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International Travel

English

Country Information

Kiribati

Country Information

Kiribati
Republic of Kiribati
Last Updated: October 18, 2017
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:


Six months

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:


One page required for stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:


Not required for stays up to 30 days

VACCINATIONS:


None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:


5000 AUD (Australian Dollars)

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:


None

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Suva, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga, Tuvalu

158 Princes Rd, Tamavua
Suva, Fiji Islands

Telephone: +(679) 331-4466

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(679) 772-8049

Fax: +(679) 330-2267

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Kiribati for additional information on U.S.- Kiribati relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

To enter Kiribati, you need:

  • a valid passport with a minimum of six months validity
  • a return or onward ticket (or sufficient funds to purchase them), and
  • sufficient funds to cover the duration of the intended stay.

For additional immigration and visa information, please visit the Consulate of Kiribati’s website or the Kiribati National Tourism Office website. For information on long-term visit or residency requirements, please contact the Consulate of the Republic of Kiribati, 95 Nakolo Place, Rm. 265, Honolulu, Hawaii 96819, tel. (808) 834-7603, fax (808) 834-7604.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Kiribati.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Public Safety: Messages regarding demonstrations and strikes, explosive device/suspicious packages, and weather-related events are posted on the embassy’s website.

Crime: The crime rate in Kiribati is low; however, you should still not be complacent regarding your personal safety or protecting your valuables.

See the Department of State and the FBI webpages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: Report crimes to the local police at 999 and contact the U.S. Embassy at +(679) 772-8049. You can also reach individual emergency services by directly dialing 992 for police, 993 for fire, and 994 for ambulance. Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the U.S. Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. It is illegal to take pictures of certain buildings. Driving under the influence could land you immediately in jail.

Furthermore, some laws are prosecutable in the United States regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Customs: Kiribati’s customs authorities strictly prohibit the importation of firearms, ammunition, explosives, counterfeit money and goods, knives, and indecent publications or pornography. Strict quarantine laws govern the import of any part of plants, fruits, or vegetables, as well as soil, animals, and animal products. Visitors are not allowed to export human remains, artifacts that are 30 or more years old, traditional fighting swords, traditional tools, dancing ornaments, or suits of armor. For more information, please contact the Consulate of the Republic of Kiribati in Honolulu at (808) 834-7603 or via e-mail.

Currency: The Australian dollar is the legal currency in Kiribati. Traveler’s checks and all major currencies are accepted by banks and may also be exchanged for local currency at some local hotels. Visa and MasterCard are accepted at most hotels.

Natural Disasters: Kiribati is located in an area of high seismic activity. Undersea earthquakes in the South Pacific region can also generate destructive tsunamis. The Government of Kiribati has only limited capability for notifying residents and visitors in the event of a tsunami. If you notice seismic activity and/or unusual tidal activity, you should take immediate precautions, such as seeking higher ground or refuge on an upper floor in a sturdy building, Strong winds are common, especially during the cyclone season from November to April. General information about natural disaster preparedness is available at the State Department’s website, as well as from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) website.

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

LGBTI Travelers: Consensual same-sex sexual conduct between men is illegal, with a maximum penalty of five to 14 years’ imprisonment, depending on the nature of the offense; however, the U.S. Embassy is not aware of any reports of prosecutions directed at gay, bisexual, or transgender persons under these provisions for sexual activity between consenting adults.  For more detailed information about LGBT rights in Kiribati, you may review  our LGBTI Travel Information and the Department of State's Human Rights report.

Persons with Mobility Issues. Accessibility of buildings, and communications and information for persons with disabilities is not mandated. There are no special accommodations for persons with disabilities.

Students: See our Students Abroad webpage.

Women Travelers: Spousal abuse and other forms of domestic violence against women are common in Kiribati. See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

Health care throughout Kiribati, including Tarawa, is substandard. Travelers may encounter shortages of routine medications and supplies. Hospital accommodations are inadequate throughout the country, and advanced technology is lacking. Serious medical conditions requiring hospitalization or evacuation to the United States or elsewhere may cost thousands of dollars.

Kiribati has no funeral homes with embalming or cremation services.

