International Parental Child Abduction

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Mexico

Mexico
United Mexican States
Exercise increased caution in Mexico due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Exercise increased caution in Mexico due to crime. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Violent crime, such as homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery, is widespread.

The U.S. government has limited ability to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in many areas of Mexico as U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to these areas.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from intercity travel after dark in many areas of Mexico. U.S. government employees are also not permitted to drive from the U.S.-Mexico border to or from the interior parts of Mexico with the exception of daytime travel on Highway 15 between Nogales and Hermosillo.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

Do not travel to:

  • Colima state due to crime.
  • Guerrero state due to crime.
  • Michoacán state due to crime.
  • Sinaloa state due to crime.
  • Tamaulipas state due to crime.

For all other states in Mexico, please see detailed information below.

If you decide to travel to Mexico:

  • Use toll roads when possible and avoid driving at night.
  • Exercise increased caution when visiting local bars, nightclubs, and casinos.
  • Do not display signs of wealth, such as wearing expensive watches or jewelry.
  • Be extra vigilant when visiting banks or ATMs.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive Alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Crime and Safety Reports for Mexico.
  • U.S. citizens who travel abroad should always have a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.

Aguascalientes state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling between cities at night. Additionally, U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Aguascalientes.

Baja California state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to the Baja California State Secretariat for Public Security, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents.

Due to poor cellular service and hazardous road conditions, U.S. government employees are only permitted to travel on “La Rumorosa” between Mexicali and Tijuana on the toll road during daylight.

There are no U.S. government restrictions in tourist areas in Baja California, which includes: Ensenada, Rosarito, and Tijuana.

Baja California Sur state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Criminal activity and violence, including homicide, remain an issue throughout the state. According to Government of Mexico statistics, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Bystanders have been injured or killed in shooting incidents. 

There are no U.S. government restrictions for travel in Baja California Sur, which includes the tourist areas of Cabo San Lucas, San Jose del Cabo, and La Paz.

Campeche state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited outside of the state capital.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Chiapas state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation. U.S. government employees are permitted to drive during daylight only.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees in tourist areas in Chiapas state, such as: Palenque, San Cristobal de las Casas, and Tuxtla Gutierrez.

Chihuahua state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are widespread.

Travel for U.S. government employees is limited to the following areas with the noted restrictions:

  • Ciudad Juarez: Due to an increase in homicides during daylight hours in the downtown area, U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling to downtown Ciudad Juarez (i.e., the area south of Calle Malecon, west of Calle 5 de Mayo, north of Calle 18 de Marzo, and east of Avenida Francisco Villa) unless approved in advance by the Consulate General’s leadership. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel after dark west of Eje Vial Juan Gabriel and south of Boulevard Zaragoza. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the areas southeast of Boulevard Independencia and the Valle de Juarez region. U.S. personnel must take the most direct route north of Boulevard Zaragoza to access the Ciudad Juarez Airport on Highway 45.
  • Within the city of Chihuahua: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the Morelos, Villa, and Zapata districts.
  • Ojinaga: U.S. government employees must travel via U.S. Highway 67 through the Presidio, Texas Port-of-Entry.
  • Palomas and the Nuevo Casas Grandes/Paquime region: U.S. government employees must use U.S. Highway 11 through the Columbus, New Mexico Port-of- Entry.
  • Nuevo Casas Grandes: U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel outside the city limits after dark.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Coahuila state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime is widespread. Local law enforcement has limited capability to prevent and respond to crime, particularly in the northern part of the state.

U.S. government employees are not permitted to travel in Coahuila state, with the exception of Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, and Parras de la Fuente. U.S. government employees can only travel to those cities using the most direct routes and maximizing the use of toll highways. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government employees must remain within Saltillo, Bosques de Monterreal, or Parras de la Fuente.

U.S. government employees are permitted to travel to Piedras Negras and Ciudad Acuna but they must travel to these cities from the United States only.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Coahuila.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Colima state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are widespread.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to Tecoman or within 12 miles of the Colima-Michoacán border and on Route 110 between La Tecomaca and the Jalisco border. 

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees travel along Route 200 from the Jalisco border to Manzanillo, including the Manzanillo airport.  There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for stays in Manzanillo from Marina Puerto Santiago to Playa las Brisas.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Colima.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Durango state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity along the highways are common.

