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September 17, 2017
Hurricanes Irma and Jose
Emergency Alert
October 2, 2017
Hurricane Maria

Travel Advisories

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Alerts and Warnings

Cuba Travel Warning

Travel Warning
September 29, 2017
Cuba Travel Warning
O E N H U T C

The Department of State warns U.S. citizens not to travel to Cuba.  Over the past several months, numerous U.S. Embassy Havana employees have been targeted in specific attacks. These employees have suffered significant injuries as a consequence of these attacks. Affected individuals have exhibited a range of physical symptoms including ear complaints and hearing loss, dizziness, headache, fatigue, cognitive issues, and difficulty sleeping.

The Governments of the United States and Cuba have not yet identified the responsible party, but the Government of Cuba is responsible for taking all appropriate steps to prevent attacks on our diplomatic personnel and U.S. citizens in Cuba. Because our personnel's safety is at risk, and we are unable to identify the source of the attacks, we believe U.S. citizens may also be at risk and warn them not to travel to Cuba. Attacks have occurred in U.S. diplomatic residences and hotels frequented by U.S. citizens. On September 29, the Department ordered the departure of nonemergency U.S. government employees and their family members to protect the safety of our personnel.

Due to the drawdown in staff, the U.S. Embassy in Havana has limited ability to assist U.S. citizens. The Embassy will provide only emergency services to U.S. citizens. U.S. citizens in Cuba in need of emergency assistance should contact the Embassy by telephone at +(53)(7) 839-4100 or the Department of State at 1-202-501-4444. U.S. citizens should not attempt to go to the U.S. Embassy as it suffered severe flood damage during Hurricane Irma.

Travelers should apprise family and friends in the United States of their whereabouts, and keep in close contact with their travel agency and hotel staff.

For further information:

Country Information

Cuba
Republic of Cuba
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Must be valid at time of entry.

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

Two pages are required for entry/exit stamps

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Tourist travel to Cuba remains prohibited. You must obtain a license from the Department of Treasury or your travel must fall into one of 12 categories of authorized travel. See ENTRY, EXIT & VISA REQUIREMENTS below.

VACCINATIONS:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

U.S. credit and debit cards do not work in Cuba. Bring cash to cover your stay. The Cuban government requires that travelers declare cash amounts over 5,000 USD. Travelers should note that the Government of Cuba charges a 10 percent fee for all U.S. dollar cash conversions; this does not apply to electronic transactions or cash conversions in other currencies.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

The export of Cuban convertible pesos (CUC) is strictly prohibited, regardless of the amount. Travelers may only export the equivalent of 5,000 USD in any currency other than the Cuban convertible pesos (CUC). Anyone wishing to export more than this amount must demonstrate evidence that the currency was acquired legitimately from a Cuban bank.

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Embassies and Consulates

United States Embassy

Calzada between L and M Streets,
Vedado,
Havana, Cuba
Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100 and dial 1 to speak with the emergency operator
Fax: (+53) 7839-4247

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Cuba for information on U.S.-Cuba relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Travel to Cuba is regulated by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) of the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Anyone located in the United States, regardless of citizenship and nationality, must comply with these regulations. Individuals seeking to travel to Cuba are not required to obtain licenses from OFAC if their travel is covered by a general license. If travel is not covered by a general license, you must seek OFAC authorization in the form of a specific license. Travelers who fail to comply with regulations may face penalties and criminal prosecution. See the Department of Treasury webpage. For travel-specific questions, please see 31 C.F.R. 515.560 and OFAC's Frequently Asked Questions.

Visit the Cuban Embassy website for visa requirements. Cuba also requires visitors to have non-U.S. medical insurance, which can normally be purchased at the airport upon arrival to Cuba. Questions about insurance should be directed to the Cuban Embassy. Foreign students on scholarships are required to test for HIV/AIDS.

Cuba does not recognize the U.S. nationality of Cuban-born U.S. citizens. Cuban-born U.S. citizens will be treated as Cuban citizens and may be subject to restrictions and obligations. The Cuban government requires such individuals to enter and depart Cuba using Cuban passports. Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found elsewhere on our website. For further information about customs regulations, please read our customs information page.

Cuban Requirements for Authorized Travelers: Attempts to enter or exit Cuba illegally, or to aid the irregular exit of Cuban nationals or other persons, are prohibited and punishable by jail. Entering Cuban territory, territorial waters or airspace without prior authorization from the Cuban government may result in arrest. Immigration violators are subject to prison terms ranging from four years to 30 years.

Civilian Aircraft Travel: The Cuban Air Force shot down two U.S.-registered civilian aircraft in international airspace in 1996. As a result of this action, the President of the United States and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an “Emergency Cease and Desist Order and Statement of Policy,” which allows for vigorous enforcement action against U.S.-registered aircraft that violate Cuban airspace. For additional information on restrictions on aircraft flying between the United States and Cuba, see the FAA's website.

Temporary Sojourn License: Most aircraft and vessels on temporary sojourn to Cuba are eligible for License Exception Aircraft, Vessels, and Spacecraft (AVS) (Section 740.15 of the EAR). Please see the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security website for additional information. Vessels of the United States, as defined in 33 CFR §107.200, may not enter Cuban territorial waters without advance permission from the U.S. Coast Guard. The U.S. Coast Guard provides permission information at (305) 415-6920. 

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Safety and Security

The security environment in Cuba is relatively stable and characterized by a strong military and police presence. Demonstrations are infrequent but can be violent.  Even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational without warning. Avoid demonstrations and maintain security awareness at all times. Security messages issued in connection with demonstrations and strikes are posted on the Embassy’s website under “Safety & Security Messages.”

Hijackings of vessels by people seeking to depart Cuba are no longer common. The United States government will prosecute any person who hijacks (or attempts to hijack) an aircraft or vessel with the maximum penalties pursuant to U.S. law.

The Cuban government has detained U.S. citizens who are suspected of engaging in activities perceived to undermine state security. Travelers to Cuba should be aware that the Cuban government may detain individuals for activities which would not be considered criminal or offensive in the United States.


Crime:
The U.S. government rates the threat of crime in Cuba as medium. With the recent influx of tourists to the island, there has been an increase in the number of property crimes, as well as violent crimes.  Crimes of opportunity, such as purse snatchings and car break-ins, are on the rise.  There have also been recent reports of a drugged sexual assault and armed robberies. 

