CSI Repository

CSI Country Catalog

Iraq

Flag_of_Iraq
Country
Country Name: Iraq
Official Country Name: Republic of Iraq
Country Code 2-Letters: IQ
Country Code 3-Letters: IRQ
Street: Al-Kindi Street International Zone
Fact sheet: http://www.state.gov/r/pa/ei/bgn/6804.htm
  • International Travel
  • Child Abductions
  • Intercountry Adoptions
  • Consular Notification
  • U.S. Visas
  • Contact
  • Quick Facts
  • Embassies and Consulates
  • Destination Description
  • Entry, Exit & Visa Requirements
  • Safety and Security
  • Local Laws & Special Circumstances
  • Health
  • Travel & Transportation
Contact
Embassy Name: U.S. Embassy Baghdad
Street Address: Al-Kindi Street
International Zone
Baghdad, Iraq
Phone: 0760-030-3000
Emergency Phone: 301-985-8841, ext. 4293 or 2413 (U.S. dial numbers that ring in Baghdad)
Fax: No Fax
Email: BaghdadACS@state.gov
Web: https://iq.usembassy.gov/embassy-consulates/baghdad/

Embassy Messages

Map

Country Map

Quick Facts
Passport Validity:


Minimum of six months remaining on entry


Blank Passport Pages:


One page required for entry stamp


Tourist Visa Required:


Yes


Vaccinations:


None required. Vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Currency Restrictions for Entry:


None


Currency Restrictions for Exit:


No more than $10,000 USD

Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Baghdad
Al-Kindi Street
International Zone
Baghdad, Iraq

Telephone:  0760-030-3000
Telephone: 301-985-8841, ext. 4293 or 2413 (U.S. dial numbers that ring in Baghdad)
U.S. Citizen Emergency After-Hours Telephone: 011-964-770-443-1286 or 011-964-770-030-4888 from the United States or 0770-443-1286 or 0770-030-4888 from within Iraq.
Email: baghdadacs@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Erbil
413 Ishtar, Ankawa Erbil, Iraq
Telephone: During business hours from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, Sunday through Thursday (local Erbil time is eight hours ahead of EST and seven hours ahead during EDT)
From Iraq: 066-211-4554
From the United States: 240-264-3467 and then extension 4554
After hours emergencies and on weekends (Friday, Saturday & Holidays):
From Iraq:
 066-211-4000 and ask to speak with the Duty Officer
From the United States: 240-264-3467 and ask to speak with the Duty Officer
E-mail: ErbilACS@state.gov

U.S. Consulate General Basrah
Basrah, Iraq (near Basrah International Airport)
At this time, U.S. Consulate General Basrah does not provide consular services; please contact the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad for assistance.

The work week in Iraq is Sunday through Thursday.

Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Iraq for additional information on U.S. – Iraq relations.

Entry, Exit & Visa Requirements

The Government of Iraq strictly enforces regulations regarding visas and entry, authorizations for weapons, and movements through checkpoints. U.S. citizens traveling to Iraq without the proper authorization or whose purpose of travel is not readily apparent have been detained without warning. 

Required Travel Documents:

  1. Passport: Valid for at least six months after dates of travel.
  2. Visa: Apply with the Embassy of Iraq in Washington, D.C.

Within seven days of the date of entry into Iraq, most travelers must:

  1. Obtain an arrival sticker
  2. Submit a blood test (does not apply to tourist visa holders)
  3. Obtain a residency stamp

Arrival Sticker: The arrival sticker is available at the immigration desk at the port-of-entry into Iraq. Visitors who exceed the seven-day period can face a large fine.

Blood Test: All visitors and new residents to Iraq, with the exception of those traveling on a tourist visa, must have a blood test for HIV and hepatitis within seven days of arrival or face a fine. The test must then be revalidated every 90 days while in Iraq. Guidance on where to go for the blood test is available at the airport upon arrival. In the Iraqi Kurdistan Region, travelers need to have this blood test only if staying for more than 15 days.

Residency Stamp: There is a high-cost penalty for visitors who do not obtain the required residency stamp within their first seven days in country. Visitors staying less than seven days do not require this stamp. A U.S. citizen who plans to stay longer than two months must apply at the Residency Office for an extension.

Exit Stamp: Before departing the country, U.S. citizens must obtain an exit stamp at a residency office. Contractors in the International Zone (IZ) may also obtain exit stamps at the Karadah Mariam Police Station (available Sunday and Wednesday, 10:00-14:00). Exit stamp fees vary, depending on length of stay, type of entry visa, and other factors. Travelers who hold a tourist passport with no visa or an expired visa are required to purchase an exit visa and pay a fine. The requirement and cost of an exit stamp may differ if the U.S. citizen passport holder has Iraqi ancestry. Visitors who intend to return to Iraq will require a re-entry visa, also available through a local residency office.

