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Travel Advisories

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Alerts and Warnings

Kenya Travel Warning

Travel Warning
September 8, 2017
Kenya Travel Warning
O E N H U T C

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens to avoid travel to the border area between Somalia and Kenya because of threats by the terrorist group al-Shabaab. U.S. citizens should also be aware of potential terrorist threats and the high risk of crime throughout the country.  This replaces the Travel Warning dated January 13, 2017.  

For your safety:

  • Avoid travel in the northeastern Kenyan counties of Mandera, Wajir, and Garissa, the coastal counties of Tana River and Lamu in their entirety, all areas north of Malindi in Kilifi County, and the Nairobi neighborhood of Eastleigh.
  • In Mombasa, the U.S. Embassy recommends U.S. citizens visit Old Town only during daylight hours, and carefully consider whether to use the Likoni ferry due to safety concerns.

Over the past year, terrorist attacks involving improvised explosive devices and shootings occurred in Kenya’s border areas with Somalia and along northern portions of the Kenyan coast. Though the threat from terrorism continues to be most pronounced in these areas, a broader terrorism risk throughout the rest of Kenya remains, including within the Nairobi area.

Terrorist targets have included Kenyan and foreign government sites, police stations, police and military vehicles, hotels, public transportation and other infrastructure targets, nightclubs and bars, religious and academic institutions, and shopping areas.

Violent and sometimes fatal crimes, including armed carjackings, muggings, home invasions and burglaries, and kidnappings can occur at any time. U.S. citizens and U.S. Embassy employees have been victims of such crimes. There has been an increase in armed incursions by herders on private farms and wildlife conservancies in Laikipia, Baringo, and Samburu counties in central Kenya. If you intend to visit the area, monitor local media and request the latest information and the level of security provided at your specific destination.

On February 26, 2017, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) extended its Notice to Airmen for Kenyan Airspace for one year. For further background information regarding FAA flight prohibitions and advisories for U.S. civil aviation, U.S. citizens should consult the Federal Aviation Administration’s Prohibitions, Restrictions and Notices.

To be safe, you should review your personal security plans; remain aware of your surroundings and local events; and monitor local news stations for updates. Maintain a high level of vigilance, take appropriate steps to enhance your personal security, and follow instructions of local authorities.

For further information:

Country Information

Kenya
Republic of Kenya
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Embassy Messages
Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

Six months

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

Two pages

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

Yes

VACCINATIONS:

Yellow Fever 

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

100,000 Kenyan Shillings

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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Nairobi

United Nations Avenue
Gigiri, Nairobi, Kenya
Telephone: +(254) (20) 363-6451
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(254) (20) 363-6170

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Destination Description

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Kenya for information on U.S. – Kenya relations.

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Entry, Exit and Visa Requirements

Kenyan Immigration has instituted a strict visa policy whereby all visitors are strongly encouraged to obtain visas by using an online system, though visas are available upon arrival at international ports of entry including Nairobi’s Jomo Kenyatta International Airport.

  • A passport with at least two blank pages, six months’ validity, and a visa are required to enter Kenya. 
  • Single-entry visas are available upon arrival at Kenyan airports; however, Kenyan Immigration plans to end visas upon arrival in the near future.
  • Multiple-entry visas must be applied for prior to traveling to Kenya.
  • Obtain the latest information on visas, as well as any additional details regarding entry requirements, from the Embassy of Kenya, 2249 R Street, NW, Washington, D.C. 20008, telephone (202) 387-6101, or the Kenyan Consulates General in Los Angeles and New York City.
  • You should have proof of yellow fever immunizations, or you may be denied entry.

For additional information on immunizations and detailed country-specific recommendations on vaccinations and other health precautions for travelers to Kenya, visit the CDC’s Travelers’ Health website.

HIV/AIDS Restrictions: The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to, or foreign residents of, Kenya. 

Find information on dual nationalityprevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

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Safety and Security

You should review the Department of State’s Travel Warning for Kenya before considering travel to Kenya.

Terrorism: Terrorist threats remain in Kenya, including those aimed at U.S., Western, and Kenyan interests, within the Nairobi area, along the coast, and within the northeastern region of the country. 

