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CSI Country Catalog

Yemen

Flag_of_Yemen
Country
Country Name: Yemen
Official Country Name: Republic of Yemen
Country Code 2-Letters: YE
Country Code 3-Letters: YEM
Street:
Fact sheet: https://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/35836.htm
  • International Travel
  • Child Abductions
  • Intercountry Adoptions
  • Consular Notification
  • U.S. Visas
  • Contact
  • Quick Facts
  • Embassies and Consulates
  • Destination Description
  • Entry, Exit & Visa Requirements
  • Safety and Security
  • Local Laws & Special Circumstances
  • Health
  • Travel & Transportation
Contact
Embassy Name: Yemen Travel Warning
Street Address:
Phone: Callers within the U.S. and Canada may dial toll free 1-888-407-4747
Emergency Phone: Callers outside the United States and Canada may dial 1-202-501-4444.
Fax: N/A
Email: YemenEmergencyUSC@state.gov
Web: /content/travel/en/traveladvisories/traveladvisories/yemen-travel-warning.html

Embassy Messages


Map
Country Map
Quick Facts
Passport Validity:


Must be valid for six months at time of entry.


Blank Passport Pages:


One page is required for entry stamp  


Tourist Visa Required:


Yes. Must be obtained at Yemeni embassies and consulates abroad.


Vaccinations:


None required.


Currency Restrictions for Entry:


  Unknown


Currency Restrictions for Exit:


  Unknown

Embassies and Consulates

The U.S. Department of State strongly recommends that U.S. citizens remaining in Yemen depart. More information can be found within the U.S. Department of State’s Yemen Travel Warning. The U.S. Embassy in Sana’a suspended operations on February 11, 2015 and therefore cannot provide protection or routine consular services to U.S. citizens in Yemen.

Please direct inquiries regarding U.S. citizens in Yemen to YemenEmergencyUSC@state.gov. Callers in the U.S. and Canada may dial the toll free number 1-888-407-4747. Callers outside the United States and Canada may dial 1-202-501-4444.

Destination Description

See the Yemen Government website and the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Yemen

Entry, Exit & Visa Requirements

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens of the high security threat level in Yemen due to the ongoing military conflict, terrorist activities, including kidnappings, and civil unrest. The Department urges U.S. citizens to defer travel to Yemen and those U.S. citizens currently living in Yemen to depart. For more information please see our Travel Warning for Yemen.

While we discourage any and all travel to Yemen, for complete visa information, visit the Embassy of Yemen’s website or call the Embassy of Yemen in Washington, D.C. at (202) 965-4760 ext. 2

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website. For further information about customs regulations, please read our Customs Information page. If you are in Yemen and have questions about your federal benefits please contact FBU.Jerusalem@SSA.gov

Safety and Security

Since the beginning of the conflict in March 2015, rebel groups in Sanaa have systematically unlawfully detained U.S. citizens.  Reports indicate that U.S. citizens are being targeted by virtue of their citizenship, regardless of the amount of time they have spent in Yemen, their established connections with the rebel groups, or their connections with local businesses or humanitarian organizations aimed at providing relief to those in need.  During their detentions, which in some cases have lasted well over a year, U.S. citizens have not been able to contact their families or to be visited by U.S. consular personnel or international humanitarian organizations. The U.S. government is severely limited in what assistance it can directly provide to U.S. citizens in detention.  There is no U.S. government presence on the ground following the rebel takeover of Sanaa.

In addition to the threat of detention by rebel groups, there continue to be other risks due to ongoing military conflict and heightened terrorist activity, including kidnappings for ransom.  In March 2015, a Saudi-led coalition initiated an air campaign in support of the exiled Yemeni government. A nationwide cessation of hostilities deteriorated in early August 2016, and high levels of violence, including armed conflict, artillery shelling, and air strikes, now persist in areas throughout the country. The level of instability and ongoing threats in Yemen are severe.

