This twisting, two-lane road is especially overcrowded in the summer, and is the site of frequent rockslides. In the winter, the Moraca Canyon and northern parts of Montenegro are covered with snow, which may slow traffic and make the road hazardous.
  • It’s common for Montenegrin drivers to attempt to pass on winding roads and hills.

Traffic Laws:

  • The use of seat belts is mandatory for all passengers.
  • Cell phone usage while driving is prohibited.
  • Vehicle lights must be switched on at all times while driving.
  • Right turns on red lights are strictly forbidden, unless a distinct green arrow is seen.
  • At unmarked intersections, the right of way is always given to the vehicle entering from the right.
  • Each vehicle must have a reflective fluorescent vest to be used in the event of an emergency road stop, as well as a European car accident report form.
  • Children under 5 years-old must use a safety seat attached to a vehicle safety belt.
  • Vehicles must have winter tires and carry snow chains between November 15 and March 30.  
  • Pedestrians crossing in designated crosswalks have the right of way. Drivers must stop.
  • The blood alcohol limit in Montenegro is .03 percent, less than half the legal limit in the United States.

Taxis:  Metered taxi service is safe, although foreigners are sometimes charged higher rates. Taxis generally do not pick up passengers on the street and must be ordered by phone or SMS.

Public Transportation: Trains, buses, and ferries often use aging and poorly-maintained equipment.

Roadside assistance is available by dialing 19807, +382 (0)20 234 467 or +382 (0)20 234 999. Other emergency numbers are police: 122; fire department: 123; and ambulance: 124

See our Road Safety page for more information. Also, we suggest that you visit the website of Montenegro’s National Tourism Organization and the Auto-moto Association of Montenegro, the national authority responsible for road safety.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Montenegro, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the Government of Montenegro’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
ALL /
ALL /
Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Podgorica

Dzona Dzeksona 2
81000 Podgorica
Montenegro

Telephone: +(382)(20) 410-500

ALL /
ALL /
General Information

Montenegro and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) since December 1, 1991, when it was part of Yugoslavia.  Following establishment of independence in 2006, Montenegro declared itself bound by this Convention on March 1, 2007.

For information concerning travel to Montenegro, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Montenegro.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

ALL /
ALL /
Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Montenegro.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State 
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel.:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Fax: 202-485-6221
Website: travel.state.gov

The Montenegro Central Authority (MCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Ministry of Justice. The MCA has an administrative role in processing Hague Abduction Convention applications.  The MCA forwards completed Hague petitions to the competent civil court within the jurisdiction of the child’s location.  The MCA can be reached at:

Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Montenegro
Vuka Karadžica # 3
81 000 Montenegro
Tel.: +382 (20) 407 520
Fax: +382 (20) 407 515
Websitemail: www.mpa.gov.me

Contact Person: Ms. Dara Tomcic
Adviser in the Ministry of Justice of Montenegro
tel./fax: +382 20 407 510
e-mail: dara.tomcic@moa.gov.me

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Montenegro, the USCA encourages a parent or legal guardian to review the eligibility criteria and instructions for completing the Hague application form located at the Department of State website and contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the MCA. It is extremely important that each document written in English be translated into Montenegrin, Serbian, Bosnian, or Croatian.  Please note, however, certified translations are not necessary.

The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to the MCA, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the U.S. or Montenegro central authorities.  Attorney fees, if necessary, are the responsibility of the applicant parent or legal guardian. Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

ALL /
ALL /
Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Montenegro.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

ALL /
ALL /
Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Montenegro.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

ALL /
ALL /
Retaining an Attorney

The Montenegro legal system does not require parents to retain a private attorney in order to file a Hague Abduction Convention petition with a court; however, the MCA recommends that parents have legal representation.  Parents may hire a private attorney to assist them with their case and to advise them as to the best course of action for their individual circumstances.  A parent who hires private counsel should notify both the Montenegro and the U.S. central authorities.

The U.S. Embassy in Podgorica, Montenegro, posts a list of attorneys including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

ALL /
ALL /
Mediation

The MCA promotes mediation in abduction cases and will attempt to initiate mediation in Hague Abduction Convention cases. While courts cannot order mediation, judges can and do strongly encourage mediated resolutions and can stay hearings to permit parties the time to mediate.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
ALL /
ALL /
Hague Convention Information

Montenegro is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoption processing in Hague countries is done in accordance with the requirements of the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations, as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Montenegro.