Terrorist attacks have cumulatively resulted in the death and injury of hundreds of people since 2011. Over the last year, most incidents have occurred in the northeastern border region of the country; there have been no major attacks in Nairobi, Mombasa, or other major cities in the last two years. 

On September 11, 2016, press accounts noted that three women purportedly attacked a police station in Mombasa with knives and petrol bombs, wounding two Kenyan police officers. On October 27, an assailant with a knife attacked a police officer guarding the U.S. Embassy compound in Nairobi.

Regions to avoid:

  • The northeastern Kenyan counties of Mandera, Wajir, and Garissa (including the cities of El Wak, Wajir, Garissa, Mandera, and Liboi).
  • All parts of the coastal counties of Tana River and Lamu, and all areas of Kilifi county north of Malindi.
  • The Nairobi neighborhood of Eastleigh.
  • In Mombasa, the U.S. Embassy recommends U.S. citizens visit Old Town only during daylight hours, and avoid using the Likoni ferry due to safety concerns.

The Peace Corps suspended its volunteer activities in 2013 due to security risks. The Peace Corps will continue to assess the security situation in Kenya and return when conditions permit.

CRIME: Crime in Kenya is a regular occurrence and Kenyan authorities have limited capacity to deter and investigate such acts.

  • Violent and sometimes fatal criminal attacks, including home invasions, burglaries, armed carjackings, muggings, and kidnappings can occur at any time.
  • “Matatus” (privately-operated public transportation buses) tend to be targeted since they carry multiple passengers.

Forced Marriage is known to occur in Kenya.

Sexual Assault is prevalent in Kenya and frequently goes unreported.

  • Victims of sexual assault may have difficulty receiving adequate social or medical support
  • Sexual assault has largely been associated with women. However, the sexual assault of men has been a growing trend that often goes unreported because of the stigma associated with it.

Domestic Violence: The Kenyan government has laws that protect its citizens from domestic violence. You should contact your local police station if you feel unsafe or are a victim of domestic violence.

Scams: Scams are known to occur in Kenya. See the Department of State and the FBI webpages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: Report crimes to the local police station and then contact the U.S. Embassy during business hours at +254-(0)20-363-6451, or after-hours at +254-(0) 20-363-6000 in cases of emergency.

Please remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes. See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police.
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent.
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms.
  • provide a list of local attorneys.
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution,
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home.
  • replace a stolen or lost passport.

Kenya has assistance programs for victims of crime sponsored by nongovernmental organizations.  These programs include but are not limited to the following:

  • Gender Violence Recovery Centre (GVRC) has been providing specialized medical treatment and psychosocial support to low income survivors of sexual and domestic violence.
  • Healthcare Assistance Kenya (HAK) offers a 24 hour Rapid Response Service to women and children survivors of Gender Based Violence at its Call Centre as well as a 24 hour toll-free hotline for sexual and gender based violence assistance. 

For further information:

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Local Laws & Special Circumstances

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.

  • Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking illegal drugs in Kenya are severe, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines.
  • Kenya enacted strict legislation regulating the sale and consumption of alcohol and cigarettes.
  • Penalties for possessing banned wildlife items under Kenya’s Wildlife Act include large fines and severe penalties, including life imprisonment.

Some laws are also prosecutable in the United States, regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: You should  ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately if you are arrested or detained. See our webpage for further information.

Customs regulations on importing items such as religious materials, antiquities, medications, business equipment, currency, ivory, rhino horn, and other wildlife products including hides, skins, and teeth into or out of Kenya are strict.  

U.S. citizens have been  detained and arrested for attempting to bring contraband into Kenya. Contact the Embassy of Kenya or one of Kenya’s consulates in the United States for specific information regarding customs requirements.  

Alcoholic Drinks Control Act of 2010, which regulates when and where alcoholic drinks may be consumed in public, states that a person found by local law enforcement authorities to be intoxicated or disorderly in or near public areas, including some businesses, may be arrested without warrant and brought to court for trial.

  • If convicted, the maximum fine is 500 Kenyan Shillings and/or imprisonment for a maximum of three months.
  • If convicted three times with the same charge within a 12 month period, you will be required to participate in mandatory rehabilitation at your expense.

More information on this law may be found on Kenya's substance abuse website, NACADA.