Vessels in the region of the Red Sea, Bab-el-Mandeb Strait and the Gulf of Aden, including near the island of Socotra, should operate under a heightened state of alert as increasing tensions in the region escalate the potential for direct or collateral damage to vessels transiting the region.  These threats may come from a variety of different sources such as missiles, projectiles or waterborne improvised explosive devices.  Houthi rebels claimed responsibility for an October 1, 2016, attack on a UAE vessel.  Also in October, rockets were fired at U.S. naval vessels transiting the region.  Piracy in the Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, and Indian Ocean remains a security threat to maritime activities in the region.  In the last several years, there were hundreds of documented pirate attacks in Yemeni territorial waters in the Gulf of Aden and the Red Sea. The United States Maritime Administration (MARAD) has also advised that elevated regional tensions have increased the risk of maritime attacks being conducted by extremists to vessels operating in the Gulf of Oman, North Arabian Sea, Gulf of Aden, and the Bab el Mandeb regions.

MARAD recommends vessels at anchor, operating in restricted maneuvering environments, or at slow speeds, should be especially vigilant and report suspicious activity. U.S. flag vessels that observe suspicious activity in the area are advised to report such suspicious activity or any hostile or potentially hostile action to COMUSNAVCENT battlewatch captain at phone number 011-973-1785-3879. All suspicious activities and events are also to be reported to the U.S. Coast Guard National Response Center at the following toll free telephone: 1-800-424-8802, direct telephone 202-267-2675, or TDD 202-267-4477. For further information, see the Department of State’s International Maritime Piracy Fact Sheet and the United States Maritime Administration (MARAD) advisory on vessels transiting high risk waters.

Other potential hazards to travelers include land mines and unexploded ordnance from the 1994 civil war and other conflicts. This is of particular concern in the six southern provinces and in the northern highlands. Most minefields have been identified and cordoned off, but there are still undetected and unidentified minefields in Yemen.

To stay connected:

CRIME: Due to the ongoing civil unrest throughout the country, travelers should not rely on significant assistance from local authorities.

The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Yemen is 199, but operators do not speak English.

Please see our information for victims of crime, including possible victim compensation programs in the United States.

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

CRIMINAL PENALTIES: While traveling in Yemen or another country, all travelers are subject to its laws even if they are U.S. citizens. Foreign laws and legal systems can be vastly different than our own. In Yemen, foreign travelers may be taken in for questioning if they don’t have their passport with them. Driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs can land the driver immediately in jail. The criminal penalties in Yemen may be very different from what U.S. citizens are accustomed to in the United States.

Persons violating Yemeni laws, even unknowingly, may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. Penalties for possession, use, or trafficking in illegal drugs in Yemen are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines. The use of the mild stimulant "qat” or “khat" is legal and common in Yemen, but it is considered an illegal substance in many other countries, including the United States.  Do not attempt to bring qat back to the United States; the penalties for trafficking qat include heavy fines and possible imprisonment.

SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES: Photography of military installations, including airports, equipment, or troops is forbidden. In the past, such photography has led to the arrest of U.S. citizens. Military sites are not always obvious. If in doubt, ask specific permission from Yemeni authorities.

U.S. citizens who travel to Yemen are subject to the jurisdiction of Yemeni courts, as well as to the country's laws, customs, and regulations. This holds true for all legal matters, including child custody and travel restrictions. Women in custody disputes in Yemen will not enjoy the same rights that they do in the United States, as Yemeni law often does not work in favor of the mother. Parents should also note that U.S. custody orders might not be enforced in Yemen.

U.S. citizen women who are married to Yemeni or Yemeni-American men should be aware that their children may not be able to depart if the children are brought to Yemen. In many instances, women must obtain permission from their husbands to obtain an exit visa. They also may not be able to take their children out of Yemen without the permission of the father, regardless of who has legal custody. U.S. divorce decrees may not be recognized in Yemen, especially if the marriage took place in Yemen. U.S. citizen women who have married in Yemen and divorced in the United States have been prevented from departing Yemen by their ex-husbands.

