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CSI Country Catalog

Taiwan

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Country
Country Name: Taiwan
Official Country Name: Taiwan
Country Code 2-Letters: TW
Country Code 3-Letters: TWN
Street: 3rd Floor, Consular Section
#7, Lane 134, Hsin Yi Road,
Section 3
Taipei, 106 Taiwan
Fact sheet: https://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/35855.htm
  • International Travel
  • Child Abductions
  • Intercountry Adoptions
  • Consular Notification
  • U.S. Visas
  • Contact
  • Quick Facts
  • Embassies and Consulates
  • Destination Description
  • Entry, Exit & Visa Requirements
  • Safety and Security
  • Local Laws & Special Circumstances
  • Health
  • Travel & Transportation
Contact
Embassy Name: The American Institute in Taiwan
Street Address: 3rd  Floor, Consular Section
#7, Lane 134, Hsin Yi Road, Section 3
Taipei, 106 Taiwan
Phone: +(886) 2-2162-2000 ext. 2306
Emergency Phone: +(886) 2-2162-2000. 
Fax: +(886) 2-2162-2239
Email: TaipeiACS@state.gov
Web: https://www.ait.org.tw/

Map
Country Map
Quick Facts
Passport Validity:

Valid throughout duration of stay


Blank Passport Pages:

1 page per entry/exit stamp


Tourist Visa Required:

Not required for stay of less than 90 days


Vaccinations:

None required. Taiwan’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends travelers to Taiwan be vaccinated against Hepatitis A. Vaccination information can be found here.


Currency Restrictions for Entry:

Declare cash amounts over 100,000 New Taiwan Dollars (TWD), foreign currencies over 10,000 USD, or over 20,000 Chinese Yuan (RMB). Customs details are here


Currency Restrictions for Exit:

Declare cash amounts over 100,000 New Taiwan Dollars (TWD), foreign currencies over 10,000 USD, or over 20,000 Chinese Yuan (RMB). Customs details are here

Embassies and Consulates

The American Institute in Taiwan

2nd  Floor, Consular Section
#7, Lane 134, Hsin Yi Road, Section 3
Taipei, 106 Taiwan
Telephone:
(886) 2-2162-2000 or (02) 2162, ext. 2306
Emergency Telephone: +(886) 2-2162-2000. Press "0" or "*"
Fax: +(886) 2-2162-2239
Email: TaipeiACS@state.gov
The U.S. maintains unofficial relations with the people on Taiwan through the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT), a private nonprofit corporation, which performs U.S. citizen and consular services similar to those at embassies.

Kaohsiung Branch Office
No. 88 Chenggong 2nd Road, 5th Floor
Kaohsiung,  Taiwan
Telephone:
+(886) 7-238-7744
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: Please contact the American Institute in Taiwan.
Fax: +(886) 7-238-5237
Email: TaipeiACS@state.gov
Please contact the American Institute in Taiwain.

The United States maintains unofficial relations with the people on Taiwan through the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT), a private nonprofit corporation, which performs U.S. citizen and consular services similar to those at embassies.

Schedule routine American Citizen Services appointments online Monday through Friday except on Taiwan and U.S. holidays.

Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Taiwan for information on U.S. - Taiwan unofficial relations. 

Entry, Exit & Visa Requirements

If you wish to enter Taiwan as a tourist or short-term visitor (less than 90 days), you do not need a visa. No extensions or changes of status are permitted.  Your U.S. passport must be valid throughout your intended length of stay and you must have a confirmed return or onward air ticket. 

If you plan to stay longer than 90 days or plan to work, you need a Taiwan visa prior to traveling. Visit the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office (TECRO)’s website for the most current visa information.

HIV/AIDS restrictions. Taiwan lifted its ban on entry, stay, and residence of foreigners living with HIV on February 4, 2015. Taiwan generally does not ask you about your HIV status unless you are applying for a resident visa which requires a health certificate that will indicate whether you are HIV positive.

Taiwan and the United States both allow dual nationality.  If you have Taiwan/U.S. dual nationality, you must enter/exit Taiwan on your Taiwan passport and enter/exit the United States on your U.S. passport. 

See the Department of State’s website for information on dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction

Also see the Department of State’s Customs Information page.

Safety and Security

Potential for Civil Disturbances:  Taiwan enjoys a vibrant democracy, and spontaneous and planned demonstrations occur.  Monitor media coverage of local and regional events and avoid public demonstrations.

Potential for Typhoons and Earthquakes: During the typhoon season (April through October), Taiwan’s Central Weather Bureau issues typhoon warnings an average of six times a year (of which, three to four normally make landfall) and heavy rainstorm alerts more frequently. Taiwan also has severe earthquakes which caused 2000 deaths in 1999 and 117 deaths with widespread damage in 2016.

Disaster Preparedness:

Crime: There is minimal street crime in Taiwan, and violent crime is rare.  Take normal safety precautions, such as avoiding travel after dark or in deserted/unfamiliar areas. 

See the Department of State's and the FBI pages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime:  U.S. citizen victims of sexual assault should contact the American Institute in Taiwan for assistance at (+886) 2-2162-2000.  U.S. citizen victims of sexual assault should also seek medical attention and report to the police as soon as possible for help. 

  • Dial 113 to reach the Taipei Center for the Prevention of Domestic violence and Sexual Assault. 
  • Dial 110 to report crimes to the local police.

Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See the U.S. Department of State’s website on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas, as well as AIT's webpage for local resources, including this guide.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys 
  • provide information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence should contact the American Institute in Taiwan for assistance at (+886) 2-2162-2000. U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence should also call 113 for emergency assistance and dial 110 for an island-wide toll-free hotline. Dial 113 to reach the Taipei Center for the Prevention of Domestic violence and Sexual Assault.

Domestic violence is considered a crime in Taiwan. Report to police and keep written records of all incidents.  Preserve evidence such as medical records documenting injuries, photos of injuries, police records, and damaged clothing and weapons used against you. If you have a court issued restraining order, present this to the police for use in the arrest of the offender.

For further information:

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. See crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Be aware that:

  • Penalties for illegal drug possession, use, or trafficking —including marijuana— are severe, with long jail sentences and heavy fines.
  • Taiwan also has the death penalty for certain violent crimes and drug offenses. 

