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Norway
Official Name:

Kingdom of Norway

Last Updated: October 20, 2017

Embassy Messages

Further Safety and Security Information

Travel Warnings: Issued when Protracted situations make a country dangerous or unstable. Defer or reconsider travel.

Travel Alerts: Issued when short-term conditions pose imminent threats. Defer or reconsider travel.

Embassy Messages: Issued when local security issues arise.

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Oslo

Morgedalsvegen 36 
0378 Oslo
Norway

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Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

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Six months recommended

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

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Two pages 

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

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 Not required for stays under 90 days

VACCINATIONS:

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None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

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25,000 Norwegian Kroner (or equivalent), not including traveler’s checks

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

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25,000 Norwegian Kroner (or equivalent), without prior approval

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U.S. Embassy Oslo

Morgedalsvegen 36 
0378 Oslo
Norway

Telephone: +(47) 2130-8540

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(47) 2130-8540

Fax: +(47) 2256-2751

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Norway for information on U.S. – Norway relations. 

Visit the Royal Norwegian Embassy website for the most current visa information.

Norway is a party to the Schengen Agreement. This means that U.S. citizens may enter Norway for up to 90 days for tourist or business purposes without a visa. Your passport should be valid for at least six months beyond the period of stay. You need sufficient funds and a return airline ticket. For additional details about travel into and within Schengen countries, please see our Schengen fact sheet.

The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Norway.

Find information on dual nationality, prevention of international child abduction and customs regulations on our websites.

Terrorism: Credible information indicates terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Europe. European governments are taking action to guard against terrorist attacks; however all European countries remain potentially vulnerable to attacks from transnational terrorist organizations.

Crime: Norway has a relatively low level of crime.

  • The most likely forms of crime, especially in the Oslo metropolitan area, include residential and office burglaries and petty thefts.
  • Instances of pickpocketing and petty theft are of higher risk in major tourist areas, hotel lobbies, train and transit stations, and surrounding areas. The Oslo Central train station is an especially popular area for pickpockets and bag snatchers.
  • Although rare, violent and weapons-related crimes do occur in areas known to have drug trafficking and gang problems, such as certain parts of eastern Oslo. As in any other urban area, you should exercise basic security awareness at all times.

See the Department of State and the FBI pages for information on scams.

Victims of Crime: Report crimes to the local police by dialing 112 and contact the U.S. Embassy at +(47) 2130-8540.

Remember that local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting the crime.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the U.S.
  • assist you in accessing Norway’s program to provide financial compensation to victims who suffer serious criminal injuries, via the Norwegian Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority.
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Domestic Violence: U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance. Victims may also contact:


Police (non-emergency)   02 800
Oslo Emergency Room   116 117
Helpline for Children and Youth  116 111
Hotline for Victims of Sexual Assault   800 57 000
DIXI Center for Victims of Rape  22 44 40 50
Oslo Crisis Center   22 48 03 80
National Association for Victims of Crime   22 16 40 00

For further information:

Medical facilities are widely available and of high quality, but may be limited outside larger urban areas. The remote and sparse populations in northern Norway and the dependence on ferries to cross fjords of western Norway may affect transportation and ready access to medical facilities. The U.S. Embassy in Oslo maintains a list of emergency medical and dental clinics in major cities.

We do not pay medical bills. Be aware that U.S. Medicare does not apply overseas.

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.  See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage.

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance (our webpage) to cover medical evacuation.

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Norway to ensure the medication is legal in Norway. Always, carry your prescription medication in original packaging with your doctor’s prescription. 

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Further health information:

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned.

Furthermore, some laws are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. For examples, see our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information.

