CSI Repository

CSI Country Catalog

Iceland

Flag_of_Iceland
Country
Country Name: Iceland
Official Country Name: Republic of Iceland
Country Code 2-Letters: IS
Country Code 3-Letters: ISL
Street: Laufásvegur 21 101 Reykjavik Iceland
Fact sheet: https://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/3396.htm
  • International Travel
  • Child Abductions
  • Intercountry Adoptions
  • Consular Notification
  • U.S. Visas
  • Contact
  • Quick Facts
  • Embassies and Consulates
  • Destination Description
  • Entry, Exit & Visa Requirements
  • Safety and Security
  • Local Laws & Special Circumstances
  • Health
  • Travel & Transportation
Contact
Embassy Name: U.S. Embassy Reykjavik
Street Address: Laufásvegur 21
101 Reykjavik
Iceland
Phone: +(354) 595-2200
Emergency Phone: +(354) 693-2907
Fax: +(354) 562-9118
Email: reykjavikconsular@state.gov
Web: https://is.usembassy.gov/

Embassy Messages

Map

Country Map

Quick Facts
Passport Validity:
Three months required, six months recommended beyond your planned date of departure from the Schengen area.


Blank Passport Pages:
Two pages required for entry stamp


Tourist Visa Required:
Not required for stays less than 90 days


Vaccinations:
None


Currency Restrictions for Entry:
Any amount over 10,000 Euros or equivalent must be declared


Currency Restrictions for Exit:
Any amount over 10,000 Euros or equivalent must be declared

Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Reykjavik

Laufásvegur 21
101 Reykjavik
Iceland

Telephone: +(354) 595-2200

Emergency Telephone: +(354) 693-2907

Fax: +(354) 562-9118

Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Iceland for information on U.S. - Iceland relations.

Entry, Exit & Visa Requirements

Visit the Icelandic Directorate of Immigration website for the most current visa information.

Iceland is a party to the Schengen Agreement. This means that U.S. citizens may enter Iceland for up to 90 days for tourist or business purposes without a visa. Your passport should be valid for at least three months beyond your planned date of departure from the Schengen area. You need sufficient funds and a return airline ticket. For additional details about travel into and within Schengen countries, please see our Schengen fact sheet.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of  Iceland.

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

Safety and Security

Credible information indicates terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Europe. European governments are taking action to guard against terrorist attacks; however, all European countries remain potentially vulnerable to attacks from transnational terrorist organizations.

Crime: Iceland has a low crime rate with rare instances of violent crime. Take the following precautions:

  • Do not put bags containing valuables, such as your passport, on the floor in bars or nightclubs.
  • Do not leave your valuables in parked vehicles, even if the vehicle is locked.
  • Be aware that downtown Reykjavik can become disorderly in the late night to early morning hours as people are leaving bars and clubs.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

 

Victims of Crime:

Report crimes to the local police by dialing 112 and contact the U.S. Embassy at +(354) 595-2200.  After working hours, call +(354) 693-9207. 

Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

The Icelandic Red Cross has a helpline that is open 24 hours a day, every day, for anyone needing assistance with grief, anxiety, fear, depression, or suicidal thoughts. Dial 1717 to reach Red Cross volunteers in Iceland.

For further information:

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties:  You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Importation of whale products to the United States: All persons are barred from importing whale products to the United States.

  • Though whale meat and other products that utilize whale parts are sold throughout Iceland, the Marine Mammal Protection Act makes it illegal to bring back whale products to the United States. Any importation of products containing whale to the United States will result in the seizure of the goods and possible criminal prosecution. Penalties include jail time and fines of up to $10,000.

Arrest Notification:  If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Faith-Based Travelers:  See the following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Iceland. 

 

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our   Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance:  Icelandic law prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities and requires that public accommodations and government buildings, including elevators, be accessible to individuals with disabilities. All government buildings in Iceland are wheelchair accessible, as are most museums, malls, and large shopping centers in the capital area. The public bus system and taxis provide transportation services for individuals with disabilities.