Tobacco Control Act 2007 regulates public smoking and the marketing and sale of tobacco products in Kenya. In public places, smoking is allowed only in designated smoking areas.

Currency: You may depart the country with up to 100,000 Kenyan shillings.

  • Destruction of Kenyan currency, even in small amounts, is illegal, and almost always results in arrest and a fine.
  • You should ensure that your U.S. currency bills are relatively new, as banks in Kenya have been known not to accept older U.S. currency. 

Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS), the governing body of Kenya’s national parks, requires all tour operators and safari lodges carry nationally-mandated insurance.  You should:

  • inquire whether prospective safari camps or tour operators are in compliance with this requirement;
  • observe all local or park regulations and exercise appropriate caution in unfamiliar surroundings; and
  • thoroughly check the qualifications and safety record of all tourist lodges and guides before engaging their services and venturing into the wild in their care.

Firearms: Import, possession, and use of firearms is governed by the Kenya Firearms Act. 

  • Import of all firearms, including sporting guns, is prohibited in Kenya except in accordance with the terms of an import permit.
  • Possession of firearms while in Kenya requires a firearms certificate, which can be difficult to obtain.
  • Non-immigrant visitors entering Kenya with firearms whose import is not prohibited (semi-automatic and automatic weapons are prohibited) and which are being imported for personal use, or ammunition for such firearms, must surrender their firearms or ammunition at the port of entry pending receipt of proper permits.
  • Violations of the Kenya Firearms Act are punishable from one year to life imprisonment. 

Faith-Based Travelers:  See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers:  Kenyan law criminalizes same-sex sexual activity.

  • Kenyan penal code criminalizes “carnal knowledge against the order of nature,” which is interpreted to prohibit consensual same-sex sexual activity, and specifies a maximum penalty of 14 years’ imprisonment.
  • A separate statute specifically criminalizes sex between men and specifies a maximum penalty of 21 years’ imprisonment.
  • Police have detained persons under these laws, particularly suspected sex workers.
  • LGBTI advocacy organizations, such as the Gay and Lesbian Coalition of Kenya, have been permitted to register and conduct activities. However, societal discrimination based on sexual orientation is widespread. 

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our Human Rights report for further details.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers:

  • Female genital mutilation (FGM) and Cutting (C): This act is known to occur in Kenya. It is a federal crime to perform FGM/C in the United States on any minor younger than 18 years old, punishable by fines and up to five years in prison.  It is also a criminal offense to knowingly take a minor younger than 18 years old outside of the United States for the purpose of performing FGM/C (so-called “vacation cutting”).

See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: Although Kenyan law prohibits discrimination against persons with disabilities, the Government of Kenya has not consistently enforced these provisions and implementation has been slow.

  • Access to government or private buildings, medical facilities, restaurants, or other public or private facilities is limited.
  • Accessibility to public transportation and taxis is limited. There is no functioning bus system in Nairobi, but rather an extensive use of vans (“matatus”) that travel along designated routes; taxis are also used.
  • Public transportation and taxis do not accommodate wheelchairs; these vehicles are most often hailed from the side of busy roads.
  • Footpaths along the side of roads are generally unpaved, bumpy, dirt paths, and road crossings are often unmarked.  
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Health

Medical services are adequate in Nairobi for most medical conditions and emergencies. Health care outside of major cities (Nairobi, Kisumu, and Mombasa) is very limited.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas. 

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance to cover medical evacuation.

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the Government of Kenya to ensure that the medication is legal in Kenya. Always carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

The Government of Kenya requires proof of yellow fever vaccination for travelers who are arriving from a country with risk of yellow fever.

The following diseases are prevalent:

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

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Travel and Transportation

Road Conditions and Safety: Road accidents are a major threat to travelers in Kenya. Roads are poorly maintained and are often bumpy, potholed, and unpaved.

  • Traffic moves on the left side of the road, which can be very disorienting to those not accustomed to it.
  • Beware of vehicles traveling at excessive speed, and unpredictable local driving habits.
  • Many vehicles are poorly maintained and lack basic safety equipment.
  • Heavy traffic jams, either due to rush hour or because of accidents, are common.
  • Some vehicles will cross the median strip and drive against the flow of traffic. 

U.S. citizens have been fatally injured in accidents involving long-distance, inter-city buses and local buses and vans called “matatus”. Matatus are commonly known to be the greatest danger to other vehicles and pedestrians.