You should regard all water as a potential health risk. You should not drink any water that is not bottled, boiled, or otherwise sterilized. You should cook vegetables and peel fruit before eating it.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas.

Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.  See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance (our webpage) to cover medical evacuation.

Carry prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription.

Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Zika Virus: The U.S. Embassy is not aware of any confirmed cases of Zika virus in Kiribati. Please visit the CDC website for up-to-date information on Zika virus in Kiribati.

For further health information, go to:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Traffic moves on the left side of the road in Kiribati. While satisfactory is some areas, roads in urban Tarawa and Christmas Island generally need repair. After heavy rains and high tides, some road sections temporarily flood. Traffic proceeds at a relatively slow rate. Drinking and driving is commonplace, especially on the weekends. Since visibility is poor, with no streetlights, drivers should be especially careful when driving at night. For specific information concerning Kiribati drivers’ permits, vehicle inspection, road tax and mandatory insurance, please contact the Consulate of the Republic of Kiribati in Honolulu, Hawaii at (808) 834-7603 or KiribatiConsul@aol.com.

Traffic Laws: The traffic speed has been reduced in places to 20 km/h or less as a result of road damage, and driving conditions are hazardous, particularly after rain.

Public Transportation: The road network is very small and the majority of roads are not sealed. The main sealed roads are on South Tarawa and Kirimati, and the unsealed roads are distributed among 20 islands. While the lightly travelled roads of Kirimati are in relatively good condition, the heavily used South Tarawa roads are deteriorating rapidly, and the impact of poor road conditions is significant. Road safety is a major concern with a growing incidence of road accidents due to increased traffic, the age and condition of vehicles, and dangerous driving.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Kiribati, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Kiribati’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Kiribati should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts at www.marad.dot.gov/msci. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website (https://homeport.uscg.mil), and the NGA broadcast warnings website https://msi.nga.mil/NGAPortal/MSI.portal (select “broadcast warnings”).

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
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U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
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Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters.
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Suva, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga, Tuvalu

158 Princes Rd, Tamavua
Suva, Fiji Islands

Telephone: +(679) 331-4466

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(679) 772-8049

Fax: +(679) 330-2267

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General Information
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Hague Abduction Convention
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Return
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Visitation/Access
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Retaining an Attorney
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Mediation
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Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Kiribati is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section  204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F).

Below is the limited adoption information that the Department has obtained from the adoption authority of Kiribati. U.S. citizens interested in adopting children from Kiribati should contact the Kiribati High Court to inquire about applicable laws and procedures. U.S. citizen prospective adoptive parents living in Kiribati who would like to adopt a child from the United States or from a third country should also contact the Kiribati High Court. See contact information below.

Only persons domiciled in Kiribati may adopt Kiribati orphans. Kiribati has no indigenous legislation on adoption. The U.K. Adoption Act of 1958, as modified and applied to meet Kiribati circumstances, governs adoptions in the country.

There are no adoption agencies or non-government lawyers in Kiribati. Attorneys resident in Suva, Fiji occasionally handle cases in Kiribati.

There are two government lawyers in Kiribati, known as "People's Lawyers," who are on volunteer contracts with the Kiribati government. The People's Lawyer may be contacted at:

Office of the People's Lawyer
Post Office Box 501
Betio, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati, Central Pacific
Tel: (+686) 26312

Prospective adoptive parents may have to seek the assistance of the People's Lawyer. Alternatively, prospective adoptive parents may seek assistance from the Attorney General's office.

The Attorney General's contact information is:

Office of the Attorney General 
Post Office Box 62
Bairiki, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati, Central Pacific
Tel: (+686) 21242

Note: Seek legal advice from the Office of the Attorney General and/or the People's Lawyer well in advance.

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable.  In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

The nearest immigrant visa issuing U.S. embassy is in Suva, Fiji. Once prospective adoptive parents receive the Form I-171 Notice of approval of relative immigrant visa petition from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, the embassy requests that U.S. prospective adoptive parents begin and maintain contact with the Immigrant Visa Unit. Their contact information is: consularsuva@state.gov and (679) 331-4466 (telephone) and (679) 330-2267 (fax).