Intercountry adoptions from Montenegro are extremely rare; fewer than five adoptions by U.S. citizen parents have taken place in the last decade. Montenegro places a priority on domestic adoption. Generally, only children with special needs are available for inter-country adoption. Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that most children in orphanages or foster care are not adoptable, and that the only way to be matched with a child is to submit an application to be found eligible to adopt with the Montenegro Central Authority (MCA) and wait for the MCA to identify a child eligible for intercountry adoption. No U.S. adoption service providers are accredited by the MCA to provide adoption services in Montenegro, and prospective adoptive parents should be wary of any adoption agencies making statements contradicting information provided here or by the MCA. The Office of Children’s Issues can be contacted for further verification.

U.S. citizens interested in adopting children from Montenegro should contact the Central Authority of Montenegro to inquire about applicable laws and procedures. U.S. citizen prospective adoptive parents living in Montenegro who would like to adopt a child from the United States or from a third country should also contact Montenegro’s Central Authority. See contact information below.

Please visit the Department’s Country Specific Information for more information on traveling to Montenegro and the U.S. Embassy in Podgorica’s website for information on consular services.

WARNING: The consular officer will send a letter (referred to as an “Article 5 Letter”) to Montenegro’s Central Authority in any intercountry adoption involving U.S. citizen parents and a child from Montenegro where all Convention requirements are met and the consular officer determines that the child appears eligible to immigrate to the United States. This letter will inform Montenegro’s Central Authority that the parents are eligible and suited to adopt, that all indications are that the child may enter and reside permanently in the United States, and that the U.S. Central Authority agrees that the adoption may proceed.

Do not attempt to adopt or obtain custody of a child in Montenegro before a U.S. consular officer issues the Article 5 Letter in any adoption case.

Remember: The consular officer will make a final decision about a child’s eligibility for an immigrant visa later in the adoption process.

Montenegro’s Adoption Authority
Ministry of Labor and Social Welfare
Department of Social Welfare and Child Protection

ALL /
ALL /
Who Can Adopt
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Who Can Be Adopted
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
How to Adopt
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Traveling Abroad
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
After Adoption
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Montenegro
Dzona Dzeksona 2
81000 Podgorica
Montenegro
Tel: +382 (0)20 410 500
Fax: +382 (0)20 241 358
Email: PodgoricaACS@state.gov
Internet: me.usembassy.gov

Montenegro’s Adoption Authority
Ministry of Labor and Social Welfare
Department of Social Welfare and Child Protection 
Mr. Goran Kuševija – Director of Department
Rimski trg 46
81000 Podgoica
Montenegro
Tel: +382 (0)20 482 447; 78 113 344
E-mail: goran.kusevija@mrs.gov.me 
Fax: +382 (0) 78 113 345

Embassy of Montenegro
1610 New Hampshire Avenue NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
Tel: 1-202-234-6108
Fax: 1-202- 234-6109
Email: usa@mfa.gov.me

Montenegro also has a consulate in New York.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
Email: AdoptionUSCA@state.gov
Internet: adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-800A or I-800 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email: NBC.Hague@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months A
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months A
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 None Multiple 36 Months
B-2 None Multiple 36 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 36 Months
C-1 None Multiple 36 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 36 Months
C-2 None Multiple 36 Months
C-3 None Multiple 48 Months A
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 36 Months
E-1 2 None Multiple 12 Months
E-2 2 None Multiple 12 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 12 Months
F-1 None Multiple 24 Months
F-2 None Multiple 24 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months A
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months A
G-3 None Multiple 36 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months A
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 24 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 24 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 12 Months
L-2 None Multiple 12 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 12 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 12 Months
R-2 None Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
ALL /
ALL /
Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

ALL /
ALL /
Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

ALL /
ALL /
General Documents

Please check back for update

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth and Death Certificates

Available. Birth (Izvod iz Maticne Knjige Rodjenih) and death certificates, (Izvod iz Maticne Knjige Umrlih) are consolidated into a national database and are available from the civil registrars throughout Montenegro. The church documents are entitled Izvod Iz Knjiga Za Upisivanje Rodjenih I Krstenih (Birth certificate) and Smrtni List (death certificate). Many records, particularly in Montenegro, were destroyed during the Second World War and reconstructed afterwards.