Injuries and fatalities involving two-wheeled motorcycle taxis, called “boda bodas,” are equally common. Boda bodas often fail to observe basic safety precautions and ignore traffic rules. Inter-city night-time road travel should be avoided due to the poor road and street light conditions and the threat of banditry throughout the country. 

During the rainy season, some unpaved roads are impassable even with four-wheel drive vehicles with high clearance. Travelers are urged to consult with local officials regarding road conditions. 

Passenger trains are considered unsafe, particularly during rainy seasons, because of the lack of routine maintenance and safety checks. The Kenya Railway Service normally operates only two days a week.

See our Road Safety page for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: As there is no direct commercial air service to the United States by carriers registered in Kenya, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has not assessed the government of Kenya’s Civil Aviation Authority for compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime: Mariners planning travel to Kenya should check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts at the Maritime Administration (MARAD) website. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website, and the NGA broadcast warnings website.

Hague Convention Participation
Party to the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
U.S. Treaty Partner under the Hague Abduction Convention?
No
What You Can Do
Learn how to respond to abductions FROM the US
Learn how to respond to abductions TO the US
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Embassies and Consulates

U.S. Embassy Nairobi

United Nations Avenue
Gigiri, Nairobi, Kenya
Telephone: +(254) (20) 363-6451
Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(254) (20) 363-6170

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General Information

For information concerning travel to Kenya including information about the location of the U.S. Embassy, the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program, entry/exit requirements, safety and security, crime, medical facilities and health information, traffic safety, road conditions and aviation safety, please see country-specific information for Kenya.

The U.S. Department of State reports statistics and compliance information for individual countries in the Annual Report on International Parental Child Abduction (IPCA).  The report is located here.

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Hague Abduction Convention

Kenya is not a signatory to the 1980 Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction (Hague Abduction Convention), nor are there any bilateral agreements in force between Kenya and the United States concerning international parental child abduction.

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Return

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  The government of Kenya maintains information about custody, visitation, and family law on the Internet at Kenya Law Reports on Gender and FamilyParents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Kenya and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances. 

The Department of State’s Bureau of Consular Affairs, Directorate for Overseas Citizens Services, Office of Children’s Issues provides assistance in cases of international parental child abduction.  For U.S. citizen parents whose children have been wrongfully removed to or retained in countries that are not U.S. partners under the Hague Abduction Convention, the Office of Children’s Issues can provide information and resources about country-specific options for pursuing the return of or access to an abducted child.  The Office of Children’s Issues may also coordinate with appropriate foreign and U.S. government authorities about the welfare of abducted U.S. citizen children.  Parents are strongly encouraged to contact the Department of State for assistance.

Contact information:

U.S. Department of State
Bureau of Consular Affairs
Office of Children's
CA/OCS/CI
SA-17, 9th Floor
Washington, DC 20522-1709
Telephone: 1-888-407-4747
Outside the United States: 1-202-501-4444
Fax: 1-202-485-6221
Website:  travel.state.gov
Email: AskCI@state.gov

Parental child abduction is a crime in Kenya.  See the Penal Code Chapter 63 Section 174.

Parents may wish to consult with an attorney in the United States and in the country to which the child has been removed or retained to learn more about how filing criminal charges may impact a custody case in the foreign court.  Please see Possible Solutions - Pressing Criminal Charges for more information. 

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Visitation/Access

Legal systems and laws pertaining to custody, divorce, and parental abduction vary widely from country to country.  Parents are encouraged to consult with an attorney who specializes in family law in Kenya and who can provide accurate legal guidance that is specific to their circumstances.

The Office of Children’s Issues may be able to assist parents seeking access to children who have been wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States. Parents who are seeking access to children who were not wrongfully removed from or retained outside the United States should contact the appropriate U.S. Embassy or Consulate in Kenya for information and possible assistance.

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Retaining an Attorney

Neither the Office of Children’s Issues nor consular officials at the U.S. Embassy or Consulates in Kenya are authorized to provide legal advice.

The U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya, posts a list of attorneys, including those who specialize in family law.

This list is provided as a courtesy service only and does not constitute an endorsement of any individual attorney. The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the persons or firms included in this list. Professional credentials and areas of expertise are provided directly by the lawyers.