  • Many stores in the old downtown area in Reykjavik, such as around the popular shopping street of Laugavegur, are not wheelchair accessible.
  • Many sidewalks in downtown Reykjavik lack curb ramps, and the streets are steep.
  • Hotels outside Reykjavik and smaller hotels in the capital are not all accessible to individuals with disabilities.
  • There are very few paths or marked trails at natural attractions found outside urban areas.

Students:  See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers:  See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Health

Medical care in Iceland is of high quality, but limited services are available outside large, urban areas. The Icelandic medical system offers coverage only for people who live in Iceland. Non-residents are expected to pay their own medical costs, and you should be prepared to pay your bill in full before leaving the hospital or clinic.

For emergency medical assistance anywhere in the country, dial 112.  For non-emergency medical assistance in the Reykjavik metropolitan area, dial 544-4114 during business hours.  During non-business hours, dial 1770.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas.  

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas.  Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.  See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Iceland to ensure the medication is legal in Iceland. Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

Travel & Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Driving in Iceland is on the right side of the road, as in the United States.

  • While in Iceland, you may encounter road conditions that differ significantly from those in the United States. Less than one-third of Iceland’s total road network is paved, and many roads outside the capital, especially those that run through the center of the country, are impassable in winter (October through April).
  • Many bridges are only one lane wide (marked with a sign “Enibreid bru”) so drivers must be alert to oncoming traffic.
  • Extreme care should be taken when driving in rural areas during the winter when daylight hours are limited and the weather and road conditions can change rapidly.
  • Many routes in the interior of the country are impassable until July due to muddy conditions and swollen rivers caused by snowmelt.
  • Always inform someone of your travel plans.

For information on current road conditions throughout the country please consult The Icelandic Road and Coastal Administration (Vegagerdin) website. This website can show you in real time the status of most roads in Iceland, color-coded by status.

Traffic Laws:  You can use a valid U.S. driver’s license for up to 90 days while visiting Iceland, but you must be at least 17 years old to drive.

  • Icelandic law requires drivers to keep headlights on at all times.
  • Talking on cell phones while driving is prohibited, except when using a hands-free system, and is subject to a fine of 5,000 Icelandic Kronur (approximately $45).
  • Driving under the influence of alcohol is a serious offense in Iceland. Drivers can be charged with Driving Under the Influence with a blood alcohol level as low as .05%.
  • Unless otherwise posted, the speed limit is 50 km/h in urban areas and 30 km/h in residential areas.
  • In rural areas, the speed limit depends on the type of road:  on dirt and gravel roads, the speed limit is 80 km/h; on paved highways, the speed limit is 90 km/h.
  • It is illegal to turn right on a red light.
  • In traffic circles, always yield to cars coming from the left/ the inside lane.
  • The use of seatbelts is mandatory in both the front and rear seats.
  • Children under the age of six must be secured in a size and weight appropriate car seat.
  • Drivers are held responsible for any passenger under the age of 15 not wearing a seatbelt.
  • No one shorter than 140 centimters, lighter than 40 kilograms (or 88 pounds), or younger than 12 years of age is allowed to ride in a front seat equipped with an airbag.

Public Transportation: Public transportation in Iceland is safe and reliable.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Iceland’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Iceland’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime Travel:  Mariners planning travel to Iceland should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts on the Maritime Administration website. Information may also be posted to the websites of the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Geospace Intelligence Agency (select “broadcast warnings”).

 

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information
Use Style in the Text Component to tag city names and to tag phone numbers, fax numbers, and emails with the respective Style icon.