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) immediately. 

Labor Disputes:

  • Avoid labor disputes by establishing all terms and conditions of employment or sponsorship in the labor contract at the beginning of your employment.
  • Try to resolve disputes privately with your employer.
  • If the dispute cannot be resolved privately, the American Institute can provide a list of English-speaking lawyers.

Customs Regulations: Taiwan has strict regulations on importing/exporting firearms, antiquities, medications, currency, and ivory.  Contact the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office (TECRO) in Washington or one of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office (TECO) offices in the United States for specific information regarding customs requirements. See also customs regulations

Dual Nationality and Compulsory Military Service: Taiwan has compulsory military service for Taiwan national males between the ages of 18 and 36. Ths includes dual U.S./Taiwan citizens who enter Taiwan on their U.S. passports.  Contact the Taipei Economic and Cultural Representative Office (TECRO) in Washington or one of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office (TECO) offices in the United States to determine your military service status.             

Faith-Based Travelers:  See our following webpages for details:

Best Practices for Volunteering Abroad

Health Screening Process: To detect and prevent the spread of diseases, Taiwan scans the body temperature of all arriving passengers with an infrared thermal apparatus. Symptomatic passengers are required to fill out a form and may need to give an onsite specimen or see local health authorities.  See also the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) website.

Judicial Assistance: Authorities on Taiwan provide judicial assistance in response to letters rogatory from foreign courts in accordance with Taiwan's "Law Governing Extension of Assistance to Foreign Courts." For further information, please go to the Department of State’s website.

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) rights events in Taiwan, and Taiwan law prohibits education and employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.  However, Taiwan does not recognize same-sex marriage, and LGBTI individuals may still face lack of tolerance, particularly in areas outside the capital and largest city Taipei. See Section 6 of our Human Rights Practices in the Human Rights Report for Taiwan and read our LGBTI Travel Information page

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Taiwan law prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities and sets minimum fines for violations.  By law, new public buildings, facilities, and transportation equipment must be accessible to persons with disabilities.  See Persons with Disabilities in the Human Rights Report for Taiwan (2015).

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: If you are a woman traveling abroad, please review our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Health

Taiwan has modern medical facilities, with state-of-the-art equipment available at many hospitals and clinics. Physicians are well trained, and many have studied in the United States and speak English.  Hospital nursing services provide medication and wound care but generally do not provide the daily patient care functions found in U.S. hospitals. For specific clinics and hospitals, see the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT)’s website

Emergency Services: Ambulances have emergency equipment and supplies and are staffed by trained medical personnel (dial 119).

We cannot pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Consider supplemental insurance that includes medical evacuation. See insurance providers for overseas coverage.  Most hospitals overseas accept only cash payments. 

Carry prescription medication in original packaging, along with your doctor’s prescription. 

Dengue Fever: In recent years, Taiwan has seen a significant increase in cases of dengue fever, a virus common in subtropical regions that is spread through mosquito bites. There is currently no vaccine or medicine to prevent dengue. Travelers can protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites. For information on how to reduce the risk of contracting dengue, please visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) website.

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For further health information, go to:

Travel & Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Road conditions, lighting, and traffic safety in cities and on major highways are generally good. Roads in major cities are generally congested. Be alert for the many scooters and motorcycles that weave in and out of traffic. Motor scooters are common throughout the island. Be alert for scooters when stepping out of public buses or exiting a car. Exercise caution when crossing streets because many drivers do not respect the pedestrian's right of way. Be especially cautious when driving on mountain roads, which are typically narrow, winding, and poorly banked, and which may be impassable after heavy rains. For example, Taiwan’s central cross-island highway is meandering with poor visibility. Exercise caution when driving on highways. 

Please see AIT’s website for more details on Driving in Taiwan

Traffic Laws: Passengers in all vehicles, including taxis, are required by law to wear seatbelts. When exiting a vehicle, you are legally required to ensure that no motor scooter, bicycle, or other vehicle is approaching from behind before opening the door. You will be fully liable for any injuries or damages if you fail to do so. Do not turn right on a red traffic signal. It’s illegal to use a mobile phone while driving without a hands-free kit in Taiwan. The legal limit for alcohol in the bloodstream of drivers in Taiwan is 50 mg per 100 ml of blood. This limit is strictly enforced. It’s useful to have proof of car insurance and proof of ownership of the vehicle. On the spot fines are very common for minor traffic offences in Taiwan and are fixed for each offense. You will be told where to pay the fines and within what period of time. For more serious driving offenses you’ll receive a court appearance.

Standard international driving laws apply with one or two exceptions.

  • You must have a warning triangle in your car to use if you break down or are involved in an accident.
  • You cannot turn on a red light unless indicated.
  • Many drivers run red lights, especially just after they change. If you’re first in line at the light when it changes to green, it is best to assess the situation before driving into the intersection.

In an emergency:

If you have a problem with your car, call the number on the rental documents or attached to the windscreen of your car.

In the event of an accident you should call the police “110” and medical assistance “119.”  Provide the police with all the important information including the type of accident, details of vehicles involved involved and if there are any injuries or fatalities. The second call you should make is to your insurance company.

You will need a police report for your insurance company. While waiting for the police, take photographs of the scene and take the names, addresses and telephone numbers of any witnesses. If it is safe to do so, don't move the vehicles.

Police will not ask for bribes. 

Police will ask parties involved in the traffic accident to do an alcohol test.  This is standard operation procedure.

If riding a motor scooter, you and the passenger must wear a helmet.

For specific information concerning Taiwan's driver's permits, vehicle inspection road tax, and mandatory insurance, contact the nearest Taiwan Economic and Cultural Office (TECO) in the United States.

Public Transportation: Public transportation is cheap, convenient, and generally safe.  Taxis and buses may swerve to the side of the road to pick up passengers with little notice or regard for other vehicles.

Please refer to the Department of State’s Road Safety page for more information. Refer also to Taiwan’s Road Traffic Safety Portal.