  • Exercise vigilance everywhere.  Do not flash large amounts of cash.  Do not leave your valuables unattended.  Carry money in your front pockets and/or hold your purse securely, and be mindful of purses or bags when dining out.
  • Do not leave a beverage unattended or accept beverages from persons unknown to you.
  • Locations such as Habana Vieja, Playas del Este, and other tourist locations tend to have a higher incidence of crime than other parts of Havana.
  • Be wary of misdirection schemes where someone attempts to gain your attention while another comes from behind to steal your purse, wallet, or other valuable items.
  • If confronted by criminals, do not resist, try to remain calm, clearly display your hands and do not make any sudden moves that could be interpreted as resistance.
  • Carry your cell phone for emergency communications and travel in groups if possible.
  • Be aware of your surroundings, especially at night or when traveling in an unfamiliar area.
  • While in your car, place valuables out of sight or in a locked trunk.  When unattended, avoid leaving items in the car, especially on the seat or in plain view. 
  • Only use marked taxis.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and secure the original.
  • Beware of hustlers, who may speak English and appear friendly.
  • When exchanging currency, use the state-run offices known as CADECAs.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

VICTIMS OF CRIME: If you are a crime victim, contact the local police (106) and the U.S. Embassy (+53 7839-4100). Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime
  • contact relatives or friends
  • explain the local criminal justice process
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide support in cases of destitution
  • replace stolen or lost passports

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

CRIMINAL PENALTIES: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Cuban penalties for the following are particularly strong:

  • Possession, use, or trafficking of illegal drugs.
  • Suspicion of assisting Cubans to leave the country illegally.
  • Drivers involved in accidents that result in injury or death, regardless of fault.
  • Importing weapons or ammunition.
  • Photographing military or police installations or personnel, or harbor, rail, or airport facilities.

The Government of Cuba does not recognize the U.S. nationality of Cuban-born U.S. citizens and may not allow U.S. consular access to Cuban-American prisoners.

Cuba-related Travel Transactions: Only persons whose travel falls into the categories mentioned above (under “Entry Requirements/Travel Transaction Limitations”) may be authorized by the U.S. Department of the Treasury to spend money related to travel to, from, or within Cuba. Direct financial transactions with certain entities and subentities under the control of, or acting for or on behalf of, the Cuban military, intelligence, or security services are also generally prohibited. For more information see the State Department’s Cuba Restricted List. For more information about licenses, visit OFAC’s Cuba Sanctions website.

Licenses for Remittances: For information on remittance authorizations, see OFAC’s Cuba Sanctions website.

What May Be Brought Back From Cuba: Importation of Cuban merchandise for commercial purposes is restricted, with very limited exceptions.  Certain imports of goods produced by independent Cuban entrepreneurs are authorized, as set forth on the State Department’s Section 515.582 List. There are no limits on the import or export of informational materials. To be considered informational material, artwork must be classified under Chapter subheading 9701, 9702, or 9703 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (for example, original paintings, drawings, pastels, engravings, prints, and sculptures are exempt from import and export restrictions).

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBT events in Cuba, but same-sex marriage is not legally recognized. See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of the Department of State's Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Individuals with mobility issues are likely to find accessibility difficultFew facilities or services are available, and information is limited. Most roads and sidewalks are poorly maintained.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers

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Health

Medical care in Cuba does not meet U.S. standards.  While doctors are generally competent, health facilities face shortages. Many medications are unavailable. Travelers should bring prescribed medicines in their original containers. Copies of prescriptions and letters from prescribing physicians may facilitate entry.

Travelers needing medical care generally must pay cash. The Embassy cannot pay bills. Medicare does not apply overseas, and many U.S. insurance companies do not provide international coverage. See our webpage for more information on overseas coverage.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Diarrheal illness is common among travelers, even in luxury accommodations. Travelers should wash their hands, drink bottled water and avoid street and undercooked food.

The following diseases are prevalent:

  • Zika Virus
  • Dengue Fever

Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For further health information, go to:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Road accidents, many involving pedestrians and bicyclists, are now Cuba’s leading cause of death. Cuban authorities may prohibit drivers from leaving the country until claims associated with an accident are settled. Drivers found responsible for accidents resulting in serious injury or death may receive long prison sentences. U.S. citizen drivers are often found at fault for accidents they are involved in.  

Drive with extreme care. Major streets are generally well-maintained, but secondary streets are not. Avoid driving at night as many roads are unlit.. Emergency lights or signals are rare making it virtually impossible to detect hazards after dark. Street signage is insufficient and confusing. Many Cuban cars are old, in poor condition, and lack reliable safety equipment.

The principal Cuban east-west highway is in good condition but extends only part of the way from Havana to the eastern end of the island. Hazards – including unfenced livestock and farm vehicles – are common.

Traffic Laws: Speed limits are sometimes posted and passengers in automobiles are required to wear seatbelts, if available. All motorcyclists are required to wear helmets. Traffic from major roads generally does not stop when entering roundabouts. Use care at intersections: stop signs are often hard to see.

Public Transportation: Taxis are available in commercial and tourist areas; radio-dispatched taxis are generally reliable. Do not share information with drivers or accept rides in unlicensed taxis as they may be used by thieves. Although popular with tourists, the three-wheeled, yellow-hooded “Co-Co” taxis should be avoided. “Co-Co” taxis are modified motorcycles that are unsafe.

Buses designated for tourist travel, both between and within cities, generally meet international standards. Public buses used by Cubans, known as "guaguas," are crowded, unreliable, and are sometimes used by petty criminals.

Rental car agencies provide roadside assistance to their clients as a condition of rental contracts. Travelers should not permit unauthorized persons to drive their rental vehicles.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

Maritime Travel: Cuban territorial waters are dangerous and difficult to navigate. The potential for running aground is high. Search-and-rescue capability is limited. Cuban authorities may hold damaged boats as collateral and confine boaters to vessels. Boaters can be detained, especially if their travel documents are not in order or if they are suspected of illegal activities. Mariners should not navigate close to Cuban territorial waters unless seeking a safe port in emergencies.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:

As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by Cuban carriers, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Cuba’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards.  Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
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U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
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Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters.
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

United States Embassy

Calzada between L and M Streets,
Vedado,
Havana, Cuba
Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100 and dial 1 to speak with the emergency operator
Fax: (+53) 7839-4247

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General Information

Cuba is not a party to the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, nor are there any international or bilateral treaties in force between Cuba and the United States dealing with international parental child abduction. American citizens who travel to Cuba place themselves under the jurisdiction of local courts. American citizens planning a trip to Cuba with dual national children should bear this in mind.

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Hague Abduction Convention

Custody Disputes: In Cuba, if parents are legally married they share the custody of their children. If they are not married and the parents cannot reach an agreement, custody is granted by the courts in the best interests of the child. Foreign court orders are not automatically recognized.

Enforcement of Foreign Judgments: Custody orders and judgments of foreign courts are not enforceable in Cuba.

Dual Nationality is not recognized under Cuban law.

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Return

Passport Applications for Minors: A person applying for a U.S. passport for a child under 16 must demonstrate that both parents or legal guardians consent to the issuance of a passport to the child or that the applying parent has sole authority to obtain the passport. This law covers passport applications made at domestic U.S. passport agencies in the United States and at U.S. consular offices abroad. Exceptions to this requirement may be made in special family circumstances or exigent circumstance necessitating the immediate travel of the child. The purpose of the new requirement that both parents' consent be demonstrated is to lessen the possibility that a U.S. passport might be used in the course of an international parental child abduction.