Note: The U.S. Embassy in Suva, Fiji cannot issue visas on the same day of the visa interview. Prospective adoptive parents should expect a minimum of two days for the visa to be issued. U.S. families should make their travel plans accordingly, including allowing for the possibility of computer difficulties or other problems that could potentially further delay visa issuance.

Please visit the Department of State’s Country Specific Information for more information on travelling to Kiribati and the U.S. Embassy in Suva, Fiji’s website for information on consular services.

KIRIBATI’S ADOPTION AUTHORITY:
Kiribati High Court
Post Office Box 501
Betio, Tarawa
Tel: (+686) 26451

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Who Can Adopt
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Who Can Be Adopted
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How to Adopt
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Traveling Abroad
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After Adoption
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Contact Information
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Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 36 Months
A-2 None Multiple 36 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 48 Months
B-2 None Multiple 48 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 48 Months
C-1 None Multiple 48 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 48 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 48 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 48 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 36 Months
F-2 None Multiple 36 Months
G-1 None Multiple 36 Months
G-2 None Multiple 36 Months
G-3 None Multiple 36 Months
G-4 None Multiple 36 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 36 Months 3
I None Multiple 36 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 36 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 36 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 36 Months
L-2 None Multiple 36 Months
M-1 None Multiple 36 Months
M-2 None Multiple 36 Months
N-8 None Multiple 36 Months
N-9 None Multiple 36 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 36 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 36 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 36 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 36 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 36 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 36 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 36 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 36 Months
R-2 None Multiple 36 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please click on the individual categories along the left menu for more information.

 

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

TAvailable. Civil documents including reports of birth, death and burial certificates are registered in Gilbertese.  When requests for the release of a birth, death or burial certificate is received, the Office of the Registrar General will issue the requesting party an extract of the original document in the English language; the extract issued will have a seal and original signature. The original civil document remains the property of the Office of the Registrar General in Kiribati. There may be fees charged for these services.

Registry of Birth, Death and Marriage
P.O.Box 267
Bairiki, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati
Telephone: +686 21-017 / 21-120

 

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Available. Civil documents including marriage and divorce certificates are registered in Gilbertese.  When requests for the release of a birth, death or burial certificate is received, the Office of the Registrar General will issue the requesting party an extract of the original document in the English language; the extract issued will have a seal and original signature. The original civil document remains the property of the Office of the Registrar General in Kiribati. There may be fees charged for these services.

Registry of Birth, Death and Marriage
P.O.Box 267
Bairiki, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati
Telephone: +686 21-017 / 21-120

Adoption Certificates

Inquiries must be made to the Office of the Attorney General.

P.O. Box 62
Bairiki, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati
Telephone: +686 21-242
Fax: +686 21-025
 

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Identity Card

Not applicable; Kiribati does not issue a national ID card.

 

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police and Prison Records

Available. There may be a fee charged for this service.

Police Headquarters
P.O. Box 497
Betio, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati
Telephone: +686 26-187
Fax: +686 26-370

Court Records

Available. There may be a fee charged for this service. P.O. Box 62 Bairiki, Tarawa Republic of Kiribati Telephone: +686 21-242 Fax: +686 21-025

 

Military Records

Not applicable; Kiribati does not maintain regular military forces.

 

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Available.  Contact:

Ministry for Foreign Affairs & Immigration
P O Box 68
Bairiki, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati
Telephone: (+686) 21-342
Facsimile: (+686) 21-466

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Suva, Fiji (Embassy)--All visa categories

158 Princes Road, Tamavua
P.O. Box 218
Suva, Fiji

 

Visa Services

 The U.S. Embassy in Suva, Fiji provides visa services for Kiribati and the following areas:

  • French Polynesia
  • Fiji
  • Nauru
  • New Caledonia (French)
  • Tonga
  • Tuvalu
  • Wallis and Futuna Islands (French)

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Honolulu, HI (808) 834-7603 (808) 834-7604

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Suva, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga, Tuvalu
158 Princes Rd, Tamavua
Suva, Fiji Islands
Telephone
+(679) 331-4466
Emergency
+(679) 772-8049
Fax
+(679) 330-2267
Kiribati Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Kiribati
Republic of Kiribati
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:


Six months

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:


One page required for stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:


Not required for stays up to 30 days

VACCINATIONS:


None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:


5000 AUD (Australian Dollars)

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:


None

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Suva, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga, Tuvalu

158 Princes Rd, Tamavua
Suva, Fiji Islands

Telephone: +(679) 331-4466

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(679) 772-8049

Fax: +(679) 330-2267

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Kiribati for additional information on U.S.- Kiribati relations. 