Washington, DC (202) 265-6653 (202) 265-6656

New York, NY (212) 593-2700 (646) 282-9369

  • General Information
  • Hague Abduction Convention
  • Return
  • Visitation/Access
  • Retaining an Attorney
  • Mediation
Hague Questions | Learn More Links
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention? Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention? Yes
Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters: /content/travel/en/International-Parental-Child-Abduction/for-providers/laws/important-feat-hague-abdtn-conv.html

General Information

Iceland and the United States have been treaty partners under the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention) since December 1, 1996.

For information concerning travel to Iceland, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Iceland.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

Hague Abduction Convention

The U.S. Department of State serves as the U.S. Central Authority (USCA) for the Hague Abduction Convention. In this capacity, the Department’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues facilitates the submission of applications under the Hague Abduction Convention for the return of, or access to, children located in countries that are U.S. treaty partners, including Iceland. Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the foreign Central Authority.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State 
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's Issues
CA/OCS/CI 
SA-17, 9th Floor 
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States or Canada: 1-202-501-4444
Website:  travel.state.gov

The Icelandic Central Authority (ICA) for the Hague Abduction Convention is the Ministry of Justice (MOJ). The ICA will review the Hague application and supporting documents before submitting the Hague petition to an Icelandic court. The ICA can be reached at:

Iceland’s Central Authority, the Ministry of Justice.

Ministry of Justice
Sölvhólsgötu 7
150 REYKJAVÍK
Iceland 
Telephone number: +354 545 9000 
Fax number: +354 552 7340 
E-mail: postur@dmr.is  
Website

To initiate a Hague case for return of, or access to, a child in Iceland, the USCA encourages a parent or legal guardian to review the eligibility criteria and instructions for completing the Hague application form located at the Department of State website and contact the Department of State for assistance prior to initiating the Hague process directly with the ICA. The ICA does not require applicants to translate their application into Icelandic. If the ICA accepts the Hague application, the ICA will forward the petition to the District Court. The parties and/or their attorneys must appear before a District Court judge to formally register the Hague request in the Icelandic legal system. The judge will schedule a hearing date if he or she accepts the case. The USCA is available to answer questions about the Hague application process, to forward a completed application to the ICA, and to subsequently monitor its progress through the foreign administrative and legal processes. 

There are no fees for filing Hague applications with either the U.S. or the Icelandic central authorities. U.S. citizens may apply for legal aid through the Ministry of Justice. The Ministry will decide if the person qualifies for legal aid. Additional costs may include airplane tickets for court appearances and for the return of the child, if so ordered.

Return

A parent or legal guardian may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for return to the United States of a child abducted to, or wrongfully retained in, Iceland.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand whether the Convention is an available civil remedy and can provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

Visitation/Access

A person may file an application under the Hague Abduction Convention for access to a child living in Iceland.  The criteria for acceptance of a Hague access application vary from country to country.  The U.S. Department of State can assist parents living in the United States to understand country-specific criteria and provide information on the process for submitting a Hague application.

Retaining an Attorney

Parents or legal guardians are not required to retain a private attorney in order to file a Hague Abduction Convention application with the ICA, but they are required to hire an attorney at their own expense once the petition is sent to a court.  A parent who hires private counsel should notify both the Icelandic and U.S. central authorities.  In addition, there are some organizations in Iceland that offer free or reduced cost legal services:

● Lawyers Association in Iceland  

● Law Students University of Iceland (Note:  these are law students who cannot represent you in court, although they are willing to offer free legal advice).

● Law Students at University of Reykjavik  (Note:  these are law students who cannot represent you in court, although they are willing to offer free legal advice.)

The U.S. Embassy in Reykjavik, Iceland, posts a list of attorneyslicensed to practice law in Iceland, including those that specialize in family law.

The list of organizations offering free or reduced cost legal services in Iceland  as well as the list of attorneys provided by the U.S. Embassy is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney or organization. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers or organizations.

Mediation

The Icelandic government is supportive of mediation programs to resolve international parental child abduction cases. If mediation is successful, the District Commissioner’s office will sign and witness the final agreement.  If the parents are unable to come to an agreement, the case returns to court. 