Same-sex marriages are not recognized in Montenegro.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Marriage certificates (Izvod iz Maticne Vencanih) are currently only available at the civil registry where the event occurred. The fact that a marriage took place by proxy is not usually evident from the marriage certificate. Prior to May l0, 1946, these records were maintained by church authorities. Since that date, only civil marriages have been legal. The church document is entitled Vencani List (Marriage certificate). Many records, particularly in Montenegro, were destroyed during the Second World War and reconstructed afterwards.

Same-sex marriages are not recognized in Montenegro.

Divorce Certificate

Available. Copies of divorce judgments are available from the district court (okruzni sud) which decided the case. A divorce certificate is typewritten and headed "In the Name of the People" (U ime naroda). Since May l0, l976, only divorces obtained through the civil courts have been legal. Prior to this date, divorces granted by church authorities were also recognized.

Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update

ALL /
ALL /
Identity Card

Available. All residents of Montenegro who have reached their eighteenth birthday must carry an identity card (Licna Karta) issued by the Secretariat for Internal Affairs (Sekretarijat za Unutrasnje Poslove). It contains the photograph, date and place of birth, and address of the bearer.

Note : Non-residents must apply for these documents through a Montenegro diplomatic mission. They are unlikely to receive a reply if they write directly to the issuing office. Montenegro consular offices throughout the world are supplied with the appropriate forms for obtaining civil documents. The request will be forwarded to the Montenegro Ministry of Foreign Affairs for transmission to the office responsible for the issuance of the required document. The document will then be returned to the applicant via the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Montenegro Diplomatic Mission overseas.

The above procedure can be lengthy. All applicants are encouraged to obtain the required documents through a family member, friend or lawyer residing in Montenegro, who could apply personally at the office which issues them.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Record

The Montenegrin Ministry of Justice became the entity responsible for issuing police certificates on 31 March 2014. These documents contain criminal records of persons convicted of criminal offenses committed in Montenegro, as well as persons convicted of criminal offenses by foreign courts.

Criminal records will be provided on the basis of a submitted written request. Requests for releasing the information can be downloaded here. A second party, such as the Embassy, may not request police certificates on individuals to independently verify someone's background.

The Ministry of Justice is located at Vuka Karadžica 3, 81000 Podgorica, Montenegro and can be contacted via e-mail at rke@mpa.gov.me

Note that in many cases, convictions can be expunged after ten years. Thus, the record may not be complete beyond ten years, but it is the best and only record available. This certificate should not be confused with the certificates issued by courts (Sudsko uverenje) that cover only the period of the past six months and indicate the absence of any investigation, charge or conviction in that period.

Non-citizens who once resided in Montenegro, and are now in their native country, may apply for police certificates with their local Ministry of Foreign Affairs which will then, through diplomatic channels, contact the Embassy of Montenegro in that country.

Non-citizens who once resided in Montenegro, and are in a third country now, may apply with their Embassy in that country, who will then, through diplomatic channels, contact the Embassy of Montenegro.

Military Records

Unavailable.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Passports: Information on Travel Documents

The Government of Montenegro issues passports to citizens of Montenegro. The Montenegrin passport is medium red with gold lettering and a crest on the front. "Montenegro" and "passport" are printed in Latin letters in Montenegrin and English, and "passport" is also in French. The passport meets modern security standards, including a plasticized biodata page that has an electronic chip inside. The nationality code for this passport is MTG. Valid visas in expired Yugoslav passports can be used together with current Serbian or Montenegrin passports with the same biodata for travel to the United States.

The blue Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Yugoslav) passports were invalidated by the Government of Serbia on December 31, 2011. All Montenegrin Citizens must now travel on the current Montenegrin passport. The Yugoslav passport was issued to both Serbian and Montenegrin citizens even after the two countries separated and there is no way to differentiate between Serbian and Montenegrin citizens based on this passport. The Yugoslav passport is dark blue with gold lettering on the front that says "Federal Republic of Yugoslavia" in Serbian Cyrillic and "passport" in Cyrillic and Latin letters and again in French. The information page contains data on a small hologram seal in the lower left corner. The passport pages are multicolored brown with a geometric design. The nationality code for this passport is SRM.

Other Records

Statement of Unmarried Status

The civil registrar having jurisdiction over a person's residence will issue a certificate (uverenje) stating that the applicant is not married.