U.S. Government Contractors: The Government of Iraq’s requirements for entry and residency for U.S. government contractors vary based on many factors. Persons traveling to Iraq to work on U.S. government contracts should check with their contracting company and contracting officer’s representative to determine entry and residency procedures and requirements. Contractors receive an Iraqi visa tied specifically to the contract and will be in violation of Iraqi immigration law if found to be violating the terms of the visa, including by overstaying. The process for obtaining these visas can be lengthy, so contractors should apply early and remain in close contact with their contracting company during the visa process.

Private U.S. Citizens Traveling for Work: U.S. citizens traveling to Iraq for the purpose of employment should check with their employers and with the Embassy of Iraq in Washington, D.C. for any special entry or exit requirements related to employment.

Residency Offices: Each province has a Residency Office in the provincial capital.

Iraqi Kurdistan Region (IKR) Entry/Exit Requirements: U.S. citizens who plan to stay for longer than 30 days in the IKR, including those with valid Iraqi visas, must visit the local residency office within seven days. U.S. citizens who allow their residency within the IKR to lapse may face difficulties getting the exit stamp needed to leave the IKR either by land or by air.

Embassy of Iraq, Washington, D.C.: Visit the Embassy of Iraq for the most current visa information. The Embassy of Iraq is located at 3421 Massachusetts Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20007; phone number is 202-742-1600; fax number is 202-333-1129.

HIV/AIDS: Iraq has imposed HIV/AIDS travel restrictions on all visitors and new residents must have an HIV blood test during their first seven days in country or face a fine. There is no waiver available for this ineligibility. Please verify this information with the Embassy of Iraq before you travel.

International Parental Child Abduction: International parental child abduction is the removal or retention of a child outside his/her country of habitual residence in breach of another parent or guardian’s custody rights. The Office of Children’s Issues within the U.S. Department of State is a leader in U.S. government efforts to prevent international parental child abduction (both from the United States and to the United States), help children and families involved in abduction cases, and promote the objectives of the Hague Abduction Convention.

If you believe your child is in the process of being abducted by a parent, legal guardian, or someone acting on their behalf, call: 1-888-407-4747 or 202-501-4444.

Other: Find information on dual nationality, prevention of international child abduction, and customs regulations.

Safety and Security

Risk of Violence to U.S. Citizens: U.S. citizens in Iraq remain at critical risk for kidnapping and terrorist violence. The U.S. Embassy warns U.S. citizens to avoid all travel to Iraq and advises citizens to read the State Department’s Iraq Travel Advisory.

ISIS (Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, also known as ISIL or Da’esh) is a designated terrorist organization conducting an active insurgency in Syria, with franchises or direct links to terrorist groups in Iraq and other parts of the world. It commits terrorist attacks, violent atrocities, and targets U.S. citizens. ISIS controls some areas of Syria on the Iraqi border. The Iraqi government declared all of its territory liberated from ISIS in December 2017; however, despite improved government control, ISIS remains a threat to public safety in Iraq through the indiscriminate use of terrorist and asymmetrical attacks. Additionally, criminal gangs and local militias pose a potential threat to U.S. citizens.

U.S. Government Security: The U.S. government considers the potential threat to U.S. government personnel in Iraq to be serious enough to require them to live and work under strict security guidelines. All U.S. government employees under the authority of the U.S. Ambassador must follow strict safety and security procedures when traveling outside Mission facilities. The internal security policies of the U.S. Mission in Iraq may change at any time. The Mission will regularly restrict or prohibit movements by its personnel, often on short notice, for security threats or demonstrations.

Private Security: State Department guidance to American businesses in Iraq advises the use of protective security details. Detailed security information is available on the U.S. Embassy website.

Avoid Border Areas: U.S. citizens should avoid border areas, especially near Syria, Turkey, and Iran. These areas are especially dangerous and not always clearly defined. For more information, please see the Iraq Travel Advisory and Country Specific Information for Iraq’s neighboring countries: Iran, Jordan, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and Syria. U.S. citizens traveling near border areas may encounter aerial or artillery bombardments, unmarked minefields, and border skirmishes with smugglers.. Neighboring governments, including Iran, have detained U.S. citizens who approach these borders.

Mosul Dam: The Government of Iraq has begun to improve the structural integrity of the Mosul Dam. A dam failure could cause significant flooding, loss of life, and interruption of essential services from Mosul to Baghdad. While it is impossible to accurately predict the likelihood of the dam failing, the Embassy has made contingency plans to relocate its personnel in such an event. The Embassy recommends that U.S. citizens in Iraq, especially those visiting or residing in the floodplain of the Tigris River, prepare their own contingency plans and stay informed of local media reports and Embassy security messages for updates.