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Visitation/Access

Cuban citizen children (including dual nationals) are required to have exit visas to depart Cuba.

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Retaining an Attorney
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Mediation

Passport Applications for Minors: A person applying for a U.S. passport for a child under 16 must demonstrate that both parents or legal guardians consent to the issuance of a passport to the child or that the applying parent has sole authority to obtain the passport. This law covers passport applications made at domestic U.S. passport agencies in the United States and at U.S. consular offices abroad. Exceptions to this requirement may be made in special family circumstances or exigent circumstance necessitating the immediate travel of the child. The purpose of the new requirement that both parents' consent be demonstrated is to lessen the possibility that a U.S. passport might be used in the course of an international parental child abduction.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
No
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information
  • Cuba is a party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention or Convention).  Intercountry adoption processing in Convention countries must be done in accordance with the requirements of the Hague Adoption Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations; as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Cuba. However, Cuba is not currently processing intercountry adoptions to any country. The Department of State is seeking further information regarding the Cuban adoption process, and will provide updated information as it becomes available. 
  • Domestic adoptions: In general, the Department of State is not aware of any U.S. citizens who have successfully completed domestic adoptions or legal guardianship in Cuba of Cuban children. We understand that some foreign nationals who are residing in Cuba with permanent status and are married to a Cuban national have successfully adopted children in Cuba. 
  • Additionally, the Department of State and USCIS caution that, under U.S. law and regulations, any Cuban children adopted by U.S. citizens under the Cuban domestic adoption process will generally not be eligible to immigrate to the United States as adopted children until they meet the criteria in section 101(b)(1)(E) of the Immigration and Nationality Act and have an approved  Form I-130 petition as an immediate relative. More specifically, children adopted by U.S. citizens through the Cuban domestic adoption process, including children adopted by their U.S. citizen biological family members (e.g., aunt, uncle, cousin, grandparent, etc.), may not be eligible for U.S. immigrant visas on the basis of the adoption until the U.S. citizen adoptive parents accrue two years of legal custody and joint residence with the child outside the United States, among other requirements. Please see the USCIS website for additional information on this process.
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Who Can Adopt
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Who Can Be Adopted
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How to Adopt
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Traveling Abroad
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After Adoption
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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Cuba
Calzada between L & M Streets
Vedado, Havana
Tel:  (53)(7) 839-4100
Email: havanaconsularinfo@state.gov
Internet: cu.usembassy.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
 
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None One A B 2 Months
A-2 None One A 2 Months A
A-3 1 None One 2 Months
B-1 None One 6 Months
B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
B-1/B-2 None One 6 Months
C-1 $26.00 One 3 Months
C-1/D $26.00 One 3 Months
C-2 None One 3 Months
C-3 None One 3 Months
CW-1 11 None One 3 Months
CW-2 11 None One 3 Months
D None One 3 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None One 3 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 3 Months A
G-2 None One 3 Months
G-3 None One 3 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None One 3 Months
H-1B None One 3 Months 3
H-1C None One 3 Months 3
H-2A None N/A N/A3
H-2B None N/A N/A3
H-2R None One 3 Months 3
H-3 None One 3 Months 3
H-4 None One 3 Months 3
I None One 3 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None One 6 Months
K-4 None One 6 Months
L-1 None One 3 Months
L-2 None One 3 Months
M-1 None One 3 Months
M-2 None One 3 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None One 3 Months 3
O-2 None One 3 Months 3
O-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-1 None One 3 Months 3
P-2 None One 3 Months 3
P-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-4 None One 3 Months 3
Q-1 6 None One 3 Months 3
R-1 None One 3 Months
R-2 None One 3 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None One 3 Months
V-2 None One 3 Months 8
V-3 None One 3 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes
  1. Visas in categories A-1 and A-2 may be revalidated in the Department for multiple entries, 12 months for individuals on permanent diplomatic assignment in the United States. G-1 visas may be revalidated at USUN for multiple entries, 12 months for individuals on permanent diplomatic assignment in the United States.

  2. Diplomatic couriers may be issued A-1 visas valid for multiple entries, 12 months, upon initial application abroad.

 

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Death/Burial

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Same-sex marriage is not recognized in Cuba.

Divorce

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Same-sex marriage is not recognized in Cuba.

Adoption Certificates

Unavailable.

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Identity Card

Unavailable.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Antecedentes penales: Police and prison records are available from the Ministry of Justice. There may be a fee for this service.

Court Records

Sentencias: Supposedly available from the courts, however, in practice, sometimes unavailable.

Prison Records

Antecedentes penales: Police and prison records are available from the Ministry of Justice. There may be a fee for this service.

Military Records

Unavailable.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Unavailable.

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Havana, Cuba (U.S. Embassy)

Visa Services

The United States Embassy in Havana opened on July 20, 2015. Nonimmigrant and immigrant visas services are available at the U.S. Embassy.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

United States Embassy
Calzada between L and M Streets,
Vedado,
Havana, Cuba
Telephone
+(53) (7) 839-4100
Emergency
+(53) (7) 839-4100 and dial 1 to speak with the emergency operator
Fax
+(53) 7839-4247
Cuba Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Cuba
Republic of Cuba
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Must be valid at time of entry.

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

Two pages are required for entry/exit stamps

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Tourist travel to Cuba remains prohibited. You must obtain a license from the Department of Treasury or your travel must fall into one of 12 categories of authorized travel. See ENTRY, EXIT & VISA REQUIREMENTS below.

VACCINATIONS:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

U.S. credit and debit cards do not work in Cuba. Bring cash to cover your stay. The Cuban government requires that travelers declare cash amounts over 5,000 USD. Travelers should note that the Government of Cuba charges a 10 percent fee for all U.S. dollar cash conversions; this does not apply to electronic transactions or cash conversions in other currencies.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

The export of Cuban convertible pesos (CUC) is strictly prohibited, regardless of the amount. Travelers may only export the equivalent of 5,000 USD in any currency other than the Cuban convertible pesos (CUC). Anyone wishing to export more than this amount must demonstrate evidence that the currency was acquired legitimately from a Cuban bank.

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Embassies and Consulates

United States Embassy

Calzada between L and M Streets,
Vedado,
Havana, Cuba
Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100 and dial 1 to speak with the emergency operator
Fax: (+53) 7839-4247

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Cuba for information on U.S.-Cuba relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Travel to Cuba is regulated by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) of the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Anyone located in the United States, regardless of citizenship and nationality, must comply with these regulations. Individuals seeking to travel to Cuba are not required to obtain licenses from OFAC if their travel is covered by a general license. If travel is not covered by a general license, you must seek OFAC authorization in the form of a specific license. Travelers who fail to comply with regulations may face penalties and criminal prosecution. See the Department of Treasury webpage. For travel-specific questions, please see 31 C.F.R. 515.560 and OFAC's Frequently Asked Questions.