U.S. government employees may travel outside the city of Durango only during daylight on toll roads. Between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m., U.S. government employees must remain within Durango city.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Durango.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Estado de Mexico state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime is common in parts of Estado de Mexico.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the following municipalities, unless they are traveling directly through the municipalities on major thoroughfares:

  • Coacalco
  • Ecatepec
  • Nezahualcoyotl
  • La Paz
  • Valle del Chalco
  • Solidaridad
  • Chalco
  • Ixtapaluca
  • Tlatlaya

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on any roads between Morelos, Huitzilac, and Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including the Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Guanajuato state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Guerrero state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Armed groups operate independently of the government in many areas of Guerrero. Members of these groups frequently maintain roadblocks and may use violence towards travelers.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the entire state of Guerrero, including Acapulco.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Hidalgo state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Jalisco state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Jalisco state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to areas bordering Michoacán and Zacatecas states. U.S. government employees are prohibited from traveling between cities after dark and from using Highway 80 between Cocula and La Huerta.

U.S. government employees may use federal toll road 15D for travel to Mexico City. However, they may not stop in the towns of La Barca or Ocotlan for any reason.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Jalisco.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for stays in the following tourist areas in Jalisco state: Guadalajara, Puerto Vallarta, Chapala, and Ajijic.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Mexico City – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Michoacán state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in Michoacán state, with the exception of Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas cities and the area north of federal toll road 15D.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel by land, except on federal toll road 15D.

U.S. government employees may fly into Morelia and Lazaro Cardenas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Morelos state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Morelos state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on any roads from Huitzilac to Santa Martha, Estado de Mexico, including Lagunas de Zempoala National Park and surrounding areas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Nayarit state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Nayarit state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in most areas of the state, with the following exceptions:

  • Riviera Nayarit (which includes Nuevo Vallarta and Bahia de Banderas)
  • Santa Maria del Oro
  • Xalisco

When traveling to permitted areas above, U.S. government employees must use major highways and cannot travel between cities after dark.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Nayarit.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Nuevo Leon state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Nuevo Leon state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside Monterrey only during daylight on toll roads, with the exception of travel to the Monterrey airport, which is permitted at any time.

U.S. government employees must remain within San Pedro Garza Garcia or Santa Catarina (south of the Santa Catarina river) municipalities between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Nuevo Leon.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Oaxaca state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

In Oaxaca, U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel on Highway 200 throughout the state, except to transit between the airport in Huatulco to hotels in Puerto Escondido and Huatulco.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to the El Istmo region. The El Istmo region is defined by Highway 185D to the west, Highway 190 to the north, and the Oaxaca/Chiapas border to the east and includes the towns of Juchitan de Zaragoza, Salina Cruz, and San Blas.

Puebla state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Queretaro state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Quintana Roo state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

According to Government of Mexico statistics, the state experienced an increase in homicide rates compared to the same period in 2016. While most of these homicides appeared to be targeted, criminal organization assassinations, turf battles between criminal groups have resulted in violent crime in areas frequented by U.S. citizens. Shooting incidents injuring or killing bystanders have occurred.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for travel in Quintana Roo state, which includes tourist areas such as: Cancun, Cozumel, Playa del Carmen, Tulum, and the Riviera Maya.

San Luis Potosi state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of San Luis Potosi state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside San Luis Potosi city only during daylight hours on toll roads. U.S. government employees must remain within San Luis Potosi city between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in San Luis Potosi.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sinaloa state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime is widespread. Criminal organizations are based and operating in Sinaloa state.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel in most areas of the state. In areas where travel is permitted, the following restrictions are in place:

  • Mazatlan: U.S. government travel is permitted only in Zona Dorada, the historic town center, and direct routes to and from these locations and the airport or the cruise ship terminal.
  • Los Mochis and Port Topolobampo: U.S. government travel is permitted within the city and the port, as well as direct routes to and from these locations and the airport.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Sonora state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Sonora is a key location used by the international drug trade and human trafficking networks. However, northern Sonora experiences much lower levels of crime than cities closer to Sinaloa and other parts of Mexico. U.S. government employees visiting Puerto Peñasco may use the Lukeville/Sonoyta crossing, and are required to travel during daylight hours on Federal Highway 8. U.S. government employees may also travel to Puerto Peñasco from Nogales by using Federal Highway 15 south and east via Federal Highway 2 and State Highway 37 through Caborca during daylight hours. U.S. government employees may travel between the cities of Nogales and Hemosillo, however, travel is restricted to daylight hours and only on Federal Highway 15 through Imuris, Magdalena, and Santa Ana.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from travel to:

  • The triangular region west of the Mariposa port-of-entry, east of Sonoyta, and north of Altar.
  • The district within Nogales that lies to the north of Ayenida Instituto Tecnologico and between Periferico and Corredor Fiscal, and the residential areas to the east of Plutarco Elias Calles. U.S. government employees are not permitted to use taxi services in Nogales, but bus travel is permitted. Movement around the city after dark is by vehicle only. U.S. government employees should avoid El Centro and all night clubs after 10:00 p.m.
  • The eastern edge of the state of Sonora, which borders the state of Chihuahua (all points along that border east of Federal Highway 17, the road between Moctezuma and Sahuaripa, and state Highway 20 between Sahuaripa and the intersection with Federal Highway 16).
  • San Carlos, Guaymas, Empalme, and all points south of Hermosillo via Federal Highway 15.


Travel of U.S. government employees to the following cities is permitted with the noted restrictions:

  • San Luis Rio Colorado: U.S. government employees must travel during daylight hours through the San Luis, Arizona port-of-entry and may not travel beyond the city limits.
  • Cananea: U.S. government employees must travel during daylight hours through the Naco, Arizona port-of-entry and along Route 2 to Cananea, including the Cananea mine, and may not travel beyond the city limits. 
  • Agua Prieta: U.S. government employees must travel during daylight hours through the Douglas, Arizona port-of-entry and may not travel beyond the city limits.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Tabasco state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Tamaulipas state – Level 4: Do Not Travel

Do not travel due to crime. Violent crime, such as murder, armed robbery, carjacking, kidnapping, extortion, and sexual assault, is common. Gang activity, including gun battles, is widespread. Armed criminal groups target public and private passenger buses traveling through Tamaulipas, often taking passengers hostage and demanding ransom payments. Local law enforcement has limited capability to respond to violence in many parts of the state.

U.S. government employees are subject to movement restrictions and a curfew between midnight and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Tamaulipas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Tlaxcala state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

There are no travel restrictions on U.S. government employees.

Veracruz state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution due to crime.

U.S. government employees are encouraged to remain in tourist areas and are not permitted to use public transportation. U.S. government employees are permitted to drive during daylight only.

Yucatan state – Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution

Exercise increased caution. Police presence and emergency response are extremely limited outside of the state capital.

There are no restrictions on U.S. government employees for travel in Yucatan state, which includes tourist areas such as: Chichen Itza, Merida, Uxmal, and Valladolid.

Zacatecas state – Level 3: Reconsider Travel

Reconsider travel due to crime. Violent crime and gang activity are common in parts of Zacatecas state.

U.S. government employees may travel outside Zacatecas city only during daylight hours on toll roads. U.S. government employees must remain within Zacatecas city between 1 a.m. and 6 a.m.

U.S. government employees are prohibited from patronizing adult clubs and gambling establishments in Zacatecas.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

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Hague Convention Participation

Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
Yes

What You Can Do

Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US

Embassies and Consulates

List of Consulates / Consular Agencies
(Also available at: https://mx.usembassy.gov/embassy-consulates/)

U.S. Embassy Mexico City
Paseo de la Reforma 305
Colonia Cuauhtemoc
06500 Mexico, D.F.
Telephone: 
011-52-55-5080-2000
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: 011-52-55-5080-2201
acsmexicocity@state.gov
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CONSULATES

U.S. Consulate General Ciudad Juarez 
Paseo de la Victoria #3650
Fracc. Partido Senecú
Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, Mexico
Telephone:
 (011) (52) (656) 227-3000
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Email: CDJSCS@state.gov
Facebook , Twitter