Crime: Petty theft is common in Iraq; this includes pick-pocketing in busy areas (e.g., markets), as well as the theft of money, jewelry, or other valuables from hotel rooms and private residences. Historically, carjacking by armed thieves has been very common, even during daylight hours, and particularly on the highways from Jordan and Kuwait to Baghdad. Foreigners, Iraqi citizens, and especially dual U.S.-Iraqi citizens are targets of kidnapping. Kidnappers often demand money but have also carried out kidnappings for political/religious reasons. Many hostages have been killed. 

The murder rate remains high due to terrorism, tribal and family disputes, and religious/sectarian tensions.

Victims of Crime: If you or someone you know becomes the victim of a crime abroad, you should contact the local police and the nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate. We can:

  • Replace a stolen passport.
  • Help you find appropriate medical care if you are the victim of violent crimes such as assault or rape.
  • Put you in contact with the appropriate police authorities, and if you want us to, contact family members or friends.
  • Help you understand the local criminal justice process and direct you to local attorneys, although it is important to remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

The local equivalent to the “911” emergency line in Iraq is “130” from both mobile and fixed line telephones. Please note that responders do not speak English.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

Protests: The Embassy urges U.S. citizens in Iraq to avoid protests and large gatherings. Iraqi authorities have responded forcefully when violence has occurred, including on two occasions in 2016 when protestors entered the International Zone (IZ) in Baghdad and attacked Iraqi government buildings. These incursions resulted in personal injury to both protesters and security personnel. Demonstrations in Baghdad have also occurred in and around Tahrir Square. Demonstrations in Basrah have occurred at the offices of the Provincial Council and governor.

For Further Information:

Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Family Circumstances: The U.S. Embassy is aware of cases in which U.S. citizens, especially female dual nationals of Iraq, have traveled to Iraq with family members and have been subject to threats, kidnappings, and extortion, including incidents of loss of custody of children or forced marriage. Women and children should pay particular attention to any warning signs, including husbands or other family members withholding money or travel documents after arrival in Iraq, and should also be aware that U.S. laws cannot protect U.S. citizens when they are outside of the United States. The Iraqi police and legal system may offer little protection.

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Property Disputes: Some U.S. citizens have been kidnapped, assaulted, or threatened by family members in response to family disputes over property. Land disputes are common in Iraq and are often difficult to resolve through legal channels. The U.S. Embassy cannot protect personal property and cannot take sides in a legal dispute. U.S. citizens wishing to purchase property should be aware of the risks, including not being physically present to oversee property. Those involved in a court dispute run the risk of having cases filed against them, and they may be arrested and jailed.

Special Circumstances: The ability of the Embassy to provide consular services to U.S. citizens is extremely limited given the security environment. Host government emergency services and support are limited.

Iraq continues to suffer from serious deficiencies in public services. Electricity often fails. Iraqi fire and rescue services are still developing, and hotels may not be fully equipped with fire safety equipment. Telephone (landline) service is very limited, and while cellular service (mobile wireless) has expanded rapidly into urban areas, reliability varies by region. The banking and financial infrastructure is underdeveloped, as transactions remain largely cash-based. Hotels usually require payment in foreign currency. Automatic Teller Machines (ATMs) are extremely rare in most of Iraq.

Customs officers have the broad authority to search persons or vehicles at Iraqi ports of entry. Officers may confiscate any goods they deem may pose a threat to the peace, security, health, environment, or social order of Iraq. Antiquities or cultural items suspected of being illegally exported may also be confiscated, as with goods that are not declared. Visitors may also be ordered to return such goods, at their expense, to the jurisdiction from which they came.

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

LGBTI Travelers: Iraqi law prohibits discrimination based on race, disability, or social status, but it does not address the issue of sexual orientation or gender identity. Societal discrimination in employment, occupation, and housing based on sexual orientation, gender identity, and unconventional appearance is common in Iraq. See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: While in Iraq, individuals with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different from what they find in the United States. The law prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities in employment, education, access to health care, and other state services. The government enforces the law in the public sector, but not in the private sector. Access for persons with disabilities to buildings and in educational and work settings remains inconsistent. Public and government buildings, as well as public bathrooms, may not be accessible.

Health

The U.S. Embassy does not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare and Medicaid do not apply overseas. U.S. citizens in Iraq should not expect any medical assistance from the U.S. government.

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation by air ambulance since the U.S. Embassy does not pay for this service.