Visit the Cuban Embassy website for visa requirements. Cuba also requires visitors to have non-U.S. medical insurance, which can normally be purchased at the airport upon arrival to Cuba. Questions about insurance should be directed to the Cuban Embassy. Foreign students on scholarships are required to test for HIV/AIDS.

Cuba does not recognize the U.S. nationality of Cuban-born U.S. citizens. Cuban-born U.S. citizens will be treated as Cuban citizens and may be subject to restrictions and obligations. The Cuban government requires such individuals to enter and depart Cuba using Cuban passports. Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found elsewhere on our website. For further information about customs regulations, please read our customs information page.

Cuban Requirements for Authorized Travelers: Attempts to enter or exit Cuba illegally, or to aid the irregular exit of Cuban nationals or other persons, are prohibited and punishable by jail. Entering Cuban territory, territorial waters or airspace without prior authorization from the Cuban government may result in arrest. Immigration violators are subject to prison terms ranging from four years to 30 years.

Civilian Aircraft Travel: The Cuban Air Force shot down two U.S.-registered civilian aircraft in international airspace in 1996. As a result of this action, the President of the United States and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an “Emergency Cease and Desist Order and Statement of Policy,” which allows for vigorous enforcement action against U.S.-registered aircraft that violate Cuban airspace. For additional information on restrictions on aircraft flying between the United States and Cuba, see the FAA's website.

Temporary Sojourn License: Most aircraft and vessels on temporary sojourn to Cuba are eligible for License Exception Aircraft, Vessels, and Spacecraft (AVS) (Section 740.15 of the EAR). Please see the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security website for additional information. Vessels of the United States, as defined in 33 CFR §107.200, may not enter Cuban territorial waters without advance permission from the U.S. Coast Guard. The U.S. Coast Guard provides permission information at (305) 415-6920. 

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Safety and Security

The security environment in Cuba is relatively stable and characterized by a strong military and police presence. Demonstrations are infrequent but can be violent.  Even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational without warning. Avoid demonstrations and maintain security awareness at all times. Security messages issued in connection with demonstrations and strikes are posted on the Embassy’s website under “Safety & Security Messages.”

Hijackings of vessels by people seeking to depart Cuba are no longer common. The United States government will prosecute any person who hijacks (or attempts to hijack) an aircraft or vessel with the maximum penalties pursuant to U.S. law.

The Cuban government has detained U.S. citizens who are suspected of engaging in activities perceived to undermine state security. Travelers to Cuba should be aware that the Cuban government may detain individuals for activities which would not be considered criminal or offensive in the United States.


Crime:
The U.S. government rates the threat of crime in Cuba as medium. With the recent influx of tourists to the island, there has been an increase in the number of property crimes, as well as violent crimes.  Crimes of opportunity, such as purse snatchings and car break-ins, are on the rise.  There have also been recent reports of a drugged sexual assault and armed robberies. 

  • Exercise vigilance everywhere.  Do not flash large amounts of cash.  Do not leave your valuables unattended.  Carry money in your front pockets and/or hold your purse securely, and be mindful of purses or bags when dining out.
  • Do not leave a beverage unattended or accept beverages from persons unknown to you.
  • Locations such as Habana Vieja, Playas del Este, and other tourist locations tend to have a higher incidence of crime than other parts of Havana.
  • Be wary of misdirection schemes where someone attempts to gain your attention while another comes from behind to steal your purse, wallet, or other valuable items.
  • If confronted by criminals, do not resist, try to remain calm, clearly display your hands and do not make any sudden moves that could be interpreted as resistance.
  • Carry your cell phone for emergency communications and travel in groups if possible.
  • Be aware of your surroundings, especially at night or when traveling in an unfamiliar area.
  • While in your car, place valuables out of sight or in a locked trunk.  When unattended, avoid leaving items in the car, especially on the seat or in plain view. 
  • Only use marked taxis.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and secure the original.
  • Beware of hustlers, who may speak English and appear friendly.
  • When exchanging currency, use the state-run offices known as CADECAs.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

VICTIMS OF CRIME: If you are a crime victim, contact the local police (106) and the U.S. Embassy (+53 7839-4100). Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime
  • contact relatives or friends
  • explain the local criminal justice process
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide support in cases of destitution
  • replace stolen or lost passports

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

CRIMINAL PENALTIES: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Cuban penalties for the following are particularly strong:

  • Possession, use, or trafficking of illegal drugs.
  • Suspicion of assisting Cubans to leave the country illegally.
  • Drivers involved in accidents that result in injury or death, regardless of fault.
  • Importing weapons or ammunition.
  • Photographing military or police installations or personnel, or harbor, rail, or airport facilities.

The Government of Cuba does not recognize the U.S. nationality of Cuban-born U.S. citizens and may not allow U.S. consular access to Cuban-American prisoners.

Cuba-related Travel Transactions: Only persons whose travel falls into the categories mentioned above (under “Entry Requirements/Travel Transaction Limitations”) may be authorized by the U.S. Department of the Treasury to spend money related to travel to, from, or within Cuba. Direct financial transactions with certain entities and subentities under the control of, or acting for or on behalf of, the Cuban military, intelligence, or security services are also generally prohibited. For more information see the State Department’s Cuba Restricted List. For more information about licenses, visit OFAC’s Cuba Sanctions website.

Licenses for Remittances: For information on remittance authorizations, see OFAC’s Cuba Sanctions website.

What May Be Brought Back From Cuba: Importation of Cuban merchandise for commercial purposes is restricted, with very limited exceptions.  Certain imports of goods produced by independent Cuban entrepreneurs are authorized, as set forth on the State Department’s Section 515.582 List. There are no limits on the import or export of informational materials. To be considered informational material, artwork must be classified under Chapter subheading 9701, 9702, or 9703 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (for example, original paintings, drawings, pastels, engravings, prints, and sculptures are exempt from import and export restrictions).

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBT events in Cuba, but same-sex marriage is not legally recognized. See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of the Department of State's Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Individuals with mobility issues are likely to find accessibility difficultFew facilities or services are available, and information is limited. Most roads and sidewalks are poorly maintained.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers

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Health

Medical care in Cuba does not meet U.S. standards.  While doctors are generally competent, health facilities face shortages. Many medications are unavailable. Travelers should bring prescribed medicines in their original containers. Copies of prescriptions and letters from prescribing physicians may facilitate entry.

Travelers needing medical care generally must pay cash. The Embassy cannot pay bills. Medicare does not apply overseas, and many U.S. insurance companies do not provide international coverage. See our webpage for more information on overseas coverage.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Diarrheal illness is common among travelers, even in luxury accommodations. Travelers should wash their hands, drink bottled water and avoid street and undercooked food.