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed Taiwan's Civil Aeronautics Administration (CAA) as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Taiwan's air carrier operations.  Further information may be found on the FAA’s Safety Assessment Page.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Taiwan should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts at www.marad.dot.gov/msci.  Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website (https:homeport.uscg.mil), and the NGA broadcast warnings website https://msi.nga.mil/NGAPortal/MSI.portal select “broadcast warnings.”

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information
Use Style in the Text Component to tag city names and to tag phone numbers, fax numbers, and emails with the respective Style icon.

Washington, DC (202) 895-1812 (202) 895-0017

Atlanta, GA (404) 870-9375(404) 870-9376

Boston, MA (617) 259-1350 (617) 737-1260

Chicago, IL (312) 616-0100 (312) 616-1486

Denver, CO (720) 587-2949 (720) 587-2958

Hagatna, GU (671) 472-5865 (671) 472-5866 (671) 472-5867 (671) 472-5869

Honolulu, HI (808) 595-6347 ext. 223 (808) 595-6542

Houston, TX (713) 626-7445 (713) 626-0990

Los Angeles, CA (213) 389-1215 (213) 383-3245

Miami, FL (305) 443-8917 (305) 442-6054

New York, NY (212) 317-7300 (212) 421-7866

San Francisco, CA (415) 362-7680 (415) 364-5629

Seattle, WA (206) 441-4586 (206) 441-1322

  • General Information
  • Hague Abduction Convention
  • Return
  • Visitation/Access
  • Retaining an Attorney
  • Mediation
Hague Questions | Learn More Links
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention? No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention? No
Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters: /content/travel/en/International-Parental-Child-Abduction/for-providers/laws/important-feat-hague-abdtn-conv.html

General Information

For information concerning travel to Taiwan, including information about the location of the American Institute in Taiwan, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Taiwan.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

 

Hague Abduction Convention

Taiwan is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between Taiwan and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country. The Taiwan authorities maintain information about custody, visitation, and family law on the Internet. Click here for the full content of the Civil Code. Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Taiwan and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

TheDepartment of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children's Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction. For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children's Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child. The Office of Children's Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children. Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Contact information:

United States Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
2201 C Street, N.W.
Washington, DC 20520
Telephone: 1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Fax: 202-736-9132
Website
Email: AskCI@state.gov

Child abduction is a crime under Taiwan's Criminal CodeArticle 234.

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court. Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information. 

Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country. Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Taiwan and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children's Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States. Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the American Institute in Taiwan for information and possible assistance.

Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children's Issues nor consular officials at the American Institute in Taiwan are authorized to provide legal advice.

The American Institute in Taiwan posts list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law:

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

Mediation

Mediation is a possible remedy for both abduction and access cases. The American Institute in Taiwan does not provide mediation services. Mediation is voluntary.

  • Hague
  • Hague Convention Information
  • U.S. Immigration Requirements
  • Who Can Adopt
  • Who Can Be Adopted
  • How To Adopt
  • Traveling Abroad
  • After Adoption
  • Contact Information
Hague Questions
Hague Adoption Convention Country? No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
Hague Convention Information

Taiwan is not party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention).  Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Hague countries are processed in accordance with 8 Code of Federal Regulations, Section  204.3 as it relates to orphans as defined under the Immigration and Nationality Act, Section 101(b)(1)(F).

In January 2013, the Taiwan Child Welfare Bureau announced its participation in a Pre-Adoption Immigration Review (PAIR) program with the United States.  The PAIR program requires prospective adoptive parents to receive a preliminary determination on the child’s likely immigration eligibility from United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) prior to filing an adoption case with a court.  This preliminary determination, also referred to as the PAIR process, provides foreign courts and relevant Taiwan authorities with information regarding a child’s likely eligibility to immigrate to the United States before the court enters an order establishing a permanent legal relationship between the U.S. citizen parent(s) and the child. 

The Taiwan Child Welfare Bureau issued an administrative order effective April 1, 2013 requiring adoption service providers to include a PAIR letter with the filing of an adoption proceeding with a Taiwan court.  To enable prospective adoptive parents adopting from Taiwan to comply with Taiwan’s new administrative order, USCIS issued a policy memorandum allowing prospective adoptive parents to file a Form I-600 (Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative), before filing an adoption proceeding with a Taiwan court.

Following the receipt of a PAIR letter from USCIS and subsequent issuance of a foreign adoption decree, prospective adoptive parents must submit the foreign adoption decree and the child’s travel and identity documents to the American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) which will then complete the final approval of their Form I-600 and issuance of a visa.  If AIT finds the case is not clearly approvable, it will return the case to USCIS for further action.  Prospective adoptive parents should pay special attention to the process described below as it differs from other non-Hague and Hague countries.

Please note again:  Beginning on April 1, 2013, the Taiwan authorities will require a PAIR letter from USCIS in all U.S. adoption cases.

The United States does not have formal diplomatic relations with Taiwan.  All Consular and other representative functions are handled by AIT, a non-profit, private corporation authorized by the Taiwan Relations Act to conduct and carry out programs, transactions, and other relations between the United States and Taiwan.

We strongly urge prospective adoptive parents to only work with licensed adoption facilitators in Taiwan.  The use of unlicensed facilitators in Taiwan could result in an adoption being carried out in a manner that does not permit the child to qualify as an orphan as defined under U.S. immigration law.  If the child does not qualify as an orphan under U.S. immigration law, he or she may be found to be ineligible to immigrate to the United States.  It is important for prospective adoptive parents to confirm that the adoption service provider they choose is authorized to facilitate adoptions in Taiwan by checking with Taiwan’s adoption authority, the Child Welfare Bureau.  Please see the Information below in the “Choose and Adoption Service Provider” section.

U.S. Immigration Requirements For Intercountry Adoptions

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Taiwan, you must meet certain suitability and eligibility requirements. USCIS determines who is suitable and eligible to adopt a child from another country and bring that child to live in the United States under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States with an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

Who Can Adopt

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, you must also meet the following requirements in order to adopt a child from Taiwan:

  • Residency: There are currently no residency requirements that prospective adoptive parents must meet in order to adopt an orphan from Taiwan.
  • Age of Adopting Parents: Prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) must be at least twenty years older than the child to be adopted. If married, one spouse must be at least twenty years older than the child to be adopted and the other spouse must be at least 16 years older than the child to be adopted.
  • Marriage: A married person who adopts a child shall do so jointly with his/her spouse. Single individuals may adopt from Taiwan..
  • Income: Prospective adoptive parents must have a stable residence, legitimate employment and sufficient financial means.
  • Other: There is no official policy or law prohibiting adoptions by LGBT individuals. Taiwan law does not recognize marriage between partners of the same sex.