Prescription Medication: Always carry your prescription medication in the original packaging with your doctor’s prescription and in sufficient supply for your entire stay.

Medical Care: Basic, modern medical care and medicines are not widely available in Iraq. Conflict has left some medical facilities non-operational and medical stocks and supplies severely depleted. The facilities in operation do not meet U.S. standards, and the majority lack medicines, equipment, and supplies. A limited number of companies facilitate medical evacuations. Blood banks exist in Iraq, though the blood supply may not be sufficient in the event of an emergency and likely has not been tested under U.S. standards for infectious disease. In addition, many areas suffer rolling power outages and generators are not always available for back-up.

Mental Health: There is limited mental health or psychiatric care in Iraq. Be aware that Iraq is a country under conflict; pre-existing mental health conditions and symptoms may resurface or be exacerbated due to exposure to ongoing events and the environment.

Prevalent Diseases:

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further Health Information:

Travel & Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Vehicular travel in Iraq can be extremely dangerous. There have been attacks on civilian vehicles as well as Iraqi military and security convoys on roads and highways throughout Iraq, both in and outside metropolitan areas. Attacks occur throughout the day, but travel at night is more dangerous and should be avoided. Such attacks are unpredictable, and have involved small arms fire and Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) capable of destroying the average vehicle.

Public Transportation: Buses run irregularly and frequently change routes. Poorly-maintained city transit vehicles are often involved in accidents. Long-distance buses are available, but are often in poor condition and drive at unsafe speeds.

Traffic Laws and Practice: Drivers usually do not yield to pedestrians at crosswalks and ignore traffic lights (if available), traffic rules, and regulations. Jaywalking is common. Roads are congested. Some cars do not use lights at night and urban street lights may not be functioning. Some motorists drive at excessive speeds, tailgate, and force other drivers to yield the right of way.

Checkpoints: Many government checkpoints are scattered throughout the country. New ones may be placed randomly, particularly after terrorist attacks. It can take a long time to navigate them in crowded traffic, and some may shut down altogether at certain hours. Drivers should have car registration and ID documents available and should be very patient and polite.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Iraq should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard Homeport and the NGA Broadcast Warnings website.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Iraq, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the Government of Iraq’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

The FAA prohibits U.S. civil flight operations over or within Iraq at certain altitudes and under other circumstances specified in KICZ NOTAM A0025/17. In addition, travel for U.S. Mission personnel through Basrah Airport remains prohibited and travel through the Baghdad International Airport (BIAP) by official personnel is limited. The FAA has determined that U.S. civil aviation flying in Iraqi airspace is at risk from military operations (military aerial combat operations and other military-related activity) and militant groups. Foreign airlines operating in Iraq may cancel their operations without warning due to the security environment or other factors. Travelers should remain vigilant and reconfirm all flight schedules with their airline prior to commencing any travel.

For further background information regarding FAA prohibitions on U.S. civil aviation, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices website.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information
Use Style in the Text Component to tag city names and to tag phone numbers, fax numbers, and emails with the respective Style icon.

Washington, DC (202) 483-7500 (202) 507-8610

Detroit, MI (248) 423-1250

Los Angeles, CA (213) 797-6060

  • General Information
  • Hague Abduction Convention
  • Return
  • Visitation/Access
  • Retaining an Attorney
  • Mediation
Hague Questions | Learn More Links
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention? Yes
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention? No
Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters: /content/travel/en/International-Parental-Child-Abduction/for-providers/laws/important-feat-hague-abdtn-conv.html

General Information


For information concerning travel to Iraq, including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Iraq.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

Hague Abduction Convention

 

On March 21, 2014, Iraq acceded to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Convention); however, the United States and Iraq are not yet treaty partners.  Until Iraq and the United States establish a treaty relationship per Article 38 of the Convention, parents whose children have been abducted from the United States to Iraq or wrongfully retained in Iraq are unable to invoke the Convention to pursue the return of or access to their children.  

 

 

Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country. Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Iraq and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children's Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction. For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children's Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child. The Office of Children's Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone:  1-888-407-4747
Fax: 202-485-6221
Website: travel.state.gov
Email: MiddleEastIPCA@state.gov

Parental child abduction is not a crime in Iraq.

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court. Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information. 

Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Iraq and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children's Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction.  For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children's Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children's Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children's Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy or Consulates in Iraq are authorized to provide legal advice.

The U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, Iraq, posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the following persons or firms. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

Mediation

The Iraqi government does not provide mediation services.  Parents should consult with an attorney in Iraq to learn of possible mediation services in Iraq.