LGBTI RIGHTS: Consensual same-sex sexual relations are criminalized in Yemen. Penalties include fines, jail time, or death. Although the U.S. Embassy is not aware of any recent arrests or prosecutions for such activities, they remain illegal. See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of the Department of State's Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: While in Yemen, travelers with disabilities will find accessibility and accommodation much more difficult from what they find in the United States. No national law in Yemen mandates accessibility of buildings for persons with disabilities.

Students: See our Students Abroad  page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: If you are a woman traveling abroad, please review our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Health

Due to the ongoing civil unrest, medical facilities in Sanaa, Aden and elsewhere in the country may not be readily available.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance:  Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.  Many hospitals will not release you until final payment arrangements have been made. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Vaccinations:  Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For further health information, go to:

Travel & Transportation

TRAFFIC SAFETY AND ROAD CONDITIONS:

Road conditions in Yemen differ significantly from those in the United States. Travel by road in Yemen is dangerous. Due to the conflict, when traveling from one location in Yemen to another, you will need to go through multiple security checkpoints and will be required to present appropriate documentation.  Please refer to our Road Safety page and the website of Yemen's national tourism office.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Yemen, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Yemen’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information
Use "Heading 1" for city name. Use "Heading 2" for phone number. Use "Heading 3" for fax number. Emails will automatically be set with an email icon.

Washington, DC (202) 965-4760 ext. 2 (202) 337-2017

New York, NY (212) 355-1730 (212) 750-9613

San Francisco, CA (415) 567-3036 (415) 567-3371

  • General Information
  • Hague Abduction Convention
  • Return
  • Visitation/Access
  • Retaining an Attorney
  • Mediation
Hague Questions | Learn More Links
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention? No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention? No
Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters: /content/travel/en/International-Parental-Child-Abduction/for-providers/laws/important-feat-hague-abdtn-conv.html

General Information

For information concerning travel to Yemen, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Yemen.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

Hague Abduction Convention

Yemen is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between Yemen and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Yemen and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children's Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction.  For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children's Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children's Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, Floor 9
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Fax:  202-736-9132
Website
Email: AskCI@state.gov

Parental child abduction may be a crime in Yemen depending on the circumstances of the child's removal.  Parents are encouraged to consult with a Yemeni attorney to determine if their particular case qualifies as a crime under Yemeni law.

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court.  Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information.

Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Yemen and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children's Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States.  Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the appropriate U.S. Embassy or Consulate Yemen for information and possible assistance.

Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children's Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy or Consulates in Yemen are authorized to provide legal advice.

Parents who wish to consult an attorney who specializes in family law in Yemen are encouraged to contact the U.S. Embassy in Sana'a for a list of attorneys.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

Mediation

Mediation in Yemen is voluntary. There are no government agencies or non-governmental organizations that offer mediation services for custody disputes.

  • Hague
  • Hague Convention Information
  • U.S. Immigration Requirements
  • Who Can Adopt
  • Who Can Be Adopted
  • How To Adopt
  • Traveling Abroad
  • After Adoption
  • Contact Information
Hague Questions
Hague Adoption Convention Country? No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
Hague Convention Information

Yemen is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoptio(Hague Adoption Convention or Convention). Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Convention countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section  204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F).

Yemeni law, which follows Shari’a law, does not permit the adoption of Yemeni children in Yemen. U.S. citizens considering adoption of a Yemeni child must obtain guardianship for emigration and adoption in the United States from the Yemen court that has jurisdiction over the prospective adoptive child’s place of residence. Most guardianships that occur in Yemen are intra-familial and are done through the local court system. U.S. citizens who wish to obtain guardianship of a Yemeni child should contact the guardianship authority in Sanaa, Mr. Adel Al Sharabi, to inquire about applicable laws and procedures.  Prospective adoptive parents should also refer to our information sheet on Adoption of Children from Countries in which Islamic Shari'a Law is Observed for more information.