Note : Non-residents must apply for these documents through a Montenegro diplomatic mission. They are unlikely to receive a reply if they write directly to the issuing office. Montenegro consular offices throughout the world are supplied with the appropriate forms for obtaining civil documents. The request will be forwarded to the Montenegro Ministry of Foreign Affairs for transmission to the office responsible for the issuance of the required document. The document will then be returned to the applicant via the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Montenegro Diplomatic Mission overseas.

The above procedure can be lengthy. All applicants are encouraged to obtain the required documents through a family member, friend or lawyer residing in Montenegro, who could apply personally at the office which issues them.

Visa Issuing Posts

Since January 2012, U.S. Embassy Podgorica offers full nonimmigrant visa processing services for Montenegrin applicants. U.S. Embassy Belgrade still processes immigrant visas for Montenegrin applicants.

Podgorica (Embassy)

Tel: Embassy Switchboard - 382-20-410-500

Belgrade (Embassy)

Tel: Embassy Switchboard - 381-11-706 4000

Fax: - 381-11-706 4481

Visa Services

Please check back for update

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 234-6108 (202) 234-6109

New York, NY (212) 661-5400 (212) 661-5466

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Podgorica
Dzona Dzeksona 2
81000 Podgorica
Montenegro
Telephone
+(382)(020) 410-500
Emergency
N/A
Fax
+(382)(020) 241-358
Montenegro Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Montenegro
Montenegro
ALL /
ALL /
Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Must be valid at time of entry

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

One page required for entry stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Not required for stays under 90 days

VACCINATIONS:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

10,000 Euros (or equivalent) must be declared

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

10,000 Euros (or equivalent) must be declared

ALL /
ALL /
Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Podgorica

Dzona Dzeksona 2
81000 Podgorica
Montenegro

Telephone: +(382)(20) 410-500

ALL /
ALL /
Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Montenegro for additional information on U.S.-Montenegro relations.

ALL /
ALL /
Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

U.S. citizen visitors (traveling with U.S. passports) do not need a visa to enter and stay in Montenegro for up to 90 days.

  • Visitors must register within the first 24 hours of arrival.
  • If you are staying in a hotel or tourist facility, the hotel will automatically register you; otherwise you are personally responsible to appear at the police station to register.
  • If you do not register, you may be subject to a fine, incarceration, expulsion, and/or difficulties in departing Montenegro.
  • The police registration form can be purchased at bookstores or is available online.

U.S. citizen visitors intending to stay longer than 90 days:

  • U.S. citizens wishing to extend their stay longer than 90 days must apply for a temporary residence permit at least one week before the 90-day period ends.
  • Due to lengthy administrative procedures, we advise you to apply as soon as you learn that you will be staying in Montenegro longer than 90 days.

You can contact the Embassy of Montenegro in Washington, D.C. for the most current visa information.  Montenegro’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs website contains additional contact information for its diplomatic posts in the United States.

Currency and Customs Restrictions:

  • Travelers are required to declare currency exceeding 10,000 euros (or equivalent) upon entry or exit.
  • To avoid customs charges, travelers must also declare luxury goods, jewelry, paintings, and computer equipment.
  • At the port of entry, travelers can obtain currency declaration forms that must be completed and presented at departure.
  • Failure to comply with these policies may result in confiscation of funds/goods and criminal proceedings.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Montenegro.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

ALL /
ALL /
Safety and Security

Credible information indicates terrorist groups continue plotting attacks in Europe.  European governments are taking action to guard against terrorist attacks; however, all European countries remain potentially vulnerable to attacks from transnational terrorist organizations. 

Demonstrations: While most demonstrations are peaceful, even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can become confrontational and potentially escalate into violence. Montenegrins are generally open and hospitable to visitors; however, in isolated incidents, visitors might encounter anti-foreign sentiment.

Montenegrin nightclubs are popular with foreign tourists.  Patrons should be aware that these establishments can be crowded and may not comply with Western standards for occupancy control or fire safety.

Crime:  Residential break-ins present the greatest security concern for U.S. citizens in Montenegro.  Violent crime is infrequent.  There is a significant increase in theft at ATMs during the May to September tourist season.

  • Police have limited English ability.
  • Visitors should ensure that they protect their PINs at all times when using ATMs, and monitor card activity.

Victims of Crime: Report crimes to the local police by dialing 112 and contact the U.S. Embassy at +382 20 410 500. 

  • Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.We can:

  • Help you find appropriate medical care
  • Assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • Contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • Explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • Provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • Provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical
  • Support in cases of destitution
  • Help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • Replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

The local equivalents to the 911 emergency line in Montenegro are 122 for police, 123 for the fire department, and 124 for an ambulance.

For further information:

ALL /
ALL /
Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Carrying weapons in Montenegro is illegal.  If you break local laws in Montenegro, your U.S. passport won’t help you avoid arrest or prosecution.

Furthermore, some crimes are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Special Circumstances

Dual U.S.-Montenegrin citizens: Dual citizens may be subject to laws that impose special obligations on Montenegrin citizens, though, as of August 30, 2006, Montenegrin men are no longer required to perform military service. 

  • If you became a dual citizen after June 3, 2006, Montenegro will only recognize dual citizenship with countries it has signed a bilateral agreement with.
  • Montenegro still abides by the bilateral consular agreement between Yugoslavia and the United States.

LGBTI Rights:  There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Montenegro. LGBT individuals are protected by anti-discrimination laws in Montenegro.  However, LGBT individuals are subject to widespread societal discrimination, ostracism, and harassment.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights Report for further details.

Athletic Contract Disputes: U.S.-citizen athletes who are considering playing for professional teams in Montenegro, particularly outside the capital, should be aware of reports of disputes regarding contracts not being honored and treatment and living conditions not matching expectations.  We recommend that U.S.-citizen athletes carefully review proposed contracts and research the team, living arrangements, and city where they will be playing prior to accepting offers or commencing travel.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance:  Many public facilities are not fully accessible to individuals with disabilities.  Accessibility for those with disabilities, including on public transportation, is lacking throughout the country.  Outside of urban areas, accessibility is particularly limited. In 2008, Montenegro passed a law regulating the accessibility to public facilities; however, only newer buildings meet those standards.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

ALL /
ALL /
Health

Medical Facilities:  Hospitals and clinics are generally not equipped or maintained to U.S. standards.

  • Travelers may need to go to privately-owned pharmacies in order to obtain medicines and basic medical supplies.
  • Hospitals and private clinics usually require payment in cash for all services. Montenegro has only a small number of ambulances.
  • Emergency services are generally responsive in only the most severe cases. Otherwise, people must have their own transportation to hospitals and clinics.
  • We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare is not valid overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation. 

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the Government of Montenegro, and its Ministry of Foreign Affairs to ensure the medication is legal in Montenegro.  Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

ALL /
ALL /
Travel and Transportation

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS: Roads in Montenegro are often poorly maintained, especially in rural areas. Roads leading to Montenegro’s coastal areas are in better condition, but are overcrowded during summer season. Drivers can be reckless and aggressive, and accidents are frequent. 

  • Dangerous areas for road travel include a road through the Moraca Canyon, north of Podgorica. This twisting, two-lane road is especially overcrowded in the summer, and is the site of frequent rockslides. In the winter, the Moraca Canyon and northern parts of Montenegro are covered with snow, which may slow traffic and make the road hazardous.
  • It’s common for Montenegrin drivers to attempt to pass on winding roads and hills.

Traffic Laws:

  • The use of seat belts is mandatory for all passengers.
  • Cell phone usage while driving is prohibited.
  • Vehicle lights must be switched on at all times while driving.
  • Right turns on red lights are strictly forbidden, unless a distinct green arrow is seen.
  • At unmarked intersections, the right of way is always given to the vehicle entering from the right.
  • Each vehicle must have a reflective fluorescent vest to be used in the event of an emergency road stop, as well as a European car accident report form.
  • Children under 5 years-old must use a safety seat attached to a vehicle safety belt.
  • Vehicles must have winter tires and carry snow chains between November 15 and March 30.  
  • Pedestrians crossing in designated crosswalks have the right of way. Drivers must stop.
  • The blood alcohol limit in Montenegro is .03 percent, less than half the legal limit in the United States.

Taxis:  Metered taxi service is safe, although foreigners are sometimes charged higher rates. Taxis generally do not pick up passengers on the street and must be ordered by phone or SMS.

Public Transportation: Trains, buses, and ferries often use aging and poorly-maintained equipment.