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Mediation

Mediation may be available for both abduction and access cases. The Chartered Institute of Arbitrators (CIArb), Kenya branch, is a professional body for Mediators and Arbitrators in Kenya and can assist in locating a mediator. The CIArb, Kenya branch, does not provide mediation services directly; it provides referrals to private and non-governmental organizations that offer mediation services specific to a client’s needs. Mediation is voluntary.

Exercising Custody Rights

While travelling in a foreign country, you are subject to the laws of that country.  It is important for parents to understand that, although a left behind parent in the United States may have custody or visitation rights pursuant to a U.S. custody order, that order may not be valid and enforceable in the country in which the child is located.   For this reason, we strongly encourage you to speak to a local attorney when planning to remove a child from a foreign country without the consent of the other parent.  Attempts to remove your child to the United States may:

  • Endanger your child and others;
  • Prejudice any future judicial efforts; and
  • Could result in your arrest and imprisonment.

To understand the legal effect of a U.S. order in a foreign country, a parent should consult with a local attorney.  

For information about hiring an attorney abroad, see our section on Retaining a Foreign Attorney. 

Although we cannot recommend an attorney to you, most U.S. Embassies have lists of attorneys available online. Please visit the local U.S. Embassy or Consulate website for a full listing.

For more information on consular assistance for U.S. citizens arrested abroad, please see our website.

Country officers are available to speak with you Monday - Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  For assistance with an abduction in progress or any emergency situation that occurs after normal business hours, on weekends, or federal holidays, please call toll free at 1-888-407-4747. See all contact information

DISCLAIMER: The information in this flyer is provided for general information only, is not intended to be legal advice, and may change without notice. Questions involving interpretation of law should be addressed to an attorney licensed in the relevant jurisdiction. 

 

Hague Convention Participation
Hague Adoption Convention Country?
Yes
Are Intercountry Adoptions between this country and the United States possible?
Intercountry adoptions are not currently possible between Kenya and the United States.
Is this country a U.S. Hague Partner?
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Hague Convention Information

Kenya is party to the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Hague Adoption Convention). Intercountry adoptions from Convention countries are processed in accordance with the Convention; the U.S. implementing legislation, the Intercountry Adoption Act of 2000 (IAA); and the IAA’s implementing regulations, as well as the implementing legislation and regulations of Kenya.

Intercountry adoptions are not currently possible in Kenya. As reported in our December 13, 2014 adoption alert, on November 27, 2014, the Government of Kenya enacted a moratorium on adoptions of Kenyan children by foreigners for a time period of six months to a year. The Government of Kenya stated their intention to reform intercountry adoption procedures during this time. In our March 10 adoption notice, we reported that on February 20, 2015, the Kenyan government established an expert committee charged with reviewing procedures for both domestic and intercountry adoptions. It is our understanding that the moratorium impacts relative and non-relative adoption alike. The Government of Kenya has not provided any information on the timeline for any reforms to intercountry and domestic adoption procedures, nor has it offered any updated timeline for lifting the moratorium.

The Department of State will provide updated information on adoption.state.gov as it becomes available.

Please visit the Department’s Country Specific Information for more information on travelling to Kenya and the U.S. Embassy in Nairobi’s website for information on consular services.

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Who Can Adopt
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Who Can Be Adopted
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Traveling Abroad
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After Adoption
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Contact Information

U.S. Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya 
Consular Section
U.S. Embassy
P.O. Box 606
Village Market
00621 Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: +254 (0)20 363-6622
Fax: +254 (0)20 363-6410
Email: NairobiAdoptions@State.gov
Internet: ke.usembassy.gov

Kenya’s Adoption Authority
The Adoption Committee
P.O. Box 46205-00100
Nairobi, Kenya
Tel: +254 (0)20 222-8411 ext 30040

Reciprocity Schedule

Select a visa category below to find the visa issuance fee, number of entries, and validity period for visas issued to applicants from this country*/area of authority.

Explanation of Terms

Visa Classification: The type of nonimmigrant visa you are applying for.

Fee: The reciprocity fee, also known as the visa issuance fee, you must pay. This fee is in addition to the nonimmigrant visa application fee (MRV fee).

