Russia Travel Advisory
August 15, 2022

Do Not Travel and Leave Immediately

International Parental Child Abduction

English

Country Information

China

China
People's Republic of China
Reconsider travel to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and the PRC’s Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws and COVID-19-related restrictions. Exercise increased caution in the PRC due to wrongful detentions.

Last Update: Reissued with updates on COVID-19 restrictions.

Reconsider travel to the People’s Republic of China (PRC) and the PRC’s Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) due to arbitrary enforcement of local laws and COVID-19-related restrictions. Exercise increased caution in the PRC due to wrongful detentions.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has determined the PRC has a low level of COVID-19 and Hong Kong has a high level of COVID-19. Visit the CDC page for the latest Travel Health Information related to your travel.

Quarantine and Testing

The zero-tolerance approach to COVID-19 by the PRC and Hong Kong SAR governments severely impacts travel and access to public services.

All travelers should prepare to quarantine at a government-designated location for an extended duration upon arrival. While in quarantine, health authorities will test travelers as often as daily for COVID-19 and will not permit travelers to leave their rooms. Travelers who test positive during this quarantine time will be transferred to a government-designated medical facility. Standards of care, accommodations, testing, and treatments may differ considerably from standards in the United States, including the possibility of unsanitary or crowded conditions, substandard or limited access to food provisions, and delayed access to medical treatment. Even after completing quarantine on-arrival, travelers to the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR, may face additional quarantines and mandatory testing as well as movement and access restrictions, including access to medical services and public transportation. In some cases, U.S. citizen children in the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR, who test positive have been separated from their parents and kept in isolation until they meet local hospital discharge requirements.

People within the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR, are subjected to mandatory testing. In areas with confirmed COVID-19 cases, restrictions may include being confined to home or moved to a government- designated quarantine facility or hospital. Visit the Embassy's COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 and related restrictions and conditions in the mainland areas of the PRC, or the Consulate General Hong Kong's COVID-19 page for information on the COVID-19 situation in the Hong Kong SAR, as testing and travel requirements frequently change.

Lockdowns  

Lockdowns, also called “dynamic static management of COVID-19 risks,” can occur in any location in the PRC at any time with little notice and may last for extended periods.  Officials may instruct people not to leave specific districts, compounds, or residences. They may lock compound and building doors, and construct gates or walls around residences with little or no notice.  Officials may require people to transfer to a quarantine facility.  Prepare to have sufficient water, food, and medication on hand for a minimum of two weeks.  If an area is restricted due to COVID-19, groceries, deliveries, and public transportation may be unavailable. Hospitals may restrict entrance or be locked down on short notice. These restrictions may be more likely to occur in border areas, particularly on the borders with the DPRK, Burma (Myanmar), Mongolia, and Russia, where COVID-19 cases have occurred that officials believe stem from cross border transmission. 

Country Summary: The PRC government arbitrarily enforces local laws, including carrying out wrongful detentions and using exit bans on U.S. citizens and citizens of other countries without fair and transparent process under the law.

The Department has determined that at least one U.S. national is wrongfully detained by the PRC government.

U.S. citizens traveling or residing in the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR, may be detained without access to U.S. consular services or information about their alleged crime. U.S. citizens may be subjected to prolonged interrogations and extended detention without due process of law.

Foreigners in the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR, including but not limited to businesspeople, former foreign government personnel, and journalists have been unjustly interrogated and detained by PRC officials for alleged violations of PRC national security laws. The PRC has also interrogated, detained, and expelled U.S. citizens living and working in the PRC.

Security personnel may detain and/or deport U.S. citizens for sending private electronic messages critical of the PRC or Hong Kong SAR governments.

In addition, the PRC government has used restrictions on travel or departure from the PRC, or so-called exit bans, to:

  • compel individuals to participate in PRC government investigations,
  • pressure family members of the restricted individual to return to the PRC from abroad,
  • resolve civil disputes in favor of PRC citizens, and
  • gain bargaining leverage over foreign governments.

In most cases, U.S. citizens only become aware of an exit ban when they attempt to depart the PRC, and there is no reliable mechanism or legal process to find out how long the ban might continue or to contest it in a court of law.  Relatives, including minor children, of those under investigation in the PRC, may become subject to an exit ban. 

The PRC and Hong Kong SAR governments do not recognize dual nationality.  U.S.-PRC citizens and U.S. citizens of Chinese descent may be subject to additional scrutiny and harassment, and the PRC and Hong Kong SAR governments may prevent the U.S. Embassy or U.S. Consulate General from providing consular services.

XINJIANG UYGHUR AUTONOMOUS REGION and TIBET AUTONOMOUS REGION

Extra security measures, such as security checks and increased levels of police presence, are common in the Xinjiang Uyghur and Tibet Autonomous Regions. Authorities may impose curfews and travel restrictions on short notice.

HONG KONG SPECIAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGION

Since the imposition of the National Security Law on June 30, 2020, the PRC unilaterally and arbitrarily exercises police and security power in the Hong Kong SAR. The PRC has demonstrated an intention to use this authority to target a broad range of activities it defines as acts of secession, subversion, terrorism, and collusion with foreign entities. The National Security Law also covers offenses committed by non-Hong Kong residents or organizations outside of Hong Kong, which could subject U.S. citizens who have been publicly critical of the PRC to a heightened risk of arrest, detention, expulsion, or prosecution. PRC security forces, including the new Office for Safeguarding National Security, now operate in the Hong Kong SAR and are not subject to oversight by the Hong Kong judiciary.