Roadside assistance is available by dialing 19807, +382 (0)20 234 467 or +382 (0)20 234 999. Other emergency numbers are police: 122; fire department: 123; and ambulance: 124

See our Road Safety page for more information. Also, we suggest that you visit the website of Montenegro’s National Tourism Organization and the Auto-moto Association of Montenegro, the national authority responsible for road safety.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Montenegro, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the Government of Montenegro’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
ALL /
ALL /
Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Podgorica

Dzona Dzeksona 2
81000 Podgorica
Montenegro

Telephone: +(382)(20) 410-500

ALL /
ALL /
General Information

Montenegro and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) since December 1, 1991, when it was part of Yugoslavia.  Following establishment of independence in 2006, Montenegro declared itself bound by this Convention on March 1, 2007.

For information concerning travel to Montenegro, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Montenegro.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

ALL /
ALL /
Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Montenegro.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State 
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel.:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Fax: 202-485-6221
Website: travel.state.gov

The Montenegro Central Authority (MCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Ministry of Justice. The MCA has an administrative role in processing Hague Abduction Convention applications.  The MCA forwards completed Hague petitions to the competent civil court within the jurisdiction of the child’s location.  The MCA can be reached at:

Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Montenegro
Vuka Karadžica # 3
81 000 Montenegro
Tel.: +382 (20) 407 520
Fax: +382 (20) 407 515
Websitemail: www.mpa.gov.me

Contact Person: Ms. Dara Tomcic
Adviser in the Ministry of Justice of Montenegro
tel./fax: +382 20 407 510
e-mail: dara.tomcic@moa.gov.me

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Montenegro, the USCA encourages a parent or legal guardian to review the eligibility criteria and instructions for completing the Hague application form located at the Department of State website and contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the MCA. It is extremely important that each document written in English be translated into Montenegrin, Serbian, Bosnian, or Croatian.  Please note, however, certified translations are not necessary.

The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to the MCA, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the U.S. or Montenegro central authorities.  Attorney fees, if necessary, are the responsibility of the applicant parent or legal guardian. Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

ALL /
ALL /
Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Montenegro.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

ALL /
ALL /
Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Montenegro.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

ALL /
ALL /
Retaining an Attorney

The Montenegro legal system does not require parents to retain a private attorney in order to file a Hague Abduction Convention petition with a court; however, the MCA recommends that parents have legal representation.  Parents may hire a private attorney to assist them with their case and to advise them as to the best course of action for their individual circumstances.  A parent who hires private counsel should notify both the Montenegro and the U.S. central authorities.

The U.S. Embassy in Podgorica, Montenegro, posts a list of attorneys including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

ALL /
ALL /
Mediation

The MCA promotes mediation in abduction cases and will attempt to initiate mediation in Hague Abduction Convention cases. While courts cannot order mediation, judges can and do strongly encourage mediated resolutions and can stay hearings to permit parties the time to mediate.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
ALL /
ALL /
Hague Convention Information

Montenegro is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoption processing in Hague countries is done in accordance with the requirements of the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations, as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Montenegro.

Intercountry adoptions from Montenegro are extremely rare; fewer than five adoptions by U.S. citizen parents have taken place in the last decade. Montenegro places a priority on domestic adoption. Generally, only children with special needs are available for inter-country adoption. Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that most children in orphanages or foster care are not adoptable, and that the only way to be matched with a child is to submit an application to be found eligible to adopt with the Montenegro Central Authority (MCA) and wait for the MCA to identify a child eligible for intercountry adoption. No U.S. adoption service providers are accredited by the MCA to provide adoption services in Montenegro, and prospective adoptive parents should be wary of any adoption agencies making statements contradicting information provided here or by the MCA. The Office of Children’s Issues can be contacted for further verification.

U.S. citizens interested in adopting children from Montenegro should contact the Central Authority of Montenegro to inquire about applicable laws and procedures. U.S. citizen prospective adoptive parents living in Montenegro who would like to adopt a child from the United States or from a third country should also contact Montenegro’s Central Authority. See contact information below.

Please visit the Department’s Country Specific Information for more information on traveling to Montenegro and the U.S. Embassy in Podgorica’s website for information on consular services.

WARNING: The consular officer will send a letter (referred to as an “Article 5 Letter”) to Montenegro’s Central Authority in any intercountry adoption involving U.S. citizen parents and a child from Montenegro where all Convention requirements are met and the consular officer determines that the child appears eligible to immigrate to the United States. This letter will inform Montenegro’s Central Authority that the parents are eligible and suited to adopt, that all indications are that the child may enter and reside permanently in the United States, and that the U.S. Central Authority agrees that the adoption may proceed.