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

To enter Kiribati, you need:

  • a valid passport with a minimum of six months validity
  • a return or onward ticket (or sufficient funds to purchase them), and
  • sufficient funds to cover the duration of the intended stay.

For additional immigration and visa information, please visit the Consulate of Kiribati’s website or the Kiribati National Tourism Office website. For information on long-term visit or residency requirements, please contact the Consulate of the Republic of Kiribati, 95 Nakolo Place, Rm. 265, Honolulu, Hawaii 96819, tel. (808) 834-7603, fax (808) 834-7604.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Kiribati.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

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Safety and Security

Public Safety: Messages regarding demonstrations and strikes, explosive device/suspicious packages, and weather-related events are posted on the embassy’s website.

Crime: The crime rate in Kiribati is low; however, you should still not be complacent regarding your personal safety or protecting your valuables.

See the Department of State and the FBI webpages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: Report crimes to the local police at 999 and contact the U.S. Embassy at +(679) 772-8049. You can also reach individual emergency services by directly dialing 992 for police, 993 for fire, and 994 for ambulance. Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the U.S. Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. It is illegal to take pictures of certain buildings. Driving under the influence could land you immediately in jail.

Furthermore, some laws are prosecutable in the United States regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Customs: Kiribati’s customs authorities strictly prohibit the importation of firearms, ammunition, explosives, counterfeit money and goods, knives, and indecent publications or pornography. Strict quarantine laws govern the import of any part of plants, fruits, or vegetables, as well as soil, animals, and animal products. Visitors are not allowed to export human remains, artifacts that are 30 or more years old, traditional fighting swords, traditional tools, dancing ornaments, or suits of armor. For more information, please contact the Consulate of the Republic of Kiribati in Honolulu at (808) 834-7603 or via e-mail.

Currency: The Australian dollar is the legal currency in Kiribati. Traveler’s checks and all major currencies are accepted by banks and may also be exchanged for local currency at some local hotels. Visa and MasterCard are accepted at most hotels.

Natural Disasters: Kiribati is located in an area of high seismic activity. Undersea earthquakes in the South Pacific region can also generate destructive tsunamis. The Government of Kiribati has only limited capability for notifying residents and visitors in the event of a tsunami. If you notice seismic activity and/or unusual tidal activity, you should take immediate precautions, such as seeking higher ground or refuge on an upper floor in a sturdy building, Strong winds are common, especially during the cyclone season from November to April. General information about natural disaster preparedness is available at the State Department’s website, as well as from the U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) website.

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

LGBTI Travelers: Consensual same-sex sexual conduct between men is illegal, with a maximum penalty of five to 14 years’ imprisonment, depending on the nature of the offense; however, the U.S. Embassy is not aware of any reports of prosecutions directed at gay, bisexual, or transgender persons under these provisions for sexual activity between consenting adults.  For more detailed information about LGBT rights in Kiribati, you may review  our LGBTI Travel Information and the Department of State's Human Rights report.

Persons with Mobility Issues. Accessibility of buildings, and communications and information for persons with disabilities is not mandated. There are no special accommodations for persons with disabilities.

Students: See our Students Abroad webpage.

Women Travelers: Spousal abuse and other forms of domestic violence against women are common in Kiribati. See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

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Health

Health care throughout Kiribati, including Tarawa, is substandard. Travelers may encounter shortages of routine medications and supplies. Hospital accommodations are inadequate throughout the country, and advanced technology is lacking. Serious medical conditions requiring hospitalization or evacuation to the United States or elsewhere may cost thousands of dollars.