U.S. Consulate General Guadalajara 
Progreso 175
Col. Americana
Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
Telephone:
 (01-33 ) 3268-2100 (from Mexico) / 011-52-33-3268-2100 (from U.S.)
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: (01-33 ) 3826-6549 (from Mexico) / 011-52-33-3826-6549 (from U.S.)
Email: acsgdl@state.gov
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U.S. Consulate General Hermosillo 
Monterrey #141 entre las calles
Rosales y Galeana
Col. Esqueda, C.P. 83000
Hermosillo, Sonora, México
Telephone:
 01-662-289-3500 (from Mexico) / 011-52-662-289-3500 (from U.S.)
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Email: hermoacs@state.gov
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U.S. Consulate General Matamoros 
Calle Primera #2002
Colonia Jardín
Matamoros, Tamaulipas
México 87330
Telephone:
 011-52-(868)-812-4402
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: 52 868  816- 08 83 (within Mexico) / 816-08-83 (within Matamoros) / 011-52-868 816 08 83 (from U.S.)
Email: MatamorosUSCitizens@state.gov
Facebook , Twitter

U.S. Consulate General Merida 
Calle 60 No. 338-K x 29 y 31
Col. Alcala Martin
Merida, Yucatan, Mexico 97050

Telephone: From the U.S. 011-52-999-942-5700 / within Mexico 01-999-942-5700 / within Merida 942-5700
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: 011-52-999-942-5758 (from the U.S.)
Email: AskMeridaACS@state.gov
The Consulate in Merida provides consular services for the three Mexican states of Yucatan, Quintana Roo and Campeche.

U.S. Consulate General Monterrey

Avenida Alfonso Reyes No. 150
Col. Valle Poniente
Santa Catarina, Nuevo León, Mexico 66196
Telephone:
 (81) 8047-3100
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512 (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: (81) 8342-5433
MonterreyACS@state.gov
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U.S. Consulate General Nogales 
Calle San José s/n
Fraccionamiento los Alamos
C. P. 84065 Nogales, Sonora.
Mexico
Telephone:
 (52)-(631)-311-8150
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: (52)-(631)-313-4652
Email: nogalesACS@state.gov
Facebook

U.S. Consulate General Nuevo Laredo 
Paseo Colon, 1901, Colonia Madero
Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas 88260 Mexico
Telephone: From Mexico:
 (867) 714-0512, ext. 3128 (If calling from the U.S., dial 01152 before the number)
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: (867) 714-0512, ext. 3197 (from Mexico) / 011-52-867-714-0512, ext. 3197 (from U.S.)
Email: NuevoLaredo-ACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate Tijuana 
Paseo de las Culturas s/n
Mesa de Otay
Delegación Centenario C.P. 22425
Tijuana, Baja California
Mexico
Telephone:
 (664) 977-2000 (Dialing from the U.S. 011-52 + phone number)
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Email: ACSTijuana@state.gov
Facebook

Consular Agencies
(Also available at: https://mx.usembassy.gov/embassy-consulates/consular-agencies/)

U.S. Consular Agent - Acapulco
Hotel Continental Emporio
Costera M. Alemán 121 - Office 14
Acapulco, Gro. 39670
Mexico

Telephone: (011)(52)(744) 481-0100 or (011)(52)(744) 484-0300
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: (52) (744) 484-0300
Monday – Friday: 9:00a.m. – 2:00p.m.

U.S. Consular Agent - Los Cabos
Las Tiendas de Palmilla L-B221
Km. 27.5 Carretera Transpeninsular
San José del Cabo, B.C.S. 23406
Mexico
Telephone:
 (624) 143-3566
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.) Monday-Friday: 9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

U.S. Consular Agent - Cancun
Blvd. Kukulcan Km 13 ZH
Torre La Europea, Despacho 301
Cancun, Quintana Roo, Mexico
Telephone: 
(011)(52)(999) 942-5700
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: (998) 883-1373
Email: ConAgencyCancun@state.gov
The U.S. Consular Agency in Cancun is open for business Monday through Friday from 8:30 am to 1:30 pm. An appointment is required for all services.

U.S. Consular Agent - Cozumel
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(999) 942 5700
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)A U.S. Consular Agent serves on the island of Cozumel for non-routine emergency services only.  