Who Can Be Adopted

In addition to U.S. immigration requirements, Taiwan has specific requirements that a child must meet in order to be eligible for adoption:

  • Relinquishment:  Where the biological mother is alive and her whereabouts known, the Family Court will request a written, signed relinquishment document. 
  • Abandonment:  A legal determination of abandonment by a court is usually required.
  • Age of Adoptive Child:  An adoptive child must be at least 20 years younger than the adopted parent. If the adoptive parents are married, the child must be at least 20 years younger than one spouse and at least 16 years younger than the other spouse.
  • Sibling Adoptions:  None
  • Special Needs or Medical Conditions:  None
  • Waiting Period or Foster Care:  None

    In addition, no child may be adopted who is:

    • directly related by blood to the prospective adoptive parents (for example: grandparents cannot adopt their grandchildren);
    • directly related by marriage, except in the adoption of the other spouse’s child as a stepchild (for example: A parent-in-law cannot adopt his/her son-in-law or daughter-in-law); or
    • indirectly related by blood or marriage, such as cousins (unless removed by a certain degree), the spouse of a sibling, or a sibling of your spouse.  (Note: Taiwan law is very detailed about what degree of indirect blood relation is excluded from adoption. If prospective adoptive parents are concerned about possible blood ties with the child they wish to adopt, they should contact AIT for clarification before proceeding with the adoption.)

    Caution:  Prospective adoptive parents should be aware that not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are adoptable.  In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending that the child return home when this becomes possible.  In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to their child(ren)’s adoption.

How To Adopt

TAIWAN'S ADOPTION AUTHORITY

Children's Bureau (Er Tong Ju), Ministry of Interior

THE PROCESS

The process for adopting a child from Taiwan generally includes the following steps:

  1. Choose an adoption service provider
  2. Apply to be found eligible to adopt
  3. Be matched with a child
  4. File the Form I-600 with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to initiate the Pre-Adoption Immigration Review (PAIR) prior to filing an adoption case with the courts
  5. Adopt the child in Taiwan
  6. Receive final approval of your Form I-600
  7. Obtain visa and bring your child home
  1. Choose an Adoption Service Provider

    The recommended first step in adopting a child from Taiwan is to decide whether or not to use a licensed adoption service provider in the United States that can help you with your adoption.  Adoption service providers must be licensed by the U.S. state in which they operate.  The Department of State provides information on selecting an adoption service provider on its website.

    Whether you choose a U.S.-based or foreign adoption service provider, they must be licensed in Taiwan or work with a licensed adoption agency in Taiwan.  Please note that an unlicensed adoption service provider may not assume legal custody of a child for the purpose of intercountry adoption.  The use of an unlicensed adoption service provider may result in your child not being eligible for an immigrant visa.  Below is a list of agencies that are currently licensed in Taiwan.

    Adoption Service Institutes and Foundations in Taiwan:
    Child Welfare League Foundation
    7F, No. 43 Chang’an W. Road, Datong District
    Taipei City 103, Taiwan

    Chung Yi Social Welfare Foundation
    No.12, Lane 85, Jingxing Road, Wenshan District
    Taipei City 116, Taiwan

    Good Shepherd Welfare Services Tainan Babies’ Home
    No.12, Lixing Street, North District
    Tainan City 704, Taiwan

    The Home of God’s Love
    No. 36, Lane 189, Dapi 2nd Road
    Dongshan Township
    Yilan County 269, Taiwan

    Christian Salvation Services
    7F, No. 420, Section1, Keelung Road
    Xinyi District, Taipei City 110, Taiwan

    Cathwel Service
    No. 155, Section 2, Beishen Road
    Shenkeng Township
    Taipei County 222, Taiwan

  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt

    In order to adopt a child from Taiwan, you will need to meet the requirements of the Government of Taiwan and U.S. immigration law. You must submit an application to be found eligible to adopt with the Children’s Bureau (Er Tong Ju), Ministry of Interior of Taiwan.

    To meet U.S. immigration requirements, you may also file an I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of an Orphan Petition with U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to be found eligible and suitable to adopt.

  3. Be Matched with a Child

    If you are eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, your Taiwan adoption service provider will provide you with a referral. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of and provide a permanent home for a particular child.

    The child must be eligible to be adopted according to Taiwan’s requirements, as described in the Who Can Be Adopted section. The child must also meet the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law.

  4. File the Form I-600 with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to initiate the Pre-Adoption Immigration Review prior to filing an adoption case with the courts

    Under the Pre-Adoption Immigration Review (PAIR) program, the U.S. prospective adoptive parent(s) files a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Immediate Relative, with the National Benefits Center (NBC) prior to obtaining a final adoption decree from the relevant court authority in Taiwan.  After review of the Form I-600 petition and completion of the necessary investigation, NBC will make a preliminary determination on whether the child meets the definition of orphan under U.S. immigration law.  If the determination is favorable, NBC will issue a preliminary determination of immigration eligibility to the U.S. prospective adoptive parent(s) in the form of a USCIS PAIR letter.  If an unfavorable determination is made, NBC may issue a request for additional evidence or denial letter to the U.S. prospective adoptive parent(s).