  • Hague
  • Hague Convention Information
  • U.S. Immigration Requirements
  • Who Can Adopt
  • Who Can Be Adopted
  • How To Adopt
  • Traveling Abroad
  • After Adoption
  • Contact Information
Hague Questions
Hague Adoption Convention Country? No
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible? Adoptions from Iraq are extremely rare.
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
Hague Convention Information

Please consult a local attorney or adoption agency familiar with laws and regulations regarding intercountry adoption in Iraq. Additionally, prospective adoptive parents should refer to our information sheet on Adoption of Children from Countries in which Islamic Shari’a Law is observed for more information.

The Government of Iraq, through its Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs (MOLSA), may accord guardianship of an Iraqi child of the Islamic faith to a member of the child’s extended family or a family friend, provided that the guardian is an Iraqi national of the Islamic faith and the child will be cared for in Iraq. A family cannot obtain guardianship over an Iraqi child who is not of the Islamic faith, regardless of the religious faith of the family. Foreign citizens cannot be guardians. Questions regarding eligibility for guardianship may be directed to MOLSA.

Iraq is not a party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention or Convention). However, under the Intercountry Adoption Universal Accreditation Act of 2012 (UAA), which became effective on July 14, 2014, the requirement that adoption service providers be accredited or approved, and therefore meet the accreditation standards, which previously only applied in Convention cases, now also applies in non-Convention (“orphan”) cases under section 101(b)(1)(F) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). The UAA requires that an accredited or approved adoption service provider act as the primary provider in every Convention or non-Convention intercountry adoption case, and that adoption service providers providing any adoption services, as defined at 22 CFR Part 96.2, on behalf of prospective adoptive parents be accredited or approved, or be a supervised or exempted provider. See additional guidance for limited situations when a primary provider may not be required. Intercountry adoptions of children from non-Convention countries continue to be processed under the Orphan Process with the filing of the Forms I-600A and I-600. However, adoption service providers should be aware of the information on the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) website on the impact of the UAA on Form I-600A and Form I-600 adjudications, including the requirement that all home studies, including home study updates and amendments, comply with the home study requirements listed at 8 CFR 204.311, which differ from the orphan home study requirements that were in effect before July 14, 2014.

U.S. citizens interested in adopting children from Iraq should contact the adoption authority of Iraq to inquire about applicable laws and procedures. U.S. citizen prospective adoptive parents living in Iraq who would like to adopt a child from the United States or from a third country should also contact Iraq’s adoption authority. See contact information below.

Caution: Prospective adoptive parents should be aware not all children in orphanages or children’s homes are eligible for adoption. In many countries, birth parents place their child(ren) temporarily in an orphanage or children’s home due to financial or other hardship, intending for the child return home when possible. In such cases, the birth parent(s) have rarely relinquished their parental rights or consented to the adoption of their child(ren).

Please visit the Department of State’s country page for more information on travelling to Iraq and the U.S. Embassy Baghdad’s website for information on consular services.

The Department of State occasionally receives inquiries from U.S. citizens concerned about the plight of children in Iraq and the possibility of adopting them. We share this concern for children in conflict areas and understand that some U.S. citizens want to respond by offering to open their homes and adopt these children in need.

It can be extremely difficult in such circumstances to determine whether children who appear to be orphans truly are eligible for adoption. Children may be temporarily separated from their parents or other family members during a conflict or natural disaster, and their parents or relatives may be looking for them. It is not uncommon in a hostile situation for parents to send their children out of the area, or for families to become separated during an evacuation or natural disaster. Even when it can be demonstrated that children are indeed orphaned or abandoned, they often will be cared for by other relatives.

During times of crisis, it can also be exceptionally difficult to fulfill the legal requirements for adoption of both the United States and the child's country of origin. This is especially true when civil authority breaks down. It can also be very difficult to gather documents necessary to fulfill the legal requirements of U.S. immigration law. Prospective adoptive parents may wish to consult with experienced immigration attorneys and to take extra caution when considering adopting or caring for a child under these circumstances.

There are still ways in which U.S. citizens can help the children of Iraq, such as by making a contribution to an established non-governmental organization that is well placed to respond to Iraq’s most urgent needs, including those related to the children of Iraq.

U.S. Immigration Requirements For Intercountry Adoptions

To bring an adopted child to the United States from Iraq, you must meet certain suitability and eligibility requirements. USCIS determines who is suitable and eligible to adopt a child from another country and bring that child to live in the United States under U.S. immigration law.

Additionally, a child must meet the definition of an orphan under U.S. immigration law in order to be eligible to immigrate to the United States with an IR-3 or IR-4 immigrant visa.