Do not attempt to adopt or obtain custody of a child in Montenegro before a U.S. consular officer issues the Article 5 Letter in any adoption case.

Remember: The consular officer will make a final decision about a child’s eligibility for an immigrant visa later in the adoption process.

Montenegro’s Adoption Authority
Ministry of Labor and Social Welfare
Department of Social Welfare and Child Protection

ALL /
ALL /
Who Can Adopt
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Who Can Be Adopted
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
How to Adopt
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Traveling Abroad
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
After Adoption
enter text here
ALL /
ALL /
Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Montenegro
Dzona Dzeksona 2
81000 Podgorica
Montenegro
Tel: +382 (0)20 410 500
Fax: +382 (0)20 241 358
Email: PodgoricaACS@state.gov
Internet: me.usembassy.gov

Montenegro’s Adoption Authority
Ministry of Labor and Social Welfare
Department of Social Welfare and Child Protection 
Mr. Goran Kuševija – Director of Department
Rimski trg 46
81000 Podgoica
Montenegro
Tel: +382 (0)20 482 447; 78 113 344
E-mail: goran.kusevija@mrs.gov.me 
Fax: +382 (0) 78 113 345

Embassy of Montenegro
1610 New Hampshire Avenue NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
Tel: 1-202-234-6108
Fax: 1-202- 234-6109
Email: usa@mfa.gov.me

Montenegro also has a consulate in New York.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, D.C. 20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
Email: AdoptionUSCA@state.gov
Internet: adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel: 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet: uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-800A or I-800 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email: NBC.Hague@uscis.dhs.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months A
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months A
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 None Multiple 36 Months
B-2 None Multiple 36 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 36 Months
C-1 None Multiple 36 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 36 Months
C-2 None Multiple 36 Months
C-3 None Multiple 48 Months A
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 36 Months
E-1 2 None Multiple 12 Months
E-2 2 None Multiple 12 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 12 Months
F-1 None Multiple 24 Months
F-2 None Multiple 24 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months A
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months A
G-3 None Multiple 36 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months A
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 24 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 24 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 12 Months
L-2 None Multiple 12 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 12 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 12 Months
R-2 None Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
ALL /
ALL /
Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

ALL /
ALL /
Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

ALL /
ALL /
General Documents

Please check back for update

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth and Death Certificates

Available. Birth (Izvod iz Maticne Knjige Rodjenih) and death certificates, (Izvod iz Maticne Knjige Umrlih) are consolidated into a national database and are available from the civil registrars throughout Montenegro. The church documents are entitled Izvod Iz Knjiga Za Upisivanje Rodjenih I Krstenih (Birth certificate) and Smrtni List (death certificate). Many records, particularly in Montenegro, were destroyed during the Second World War and reconstructed afterwards.

Same-sex marriages are not recognized in Montenegro.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Marriage certificates (Izvod iz Maticne Vencanih) are currently only available at the civil registry where the event occurred. The fact that a marriage took place by proxy is not usually evident from the marriage certificate. Prior to May l0, 1946, these records were maintained by church authorities. Since that date, only civil marriages have been legal. The church document is entitled Vencani List (Marriage certificate). Many records, particularly in Montenegro, were destroyed during the Second World War and reconstructed afterwards.

Same-sex marriages are not recognized in Montenegro.

Divorce Certificate

Available. Copies of divorce judgments are available from the district court (okruzni sud) which decided the case. A divorce certificate is typewritten and headed "In the Name of the People" (U ime naroda). Since May l0, l976, only divorces obtained through the civil courts have been legal. Prior to this date, divorces granted by church authorities were also recognized.

Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update

ALL /
ALL /
Identity Card

Available. All residents of Montenegro who have reached their eighteenth birthday must carry an identity card (Licna Karta) issued by the Secretariat for Internal Affairs (Sekretarijat za Unutrasnje Poslove). It contains the photograph, date and place of birth, and address of the bearer.

Note : Non-residents must apply for these documents through a Montenegro diplomatic mission. They are unlikely to receive a reply if they write directly to the issuing office. Montenegro consular offices throughout the world are supplied with the appropriate forms for obtaining civil documents. The request will be forwarded to the Montenegro Ministry of Foreign Affairs for transmission to the office responsible for the issuance of the required document. The document will then be returned to the applicant via the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Montenegro Diplomatic Mission overseas.