    Under the PAIR process, prospective adoptive parents should submit a completed Form I-600 together with all available documentation listed in the Form I-600 Instructions, minus an adoption decree or grant of legal custody to the USCIS National Benefits Center through the Dallas Lockbox. This would include the Taiwan Household Registry of both the child and the birth parents and the contract between the birth parents and the Taiwan adoption service provider in cases of relinquishment, showing the placement of the child for adoption. For the address, see the “Where to File” section of the Form I-600 Instructions.  All documents originally produced in a foreign language must be accompanied by a certified English translation.  In addition, the following PAIR-specific documentation must be submitted when the child’s country of origin is Taiwan:

    • Evidence of availability for intercountry adoption generated by island-wide database
    • Signed adoption agreement between birth parents and prospective adoptive parents, where applicable, for use in Taiwan District Family courts
    • Power of attorney appointing the Taiwan ASP to represent the prospective adoptive parents

    In addition to the documentation required in the Form I-600 instructions pertaining to evidence that the child is an orphan as defined in section 101(b)(1)(F) and 8 CFR 204.3(b), there may be Taiwan specific documentation that can help establish the child’s orphan status.  Such documentation may include, but is not limited to:

    • Child’s original household registration
    • Birth parent-ASP contract showing relinquishment of child
    • Court order terminating parental rights and placing child into the care of an ASP
    • Documentation establishing an abandoned child and placing the child with an ASP
    • ASP report on the history of the child

    Please note that additional documents may be requested.

    USCIS will forward its preliminary determination, together with the prospective adoptive parent’s file, to AIT.  USCIS will also forward the original preliminary determination letter to the prospective adoptive parents for their records.  AIT will then issue a letter to the prospective adoptive parents to be included in the court filing indicating that the preliminary determination regarding the child’s likely immigration eligibility has been completed and will attach a copy of the original USCIS letter. 

    Upon issuance of the PAIR letter, USCIS NBC will forward the petition to AIT for final adjudication following the completion of the Taiwan court process.

  5. Adopt or Gain Legal Custody of Child in Taiwan

    The process for finalizing the adoption in Taiwan generally includes the following:

    • Role of Adoption Authority:  The central authority for licensing adoption agencies and orphanages is the Child Welfare Bureau.  It also oversees legal and legislative developments as they pertain to the welfare of children. 
    • Role of the Court:  All applications for adoption are first submitted to the Taiwan District Court.
    • Role of Adoption Agencies:  Most adoptions are processed through local orphanages or adoption agencies identified by U.S. or other foreign-based adoption agencies.  Unlicensed adoption agencies or orphanages in Taiwan cannot take legal custody of a child for the purpose of intercountry adoption.  We strongly encourage the use of only licensed adoption service providers in Taiwan. 
    • Adoption Application:  An application for adoption is first submitted to the Taiwan District Court.  As of April 1, 2013, this application must include a letter from AIT indicating that the preliminary determination regarding the child’s likely immigration eligibility has been completed together with a copy of the original USCIS letter.  After one to two months, the prospective adoptive parent(s) or a designated representative will receive a notice to appear.  During this waiting period, a Taiwan social worker from the local Bureau of Social Affairs appointed by the Family Court will review the foreign (U.S.) home study.  After the hearing, the court will rule on the adoption (usually within two months) and publish a final ruling three weeks later.
    • Time Frame:  The average time to complete an intercountry adoption in Taiwan ranges from one to two years from initial contact with the adoption agency in the United States until the immigrant visa is issued.  This time includes approximately 4-6 weeks for the PAIR processing by USCIS following the match and approximately five to six months for the adoption petition to be finalized by the Taiwan District Family Court.
    • Adoption Fees:  The following fees apply to adoptions in Taiwan:
      • Court processing fee – 1,000 NT or about U.S. $30
      • Taiwan passport application fee (regular fee) – 1600 NT or U.S. $55. The application process can be expedited by paying fees up to 900 NT or U.S. $30.
      • Taiwan Household Registry (HHR) application fee – U.S. $ 0.30 per copy
        (All Taiwan residents are part of an efficient household registry system that tracks events such as births, deaths, marriage, and divorce)
      • Translation fees – Variable
      • Taiwan notary fees – U.S. $25 per document
    • Documents Required:  After a child has been identified, and the PAIR process has been completed with USCIS, the prospective adoptive parents must submit the following documents to the Taiwan authorities to process the local adoption:
      • Power of attorney, in English and Chinese, appointing the Taiwan orphanage or social worker to represent the prospective adoptive parents;
      • U.S. home study and Chinese translation;
      • Copy of U.S. state law pertaining to international adoption with Chinese translation certified by TECRO.
      • Evidence of prospective adoptive parents' right to adopt in the United States (included in U.S.-certified home study report);
      • I-797 approval notice (indicating Form I-600A approval) from USCIS;
      • Copy of U.S. prospective adoptive parents' home state adoption laws and Chinese translation;
      • Signed adoption agreement notarized by the TECRO (Taipei Economic and Cultural Office) having jurisdiction over the place of the parent(s)' residence (in English and Chinese); and
      • AIT’s notice of USCIS’ Pre-Adoption Immigration Eligibility Review, with USCIS’ original PAIR letter indicating preliminary determination regarding the child’s likely immigration eligibility has been completed
      • Other documents (birth certificates, marriage certificates, etc.) may be requested by the orphanage, agency, or Taiwan authorities.
      • *Chinese translations prepared in the United States must be certified by the TECRO office for that district and English versions must be notarized by a U.S. notary public.

    Please note:  All documents originally produced in a foreign language must be accompanied by certified English translation.  Documents issued in the United States that would eventually be submitted to Taiwan courts, must be translated into Mandarin, must be certified by the TECRO office for that district, and English versions must be notarized by a U.S. notary public.

    Note:  Additional documents may be requested.

    • Authentication of Documents:  You may be asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic.  If so, the Department of State, Authentications Office may be able to assist.

  6. Receive final approval of your Form I-600

    Under the PAIR program, your Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an Adopted Child is not adjudicated until after your adoption is complete.  You will need to submit the final adoption decree issued by the Taiwan District Family Court, as well as the child’s identity and travel documents, to the AIT in order to complete the processing of the I-600 and receive a final determination on the immigration eligibility of your child.  AIT will approve Form I-600s that are clearly approvable.

    You will need to apply for several documents before you submit your decree:

    Birth Certificate
    If you have finalized the adoption in Taiwan, you will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child. Taiwan birth certificates, once issued, cannot be modified or amended. PAPs can apply for a birth certificate from the hospital of birth and/or from the local Household Registration office where the child was registered at the time of birth. For further information, see the Department of Household Registration, Ministry of Interior website.

    If you have been granted custody for the purpose of adopting the child in the United States, the birth certificate you obtain will, in most cases, not yet include your name.