Demonstrations: Participating in demonstrations or any other activities that authorities interpret as constituting an act of secession, subversion, terrorism, or collusion with a foreign country could result in criminal charges. On June 30, 2020, as part of its color-coded system of warning flags, the Hong Kong police unveiled a new purple flag, which warns protesters that shouting slogans or carrying banners with an intent prohibited by the law could now result in criminal charges. U.S. citizens are strongly cautioned to be aware of their surroundings and avoid demonstrations.

Propaganda: A PRC propaganda campaign has falsely accused individuals, including U.S. citizens, of fomenting unrest in the Hong Kong SAR. In some cases, the campaign has published their personal information, resulting in threats of violence on social media.

Read the country information page for the PRC and the information page for the Hong Kong SAR for additional information on travel.

If you decide to travel to the PRC, including the Hong Kong SAR:

  • Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before planning any international travel, read the Embassy COVID-19 page for the PRC and the Consulate General COVID-19 page for the Hong Kong SAR for specific COVID-19 information.
  • For the Hong Kong SAR, monitor local media, local transportations sites and apps like MTR Mobile or CitybusNWFB, and the Hong Kong International Airport website for updates.
  • Avoid the areas of the demonstrations.
  • Exercise caution if you are in the vicinity of large gatherings or protests.
  • Avoid taking photographs of protesters or police without permission.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Keep a low profile.
  • For the Hong Kong SAR, review your Hong Kong flight status with your airline or at the Hong Kong International Airport website.
  • Enter the PRC on your U.S. passport with a valid PRC visa and keep it with you.
  • If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy or the nearest consulate immediately.
  • If you plan to enter the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), read the DPRK Travel Advisory. Travelers should note that U.S. passports are not valid for travel to, in, or through the DPRK, unless they are specially validated by the Department of State.
  • Enroll in the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP) to receive alerts and make it easier to locate you in an emergency.
  • Follow the Department of State on Facebook and Twitter. Follow the U.S. Embassy on TwitterWeChat, and Weibo. Follow U.S. Consulate General Hong Kong on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Review the Country Security Report for the PRC and the Hong Kong SAR.
  • Prepare a contingency plan for emergency situations. Review the Traveler’s Checklist.
... [READ MORE]

Hague Convention Participation

Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No

What You Can Do

Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US

Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Beijing 

No. 55 An Jia Lou Road 
Chaoyang District, Beijing 100600 
China 
Telephone: +(86)(10) 8531-4000 
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(86)(10) 8531-4000 
Fax: +(86)(10) 8531-3300 
The Embassy consular district includes the municipalities of Beijing, Tianjin, Gansu, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Hunan, Inner Mongolia, Jiangxi, Ningxia, Qinghai, Shaanxi, Shandong, Shanxi, Xinjiang, Chongqing, Guizhou, Sichuan, Yunnan, Tibet 
BeijingACS@state.gov 

Consulates 

U.S. Consulate General Guangzhou 
43 Hua Jiu Road, Zhujiang New Town, Tianhe District 
Guangzhou 510623 
China 
Telephone: +(86)(20) 3814-5775 
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(86)(10) 8531-4000 
Fax: +(86)(20) 3814-5572 
Email: GuangzhouACS@state.gov 
This consular district includes the provinces/autonomous region of Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Hainan  

U.S. Consulate General Shanghai 
Westgate Mall, 9th Floor, 1038 Nanjing Xi Lu, 
Shanghai 200031 
China 
Telephone: +(86)(21) 8011-2400 
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(86)(10) 8531-4000 
Fax: +(86)(21) 6148-8266 
Email: ShanghaiACS@state.gov 
This consular district includes Shanghai municipality and the provinces of Shanghai, Anhui, Jiangsu, Zhejiang 

U.S. Consulate General Shenyang 
No. 52, 14th Wei Road, Heping District, 
Shenyang 110003 
China 
Telephone: +(86)(24) 2322-1198 
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(86)(24) 2322-1198 
Fax: +(86)(24) 2323-1465 
Email: ShenyangACS@state.gov 
This consular district includes: the provinces of Heilongjiang, Jilin, Liaoning 

The U.S. Consulate General in Wuhan 
New World International Trade Tower I, 
No. 568, Jianshe Avenue 
Hankou, Wuhan 430022 
China 
Telephone: +(86)(027) 8555-7791 
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(86)(10) 8531-4000 
Fax: +(86)(027) 8555-7761 
Please note that Consulate General Wuhan is currently providing information and emergency services for U.S. citizens. Regular ACS services are expected in Fall 2022.  For routine services at this time please contact U.S. Embassy Beijing 
WuhanACS@state.gov 

General Information

For information concerning travel to China, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country specific information for China. 

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Child Abduction. The report is located here

Hague Abduction Convention

China is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between China and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  The government of China maintains information about custody, visitation, and family law on the Internet here under Marriage Law.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in China and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children's Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction.  For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children's Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children's Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State 
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website: travel.state.gov

Under Article 262 of the Criminal Law, abduction of a child under the age of 14 that would cause the child to be separated from his/her family or guardian is a crime in China, Please see full text of the law, which does not clearly address how this law applies if the abductor is a parent.

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court.  Please see Pressing Criminal Charges for more information. 

Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in China and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children's Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States.   Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the appropriate U.S. Embassy or Consulate in China for information and possible assistance.

Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children's Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy or Consulates in China are authorized to provide legal advice.

The U.S. Embassy in Beijing posts list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list.  Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

Mediation

Divorce cases brought before the courts often include voluntary mediation to resolve conflicts and to help develop parenting plan(s) best for the family.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in China who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. For more resources please check www.npc.gov.cnor for the Chinese version please obtain information at http://www.gov.cn.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Last Updated: June 1, 2015

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Beijing
No. 55 An Jia Lou Road
Chaoyang District, Beijing 100600
China
Telephone
+(86)(10) 8531-4000
Emergency
+(86)(10) 8531-4000
Fax
+(86)(10) 8531-3300

China Map