Who Can Adopt

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Who Can Be Adopted

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How To Adopt

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Traveling Abroad

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After Adoption

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Contact Information

IRAQ’S ADOPTION AUTHORITY:
Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs (MOLSA)
Internet: http://www.molsa.gov.iq/

U.S. Embassy in Baghdad, Iraq
Al-Kindi Street
International Zone
Baghdad, Iraq
Tel: +0760-030-3000
Email: BaghdadACS@state.gov
Internet: https://iq.usembassy.gov/embassy-consulates/baghdad/

Office of Children’s Issues
U.S. Department of State
2201 C Street, NW
SA-17
Washington, DC 20520
Tel: 1-888-407-4747
E-mail: Adoption@state.gov
http://adoption.state.gov

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)
For questions about filing a Form I-800A application or a Form I-800 petition:
USCIS National Benefits Center (NBC):
Tel:  1-877-424-8374 (toll free); 1-913-275-5480 (local); Fax: 1- 913-214-5808
Email: NBC.Adoptions@uscis.dhs.gov

For general questions about immigration procedures:
USCIS Contact Center
Tel:  1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833)
Internet:  uscis.gov

  • Visa Classifications
  • General Documents | Birth, Death, Burial Certificates | Marriage, Divorce Certificates
  • Adoption Certificates | Identity Card | Police, Court, Prison Records | Military Records
  • Passports & Other Travel Documents | Other Records | Visa Issuing Posts | Visa Services
Classifications
Visa Classifications

Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 12 Months
A-2 None Multiple 12 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1 None Multiple 12 Months
B-2 None Multiple 12 Months
B-1/B-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1 None Multiple 12 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 12 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 12 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 12 Months
F-1 None Multiple 12 Months
F-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-1 None Multiple 12 Months
G-2 None Multiple 12 Months
G-3 None Multiple 12 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 12 Months
H-1B None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-1C None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-2A None N/A N/A3
H-2B None N/A N/A3
H-2R None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
I None Multiple 12 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 12 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 12 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None One 6 Months
K-4 None One 6 Months
L-1 None Multiple 12 Months
L-2 None Multiple 12 Months
M-1 None Multiple 12 Months
M-2 None Multiple 12 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-1 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-2 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-3 None Multiple 12 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 12 Months 3
Q-1 6 None Multiple 12 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 12 Months
R-2 None Multiple 12 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None One 3 Months
V-2 None One 3 Months 8
V-3 None One 3 Months 8

Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Visa Category Footnotes

  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

General Documents | Birth, Death, Burial Certificates | Marriage, Divorce Certificates
General Documents

General Document Information: Although these documents are theoretically available from Iraqi authorities, on occasion they may be withheld in individual cases for political or other reasons.  In other cases applicants may be reluctant to obtain documents, particularly police documents, for fear of retribution. There are two types of personal identification documents typically possessed by Iraqi nationals: 1) Iraqi ID card "Aljinssiyah", and 2) Nationality Certificate "Shahadat aljinssiyah".

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available    

Fees: There are no fees

Document Name: Shahadat Alwiladah

Issuing Authority: Ministry of Health - Bureau of births and deaths " wazarat alsehha-maktab alwiladat wa alwafiyat "

Official Seal(s) / Color / Format:  Two types of birth certificates, one called "shahadat alwiladah" issued by the Ministry of Health - the hospital, or "Surat Qayd alwiladah" issued by the Ministry of Health "wazarat alsehha-maktab alwiladat", both of which have the official seal of the Ministry of Health.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Doctor and Statistician from Ministry of Health

Registration Criteria: When the baby is born, the parents take the birth document issued by the health clinic/hospital and take it to the Ministry of Health, where the child's birth is officially registered.

Procedure for Obtaining: The clinic/hospital will issue a birth certificate when a child is born.  The parents must take the certificate to the Ministry of Health where the certificate will be stamped and the birth will be officially registered with the government.

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are available

Alternate Documents: The Family Book "Qayd 57/Copy of Entry 1957" issued by the  General Directorate Of Nationality (Mudeeriyat Al-Jenssiyah Al-Aama)

Exceptions: According to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, an Iraqi birth certificate can only be issued to a child of an Iraqi father; it may not be issued in the event that the child's father is an Arab-state national (other than Iraqi) or a foreigner.

Comments: If the Ministry of Health has no record of the subject's birth, either because the birth was never registered, or because the record was lost (i.e. during a fire, etc.), then the subject can appear at the General Directorate Of Nationality and present his/her family's identification. The Directorate then affirms that the subject-to-be-registered or confirmed registered was in fact born on "x" date. The General Directorate of Nationality uses that information to register the birth via a document called the "Family Book", which details the family tree of the immediate family.