U.S. citizen prospective adoptive parents living in Yemen who wish to adopt a child from the United States or from a third country should also contact Mr. Adel Al Sharabi (see contact information below).

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

Please visit the Department of State’s Country Specific Information for more information on travelling to Yemen and contact the U.S. Embassy in Sanaa’s website for information on consular services.

YEMEN’S LEGAL GUARDIANSHIP AUTHORITY:

Mr. Adel Al Sharabi
Director of Social Protection
Ministry of Social Affairs and Labor
Tel:  +967-261064 or 967-262808
Email:  adbwan@yahoo.com

U.S. Immigration Requirements For Intercountry Adoptions

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Who Can Be Adopted

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How To Adopt

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Traveling Abroad

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After Adoption

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Contact Information

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  • Visa Classifications
  • General Documents | Birth, Death, Burial Certificates | Marriage, Divorce Certificates
  • Adoption Certificates | Identity Card | Police, Court, Prison Records | Military Records
  • Passports & Other Travel Documents | Other Records | Visa Issuing Posts | Visa Services
Classifications
Visa Classifications

Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 36 Months
A-2 None Multiple 12 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
B-2 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
B-1/B-2 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
C-1 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
C-1/D $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
C-2 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 12 Months
F-1 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
F-2 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
G-1 None Multiple 12 Months
G-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-3 None Multiple 12 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A $30.00 N/A N/A 3
H-2B $30.00 N/A N/A 3
H-2R $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
I $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
L-2 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
M-1 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
M-2 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
N-8 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
N-9 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 $30.00 Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
R-2 $30.00 Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8

Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Visa Category Footnotes

  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

General Documents | Birth, Death, Burial Certificates | Marriage, Divorce Certificates
General Documents

Please check back for update.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth

Available. However, Yemen does not yet have an established system of recording vital statistics. Furthermore, most Yemenis do not register births, marriages, divorces and deaths when they occur. To satisfy the need for civil documents for immigration and other purposes, Yemenis generally prepare 'court judgments.' These can be issued at any time by any district court within the country. Information in these documents is normally based on the testimony of an informant or his proxy, and witnesses who may or may not have direct knowledge of the events about which they are testifying. Dates in these documents are always suspect. At best, they are only as good as the memory or written records of the informant. At worst, the information in these documents can be completely false. The court makes no attempt to independently verify the testimony of informants and witnesses. Therefore, court judgments should be given no more weight than affidavits if presented in support of a relationship claim.

Recently, civil registry offices around the country have begun to issue birth and death certificates in standardized formats, normally on orange or green cards approximately 5 x 8 inches in size. Again, however, these certificates are issued at any time after the event on the basis of information provided to the civil registry office by the person requesting the document. Therefore, they cannot be considered any more reliable than court judgments.

Parts of the former PDRY (South Yemen) had an established civil registry system based on the British system and documents were issued in a format similar to that used in the U.K. and some of its former colonies. Documents that are older and were issued soon after the event are considered more reliable than so-called delayed certificates. There may be a fee for this service.

Death/Burial

Available. However, Yemen does not yet have an established system of recording vital statistics. Furthermore, most Yemenis do not register births, marriages, divorces and deaths when they occur. To satisfy the need for civil documents for immigration and other purposes, Yemenis generally prepare 'court judgments.' These can be issued at any time by any district court within the country. Information in these documents is normally based on the testimony of an informant or his proxy, and witnesses who may or may not have direct knowledge of the events about which they are testifying. Dates in these documents are always suspect. At best, they are only as good as the memory or written records of the informant. At worst, the information in these documents can be completely false. The court makes no attempt to independently verify the testimony of informants and witnesses. Therefore, court judgments should be given no more weight than affidavits if presented in support of a relationship claim.