    Taiwan Passport
    Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or passport from Taiwan.

    For information on how to apply for a new passport in Taiwan, please visit the Bureau of Consular Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ website. The fee is 1600 NT or U.S. $55, and the turn-around time is approximately four days. Expedited processing requires an additional fee of up to 900 NT or U.S. $30.

  7. Obtain a Visa and Bring Your Child Home

    U.S. IMMIGRANT VISA

    If your Form I-600 is approved, you then need to apply for a U.S. immigrant visa for your child from the AIT.  This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you.  As part of this process, the AIT must be provided the Panel Physician’s medical report on the child.

    You may submit your immigrant visa application and medical report when you submit the final, certified adoption decree, birth certificate, and Taiwan passport for final adjudication of your Form I-600.  You can find instructions for applying for an immigrant visa on the adoption page of the AIT website.  AIT will contact you, and your ASP or designated representative, once the Form I-600 is approved, to schedule the immigrant visa interview.

    CHILD CITIZENSHIP ACT

    For adoptions finalized abroad prior to the child’s entry into the United States:  A child will acquire U.S. citizenship upon entry into the United States if the adoption was finalized prior to entry and the child otherwise meets the requirements of the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

    For adoptions finalized after the child’s entry into the United States:  An adoption will need to be completed following your child’s entry into the United States for the child to acquire U.S. citizenship.

    *Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible.  Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

    Read more about the Child Citizenship Act of 2000.

Traveling Abroad

Applying for Your U.S. Passport
U.S. citizens are required by law to enter and depart the United States on a valid U.S. passport. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print—all in one place.

Obtaining a Visa to Travel to Taiwan
In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are affixed to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation. To find information about obtaining a visa for Taiwan, see the Department of State’s Country Specific Information.

Staying Safe on Your Trip
Before you travel, it is always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

Staying in Touch on Your Trip
When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to enroll with the Department of State. Enrollment makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there is a family emergency in the United States or a crisis in Taiwan, enrollment assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Enrollment is free and can be done online via the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program (STEP).

After Adoption

Taiwan requires five years of post-placement reports. In the first year, post placement reports are required at three, six, and twelve months. After that, one report per year is required. (This means seven reports over a five-year period.) The reports, which include photos of the child, must be completed by a licensed social worker or agency through home visits.

We strongly urge you to comply with the wishes of Taiwan and complete all post-adoption requirements in a timely manner. Your U.S. adoption service provider may be able to help you with this process. Your cooperation will contribute to Taiwan’s history of positive experiences with American parents.

Post-Adoption Resources
Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. There are many public and private nonprofit post-adoption services available for children and their families. There are also numerous adoptive family support groups and adoptee organizations active in the United States that provide a network of options for adoptees who seek out other adoptees from the same country of origin. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family, whether it is another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

Contact Information

The American Institute in Taiwan
Consular Section
Immigrant Visa Unit, 2nd Floor
American Institute in Taiwan
Number 7, Lane 134
Xin Yi Rd, Section 3
Taipei 106, Taiwan
Tel: (886) 02-2162-2005
Fax: (886) 02-2162-2253
Email: aitadoptions@state.gov
Internet: ait.org.tw/en/

Taiwan’s Adoption Authority
Child Welfare Bureau (Er Tong Ju), Ministry of Interior
7F, No. 503 Li-Ming Road, Section 2
Nantun, Taichung 408, R.O.C.
Tel: (886-4) 2250-2850
Fax: (886-4) 2250-2903/2899
Email: dbi@cbi.gov.tw

Taiwan Economic and Cultural Representation Office (TECRO) in the United States
4201 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20016
Tel: (202) 895-1800
Email: tecroinfodc@tecro-info.org
*Taiwan also has offices (consulates) in: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Guam, Honolulu, Houston, Kansas City, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, San Francisco and Seattle.

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor  
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel:  1-888-407-4747
Email:  AskCI@state.gov
Internet:  adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about immigration procedures:
National Customer Service Center (NCSC)
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov

For questions about filing a Form I-600A or I-600 petition:
National Benefits Center
Tel: 1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-816-251-2770 (local)
Email:  NBC.Adoptions@DHS.gov

  • Visa Classifications
  • General Documents | Birth, Death, Burial Certificates | Marriage, Divorce Certificates
  • Adoption Certificates | Identity Card | Police, Court, Prison Records | Military Records
  • Passports & Other Travel Documents | Other Records | Visa Issuing Posts | Visa Services
Classifications
Visa Classifications

 
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months A B
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months A B
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months A B
B-1 None Multiple 60 Months
B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None N/A A B N/A
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 None Multiple C 60 Months
E-2 2 None Multiple C 60 Months
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 12 Months A B
G-2 None Multiple 12 Months A B
G-3 None Multiple 12 Months A B
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months A B
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months A B
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 60 Months
V-2 None Multiple 60 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 60 Months 8

Country Specific Footnotes

  1. Diplomatic relations not in force.

  2. A and G visas may be issued to Taiwan applicants who are employed by a government other than the Taiwan authorities, or who are attendants or personal employees of accredited officials of a government other than the Taiwan authorities. Qualified applicants should be issued visas on Form OF-232 following the procedures indicated in 22 CFR 41.113(b).The Machine Readable Visa (MRV) on Form DS-232 should be annotated as follows:

    • "Bearer is employed by the Embassy of _____, Washington, D.C."

    or

    • "Bearer is an employee of John Doe, Embassy of _____, Washington, D.C."

    A and G visas may also be issued on Form OF-232 to Taiwan applicants who are immediate family members of an accredited official from another country who has been accorded A or G nonimmigrant status. The MRV on the Form OF-232 should be annotated as follows:

    • "Bearer is the immediate family member of John Doe, Embassy of ________, Washington, D.C."

    or

    • "Bearer is the immediate family member of John Doe, (international organization), Washington, D.C."
  3. In addition to the applicants eligible under the treaty trader and investor agreement, the Taiwan authorities and their derivatives are also entitled to E-1 status. Attendants and personal employees of a member of the Taiwan authorities are entitled to B-1 status.