Mediation services are always carried out through the District Commissioner’s office in the district where the child resides. A lawyer and social worker generally preside over the mediation process and offer counseling and advice to parents. There are no costs for this service. 

  • Hague
  • Hague Convention Information
  • U.S. Immigration Requirements
  • Who Can Adopt
  • Who Can Be Adopted
  • How To Adopt
  • Traveling Abroad
  • After Adoption
  • Contact Information
Hague Questions
Hague Adoption Convention Country? Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
Hague Convention Information

Iceland is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption ( Hague Adoption Convention). Therefore all adoptions between Iceland and the United States must meet the requirements of the Convention and U.S. law implementing the Convention.

Iceland is not considered a country of origin in inter-country adoption. While legally possible, inter-country adoption of an Icelandic orphan by foreigners is unlikely. No Icelandic orphans have received U.S. immigrant visas in the past five fiscal years. The information provided is intended primarily to assist in extremely rare adoption cases from Iceland, including adoptions of Icelandic children by relatives in the United States, as well as adoptions from third countries by Americans living in Iceland.

U.S. Immigration Requirements For Intercountry Adoptions

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Iceland, you must meet certain suitability and eligibility requirements. USCIS determines who is suitable and eligible to adopt a child from another country and bring that child to live in the United States under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of a Convention adoptee under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States with an IH-3 or IH-4 immigrant visa.

Who Can Adopt

Adoption between the United States and Iceland is governed by the Hague Adoption Convention. Therefore to adopt from Iceland, you must first be found eligible to adopt by the U.S. Government. The U.S. Government agency responsible for making this determination is the Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn more.

In addition to these U.S. requirements for prospective adoptive parents, Iceland also has the following requirements for prospective adoptive parents:

RESIDENCY REQUIREMENTS:

  • Prospective adoptive parents must be residents of Iceland or "have a special connection to the country" to be allowed to adopt children in Iceland

AGE AND MARRIAGE REQUIREMENTS:

  • Applicants must be at least 25 years old, but not more than 45 years old;
  • Married couples or a male and a female that have lived together in a proxy marriage (cohabitation registered with the National Registry) for at least 5 years can adopt together;
  • One of the married individuals or a male/female in a proxy marriage can adopt the partner's child or foster child with the partner's permission;
  • One of the married individuals or a male/female in a proxy marriage can adopt a child without the partner's permission if the partner has vanished or his/her mental state would impede the adoption process;
  • Individuals can adopt children in special circumstances and if the adoption benefits the welfare of the child.
  • Same-sex couples can adopt (since 2006) as long as they fulfill all other requirements, such as length of marriage/ proxy marriage, age, health and no criminal record.

INCOME OR OTHER REQUIREMENTS:

  • Applicants must be in good mental and physical state;
  • Must not have a criminal record;
  • Must be able to financially support a family.

Who Can Be Adopted

Because Iceland is party to The Hague Adoption Convention, children from Iceland must meet the requirements of the Convention in order to be eligible for adoption. For example, the Convention requires that Iceland attempt to place a child with a family in-country before determining that a child is eligible for intercountry adoption. In addition to Iceland's requirements, a child must meet the definition of a Convention adopteefor you to bring him or her back to the United States.

How To Adopt

ICELAND'S ADOPTION AUTHORITY

The Ministry of Judicial and Ecclesiastical Affairs - The National Commissioner on Adoptions.

THE PROCESS

Because Iceland is party to The Hague Adoption Convention, adopting from Iceland must follow a specific process designed to meet the Convention's requirements. A brief summary of the Convention adoption process is given below. You must complete these steps in the following order so that your adoption meets all necessary legal requirements.

NOTE: If you filed your I-600a with Iceland before April 1, 2008, the Hague Adoption Convention may not apply to your adoption. Your adoption could continue to be processed in accordance with the immigration regulations for non-Convention adoptions.  Learn more.