 

Death Certificates

Available

Fees:  There are no fees

Document Name: Shahadat alwafat

Issuing  Authority: Ministry of Health - Bureau of births and deaths "wazarat alsehha-maktab alwiladat wa alwafiyat"

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Seal of Ministry of Health

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Ministry of Health - Bureau of Births and Deaths

Registration Criteria: The family may register the death of their family member by submitting a hospital or report of death to the Ministry of Health's Bureau of Births and Deaths.

Procedure for Obtaining: The clinic/hospital will issue a death certificate when someone is deceased.  The certificate must be taken to the Ministry of Health where the certificate will be stamped and the death will be officially registered with the government.

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are available.

Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions: None

Comments: None

 

Burial Certificates

Unavailable: The Iraqi authority does not issue Burial Certificates.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available

Fees: There are no fees

Document Name: Aqd al-zawaj

Issuing Authority: Ministry of Justice, Civil Status Court "wazarat aladel- mahkamat al ahwal alshakhsiyah"

Official Seal(s) / Color / Format: The seal of the high judicial council "majles alqadhaa alaala" and the judge’s original green signature.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Judge of the Civil Court

Registration Criteria: The couple files a marriage contract/certificate application with the Ministry of Justice's Civil Status Court, who then issues the marriage contract/certificate.

Procedure for Obtaining: The couple must file a marriage contract or certificate application form to the Ministry of Justice’s Civil Status Court in order to obtain a marriage certificate.

Certified Copies Available: The court issues one original marriage contract/certificate, and certified copies.

Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents

Exceptions: None

Comments: Religious marriage certificates are not acceptable for Immigrant Visa application purposes.  All marriages must be registered in either a Muslim religious (Sharia) court or civil court. Although Christian churches perform marriage ceremonies and issue marriage certificates, these marriages are not legal in Iraq until recorded with an appropriate civil court.

 

Divorce Certificates

Available

Fees: There are no fees.

Document Name: Watheeqat al-talaq

Issuing  Authority: Ministry of Justice "wazarat aladel- mahkamat al ahwal alshakhsiyah"

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: The seal of high judicial council "majles alqadhaa alaala" and the judge original green signature.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Judge of the Civil Court

Registration Criteria: The divorce request is filed with the Ministry of Justice's Civil Status Court; when the divorce has been finalized, the court registers the marriage dissolution and issues the final divorce decree.

Procedure for Obtaining: The divorce request must be filed with the Ministry of Justice’s Civil Court; once the divorce has been finalized, the court will register the marriage dissolution and issues the final divorce decree.

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are available.

Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions: None

Comments: None

Adoption Certificates | Identity Card | Police, Court, Prison Records | Military Records
Adoption Certificates

Unavailable:  Iraqi law does not permit adoptions; family guardianships may be registered but do not qualify for immigration purposes.

Identity Card

Available

Fees: There are no fees

Document Name: "Hawiat Al Ahwal Almadaniyah" or "aljinssiyah"

Issuing Authority: The Nationality Directorate (Mudeeriyat Al-Jenssiyah).

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  The seal of the Nationality Directorate and letter pressed serial number (letter-press, red ink) and official hologram

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Nationality Directorate

Registration Criteria:  The Nationality Directorate keeps records of all citizens. They issue the National ID according to the subject’s birth certificate. Subject can renew or get a new National ID if lost.

Procedure for Obtaining: Adults must present a Residency Card, Certificate of Nationality and expired National ID card (if available).  Adults applying on behalf of a minor must submit the child’s birth certificate and the parents’ National ID cards for the Nationality Directorate to issue a National ID Card.

Certified Copies Available:  Certified copies are not available.

Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions: None

Comments: None

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police/Prison Records

Available

Fees:   IQD $25,000 - equivalent to approximately USD $20.

Document Name:  Shahadat adam mahkoomiyah

Issuing Government Authority:        The Directorate of Criminal Information "Modeeriat Aladellah Aljinaeyah" in Baghdad.

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format:  The certificate is in Arabic and English, the color of the certificate is brown,  has the  applicant’s ten fingerprints at the back of the certificate,;  wet seal from Criminal Evidence Department (front), dry seal from Ministry of Interior (front), wet seal from Ministry of Foreign Affairs (back) please see additional comment below; wet seal over the applicant’s photo (front); signatures from Director of Criminal Evidence Department and Ministry of Interior (front), and signatures of Director of Fingerprints Department, Fingerprints Expert and Fingerprints Officer (back).