Kiribati has no funeral homes with embalming or cremation services.

You should regard all water as a potential health risk. You should not drink any water that is not bottled, boiled, or otherwise sterilized. You should cook vegetables and peel fruit before eating it.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas.

Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.  See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance (our webpage) to cover medical evacuation.

Carry prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription.

Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Zika Virus: The U.S. Embassy is not aware of any confirmed cases of Zika virus in Kiribati. Please visit the CDC website for up-to-date information on Zika virus in Kiribati.

For further health information, go to:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Traffic moves on the left side of the road in Kiribati. While satisfactory is some areas, roads in urban Tarawa and Christmas Island generally need repair. After heavy rains and high tides, some road sections temporarily flood. Traffic proceeds at a relatively slow rate. Drinking and driving is commonplace, especially on the weekends. Since visibility is poor, with no streetlights, drivers should be especially careful when driving at night. For specific information concerning Kiribati drivers’ permits, vehicle inspection, road tax and mandatory insurance, please contact the Consulate of the Republic of Kiribati in Honolulu, Hawaii at (808) 834-7603 or KiribatiConsul@aol.com.

Traffic Laws: The traffic speed has been reduced in places to 20 km/h or less as a result of road damage, and driving conditions are hazardous, particularly after rain.

Public Transportation: The road network is very small and the majority of roads are not sealed. The main sealed roads are on South Tarawa and Kirimati, and the unsealed roads are distributed among 20 islands. While the lightly travelled roads of Kirimati are in relatively good condition, the heavily used South Tarawa roads are deteriorating rapidly, and the impact of poor road conditions is significant. Road safety is a major concern with a growing incidence of road accidents due to increased traffic, the age and condition of vehicles, and dangerous driving.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Kiribati, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Kiribati’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Kiribati should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts at www.marad.dot.gov/msci. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website (https://homeport.uscg.mil), and the NGA broadcast warnings website https://msi.nga.mil/NGAPortal/MSI.portal (select “broadcast warnings”).

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
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U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
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Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters.
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Suva, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga, Tuvalu

158 Princes Rd, Tamavua
Suva, Fiji Islands

Telephone: +(679) 331-4466

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(679) 772-8049

Fax: +(679) 330-2267

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General Information
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Mediation
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Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Kiribati is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section  204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F).

Below is the limited adoption information that the Department has obtained from the adoption authority of Kiribati. U.S. citizens interested in adopting children from Kiribati should contact the Kiribati High Court to inquire about applicable laws and procedures. U.S. citizen prospective adoptive parents living in Kiribati who would like to adopt a child from the United States or from a third country should also contact the Kiribati High Court. See contact information below.

Only persons domiciled in Kiribati may adopt Kiribati orphans. Kiribati has no indigenous legislation on adoption. The U.K. Adoption Act of 1958, as modified and applied to meet Kiribati circumstances, governs adoptions in the country.

There are no adoption agencies or non-government lawyers in Kiribati. Attorneys resident in Suva, Fiji occasionally handle cases in Kiribati.

There are two government lawyers in Kiribati, known as "People's Lawyers," who are on volunteer contracts with the Kiribati government. The People's Lawyer may be contacted at:

Office of the People's Lawyer
Post Office Box 501
Betio, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati, Central Pacific
Tel: (+686) 26312

Prospective adoptive parents may have to seek the assistance of the People's Lawyer. Alternatively, prospective adoptive parents may seek assistance from the Attorney General's office.

The Attorney General's contact information is:

Office of the Attorney General 
Post Office Box 62
Bairiki, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati, Central Pacific
Tel: (+686) 21242

Note: Seek legal advice from the Office of the Attorney General and/or the People's Lawyer well in advance.

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable.  In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

The nearest immigrant visa issuing U.S. embassy is in Suva, Fiji. Once prospective adoptive parents receive the Form I-171 Notice of approval of relative immigrant visa petition from the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services, the embassy requests that U.S. prospective adoptive parents begin and maintain contact with the Immigrant Visa Unit. Their contact information is: consularsuva@state.gov and (679) 331-4466 (telephone) and (679) 330-2267 (fax).