  1. Choose an Accredited Adoption Service Provider
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt
  3. Be Matched with a Child
  4. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Immigration to the United States
  5. Adopt the Child in Iceland
  6. Bring your Child Home
  1. Choose an Accredited Adoption Service Provider: 

    The first step in adopting a child from Iceland is to select an adoption service provider in the United States that has been accredited. Only these agencies and attorneys can provide adoption services between the United States and Iceland. Learn more.
  2. Apply to be Found Eligible to Adopt:

    After you choose an accredited adoption service provider, you apply to be found eligible to adopt (Form I-800A) by the U.S. Government, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Learn how.

    Once the U.S. government determines that you are "eligible" and "suitable" to adopt, you or your agency will forward your information to the adoption authority in Iceland. Iceland's adoption authority will review your application to determine whether you are also eligible to adopt under Iceland's law.

  3. Be Matched with a Child:

    If both the United States and Iceland determine that you are eligible to adopt, and a child is available for intercountry adoption, the central adoption authority in Iceland may provide you with a referral for a child. Each family must decide for itself whether or not it will be able to meet the needs of the particular child and provide a permanent family placement for the referred child.

  4. Apply for the Child to be Found Eligible for Adoption:

    After you accept a match with a child, you will apply to the U.S Government, Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) for provisional approval to adopt that particular child (Form I-800). USCIS will determine whether the child is eligible under U.S. law to be adopted and enter the United States. Learn how.

    After this, your adoption service provider or you will submit a visa application for to a Consular Officer at the U.S. Embassy. The Consular Officer will review the child's information and evaluate the child for possible visa ineligibilities. If the Consular Office determines that the child appears eligible to immigrate to the United States, he/she will notify the Iceland's adoption authority (Article 5 letter). For Convention country adoptions, prospective adoptive parent(s) may not proceed with the adoption or obtain custody for the purpose of adoption until this takes place.

    Remember: The Consular Officer will make a final decision about the immigrant visa later in the adoption process.

  5. Adopt the Child (or Gain Legal Custody) in-country:

    Remember: Before you adopt (or gain legal custody of) a child in Iceland, you must have completed the above four steps. Only after completing these steps, can you proceed to finalize the adoption or grant of custody for the purposes of adoption in Iceland.

    The process for finalizing the adoption (or gaining legal custody) in Iceland generally includes the following:

    • ADOPTION APPLICATION AND ROLE OF ADOPTION AUTHORITY: The first step to adopt a child is to apply for a pre-approval from The National Commissioner on Adoptions. Applicants can get the application forms on the Ministry of Judicial and Ecclesiastical Affairs website . Then they return the forms to "slensk Ættleiðing (Icelandic Adoption Society -IAS) and the agency will send the forms to The National commissioner on adoptions and attach necessary documents. Please see the Required Documents section below.

      The application with attached documents is sent to The National Commissioner on Adoptions which then asks the social services and the child protection agency in the applicants' home town to give a report about the applicant's home and family environment. An employee from social services will contact the applicant and do a home study. This report is sent to the ministry which will take the decision based on this report. If the pre-approval is granted, then it is sent in English to IAS and the applicant gets a copy. The approval notice, which is valid for two years, will state that the applicant is permitted to adopt a child from a specific third country.

    • ROLE OF ADOPTION AGENCIES: "slensk Ættleiðing (Icelandic Adoption Society) is the only adoption agency in Iceland. Please see their website (only in Icelandic): http://www.isadopt.is