  • Svalbard: The Svalbard archipelago consists of nine main islands located midway between mainland Norway and the North Pole. You need a passport to enter Svalbard.
    • Unlike Norway’s mainland, Svalbard is not party to the Schengen Agreement and air travelers to Svalbard from Norway will depart the Schengen Zone prior to boarding.
    • Travelers to Svalbard face unique hazards given the extreme weather conditions and limited transport infrastructure.
    • The U.S. Embassy has no direct representation on Svalbard, limiting its ability to provide emergency consular services.
    • Verify that you have adequate travel, medical, and medical evacuation insurance to cover the potential costs of medical treatment or repatriation before you travel to Svalbard.
    • Although road systems exist within the three largest towns, Longyearbyen, Barentsburg, and Ny-Alesund, they do not connect with each other, making sea, snowmobile or limited air service the only options for traveling throughout Svalbard.
    • Tourism to Ny-Alesund is restricted due to its status as a research facility and the danger of polar bear attacks.
    • There have been several reported instances of death or injury to tourists in the Svalbard archipelago due to animal attacks and boating incidents, often involving unpredictable weather or ocean conditions.
    • In cases of illness or injury, a clinic in Longyearbyen can provide limited emergency care until medical evacuation to Tromsoe is available.
    • You should consult the Sysselmann’s Office and the Svalbard Tourist Board for the latest travel conditions and information before you go.

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Norway.

See our LGBTI Travel Information page and section 6 of our  Human Rights report for further details.

Travelers Who Require Accessibility Assistance: While in Norway, individuals with disabilities may find accessibility and accommodation very different from that in the United States.

  • Oslo Gardermoen International Airport is accessible to wheelchair users and the staff is very helpful with accessibility issues.
  • The Oslo subway/light-rail system (T-banen) has above-average wheelchair accessibility.
  • Taxis drivers are generally helpful in assisting wheelchair users. It is possible to order taxis with wheelchair lifts.
  • From December to March it is impossible for wheelchair users to navigate Oslo’s streets without assistance due to snow and ice.
  • Shopping malls, hotels, public buildings, and most modern structures will have handicap accessible toilets.
  • Fewer than half of the restaurants in Norway are wheelchair accessible and many have restrooms located up or down a flight of stairs.
  • Many modern public structures, such as shopping centers, substitute inclined moving walkways/ramps for elevators, which are difficult for wheelchair users to use safely.
  • Norway’s Tourist Board website offers accessibility information specifically for ferries.

Students: See our Students Abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for Women Travelers.

Road Conditions and Safety: The maintenance and condition of urban roads is generally good. Rural road conditions are fair, and the availability of roadside assistance is limited.

  • Roadside assistance is mainly provided by two service providers in Norway: Viking (phone number +47 06000) and Falck (phone number +47 02222). Both service providers operate with 24/7 duty phones.
  • Most roadways beyond the city limits of Oslo and other major cities tend to be simple two-lane roads. In mountainous areas of Norway, the roads tend to be narrow, winding, and have many tunnels.
  • Road conditions vary greatly, depending on weather and time of year. Extreme weather, floods, and landslides can occur. This can disrupt both rail and road travel.
  • The use of winter tires is mandatory on all motor vehicles from November to April.
  • The Norwegian Government’s Crisis Information website provides information and advice to the public before, during, and after a crisis. Many mountain roads are closed due to snow from late fall to late spring.

Traffic Laws: Norwegian law requires that drivers always use headlights when driving. Norwegian law also requires drivers to yield to vehicles coming from the right, except in a traffic circle, when drivers are required to yield to vehicles already in the circle.

  • Seatbelts are mandatory for drivers and passengers.
  • It is illegal to use a hand-held cell phone while driving; violators risk a fine of 1,300 kroner (approximately $215).
  • Automatic cameras placed by the police along roadways help enforce speed limits, which are often lower than in other European countries. Fines – and sometimes even jail time – are imposed for violations.
  • The maximum legal blood alcohol content level for driving a car in Norway is .02 percent. Frequent road checks with mandatory breathalyzer tests and the promise of stiff jail sentences encourage alcohol-free drinking.

Public Transportation: See our Road Safety page for more information. Visit the website of Norway’s Tourist Board and the Norwegian Council for Road Safety.

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the government of Norway’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Norways’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Norway should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts at www.marad.dot.gov/msci. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website (https:homeport.uscg.mil), and the NGA broadcast warnings website https://msi.nga.mil/NGAPortal/MSI.portal select “broadcast warnings”.

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