Note: The U.S. Embassy in Suva, Fiji cannot issue visas on the same day of the visa interview. Prospective adoptive parents should expect a minimum of two days for the visa to be issued. U.S. families should make their travel plans accordingly, including allowing for the possibility of computer difficulties or other problems that could potentially further delay visa issuance.

Please visit the Department of State’s Country Specific Information for more information on travelling to Kiribati and the U.S. Embassy in Suva, Fiji’s website for information on consular services.

KIRIBATI’S ADOPTION AUTHORITY:
Kiribati High Court
Post Office Box 501
Betio, Tarawa
Tel: (+686) 26451

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Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 36 Months
A-2 None Multiple 36 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 None Multiple 48 Months
B-2 None Multiple 48 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 48 Months
C-1 None Multiple 48 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 48 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 48 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 48 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 36 Months
F-2 None Multiple 36 Months
G-1 None Multiple 36 Months
G-2 None Multiple 36 Months
G-3 None Multiple 36 Months
G-4 None Multiple 36 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 36 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 36 Months 3
I None Multiple 36 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 36 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 36 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 36 Months
L-2 None Multiple 36 Months
M-1 None Multiple 36 Months
M-2 None Multiple 36 Months
N-8 None Multiple 36 Months
N-9 None Multiple 36 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 36 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 36 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 36 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 36 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 36 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 36 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 36 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 36 Months
R-2 None Multiple 36 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please click on the individual categories along the left menu for more information.

 

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

TAvailable. Civil documents including reports of birth, death and burial certificates are registered in Gilbertese.  When requests for the release of a birth, death or burial certificate is received, the Office of the Registrar General will issue the requesting party an extract of the original document in the English language; the extract issued will have a seal and original signature. The original civil document remains the property of the Office of the Registrar General in Kiribati. There may be fees charged for these services.

Registry of Birth, Death and Marriage
P.O.Box 267
Bairiki, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati
Telephone: +686 21-017 / 21-120

 

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Available. Civil documents including marriage and divorce certificates are registered in Gilbertese.  When requests for the release of a birth, death or burial certificate is received, the Office of the Registrar General will issue the requesting party an extract of the original document in the English language; the extract issued will have a seal and original signature. The original civil document remains the property of the Office of the Registrar General in Kiribati. There may be fees charged for these services.

Registry of Birth, Death and Marriage
P.O.Box 267
Bairiki, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati
Telephone: +686 21-017 / 21-120

Adoption Certificates

Inquiries must be made to the Office of the Attorney General.

P.O. Box 62
Bairiki, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati
Telephone: +686 21-242
Fax: +686 21-025
 

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Identity Card

Not applicable; Kiribati does not issue a national ID card.

 

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police and Prison Records

Available. There may be a fee charged for this service.

Police Headquarters
P.O. Box 497
Betio, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati
Telephone: +686 26-187
Fax: +686 26-370

Court Records

Available. There may be a fee charged for this service. P.O. Box 62 Bairiki, Tarawa Republic of Kiribati Telephone: +686 21-242 Fax: +686 21-025

 

Military Records

Not applicable; Kiribati does not maintain regular military forces.

 

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Available.  Contact:

Ministry for Foreign Affairs & Immigration
P O Box 68
Bairiki, Tarawa
Republic of Kiribati
Telephone: (+686) 21-342
Facsimile: (+686) 21-466

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Suva, Fiji (Embassy)--All visa categories

158 Princes Road, Tamavua
P.O. Box 218
Suva, Fiji

 

Visa Services

 The U.S. Embassy in Suva, Fiji provides visa services for Kiribati and the following areas:

  • French Polynesia
  • Fiji
  • Nauru
  • New Caledonia (French)
  • Tonga
  • Tuvalu
  • Wallis and Futuna Islands (French)

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Honolulu, HI (808) 834-7603 (808) 834-7604

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Suva, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, Tonga, Tuvalu
158 Princes Rd, Tamavua
Suva, Fiji Islands
Telephone
+(679) 331-4466
Emergency
+(679) 772-8049
Fax
+(679) 330-2267
Kiribati Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.