Number of Entries: The number of times you may seek entry into the United States with that visa. "M" means multiple times. If there is a number, such as "One", you may apply for entry one time with that visa.

Validity Period: This generally means the visa is valid, or can be used, from the date it is issued until the date it expires, for travel with that visa. If your Validity Period is 60 months, your visa will be valid for 60 months from the date it is issued.

Visa Classifications
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
Visa
Classification
Fee Number
of Entries
Validity
Period
A-1 None Multiple 24 Months
A-2 None Multiple 24 Months
A-3 1 None Multiple 24 Months
B-1 $40 Multiple 60 Months
B-2 $40 Multiple 60 Months
B-1/B-2 $40 Multiple 60 Months
C-1 None Multiple 60 Months
C-1/D None Multiple 60 Months
C-2 None Multiple 12 Months
C-3 None Multiple 60 Months
CW-1 11 None Multiple 12 Months
CW-2 11 None Multiple 12 Months
D None Multiple 60 Months
E-1 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2 2 No Treaty N/A N/A
E-2C 12 None Multiple 24 Months
F-1 $40 Multiple 60 Months
F-2 $40 Multiple 60 Months
G-1 None Multiple 24 Months
G-2 None Multiple 24 Months
G-3 None Multiple 24 Months
G-4 None Multiple 24 Months
G-5 1 None Multiple 24 Months
H-1B $340.00 Multiple 60 Months 3
H-1C $340.00 Multiple 60 Months 3
H-2A $340.00 N/A N/A3
H-2B $340.00 N/A N/A3
H-2R $340.00 Multiple 60 Months 3
H-3 $340.00 Multiple 60 Months 3
H-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
I None Multiple 60 Months
J-1 4 None Multiple 24 Months
J-2 4 None Multiple 24 Months
K-1 None One 6 Months
K-2 None One 6 Months
K-3 None Multiple 24 Months
K-4 None Multiple 24 Months
L-1 $275.00 Multiple 60 Months
L-2 None Multiple 60 Months
M-1 None Multiple 24 Months
M-2 None Multiple 24 Months
N-8 None Multiple 12 Months
N-9 None Multiple 12 Months
NATO 1-7 N/A N/A N/A
O-1 $340.00 Multiple 60 Months 3
O-2 $340.00 Multiple 60 Months 3
O-3 None Multiple 60 Months 3
P-1 $340.00 Multiple 60 Months 3
P-2 $340.00 Multiple 60 Months 3
P-3 $340.00 Multiple 60 Months 3
P-4 None Multiple 60 Months 3
Q-1 6 $340.00 Multiple 15 Months 3
R-1 None Multiple 60 Months
R-2 None Multiple 60 Months
S-5 7 None One 1 Month
S-6 7 None One 1 Month
S-7 7 None One 1 Month
T-1 9 N/A N/A N/A
T-2 None One 6 Months
T-3 None One 6 Months
T-4 None One 6 Months
T-5 None One 6 Months
T-6 None One 6 Months
TD 5 N/A N/A N/A
U-1 None Multiple 48 Months
U-2 None Multiple 48 Months
U-3 None Multiple 48 Months
U-4 None Multiple 48 Months
U-5 None Multiple 48 Months
V-1 None Multiple 120 Months
V-2 None Multiple 120 Months 8
V-3 None Multiple 120 Months 8
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Country Specific Footnotes

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.

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Visa Category Footnotes
  1. The validity of A-3, G-5, and NATO 7 visas may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the person who is employing the applicant. The "employer" would have one of the following visa classifications:

    • A-1
    • A-2
    • G-1 through G-4
    • NATO 1 through NATO 6

  2. An E-1 and E-2 visa may be issued only to a principal alien who is a national of a country having a treaty, or its equivalent, with the United States. E-1 and E-2 visas may not be issued to a principal alien if he/she is a stateless resident. The spouse and children of an E-1 or E-2 principal alien are accorded derivative E-1 or E-2 status following the reciprocity schedule, including any reciprocity fees, of the principle alien’s country of nationality.  

    Example: John Doe is a national of the country of Z that has an E-1/E-2 treaty with the U.S. His wife and child are nationals of the country of Y which has no treaty with the U.S. The wife and child would, therefore, be entitled to derivative status and receive the same reciprocity as Mr. Doe, the principal visa holder.  