U.S. Consular Agent - Mazatlán
Playa Gaviotas No. 202
Zona Dorada
Mazatlán, Sinaloa 82110
Mexico
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(818) 047-3145
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)General Business hours: Monday thru Friday from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm.
Email: ConAgencyMazatlan@state.gov

U.S. Consular Agent - Oaxaca
Macedonio Alcala No. 407, Office 20
Oaxaca, Oax. 68000
Mexico
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(951)514-3054 or (011)(52)(951) 516-2853
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: (52) (951) 516-2701
Monday – Thursday: 10:00a.m. – 3:00p.m.

U.S. Consular Agent - Piedras Negras
Abasolo #211, Local #3
Centro
26000 Piedras Negras, Coahuila
Mexico
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(878) 782-5586 or (011)(52)(878) 782-8664
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: (52) (878) 782-8707
Monday– Friday: 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
E-mail: NuevoLaredo-ACS@state.gov

U.S. Consular Agent - Playa del Carmen
(An extension of the Consulate in Merida)
Plaza Progreso, Local 33
Carretera Federal Puerto Juarez-Chetumal, Mz. 293 Lt. 1.
Playa del Carmen, Quintana Roo C.P. 77710

Phone: (52)(999) 942-5700
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
E-mail:
 ConAgencyPlayadelC@state.gov
The U.S. Consular Agency in Playa del Carmen is open for business Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm. An appointment is required for all services.  

U.S. Consular Agent - Puerto Vallarta
Paseo de Los Cocoteros 85 Sur
Paradise Plaza - Local L-7
Nuevo Vallarta, Nayarit C.P
Mexico
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(322) 222-0069
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)

U.S. Consular Agent - San Miguel de Allende
Dr. Hernandez Macías No. 72
San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato
Mexico
Telephone:
 (011)(52)(81) 8047-3145
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512  (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax: (52) (415) 152-1588
Monday-Thursday: 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
ConAgencySanMiguel@state.gov

General Information


Mexico and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) since October 1, 1991.

For information concerning travel to Mexico, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Mexico. 

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

Hague Abduction Convention


The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention.  In this capacity, the Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children's Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Mexico.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Fax: 1-202-485-6221
Website

The Mexican Central Authority for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Secretaria de Relaciones Exteriores (SRE).  The Mexican Central Authority performs an administrative role in processing Hague Abduction Convention applications.  They can be reached at:

Secretari­a de Relaciones Exteriores
Direccion General de Proteccion a Mexicanos en el Exterior
Direccion de Derecho de Familia
Plaza Juarez No. 20, Piso 17
Colonia Centro, Del. Cuauhtemoc
C.P. 06010 Mexico, D.F.
Telephone: 011-52-55-36865100
Fax: 011-52-55-36865865
Email: dgpmexterior@sre.gob.m
Website

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Mexico, the left behind parent should submit a Hague application to the Mexican Central Authority, either through the USCA or directly.  In exceptional cases, some courts may accept a petition filed directly.  The Mexican Central Authority will, upon receipt and acceptance of the Hague Convention application, prepare a written communique for the court containing an explanation of the Hague Convention and its objectives and forward the application to the appropriate state court. The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to the Mexican Central Authority, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are not fees for filing Hague applications with either the United States or Mexican central authorities.  If the applicant parent hires an attorney, attorney fees are the responsibility of the applicant parent.  Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Mexico.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Mexico.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

Retaining an Attorney

Applicants are not required to retain an attorney to file a Hague Convention application in Mexico.  A parent may choose to retain an attorney, however, to follow-up on the case and to provide them with direct information on the status of the case. A retained attorney should contact the Mexican Central Authority as soon as possible after the application is submitted.  The Mexican Central Authority does not represent Hague Convention applicants in court or assign an attorney to represent the applicant.

The U.S. Embassy and the U.S. Consulates in Mexico posts a list of attorneys including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

Mediation

Courts in Mexico prefer to resolve cases through voluntary agreements, usually negotiated under the supervision of the court. The use of professional mediation services is not widely available in Mexico and is not a prevalent practice in Hague Convention cases with Mexico.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Last Updated: June 26, 2018

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Mexico City
Paseo de la Reforma 305
Colonia Cuauhtemoc
Mexico, D.F., Mexico C.P.
06500
Telephone
011-52-55-5080-2000
Emergency
American Citizen Services: 01 800 681 9374 (toll free in Mexico) / 81 4160 5512 (from within Mexico) / 844 528 6611 (toll free in the U.S.)
Fax
011-52-55-5080-2201

Mexico Map