The above procedure can be lengthy. All applicants are encouraged to obtain the required documents through a family member, friend or lawyer residing in Montenegro, who could apply personally at the office which issues them.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Record

The Montenegrin Ministry of Justice became the entity responsible for issuing police certificates on 31 March 2014. These documents contain criminal records of persons convicted of criminal offenses committed in Montenegro, as well as persons convicted of criminal offenses by foreign courts.

Criminal records will be provided on the basis of a submitted written request. Requests for releasing the information can be downloaded here. A second party, such as the Embassy, may not request police certificates on individuals to independently verify someone's background.

The Ministry of Justice is located at Vuka Karadžica 3, 81000 Podgorica, Montenegro and can be contacted via e-mail at rke@mpa.gov.me

Note that in many cases, convictions can be expunged after ten years. Thus, the record may not be complete beyond ten years, but it is the best and only record available. This certificate should not be confused with the certificates issued by courts (Sudsko uverenje) that cover only the period of the past six months and indicate the absence of any investigation, charge or conviction in that period.

Non-citizens who once resided in Montenegro, and are now in their native country, may apply for police certificates with their local Ministry of Foreign Affairs which will then, through diplomatic channels, contact the Embassy of Montenegro in that country.

Non-citizens who once resided in Montenegro, and are in a third country now, may apply with their Embassy in that country, who will then, through diplomatic channels, contact the Embassy of Montenegro.

Military Records

Unavailable.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Passports: Information on Travel Documents

The Government of Montenegro issues passports to citizens of Montenegro. The Montenegrin passport is medium red with gold lettering and a crest on the front. "Montenegro" and "passport" are printed in Latin letters in Montenegrin and English, and "passport" is also in French. The passport meets modern security standards, including a plasticized biodata page that has an electronic chip inside. The nationality code for this passport is MTG. Valid visas in expired Yugoslav passports can be used together with current Serbian or Montenegrin passports with the same biodata for travel to the United States.

The blue Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Yugoslav) passports were invalidated by the Government of Serbia on December 31, 2011. All Montenegrin Citizens must now travel on the current Montenegrin passport. The Yugoslav passport was issued to both Serbian and Montenegrin citizens even after the two countries separated and there is no way to differentiate between Serbian and Montenegrin citizens based on this passport. The Yugoslav passport is dark blue with gold lettering on the front that says "Federal Republic of Yugoslavia" in Serbian Cyrillic and "passport" in Cyrillic and Latin letters and again in French. The information page contains data on a small hologram seal in the lower left corner. The passport pages are multicolored brown with a geometric design. The nationality code for this passport is SRM.

Other Records

Statement of Unmarried Status

The civil registrar having jurisdiction over a person's residence will issue a certificate (uverenje) stating that the applicant is not married.

Note : Non-residents must apply for these documents through a Montenegro diplomatic mission. They are unlikely to receive a reply if they write directly to the issuing office. Montenegro consular offices throughout the world are supplied with the appropriate forms for obtaining civil documents. The request will be forwarded to the Montenegro Ministry of Foreign Affairs for transmission to the office responsible for the issuance of the required document. The document will then be returned to the applicant via the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Montenegro Diplomatic Mission overseas.

The above procedure can be lengthy. All applicants are encouraged to obtain the required documents through a family member, friend or lawyer residing in Montenegro, who could apply personally at the office which issues them.

Visa Issuing Posts

Since January 2012, U.S. Embassy Podgorica offers full nonimmigrant visa processing services for Montenegrin applicants. U.S. Embassy Belgrade still processes immigrant visas for Montenegrin applicants.

Podgorica (Embassy)

Tel: Embassy Switchboard - 382-20-410-500

Belgrade (Embassy)

Tel: Embassy Switchboard - 381-11-706 4000

Fax: - 381-11-706 4481

Visa Services

Please check back for update

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 234-6108 (202) 234-6109

New York, NY (212) 661-5400 (212) 661-5466

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Podgorica
Dzona Dzeksona 2
81000 Podgorica
Montenegro
Telephone
+(382)(020) 410-500
Emergency
N/A
Fax
+(382)(020) 241-358
Montenegro Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.