  3. The validity of H-1 through H-3, O-1 and O-2, P-1 through P-3, and Q visas may not exceed the period of validity of the approved petition or the number of months shown, whichever is less.

    Under 8 CFR §214.2, H-2A and H-2B petitions may generally only be approved for nationals of countries that the Secretary of Homeland Security has designated as participating countries. The current list of eligible countries is available on USCIS's website for both H-2A and H-2B visas. Nationals of countries not on this list may be the beneficiary of an approved H-2A or H2-B petition in limited circumstances at the discretion of the Department of Homeland Security if specifically named on the petition.  

    Derivative H-4, L-2, O-3, and P-4 visas, issued to accompanying or following-to-join spouses and children, may not exceed the validity of the visa issued to the principal alien.

  4. There is no reciprocity fee for the issuance of a J visa if the alien is a United States Government grantee or a participant in an exchange program sponsored by the United States Government.

    Also, there is no reciprocity fee for visa issuance to an accompanying or following-to-join spouse or child (J-2) of an exchange visitor grantee or participant.

    In addition, an applicant is eligible for an exemption from the MRV fee if he or she is participating in a State Department, USAID, or other federally funded educational and cultural exchange program (program serial numbers G-1, G-2, G-3 and G-7).

    However, all other applicants with U.S. Government sponsorships, including other J-visa applicants, are subject to the MRV processing fee.

  5. Under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Canadian and Mexican nationals coming to engage in certain types of professional employment in the United States may be admitted in a special nonimmigrant category known as the "trade NAFTA" or "TN" category. Their dependents (spouse and children) accompanying or following to join them may be admitted in the "trade dependent" or "TD" category whether or not they possess Canadian or Mexican nationality. Except as noted below, the number of entries, fees and validity for non-Canadian or non-Mexican family members of a TN status holder seeking TD visas should be based on the reciprocity schedule of the TN principal alien.

    Canadian Nationals

    Since Canadian nationals generally are exempt from visa requirement, a Canadian "TN' or "TD" alien does not require a visa to enter the United States. However, the non-Canadian national dependent of a Canadian "TN", unless otherwise exempt from the visa requirement, must obtain a "TD" visa before attempting to enter the United States. The standard reciprocity fee and validity period for all non-Canadian "TD"s is no fee, issued for multiple entries for a period of 36 months, or for the duration of the principal alien's visa and/or authorized period of stay, whichever is less. See 'NOTE' under Canadian reciprocity schedule regarding applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality.

    Mexican Nationals

    Mexican nationals are not visa-exempt. Therefore, all Mexican "TN"s and both Mexican and non-Mexican national "TD"s accompanying or following to join them who are not otherwise exempt from the visa requirement (e.g., the Canadian spouse of a Mexican national "TN") must obtain nonimmigrant visas.

    Applicants of Iranian, Iraqi or Libyan nationality, who have a permanent resident or refugee status in Canada/Mexico, may not be accorded Canadian/Mexican reciprocity, even when applying in Canada/Mexico. The reciprocity fee and period for "TD" applicants from Libya is $10.00 for one entry over a period of 3 months. The Iranian and Iraqi "TD" is no fee with one entry over a period of 3 months.

  6. Q-2 (principal) and Q-3 (dependent) visa categories are in existence as a result of the 'Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program Act of 1998'. However, because the Department anticipates that virtually all applicants for this special program will be either Irish or U.K. nationals, the Q-2 and Q-3 categories have been placed only in the reciprocity schedules for those two countries. Q-2 and Q-3 visas are available only at the Embassy in Dublin and the Consulate General in Belfast.

  7. No S visa may be issued without first obtaining the Department's authorization.

  8. V-2 and V-3 status is limited to persons who have not yet attained their 21st birthday. Accordingly, the period of validity of a V-2 or V-3 visa must be limited to expire on or before the applicant's twenty-first birthday.

  9. Posts may not issue a T-1 visa. A T-1 applicant must be physically present in the United States, American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands or a U.S. port of entry, where he/she will apply for an adjustment of status to that of a T-1. The following dependents of a T-1 visa holder, however, may be issued a T visa at a U.S. consular office abroad:

    • T-2 (spouse)
    • T-3 (child)
    • T-4 (parent)
  10. The validity of NATO-5 visas may not exceed the period of validity of the employment contract or 12 months, whichever is less.