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

 

Visa Category Footnotes

  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

General Documents | Birth, Death, Burial Certificates | Marriage, Divorce Certificates
General Documents

General Document Information:

Fees for many documents (such as court documents) vary depending on the municipality and if it is a first-time application, a renewal, or a replacement.  

Please note that while Taiwan does issue national IDs to those it considers its citizens, these IDs are not valid for visa-issuing purposes as there is no English version is available.

General Issuing Authority Information:

Please note that with respect to all references to “country” or “countries,” it should be noted that the Taiwan Relations Act of 1979, Pub. L. No. 96-8, Section 4(b)(1), provides that “[w]henever the laws of the United States refer or relate to foreign countries, nations, states, governments, or similar entities, such terms shall include and such laws shall apply with respect to Taiwan.” 22 U.S.C. § 3303(b) (1).  Accordingly, all references to “country” or “countries” in the Immigration and Nationality Act are read to include Taiwan. This is consistent with the United States’ one-China policy, under which the United States has maintained unofficial relations with Taiwan since 1979.

Taiwan passports are issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ Bureau of Consular Affairs.

Much of the required information contained in the documents/certificates below (records of birth, death, marriage, and adoption) can be found in a Taiwan national’s Household Registration Record, issued by the Office of Household Registration.  These offices are located in all major Taiwan cities and in rural county seats. Individuals may obtain extracts of their household registration records by providing their Taiwan National ID and furnishing their name, date of birth, names of parents, and name of spouse, if married.

A note on eligibility for Taiwan nationality: Children born in Taiwan to foreign parents are not granted citizenship by the Taiwan authorities and are usually registered with their own consular authorities.  Before February 2000, Taiwan’s Nationality Law only permitted Taiwan national fathers to transmit Taiwan citizenship to their children.  Children of foreign fathers were not granted Taiwan citizenship.  Following the amendment of the Nationality Law in 2000, children are eligible for Taiwan citizenship as long as one of the parents is a Taiwan national. Persons born outside of Taiwan should be requested to obtain the documentation applicable to the country in which they were born.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available

Fees: Free of charge, although there may be a small fee for the English version depending on the hospital

Document Name: Birth Certificate

Issuing Authority: Hospital of birth

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Should be signed and dated by the by the attending physician and the physician’s seal should be present in wet ink

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Attending physician

Registration Criteria: Births of Taiwan nationals must be registered with the local Office of Household Registration.  Before February 9, 2000, only Taiwan national fathers could transmit Taiwan citizenship to their children.  Children of foreign fathers were not granted Taiwan citizenship and were registered with the consular authorities of their father’s country of citizenship.  Following the amendment of the Nationality Law in 2000, either parent can transmit Taiwan citizenship to their children.  Children born in Taiwan to foreign parents are not granted citizenship by the Taiwan authorities and are usually registered with their own consular authorities.

Procedure for Obtaining: Contact hospital of birth

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are not available

Alternate Documents: Birth registration record (issued by the Office of Household Registration) together with the Household Registration Record

Exceptions: Records on Chinese who came to Taiwan from mainland China after World War II date back only to the date they first applied for registration with the local Office of Household Registration and are based on information provided by the applicant.

Comments: Immigrant visa applicants are required to submit a current Household Registration Record as well as a birth certificate.  Applicants who are unable to obtain their birth certificate – for example, those born in Taiwan during the Japanese occupation that ended in 1945, or those who came from mainland China following WWII — may provide their initial Household Registration Record as an alternative to the birth certificate.

 

Death Certificates

Available

Fees: Fees vary depending on the municipality and if it is a first time application or a replacement.  

Document Name:  Death Certificate

Issuing Authority: Attending physician, coroner, or hospital

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Should be signed and dated by the by the attending physician and the physician’s seal should be present in wet ink

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Attending physician or the administrative official attending an autopsy

Registration Criteria: Deaths of Taiwan nationals are registered with the Office of Household Registration and will be listed on the family’s Household Registration Record

Procedure for Obtaining: Contact hospital or attending physician

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are not available

Alternate Documents: Death registration record (issued by the Office of Household Registration) together with the Household Registration Record

Exceptions:  In the case of an untimely death, the certificate will be issued by a coroner.  If the death occurred during military service, a military indemnity eligibility certificate is acceptable as proof of death.

Comments: Death certificates are issued by the attending physician or coroner and not by a government agency.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available

Fees:  NT$100

Document Name:  Marriage Certificate

Issuing Authority: Office of Household Registration

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Red wet seal

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Office of Household Registration

Registration Criteria: Marriages occurring in Taiwan on or after May 23, 2008 must be registered with the Office of Household Registration.  The registration date is the effective date of marriage. The Office of Household Registration will then issue a standard marriage certificate.  Prior to May 23, 2008, there was no requirement to register with the Office of Household Registration and a marriage is considered valid as long as there were two witnesses.

Procedure for Obtaining:  Contact the local Office of Household Registration

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are not available

Alternate Documents: Marriage registration record along (issued by the Office of Household Registration) together with the Household Registration Record

Exceptions: Prior to May 23, 2008, there was no requirement to register with the Office of Household Registration and a marriage before that date is considered valid as long as there were two witnesses.  A marriage certificate with signature of two witnesses is acceptable; however, a marriage certificate notarized by the court is more credible.

Comments: Same-sex marriages are not currently recognized in Taiwan, but new legislation may be forthcoming after since Taiwan’s Constitutional Court ruled on May 24, 2017 that same-sex couples have the right to marry under Taiwan’s constitution and that Taiwan’s Legislative Yuan has two years to amend the marriage laws to align with the constitution. 

 

Divorce Certificates

Available

Fees: NT$100  

Document Name: Divorce Certificate

Issuing Authority: Office of Household Registration

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Red wet seal

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Office of Household Registration

Registration Criteria: A husband and wife may obtain a divorce by mutual consent by signing an agreement in the presence of two witnesses and registering the divorce at the Office of Household Registration.

Procedure for Obtaining: Contact the local Office of Household Registration

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are not available

Alternate Documents: Divorce registration record (issued by the Office of Household Registration) together with the Household Registration Record

Exceptions: None

Comments: For a divorce to be valid, its registration should be reflected on the individual's Household Registration Record.