    • TIME FRAME: The pre-approval process, described below, will take three to six months. The length of time to adopt in a third country will depend on the child's country of origin.
    • DOCUMENTS REQUIRED:
      • Application for pre-approval, Ministry of Judicial and Ecclesiastical Affairs - The National Commissioner on Adoptions. Skuggasundi, 150 Reykjavík. Telephone: 354-545-9000. Opening hours: Mon-Fri. 8:30 - 16.00.
      • Birth certificate from applicant;
      • Information about applicant on this form. (1. Re Application For Permission to Adopt. 2. Re Application for Pre-Approval)
      • Marriage certificate or certificate that proves proxy marriage of applicant;
      • Certificate from the National Registry to show how long applicants have been living together. Marriage must have lasted at least three years and Proxy Marriage at least five years. The certificate can be sought at the National Registry in Iceland, Borgartúni 21a, 104 Reykjavík. Telephone: 354-569-2900. Business hours: Mon-Fri. 8:30-16:00;
      • Police certificates from countries prospective adoptive parents resided for 3 months after the age of 16;
      • Information about the applicant's health on the Information on Health Re application for Pre-Approval to Adopt a Child form;
      • Doctors certificate for the adopting parent. Here you can get the Medical Certificate for Prospective Adoption Parent form, needs to be filled out by a doctor and the applicant;
      • Certified copy of tax returns for the last two years.

      The documents referenced above can be sought in Icelandic at http://www.syslumenn.is/thjonusta/fjolskyldumal/aettleidingar.

      NOTE: Additional documents may be requested. If you are asked to provide proof that a document from the United States is authentic, we can help. Learn more.

  6. Bring Your Child Home Now that your adoption is complete (or you have obtained legal custody of the child), there are a few more steps to take before you can head home. Specifically, you need to apply for three documents for your child before he or she can travel to the United States:

    • Birth Certificate 
      You will first need to apply for a new birth certificate for your child, so that you can later apply for a passport. Your name will be added to the new birth certificate.

      To obtain a new birth certificate for the adopted child, please contact Iceland's national Registry:

      The National Registry (Thjodskra)
      Borgartun 24,
      105 Reykjavik,
      Iceland.
      Phone #354-569-2900,
      www.Thjodskra.is
      Opening hours are from 8:30 - 16:00
      Phone hours from 9:00 - 16:00,
      The fee is Icelandic kronur 900,00

    • Iceland Passport
      Your child is not yet a U.S. citizen, so he/she will need a travel document or Passport from Iceland.

      To obtain a Passport for the child in Iceland please contact The District Commissioner in Kopavogur.

      The District Commissioner in Kopavogu ( Sýslumaðurinn í Kópavogi) 
      Dalvegi 18
      201 Kópavogur - Map
      Tel.+354-560-3000;
      Fax +354-560-3090
      Netfang kopavogur@syslumenn.is
      Opening hours are from 9:00 to 15:30.
      Phone hours are from 8:30 to 16:00

    • U.S. Immigrant Visa 
      After you obtain the new birth certificate and passport for your child, you also need to apply for an U.S. visa from the United States Embassy for your child. After the adoption (or custody for purpose of adoption) is granted, visit the U.S Embassy for final review and approval of the child's I-800 petition and to obtain a visa for the child. This immigrant visa allows your child to travel home with you. As part of this process, the Consular Officer must be provided the "Panel Physician's" medical report on the child if it was not provided during the provisional approval stage.

CHILD CITIZENSHIP ACT

For adoptions finalized abroad: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your child to acquire American citizenship when he or she enters the United States as lawful permanent residents.

For adoptions to be finalized in the United States: The Child Citizenship Act of 2000 allows your child to typically acquire American citizenship when the U.S. state court issues the final adoption decree. We urge your family to finalize the adoption in a U.S. State court as quickly as possible.

*Please be aware that if your child did not qualify to become a citizen upon entry to the United States, it is very important that you take the steps necessary so that your child does qualify as soon as possible. Failure to obtain citizenship for your child can impact many areas of his/her life including family travel, eligibility for education and education grants, and voting.

Learn more about the Child Citizenship Act.

Traveling Abroad

APPLYING FOR YOUR U.S. PASSPORT

A valid U.S. passport is required to enter and leave Iceland. Only the U.S. Department of State has the authority to grant, issue, or verify U.S. passports.