The following diseases are prevalent:

  • Zika Virus
  • Dengue Fever

Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For further health information, go to:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Road accidents, many involving pedestrians and bicyclists, are now Cuba’s leading cause of death. Cuban authorities may prohibit drivers from leaving the country until claims associated with an accident are settled. Drivers found responsible for accidents resulting in serious injury or death may receive long prison sentences. U.S. citizen drivers are often found at fault for accidents they are involved in.  

Drive with extreme care. Major streets are generally well-maintained, but secondary streets are not. Avoid driving at night as many roads are unlit.. Emergency lights or signals are rare making it virtually impossible to detect hazards after dark. Street signage is insufficient and confusing. Many Cuban cars are old, in poor condition, and lack reliable safety equipment.

The principal Cuban east-west highway is in good condition but extends only part of the way from Havana to the eastern end of the island. Hazards – including unfenced livestock and farm vehicles – are common.

Traffic Laws: Speed limits are sometimes posted and passengers in automobiles are required to wear seatbelts, if available. All motorcyclists are required to wear helmets. Traffic from major roads generally does not stop when entering roundabouts. Use care at intersections: stop signs are often hard to see.

Public Transportation: Taxis are available in commercial and tourist areas; radio-dispatched taxis are generally reliable. Do not share information with drivers or accept rides in unlicensed taxis as they may be used by thieves. Although popular with tourists, the three-wheeled, yellow-hooded “Co-Co” taxis should be avoided. “Co-Co” taxis are modified motorcycles that are unsafe.

Buses designated for tourist travel, both between and within cities, generally meet international standards. Public buses used by Cubans, known as "guaguas," are crowded, unreliable, and are sometimes used by petty criminals.

Rental car agencies provide roadside assistance to their clients as a condition of rental contracts. Travelers should not permit unauthorized persons to drive their rental vehicles.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

Maritime Travel: Cuban territorial waters are dangerous and difficult to navigate. The potential for running aground is high. Search-and-rescue capability is limited. Cuban authorities may hold damaged boats as collateral and confine boaters to vessels. Boaters can be detained, especially if their travel documents are not in order or if they are suspected of illegal activities. Mariners should not navigate close to Cuban territorial waters unless seeking a safe port in emergencies.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:

As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by Cuban carriers, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Cuba’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards.  Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
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U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
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Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters.
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

United States Embassy

Calzada between L and M Streets,
Vedado,
Havana, Cuba
Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100 and dial 1 to speak with the emergency operator
Fax: (+53) 7839-4247

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General Information

Cuba is not a party to the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, nor are there any international or bilateral treaties in force between Cuba and the United States dealing with international parental child abduction. American citizens who travel to Cuba place themselves under the jurisdiction of local courts. American citizens planning a trip to Cuba with dual national children should bear this in mind.

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Hague Abduction Convention

Custody Disputes: In Cuba, if parents are legally married they share the custody of their children. If they are not married and the parents cannot reach an agreement, custody is granted by the courts in the best interests of the child. Foreign court orders are not automatically recognized.

Enforcement of Foreign Judgments: Custody orders and judgments of foreign courts are not enforceable in Cuba.

Dual Nationality is not recognized under Cuban law.

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Return

Passport Applications for Minors: A person applying for a U.S. passport for a child under 16 must demonstrate that both parents or legal guardians consent to the issuance of a passport to the child or that the applying parent has sole authority to obtain the passport. This law covers passport applications made at domestic U.S. passport agencies in the United States and at U.S. consular offices abroad. Exceptions to this requirement may be made in special family circumstances or exigent circumstance necessitating the immediate travel of the child. The purpose of the new requirement that both parents' consent be demonstrated is to lessen the possibility that a U.S. passport might be used in the course of an international parental child abduction.

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Visitation/Access

Cuban citizen children (including dual nationals) are required to have exit visas to depart Cuba.

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Retaining an Attorney
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Mediation

Passport Applications for Minors: A person applying for a U.S. passport for a child under 16 must demonstrate that both parents or legal guardians consent to the issuance of a passport to the child or that the applying parent has sole authority to obtain the passport. This law covers passport applications made at domestic U.S. passport agencies in the United States and at U.S. consular offices abroad. Exceptions to this requirement may be made in special family circumstances or exigent circumstance necessitating the immediate travel of the child. The purpose of the new requirement that both parents' consent be demonstrated is to lessen the possibility that a U.S. passport might be used in the course of an international parental child abduction.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
No
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information
  • Cuba is a party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention or Convention).  Intercountry adoption processing in Convention countries must be done in accordance with the requirements of the Hague Adoption Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations; as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Cuba. However, Cuba is not currently processing intercountry adoptions to any country. The Department of State is seeking further information regarding the Cuban adoption process, and will provide updated information as it becomes available. 
  • Domestic adoptions: In general, the Department of State is not aware of any U.S. citizens who have successfully completed domestic adoptions or legal guardianship in Cuba of Cuban children. We understand that some foreign nationals who are residing in Cuba with permanent status and are married to a Cuban national have successfully adopted children in Cuba. 
  • Additionally, the Department of State and USCIS caution that, under U.S. law and regulations, any Cuban children adopted by U.S. citizens under the Cuban domestic adoption process will generally not be eligible to immigrate to the United States as adopted children until they meet the criteria in section 101(b)(1)(E) of the Immigration and Nationality Act and have an approved  Form I-130 petition as an immediate relative. More specifically, children adopted by U.S. citizens through the Cuban domestic adoption process, including children adopted by their U.S. citizen biological family members (e.g., aunt, uncle, cousin, grandparent, etc.), may not be eligible for U.S. immigrant visas on the basis of the adoption until the U.S. citizen adoptive parents accrue two years of legal custody and joint residence with the child outside the United States, among other requirements. Please see the USCIS website for additional information on this process.
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Who Can Adopt
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Who Can Be Adopted
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How to Adopt
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Traveling Abroad
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After Adoption
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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Cuba
Calzada between L & M Streets
Vedado, Havana
Tel:  (53)(7) 839-4100
Email: havanaconsularinfo@state.gov
Internet: cu.usembassy.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
 
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None One A B 2 Months
A-2 None One A 2 Months A
A-3 1 None One 2 Months
B-1 None One 6 Months
B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
B-1/B-2 None One 6 Months
C-1 $26.00 One 3 Months
C-1/D $26.00 One 3 Months
C-2 None One 3 Months
C-3 None One 3 Months
CW-1 11 None One 3 Months
CW-2 11 None One 3 Months
D None One 3 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None One 3 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 3 Months A
G-2 None One 3 Months
G-3 None One 3 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None One 3 Months
H-1B None One 3 Months 3
H-1C None One 3 Months 3
H-2A None N/A N/A3
H-2B None N/A N/A3
H-2R None One 3 Months 3
H-3 None One 3 Months 3
H-4 None One 3 Months 3
I None One 3 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None One 6 Months
K-4 None One 6 Months
L-1 None One 3 Months
L-2 None One 3 Months
M-1 None One 3 Months
M-2 None One 3 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None One 3 Months 3
O-2 None One 3 Months 3
O-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-1 None One 3 Months 3
P-2 None One 3 Months 3
P-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-4 None One 3 Months 3
Q-1 6 None One 3 Months 3
R-1 None One 3 Months
R-2 None One 3 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None One 3 Months
V-2 None One 3 Months 8
V-3 None One 3 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes
  1. Visas in categories A-1 and A-2 may be revalidated in the Department for multiple entries, 12 months for individuals on permanent diplomatic assignment in the United States. G-1 visas may be revalidated at USUN for multiple entries, 12 months for individuals on permanent diplomatic assignment in the United States.