  11. The validity of CW-1 and CW-2 visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (12 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

  12. The validity of E-2C visas shall not exceed the maximum initial period of admission allowed by DHS (24 months) or the duration of the transition period ending December 31, 2014, whichever is shortest.

 

 

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General Documents

Please check back for update.

Birth, Death, Burial Certificates

Birth Certificates

Available. Birth certificates may be obtained from the Department of Civil Registration, Office of the President, P.O. Box 49179, Nairobi. When a birth has not been registered, application may be made to the Registrar General for late registration of birth. If that office is satisfied with the evidence presented, late registration will be authorized and an official birth certificate can be obtained. There may be a fee for this service.

Death Certificates

Available, with certain limitations. Death certificates may be obtained from Registrar General, State Law Office, Harambee Avenue,PO Box 30031, Nairobi. Telephone 227461.There may be a fee for this service.

Marriage, Divorce Certificates

Marriage Certificates

Available. Marriage certificate may be obtained from the Department of the Registrar General, P.O. Box 30031, Nairobi. Only marriages performed under the Marriage Ordinance are registered. There is a fee for this service.

Divorce Certificates

Available. Certified copies of decrees absolute may be obtained from the Registrar, The Law Courts, P.O. Box 30041, Nairobi. There may be a fee for this service.

Adoption Certificates

Please check back for update.

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Identity Card

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Police, Court, Prison Records

Police Records

To obtain a Certificate of Good Conduct, applicants residing in other countries must send a complete set of rolled and plain fingerprints together with a written request to the Criminal Investigations Department, P.O. Box 30036, Nairobi. Fingerprints should be taken by a local police official and bear an official stamp, or be taken before an attorney and certified. The official should also verify the identity of the individual being fingerprinted by noting the details of the identification document. Fee is 1,000 Kenyan Shillings per application plus return postage, with results available in 4-6 weeks. The fee may also be paid at Kenyan Embassies or Consulates abroad. Applicants in Kenya should apply in person at CID Headquarters in Nairobi. Appropriately registered aliens or refugees that have registered with the Kenyan Commission of Refugees and UNHCR may be issued Certificates of Good Conduct. Undocumented aliens in Kenya are not eligible for a Police Certificate. For more information visit: http://www.kenyapolice.go.ke/Good_conduct.asp

Prison Records

Available. Prison records can be obtained from the prison where the applicant was incarcerated. A written request should be addressed with details of the individual's full name, nationality, prison where incarcerated and period imprisoned to the Commissioner of Prisons, P.O. Box 30175, Nairobi.

Military Records

Available. Applications should be addressed to the applicable branch of the Kenyan armed services. Inquiries should include the service number of the individual and the period employed:

  • Kenya Army, P.O. Box 30503, Nairobi
  • Kenya Air Force, P.O. Box 4888, Nairobi
  • Kenya Navy, P.O. Box 95350, Mombasa.
Passports & Other Travel Documents

Please check back for update.

Other Records

Not applicable.

Visa Issuing Posts

Nairobi, Kenya
(Embassy)

Address:
United Nations Avenue,
Gigiri, Nairobi

Mailing Address:
APO AE 09831-8900

International Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 30137
Nairobi, Kenya

Tel: 254-2-363-6000
After hours emergencies: 254-2-363-6170

Fax: 254-2-363-6410

Visa Services

All visa categories for all of Kenya and immigration visa applications for:

  • Uganda
  • Burundi
  • South Sudan
  • Eritrea
  • Somalia

Foreign Consular Office Contact Information

Washington, DC (202) 387-6101 (202) 462-3829

Los Angeles, CA (323) 939-2408 (323) 939-2412

New York, NY (212) 421-4741 (212) 496-1985

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Nairobi
United Nations Avenue
Gigiri, Nairobi, Kenya
Telephone
+(254) (20) 363-6451
Emergency
+(254) (20) 363-6170
Fax
No Fax
Kenya Country Map

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Additional Information for Reciprocity

Although care has been taken to ensure the accuracy, completeness and reliability of the information provided, please contact the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you plan to apply if you believe this information is in error or if you have further questions.