Recently, civil registry offices around the country have begun to issue birth and death certificates in standardized formats, normally on orange or green cards approximately 5 x 8 inches in size. Again, however, these certificates are issued at any time after the event on the basis of information provided to the civil registry office by the person requesting the document. Therefore, they cannot be considered any more reliable than court judgments.

Parts of the former PDRY (South Yemen) had an established civil registry system based on the British system and documents were issued in a format similar to that used in the U.K. and some of its former colonies. Documents that are older and were issued soon after the event are considered more reliable than so-called delayed certificates. There may be a fee for this service.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage

Available. However, Yemen does not yet have an established system of recording vital statistics. Furthermore, most Yemenis do not register births, marriages, divorces and deaths when they occur. To satisfy the need for civil documents for immigration and other purposes, Yemenis generally prepare 'court judgments.' These can be issued at any time by any district court within the country. Information in these documents is normally based on the testimony of an informant or his proxy, and witnesses who may or may not have direct knowledge of the events about which they are testifying. Dates in these documents are always suspect. At best, they are only as good as the memory or written records of the informant. At worst, the information in these documents can be completely false. The court makes no attempt to independently verify the testimony of informants and witnesses. Therefore, court judgments should be given no more weight than affidavits if presented in support of a relationship claim.

Recently, civil registry offices around the country have begun to issue birth and death certificates in standardized formats, normally on orange or green cards approximately 5 x 8 inches in size. Again, however, these certificates are issued at any time after the event on the basis of information provided to the civil registry office by the person requesting the document. Therefore, they cannot be considered any more reliable than court judgments.

Parts of the former PDRY (South Yemen) had an established civil registry system based on the British system and documents were issued in a format similar to that used in the U.K. and some of its former colonies. Documents that are older and were issued soon after the event are considered more reliable than so-called delayed certificates. There may be a fee for this service.

Divorce

Available. However, Yemen does not yet have an established system of recording vital statistics. Furthermore, most Yemenis do not register births, marriages, divorces and deaths when they occur. To satisfy the need for civil documents for immigration and other purposes, Yemenis generally prepare 'court judgments.' These can be issued at any time by any district court within the country. Information in these documents is normally based on the testimony of an informant or his proxy, and witnesses who may or may not have direct knowledge of the events about which they are testifying. Dates in these documents are always suspect. At best, they are only as good as the memory or written records of the informant. At worst, the information in these documents can be completely false. The court makes no attempt to independently verify the testimony of informants and witnesses. Therefore, court judgments should be given no more weight than affidavits if presented in support of a relationship claim.

Recently, civil registry offices around the country have begun to issue birth and death certificates in standardized formats, normally on orange or green cards approximately 5 x 8 inches in size. Again, however, these certificates are issued at any time after the event on the basis of information provided to the civil registry office by the person requesting the document. Therefore, they cannot be considered any more reliable than court judgments.

Parts of the former PDRY (South Yemen) had an established civil registry system based on the British system and documents were issued in a format similar to that used in the U.K. and some of its former colonies. Documents that are older and were issued soon after the event are considered more reliable than so-called delayed certificates. There may be a fee for this service.

Adoption Certificates | Identity Card | Police, Court, Prison Records | Military Records
Adoption Certificates

Unavailable.

Identity Card

Unavailable.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Unavailable. 

Prison Records

Unavailable.

Military Records

Unavailable.

Passports & Other Travel Documents | Other Records | Visa Issuing Posts | Visa Services
Passports & Other Travel Documents

Passports issued by the former "Yemen Arab Republic" (YAR or North Yemen) and the "People's Democratic Republic of Yemen" (PDRY or South Yemen) are no longer valid. Visas should only be issued in "Republic of Yemen" travel documents. These have been in circulation since 1992.

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Sanaa, Yemen
(Embassy)

Tel: 967-1-303-155 (Emergency assistance for U.S. citizens)

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Yemen.