  2. Diplomatic couriers may be issued A-1 visas valid for multiple entries, 12 months, upon initial application abroad.

 

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Death/Burial

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Same-sex marriage is not recognized in Cuba.

Divorce

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Same-sex marriage is not recognized in Cuba.

Adoption Certificates

Unavailable.

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Identity Card

Unavailable.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Antecedentes penales: Police and prison records are available from the Ministry of Justice. There may be a fee for this service.

Court Records

Sentencias: Supposedly available from the courts, however, in practice, sometimes unavailable.

Prison Records

Antecedentes penales: Police and prison records are available from the Ministry of Justice. There may be a fee for this service.

Military Records

Unavailable.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Unavailable.

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Havana, Cuba (U.S. Embassy)

Visa Services

The United States Embassy in Havana opened on July 20, 2015. Nonimmigrant and immigrant visas services are available at the U.S. Embassy.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

United States Embassy
Calzada between L and M Streets,
Vedado,
Havana, Cuba
Telephone
+(53) (7) 839-4100
Emergency
+(53) (7) 839-4100 and dial 1 to speak with the emergency operator
Fax
+(53) 7839-4247
Cuba Country Map

Learn about your destination
Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

Country Information

Cuba
Republic of Cuba
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Must be valid at time of entry.

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

Two pages are required for entry/exit stamps

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Tourist travel to Cuba remains prohibited. You must obtain a license from the Department of Treasury or your travel must fall into one of 12 categories of authorized travel. See ENTRY, EXIT & VISA REQUIREMENTS below.

VACCINATIONS:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

U.S. credit and debit cards do not work in Cuba. Bring cash to cover your stay. The Cuban government requires that travelers declare cash amounts over 5,000 USD. Travelers should note that the Government of Cuba charges a 10 percent fee for all U.S. dollar cash conversions; this does not apply to electronic transactions or cash conversions in other currencies.

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

The export of Cuban convertible pesos (CUC) is strictly prohibited, regardless of the amount. Travelers may only export the equivalent of 5,000 USD in any currency other than the Cuban convertible pesos (CUC). Anyone wishing to export more than this amount must demonstrate evidence that the currency was acquired legitimately from a Cuban bank.

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Embassies and Consulates

United States Embassy

Calzada between L and M Streets,
Vedado,
Havana, Cuba
Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100 and dial 1 to speak with the emergency operator
Fax: (+53) 7839-4247

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Cuba for information on U.S.-Cuba relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Travel to Cuba is regulated by the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) of the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Anyone located in the United States, regardless of citizenship and nationality, must comply with these regulations. Individuals seeking to travel to Cuba are not required to obtain licenses from OFAC if their travel is covered by a general license. If travel is not covered by a general license, you must seek OFAC authorization in the form of a specific license. Travelers who fail to comply with regulations may face penalties and criminal prosecution. See the Department of Treasury webpage. For travel-specific questions, please see 31 C.F.R. 515.560 and OFAC's Frequently Asked Questions.

Visit the Cuban Embassy website for visa requirements. Cuba also requires visitors to have non-U.S. medical insurance, which can normally be purchased at the airport upon arrival to Cuba. Questions about insurance should be directed to the Cuban Embassy. Foreign students on scholarships are required to test for HIV/AIDS.

Cuba does not recognize the U.S. nationality of Cuban-born U.S. citizens. Cuban-born U.S. citizens will be treated as Cuban citizens and may be subject to restrictions and obligations. The Cuban government requires such individuals to enter and depart Cuba using Cuban passports. Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found elsewhere on our website. For further information about customs regulations, please read our customs information page.

Cuban Requirements for Authorized Travelers: Attempts to enter or exit Cuba illegally, or to aid the irregular exit of Cuban nationals or other persons, are prohibited and punishable by jail. Entering Cuban territory, territorial waters or airspace without prior authorization from the Cuban government may result in arrest. Immigration violators are subject to prison terms ranging from four years to 30 years.

Civilian Aircraft Travel: The Cuban Air Force shot down two U.S.-registered civilian aircraft in international airspace in 1996. As a result of this action, the President of the United States and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) issued an “Emergency Cease and Desist Order and Statement of Policy,” which allows for vigorous enforcement action against U.S.-registered aircraft that violate Cuban airspace. For additional information on restrictions on aircraft flying between the United States and Cuba, see the FAA's website.

Temporary Sojourn License: Most aircraft and vessels on temporary sojourn to Cuba are eligible for License Exception Aircraft, Vessels, and Spacecraft (AVS) (Section 740.15 of the EAR). Please see the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security website for additional information. Vessels of the United States, as defined in 33 CFR §107.200, may not enter Cuban territorial waters without advance permission from the U.S. Coast Guard. The U.S. Coast Guard provides permission information at (305) 415-6920. 

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Safety and Security

The security environment in Cuba is relatively stable and characterized by a strong military and police presence. Demonstrations are infrequent but can be violent.  Even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational without warning. Avoid demonstrations and maintain security awareness at all times. Security messages issued in connection with demonstrations and strikes are posted on the Embassy’s website under “Safety & Security Messages.”

Hijackings of vessels by people seeking to depart Cuba are no longer common. The United States government will prosecute any person who hijacks (or attempts to hijack) an aircraft or vessel with the maximum penalties pursuant to U.S. law.

The Cuban government has detained U.S. citizens who are suspected of engaging in activities perceived to undermine state security. Travelers to Cuba should be aware that the Cuban government may detain individuals for activities which would not be considered criminal or offensive in the United States.


Crime:
The U.S. government rates the threat of crime in Cuba as medium. With the recent influx of tourists to the island, there has been an increase in the number of property crimes, as well as violent crimes.  Crimes of opportunity, such as purse snatchings and car break-ins, are on the rise.  There have also been recent reports of a drugged sexual assault and armed robberies. 