Getting or renewing a passport is easy. The Passport Application Wizard will help you determine which passport form you need, help you to complete the form online, estimate your payment, and generate the form for you to print-all in one place.

OBTAINING YOUR VISA

In addition to a U.S. passport, you may also need to obtain a visa. A visa is an official document issued by a foreign country that formally allows you to visit. Where required, visas are attached to your passport and allow you to enter a foreign nation.

To find information about obtaining a visa for Iceland, see the Department of State's Country Specific Information.

STAYING SAFE ON YOUR TRIP

Before you travel, it's always a good practice to investigate the local conditions, laws, political landscape, and culture of the country. The State Department is a good place to start.

The Department of State provides Country Specific Information for every country of the world about various issues, including the health conditions, crime, unusual currency or entry requirements, and any areas of instability.

STAYING IN TOUCH ON YOUR TRIP

When traveling during the adoption process, we encourage you to register your trip with the Department of State. Travel registration makes it possible to contact you if necessary. Whether there's a family emergency in the United States, or a crisis in Iceland, registration assists the U.S. Embassy or Consulate in reaching you.

Registration is free and can be done online.

After Adoption

Iceland does not have any post-adoption or post-placement reporting requirements at this time.

What resources are available to assist families after the adoption?

Many adoptive parents find it important to find support after the adoption. Take advantage of all the resources available to your family -- whether it's another adoptive family, a support group, an advocacy organization, or your religious or community services.

Here are some good places to start your support group search:

Note: Inclusion of non-U.S. Government links does not imply endorsement of contents.

Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Iceland
Laufasvegur 21,
101 Reykjavik, Iceland
Tel: (354) 562-9100
E-mail: reykjavikconsular@state.gov

Iceland's Adoption Authority
The Ministry of Judicial and Ecclesiastical Affairs
Arnarhvall on Lindargata
150 Reykjavik, Iceland
Tel: 011-354-560-9010
Fax: 011-354-552-7340
E-mail: postur@dkm.stjr.is
Internet: www.stjr.is.

Embassy of Iceland
1156 15 th Street N.W., Suite 1200
Washington, D.C. 20005-1704
Tel.: (202) 265 6653
E-mail: icemb.wash@mfa.is
Iceland also has a Consulate General in New York and honorary consulates around the United States.

Office of Children's Issues
U.S. Department of State  
CA/OCS/CI  
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
E-mail: AskCI@state.gov
Internet: http://adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about filing a Form I-800A application or a Form I-800 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center (NBC):
Tel:  1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-913-275-5480 (local); Fax: 1- 913-214-5808
Email: NBC.Adoptions@uscis.dhs.gov

For general questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS Contact Center
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov

  • Visa Classifications
  • General Documents | Birth, Death, Burial Certificates | Marriage, Divorce Certificates
  • Adoption Certificates | Identity Card | Police, Court, Prison Records | Military Records
  • Passports & Other Travel Documents | Other Records | Visa Issuing Posts | Visa Services
Classifications
Visa Classifications

Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 60 Months
A-2 None Multiple 60 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 None Multiple 120 Months
B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1 None Multiple 120 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 120 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 120 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None None 24 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 60 Months
G-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-3 None Multiple 60 Months
G-4 None Multiple 60 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2B None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2R None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 None Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 60 Months
M-2 None Multiple 60 Months
N-8 None Multiple 60 Months
N-9 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO 1-6 10 None Multiple 60 Months
NATO-7 1 None Multiple 12 Months
O-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8

Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Visa Category Footnotes
General Documents | Birth, Death, Burial Certificates | Marriage, Divorce Certificates
General Documents

Please check back for update.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates
 

Available

Fees: The fee is 2,240 ISK

Document Name: “Faedingarvottord”

Issuing Authority: Statistical Bureau of Iceland (“Hagstofa Islands – Thjodskra”), Borgartuni 21, 105 Reykjavik

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Birth Certificates are in Icelandic, with an interlinear translation into Danish, English, German, French, Spanish, Italian, and Dutch. Each document is signed in ink and bears the imprint of a rubber stamp, which is a circle within a circle. The words "The Statistical Bureau of Iceland" appear in the space between the two circles. The form is printed on letterhead bearing the National Seal of Iceland in the upper left hand corner, and with the heading "Hafstofa Islands - Thjodskra; The National Registry."