Adoption Certificates | Identity Card | Police, Court, Prison Records | Military Records
Adoption Certificates

Available

Fees:  NT$100

Document Name: Court order

Issuing Authority: Local court

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Red wet seal

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Judge

Registration Criteria: Adoptions are registered with the local Office of Household Registration and should be reflected on the Household Registration Record.

Procedure for Obtaining: Contact issuing court

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are not available

Alternate Documents: Adoption registration record (issued by the Office of Household Registration) together with the Household Registration Record.

Exceptions: None

Comments: None

Identity Card

Available but not valid for visa-issuing purposes

Comments: Every Taiwan citizen is assigned a unique national identification number that will does not change.  However, as there is no English version of the national ID card is available and the name is written only in Chinese characters, it is not a valid ID for visa-issuing purposes.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Court/Prison Records

Available (Court records are available, Prison records are not available)

Fees: Fees vary depending on the municipality and if it is a first time application or a replacement.  

Document Name: Court Record

Issuing Authority: Trial court

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Red wet seal

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Trial Judge

Registration Criteria: There are no registration criteria

Procedure for Obtaining: Contact the appropriate court

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are not available

Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents

Exceptions: Theoretically, the records of all cases that have come before a court in Taiwan are available. However, due to the dispersal of records in Taiwan, obtaining full information on old cases may be difficult.

Comments: With regards to prison records, there is no established procedure for obtaining an official document containing a report of an individual's confinement in prison.  However, if a person has been arrested and sentenced, this information may appear in the police certificate.

 

Police Certificates

Available

Fees: NT $100 for applicants in Taiwan, US$6 for overseas applicants

Document Name: Police Criminal Record Certificate

Issuing Authority: Police headquarters in the city where the household is registered

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Blue wet seal

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Commissioner of the City/County Police Department

Registration Criteria: There are no registration criteria

Procedure for Obtaining: Applicants with Taiwan passports should apply for a police certificate from the police headquarters having jurisdiction over the county or city in which the applicant's household is registered, as recorded in the Household Registration Record.  A third party with an authorization letter can assist in this application.  Previous residents of Taiwan not holding a Taiwan passport may apply for a police certificate through the Taipei Municipal Police Department’s Foreign Affairs Division.

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are not available

Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents

Exceptions: Police certificates are not available for persons living in Taiwan prior to August 1945.

Comments: Taiwan issues police certificates, although the information is not always comprehensive. Also, Taiwan police certificates do not include criminal convictions resulting in a penalty of a fine, probation, suspended sentences, or jail term of less than six months. Crimes committed by juveniles are also not part of the criminal record.

Military Records

Unavailable.

Passports & Other Travel Documents | Other Records | Visa Issuing Posts | Visa Services
Passports & Other Travel Documents

Types Available: Regular, Diplomatic, and Official

Fees: NT$1,300 for a regular, 10-year passport (US$45)

Document Name: Passport

Issuing Government Authority: Ministry of Foreign Affair’s Bureau of Consular Affairs

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The cover of the regular passport is dark green with the emblem of a sun in the middle.  On the top is written "REPUBLIC OF CHINA" in both Traditional Chinese characters and English.  Below the emblem the word "TAIWAN" is printed in English only and "PASSPORT" is printed in both Traditional Chinese and English.  The cover of the official passport is brown and shows "OFFICIAL PASSPORT" on the cover, and the diplomatic passport is dark blue with "DIPLOMATIC PASSPORT" on the cover.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Registration Criteria: Applicants must provide their Taiwan National ID card, which requires registration with the Office of Household Registration.

Procedure for Obtaining: Through the Bureau of Consular Affairs.  First-time applicants must apply in person but renewals may be done by mail.  Overseas Taiwan nationals may apply at their nearest embassy, consulate, or Taiwan Economic and Cultural Representative Office (TECRO).

Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents

Exceptions: Passports issued since May 20, 2000, meet the definition of a passport under INA requirements as long as they contain a national identification number on the biographic page. Despite the term "passport" on the cover, documents that do not show that the bearer has a Taiwan national identification number do not allow the bearer unrestricted right to enter and/or reside in Taiwan and do not satisfy the definition of a passport under INA 101(a)(30). Pursuant to 22 CFR 41.104(b), the Department has waived the passport requirement for bearers of such documents, who may be issued visas on Form DS-232 if they are otherwise eligible. Visas should be limited to a single entry within three months. Such persons are considered stateless for visa issuing purposes.

Comments: U.S. visas may never be placed in diplomatic or official passports issued by the Taiwan authorities. When issuing visas to bearers of diplomatic or official passports, consular officers should follow the instructions in 22 CFR 41.113(b).

Other Documents Available: There are no other documents available

Other Records

Child Abuse Background Checks

In accordance with U.S. guidelines for the preparation of home studies, Taiwan's Child Welfare Bureau will issue certificates of child-abuse background checks to American citizens (either formerly or currently resident in Taiwan) wishing to adopt children from Hague Convention countries. Prospective American adoptive parents can apply in person or by mail to the central office of the Child Welfare Bureau with an application form and presentation of a valid passport. A simple certificate will be issued indicating whether or not a record of child abuse exists in Taiwan's centralized databases. 

Visa Issuing Posts

Post Title: American Institute in Taiwan, Taipei

Address: #7, Lane 134, Hsin Yi Rd., Section 3

Phone Number: +886 2-7741-7989 or +886 2-7741-7998
From the U.S.: +703-665-7348

Visa Services: All nonimmigrant visa (NIV) and immigrant visa (IV) services

Comments / Additional Information: The American Institute in Taiwan (AIT) is a non-governmental organization created by Public Law 96-8 (The Taiwan Relations Act).  Prior to July 1, 1997, immigrant and nonimmigrant visa applications were issued under the authority of the Consulate General in Hong Kong. Since July 1, 1997, the AIT Consular Section has had authority to issue and deny visas.

Visa Services

The American Institute in Taiwan, Taipei provides nonimmigrant and immigrant visa services for:

  • All of Taiwan
  • Penghu (Pescadores) Islands
  • Other areas administered by the Taiwan authorities including the islands of Jinmen (Kinmen, Quemoy) and Mazu (Matsu) in the Fujian Province.