Issuing Authority Personnel Title:  Major General, Director  of Criminal Evidence Department "modeer qesim aladellah aljinaeyah"

Registration Criteria:  Each applicant with legal residency in Iraq can apply for an Iraqi Police Certificate, regardless of nationality.  Applicants within Iraq must obtain this certificate from the Directorate of Criminal Evidence Department, Ministry of Interior in Baghdad, Iraq.  Certificates obtained from branch offices in other cities are not acceptable.  Applicants outside Iraq can apply for a certificate through the Iraq Embassy or Consulate in their country of residence.

Procedure for Obtaining:  Applicants must appear in-person to apply for a police certificate.  Processing time: 5 days.

Certified Copies Available:  Certified copies are not available

Alternate Documents:  There are no alternate documents

Exceptions: None

Comments:   (1) All Iraqi police certificates issued by The Directorate of Criminal Information in Baghdad must be certified by The Iraqi Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MOFA).  This MOFA stamp is a commonly missing element and Post will not accept the police certificate without it.  It should be on the back of the certificate at the top of the sheet in the box marked “MOFA Ministry of Foreign Affairs.” (2) Police certificates issued in the Kurdistan region (Erbil, Sulaimaniyah and Dohuk) are not acceptable for Immigrant Visa application purposes.

 

Court Records

Available: Only if there is a court decision.

Fees: There are no fees

Document Name: Sijil almahkamah

Issuing Authority: Court

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Original Signature of the Judge.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: The court having jurisdiction over the proceedings.

Registration Criteria: An application for certified copies of court proceedings must be requested by directly contacting the court having jurisdiction over such proceedings.

Procedure for Obtaining: See above.

Certified Copies Available: Yes, if court proceedings exist.

Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions: None

Comments: None

Military Records

Available

Fees: There are no fees.

Document Name: "Daftar alkhidmah alaskariyah"

Issuing Authority: Ministry of Defense

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: Seal of Ministry of Defense

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: There is no issuing authority personnel.

Registration Criteria: Members of the Iraqi military who served prior to 2003 were issued a military book indicating their service status, which are kept by the service member after discharge; the military book is required for Immigrant Visa application purposes.  Members of the Iraqi military who served after 2003 were/are issued military identification cards; these cards are required for Immigrant Visa application purposes.

Procedure for Obtaining: See above.

Certified Copies Available: Certified copies are not available

Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents

Exceptions: If a military book or identification card is lost or destroyed after service concludes, the applicant is unable to obtain a replacement and an exception for the missing card can be made if the applicant provides a statement noting the card was lost or destroyed after military service.

Comments: None 

Passports & Other Travel Documents | Other Records | Visa Issuing Posts | Visa Services
Passports & Other Travel Documents

Types Available: "A" series passports are issued to non-diplomatic or official passport holders.  “D” passports are issued to diplomatic passport holders.  “C” and “E” series passports are issued to officials and government service staff respectively.

Fees: IQD $25,000 - equivalent to approximately USD $20

Document Name: Jawaz

Issuing Government Authority: The Directorate of Passports, Ministry of Interior or its branches in provinces

Special Seal(s) / Color / Format: It has a hologram image, hologram seal and water marks.

Issuing Authority Personnel Title: Passports Office Director

Registration Criteria: Per the Iraqi Passport Directorate, the following documents are required in order to apply for an Iraqi passport: 1) National ID card; 2) Certificate of Iraqi Nationality; 3) Residency card; 4) Two photographs; 5) National ID of the guardian (if applicant is a minor); 6) Fee.

Procedure for Obtaining: Every individual must appear in-person to apply for a passport and the processing time is one week.

Alternate Documents: There are no alternate documents.

Exceptions: None

Comments: Only D (diplomatic), E (official), C (government service staff) and A passports are valid for U.S. visas and admission to the United States. All Iraqis of all ages must apply for passports in person.

Other Documents Available: There are no other documents available.

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Post Title: Baghdad, Iraq (Embassy)

Address: Al Kindi Street, International Zone, Baghdad, Iraq

Email: BaghdadNIV@state.gov (Non-immigrant Visa); BaghdadIV@state.gov (Immigrant Visa); BaghdadACS@state.gov (American Citizen Services)

Phone Number:  There is no phone number for this office.

Comments / Additional Information: None

Erbil, Iraq (Consulate General)

Address: 413 Ishtar, Ankawa, Erbil, Iraq

Email: ErbilNIV@state.gov; ErbilACS@state.gov

Visa Services

The Consular Section of the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad processes applications for all immigrant and nonimmigrant visa classifications.

Consulate General Erbil accepts applications for all nonimmigrant visa classifications except for A and G visas, which are processed by U.S. Embassy Baghdad.  U.S. Consulate General Erbil does not process immigrant visa applications; they are solely processed by U.S. Embassy Baghdad.