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria

Procedure for Obtaining: The full name, date and place of birth, as well as the name of the individual's parents should be furnished.

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

 

Death/Burial Certificates

Available

Fees: The fee is 2,240 ISK

Document Name: “Danavottord”

Issuing Authority: Statistical Bureau of Iceland (“Hagstofa Islands – Thjodskra”), Borgartuni 21, 105 Reykjavik

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: In Icelandic with interlinear translations, including English, in a format similar to Birth Certificates.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria: Requests should include the full name of the deceased, the date and place of death.

Procedure for Obtaining:

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments: 

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available

Fees: The fee is 2,240 ISK

Document Name: “Hjonavigsluvottord”

Issuing Authority: Statistical Bureau of Iceland (“Hagstofa Islands – Thjodskra”), Borgartuni 21, 105 Reykjavik. Marriage certificates can also be obtained in English or in Icelandic from District Commissioners (“Syslumadurinn”) who have performed weddings in their offices.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining: Requests for marriage certificates should include the full names of both husband and wife, date and place of marriage, as well as the name of the person performing the marriage ceremony, if known.

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments:

 

Divorce Certificates

Available

Fees: The fee is 8,000ISK

Document Name: “Hjúskaparsöguvottorð”

Issuing Authority: Statistical Bureau (“Hagstofa Islands – Thjodskra”), Borgartuni 21, 105 Reykjavik. 

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining: Online

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments: Requests for detailed certificates of divorce prior to July 1, 1992, may be sent to the Ministry of Justice and Ecclesiastical Affairs (“Doms-og Kirkjumalaraduneytid”) at  Sölvhólsgötu 7, 101 Reykjavík. The document is entitled "Skilnadarvottord". There may be a fee for this service.

For divorces after July 1, 1992, requests should be directed to the corresponding District Commissioner or Magistrate (“Syslumadurinn”) where the service was performed. The address for all the District Commissioner’s offices can be found at www.syslumenn.is

Adoption Certificates | Identity Card | Police, Court, Prison Records | Military Records
Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update.

Identity Card

Please check back for update.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Available

Fees:  None

Document Name: “Lögreluathugun”

Issuing Authority: National Commissioner's Office, which is located on Skúlagata 21, in Reykjavik. Outside the capital, requests can be made through the local District Commissioner ("syslumadur").

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:

Registration Criteria:

Procedure for Obtaining: The request for an individual police certificate must be written and signed by the individual concerned. A third party is not allowed to obtain a person's individual police certificate without that person's express, written authorization.

Certified Copies Available:

Alternate Documents:

Exceptions:

Comments: The certificate is usually ready for pick-up within one week at the National Commissioner's Office.

 

Court Records

 

Prison Records

Unavailable

Comments:  All necessary information regarding an individual's prison record is contained in the “Lögregluathugun” obtained at the National Commissioner’s Office which is located on Skúlagata 21, in Reykjavik. Outside the capital, requests can be made through the local district commissioner ("syslumadur").

 

Military Records

N/A

Passports & Other Travel Documents | Other Records | Visa Issuing Posts | Visa Services
Passports & Other Travel Documents

Please check back for update.

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Post Title: Embassy

Address:

Mailing Address:
5640 Reykjavik Place, Dulles, VA 20189

Street Address:
Laufasvegur 21

Phone Number:
Tel: 354-545 2200

                                

 

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Iceland