  • Exercise vigilance everywhere.  Do not flash large amounts of cash.  Do not leave your valuables unattended.  Carry money in your front pockets and/or hold your purse securely, and be mindful of purses or bags when dining out.
  • Do not leave a beverage unattended or accept beverages from persons unknown to you.
  • Locations such as Habana Vieja, Playas del Este, and other tourist locations tend to have a higher incidence of crime than other parts of Havana.
  • Be wary of misdirection schemes where someone attempts to gain your attention while another comes from behind to steal your purse, wallet, or other valuable items.
  • If confronted by criminals, do not resist, try to remain calm, clearly display your hands and do not make any sudden moves that could be interpreted as resistance.
  • Carry your cell phone for emergency communications and travel in groups if possible.
  • Be aware of your surroundings, especially at night or when traveling in an unfamiliar area.
  • While in your car, place valuables out of sight or in a locked trunk.  When unattended, avoid leaving items in the car, especially on the seat or in plain view. 
  • Only use marked taxis.
  • Carry a copy of your passport and secure the original.
  • Beware of hustlers, who may speak English and appear friendly.
  • When exchanging currency, use the state-run offices known as CADECAs.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

VICTIMS OF CRIME: If you are a crime victim, contact the local police (106) and the U.S. Embassy (+53 7839-4100). Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime
  • contact relatives or friends
  • explain the local criminal justice process
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide support in cases of destitution
  • replace stolen or lost passports

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

CRIMINAL PENALTIES: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law.  For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

Cuban penalties for the following are particularly strong:

  • Possession, use, or trafficking of illegal drugs.
  • Suspicion of assisting Cubans to leave the country illegally.
  • Drivers involved in accidents that result in injury or death, regardless of fault.
  • Importing weapons or ammunition.
  • Photographing military or police installations or personnel, or harbor, rail, or airport facilities.

The Government of Cuba does not recognize the U.S. nationality of Cuban-born U.S. citizens and may not allow U.S. consular access to Cuban-American prisoners.

Cuba-related Travel Transactions: Only persons whose travel falls into the categories mentioned above (under “Entry Requirements/Travel Transaction Limitations”) may be authorized by the U.S. Department of the Treasury to spend money related to travel to, from, or within Cuba. Direct financial transactions with certain entities and subentities under the control of, or acting for or on behalf of, the Cuban military, intelligence, or security services are also generally prohibited. For more information see the State Department’s Cuba Restricted List. For more information about licenses, visit OFAC’s Cuba Sanctions website.

Licenses for Remittances: For information on remittance authorizations, see OFAC’s Cuba Sanctions website.

What May Be Brought Back From Cuba: Importation of Cuban merchandise for commercial purposes is restricted, with very limited exceptions.  Certain imports of goods produced by independent Cuban entrepreneurs are authorized, as set forth on the State Department’s Section 515.582 List. There are no limits on the import or export of informational materials. To be considered informational material, artwork must be classified under Chapter subheading 9701, 9702, or 9703 of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States (for example, original paintings, drawings, pastels, engravings, prints, and sculptures are exempt from import and export restrictions).

Faith-Based Travelers: See the Department of State’s International Religious Freedom Report.

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBT events in Cuba, but same-sex marriage is not legally recognized. See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of the Department of State's Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Individuals with mobility issues are likely to find accessibility difficultFew facilities or services are available, and information is limited. Most roads and sidewalks are poorly maintained.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers

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Health

Medical care in Cuba does not meet U.S. standards.  While doctors are generally competent, health facilities face shortages. Many medications are unavailable. Travelers should bring prescribed medicines in their original containers. Copies of prescriptions and letters from prescribing physicians may facilitate entry.

Travelers needing medical care generally must pay cash. The Embassy cannot pay bills. Medicare does not apply overseas, and many U.S. insurance companies do not provide international coverage. See our webpage for more information on overseas coverage.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

Diarrheal illness is common among travelers, even in luxury accommodations. Travelers should wash their hands, drink bottled water and avoid street and undercooked food.

The following diseases are prevalent:

  • Zika Virus
  • Dengue Fever

Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For further health information, go to:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Road accidents, many involving pedestrians and bicyclists, are now Cuba’s leading cause of death. Cuban authorities may prohibit drivers from leaving the country until claims associated with an accident are settled. Drivers found responsible for accidents resulting in serious injury or death may receive long prison sentences. U.S. citizen drivers are often found at fault for accidents they are involved in.  

Drive with extreme care. Major streets are generally well-maintained, but secondary streets are not. Avoid driving at night as many roads are unlit.. Emergency lights or signals are rare making it virtually impossible to detect hazards after dark. Street signage is insufficient and confusing. Many Cuban cars are old, in poor condition, and lack reliable safety equipment.

The principal Cuban east-west highway is in good condition but extends only part of the way from Havana to the eastern end of the island. Hazards – including unfenced livestock and farm vehicles – are common.

Traffic Laws: Speed limits are sometimes posted and passengers in automobiles are required to wear seatbelts, if available. All motorcyclists are required to wear helmets. Traffic from major roads generally does not stop when entering roundabouts. Use care at intersections: stop signs are often hard to see.

Public Transportation: Taxis are available in commercial and tourist areas; radio-dispatched taxis are generally reliable. Do not share information with drivers or accept rides in unlicensed taxis as they may be used by thieves. Although popular with tourists, the three-wheeled, yellow-hooded “Co-Co” taxis should be avoided. “Co-Co” taxis are modified motorcycles that are unsafe.

Buses designated for tourist travel, both between and within cities, generally meet international standards. Public buses used by Cubans, known as "guaguas," are crowded, unreliable, and are sometimes used by petty criminals.

Rental car agencies provide roadside assistance to their clients as a condition of rental contracts. Travelers should not permit unauthorized persons to drive their rental vehicles.

Please refer to our Road Safety page for more information.

Maritime Travel: Cuban territorial waters are dangerous and difficult to navigate. The potential for running aground is high. Search-and-rescue capability is limited. Cuban authorities may hold damaged boats as collateral and confine boaters to vessels. Boaters can be detained, especially if their travel documents are not in order or if they are suspected of illegal activities. Mariners should not navigate close to Cuban territorial waters unless seeking a safe port in emergencies.

AVIATION SAFETY OVERSIGHT:

As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by Cuban carriers, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Cuba’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards.  Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
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U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
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Learn why the Hague Abduction Convention Matters.
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

United States Embassy

Calzada between L and M Streets,
Vedado,
Havana, Cuba
Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(53)(7) 839-4100 and dial 1 to speak with the emergency operator
Fax: (+53) 7839-4247

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General Information

Cuba is not a party to the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction, nor are there any international or bilateral treaties in force between Cuba and the United States dealing with international parental child abduction. American citizens who travel to Cuba place themselves under the jurisdiction of local courts. American citizens planning a trip to Cuba with dual national children should bear this in mind.

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Hague Abduction Convention

Custody Disputes: In Cuba, if parents are legally married they share the custody of their children. If they are not married and the parents cannot reach an agreement, custody is granted by the courts in the best interests of the child. Foreign court orders are not automatically recognized.

Enforcement of Foreign Judgments: Custody orders and judgments of foreign courts are not enforceable in Cuba.

