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Peru

Peru
Republic of Peru
Last Updated: November 15, 2013

Exercise normal precautions in Peru. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • The Colombian - Peruvian border area in the Loreto Region due to crime.
  • The area in central Peru known as the V

Exercise normal precautions in Peru. Some areas have increased risk. Read the entire Travel Advisory.

Do not travel to:

  • The Colombian - Peruvian border area in the Loreto Region due to crime.
  • The area in central Peru known as the Valley of the Rivers Apurimac, Ene, and Mantaro (VRAEM) due to crime and terrorism.

Reconsider travel to:

  • Areas outside cities at night by car due to crime.

Read the Safety and Security section on the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Peru:

Colombian Border

Except on the Amazon River itself, U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling within 20 kilometers of the border with Colombia in the Loreto region, without prior permission. This includes travel on the Putumayo River, which forms most of the Peru-Colombia border. Drug trafficking and other criminal activity, combined with poor infrastructure, limit the capability and effectiveness of law enforcement in this area.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

The VRAEM (Valley of the Rivers Apurimac, Ene, and Mantaro)

Drug trafficking and other criminal activity, combined with poor infrastructure, limit the capability and effectiveness of law enforcement in this area.

Remnants of the Shining Path terrorist group are active in the VRAEM. They may attack with little or no warning, targeting Peruvian government installations.

U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling in the VRAEM. The VRAEM is defined as restricted areas within the regions of Ayacucho, Cusco, Huancavelica, and Junín as follows:

Ayacucho 

Permitted

  • Daylight road travel from Ayacucho City to Huanta city.
  • Staying within the city limits of Huanta.
  • Daylight road travel from Pisco city (Department of Ica) to Ayacucho city.

Restricted

Provinces of La Mar and Huanta. Road travel from Ayacucho City to San Francisco city.

Cusco

Permitted

  • Except as restricted below, most areas, including the Machu Picchu area and city of Cusco.

Restricted

  • 20-kilometer swath of territory contiguous to the Apurimac River and Ayacucho Department (specifically: the districts of Kimbiri, Pichari, Vilcabamba, and Echarate in the Province of La Convencíon).

Huancavelica

Permitted   

  • Train travel from Lima to Huancayo city (Department of Junin) and Huancavelica city.
  • Daylight road travel from Lima to Huancayo city.
  • Daylight road travel from Pisco city (Department of Ica) to Ayacucho city (Department of Ayacucho).

Restricted   

  • Provinces of Churcampa, Acobamba, and Tayacaja.

Junín

Permitted 

  • Daylight travel from La Merced city to the Satipo provincial boundary.

Restricted  

  • Province of Satipo. In the Province of Concepción, travel east of the cities of San Antonio de Ocopa and Santa Rosa (located northeast of Concepción city). The Districts of Santo Domingo de Acobamba and Pariahuanca in the Province of Huancayo.

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

Areas Outside Cities at Night

Criminal gangs are known to use roadblocks and rob passengers in passing cars and buses. Nighttime travel via road outside Lima and other cities is generally not permitted for U.S. government personnel. However, the following travel by U.S. government personnel is permitted at night:

  • Travel by commercial bus on the Pan American Highway, between the Pan American Highway and Huaraz, or between the Pan-American Highway, Arequipa, and Cusco.
  • Travel by car on the Pan-American Highway south from Lima to Paracas or north from Lima to Huacho (approximately three hours north and south of Lima).

Visit our website for Travel to High-Risk Areas.

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Peru
Republic of Peru