Dual Nationality is not recognized under Cuban law.

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Return

Passport Applications for Minors: A person applying for a U.S. passport for a child under 16 must demonstrate that both parents or legal guardians consent to the issuance of a passport to the child or that the applying parent has sole authority to obtain the passport. This law covers passport applications made at domestic U.S. passport agencies in the United States and at U.S. consular offices abroad. Exceptions to this requirement may be made in special family circumstances or exigent circumstance necessitating the immediate travel of the child. The purpose of the new requirement that both parents' consent be demonstrated is to lessen the possibility that a U.S. passport might be used in the course of an international parental child abduction.

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Visitation/Access

Cuban citizen children (including dual nationals) are required to have exit visas to depart Cuba.

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Retaining an Attorney
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Mediation

Passport Applications for Minors: A person applying for a U.S. passport for a child under 16 must demonstrate that both parents or legal guardians consent to the issuance of a passport to the child or that the applying parent has sole authority to obtain the passport. This law covers passport applications made at domestic U.S. passport agencies in the United States and at U.S. consular offices abroad. Exceptions to this requirement may be made in special family circumstances or exigent circumstance necessitating the immediate travel of the child. The purpose of the new requirement that both parents' consent be demonstrated is to lessen the possibility that a U.S. passport might be used in the course of an international parental child abduction.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country. It is important for parents to understand that, although a left-behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.  For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney if planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

The U.S. government cannot interfere with another country’s court or law enforcement system.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney in the country in which the child is located.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
No
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information
  • Cuba is a party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention or Convention).  Intercountry adoption processing in Convention countries must be done in accordance with the requirements of the Hague Adoption Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations; as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Cuba. However, Cuba is not currently processing intercountry adoptions to any country. The Department of State is seeking further information regarding the Cuban adoption process, and will provide updated information as it becomes available. 
  • Domestic adoptions: In general, the Department of State is not aware of any U.S. citizens who have successfully completed domestic adoptions or legal guardianship in Cuba of Cuban children. We understand that some foreign nationals who are residing in Cuba with permanent status and are married to a Cuban national have successfully adopted children in Cuba. 
  • Additionally, the Department of State and USCIS caution that, under U.S. law and regulations, any Cuban children adopted by U.S. citizens under the Cuban domestic adoption process will generally not be eligible to immigrate to the United States as adopted children until they meet the criteria in section 101(b)(1)(E) of the Immigration and Nationality Act and have an approved  Form I-130 petition as an immediate relative. More specifically, children adopted by U.S. citizens through the Cuban domestic adoption process, including children adopted by their U.S. citizen biological family members (e.g., aunt, uncle, cousin, grandparent, etc.), may not be eligible for U.S. immigrant visas on the basis of the adoption until the U.S. citizen adoptive parents accrue two years of legal custody and joint residence with the child outside the United States, among other requirements. Please see the USCIS website for additional information on this process.
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Who Can Adopt
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Who Can Be Adopted
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How to Adopt
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Traveling Abroad
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After Adoption
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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Cuba
Calzada between L & M Streets
Vedado, Havana
Tel:  (53)(7) 839-4100
Email: havanaconsularinfo@state.gov
Internet: cu.usembassy.gov

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
 
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None One A B 2 Months
A-2 None One A 2 Months A
A-3 1 None One 2 Months
B-1 None One 6 Months
B-2 None Multiple 60 Months
B-1/B-2 None One 6 Months
C-1 $26.00 One 3 Months
C-1/D $26.00 One 3 Months
C-2 None One 3 Months
C-3 None One 3 Months
CW-1 11 None One 3 Months
CW-2 11 None One 3 Months
D None One 3 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None One 3 Months
F-1 None Multiple 60 Months
F-2 None Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 3 Months A
G-2 None One 3 Months
G-3 None One 3 Months
G-4 None Multiple 12 Months
G-5 1 None One 3 Months
H-1B None One 3 Months 3
H-1C None One 3 Months 3
H-2A None N/A N/A3
H-2B None N/A N/A3
H-2R None One 3 Months 3
H-3 None One 3 Months 3
H-4 None One 3 Months 3
I None One 3 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 60 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 60 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None One 6 Months
K-4 None One 6 Months
L-1 None One 3 Months
L-2 None One 3 Months
M-1 None One 3 Months
M-2 None One 3 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 None One 3 Months 3
O-2 None One 3 Months 3
O-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-1 None One 3 Months 3
P-2 None One 3 Months 3
P-3 None One 3 Months 3
P-4 None One 3 Months 3
Q-1 6 None One 3 Months 3
R-1 None One 3 Months
R-2 None One 3 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None One 3 Months
V-2 None One 3 Months 8
V-3 None One 3 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes
  1. Visas in categories A-1 and A-2 may be revalidated in the Department for multiple entries, 12 months for individuals on permanent diplomatic assignment in the United States. G-1 visas may be revalidated at USUN for multiple entries, 12 months for individuals on permanent diplomatic assignment in the United States.

  2. Diplomatic couriers may be issued A-1 visas valid for multiple entries, 12 months, upon initial application abroad.

 

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Death/Burial

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Same-sex marriage is not recognized in Cuba.

Divorce

These certificates are available from the Ministry of Justice, however, there are fees for these services.

Former citizens of Cuba, including all dual nationals, are considered Cubans by the Cuban Government, and must apply for civil documents through Cuban diplomatic and consular missions abroad. Foreign nationals (formerly resident in Cuba) are not considered Cuban nationals by the Cuban Government and may apply either through their diplomatic or consular missions in Cuba. There may be a fee for a certificate of birth, marriage, divorce, death, police or prison record. All requests for documents made through the Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C. must include a non-refundable $20.00 money order. If the document is located, the applicant must pay an additional fee via money order to obtain a copy of the document. The Cuban authorities will not accept requests for civil documentation from the U.S. Embassy on behalf of Cubans in the United States or any other third country.

Same-sex marriage is not recognized in Cuba.

Adoption Certificates

Unavailable.

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Identity Card

Unavailable.

Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

Antecedentes penales: Police and prison records are available from the Ministry of Justice. There may be a fee for this service.

Court Records

Sentencias: Supposedly available from the courts, however, in practice, sometimes unavailable.

Prison Records

Antecedentes penales: Police and prison records are available from the Ministry of Justice. There may be a fee for this service.

Military Records

Unavailable.

Passports & Other Travel Documents

Unavailable.

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Havana, Cuba (U.S. Embassy)

Visa Services

The United States Embassy in Havana opened on July 20, 2015. Nonimmigrant and immigrant visas services are available at the U.S. Embassy.

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

United States Embassy
Calzada between L and M Streets,
Vedado,
Havana, Cuba
Telephone
+(53) (7) 839-4100
Emergency
+(53) (7) 839-4100 and dial 1 to speak with the emergency operator
Fax
+(53) 7839-4247
Cuba Country Map

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Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.


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