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Denmark (including Greenland)
Official Name:

Kingdom of Denmark

Last Updated: April 12, 2017

Embassy Messages

Further Safety and Security Information

Travel Warnings: Issued when Protracted situations make a country dangerous or unstable. Defer or reconsider travel.

Travel Alerts: Issued when short-term conditions pose imminent threats. Defer or reconsider travel.

Embassy Messages: Issued when local security issues arise.

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

Assistance for U.S. Citizens

U.S. Embassy Copenhagen

Dag Hammarskjölds Allé 24
2100 Copenhagen
Denmark

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Quick Facts
PASSPORT VALIDITY:

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Six months is recommended

BLANK PASSPORT PAGES:

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Two pages per stamp

TOURIST VISA REQUIRED:

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Not required for stays under 90 days

VACCINATIONS:

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None

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR ENTRY:

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10,000 Euros (or equivalent)

CURRENCY RESTRICTIONS FOR EXIT:

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10,000 Euros (or equivalent)

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U.S. Embassy Copenhagen

Dag Hammarskjölds Allé 24
2100 Copenhagen
Denmark

Telephone: +(45) 3341-7100

Emergency After-Hours Telephone: +(45) 3341-7400

Fax: +(45) 3538-9616

See the Department of State’s Fact Sheet on Denmark for information on U.S.-Denmark relations. 

Denmark is a party to the Schengen Agreement. Visit the Embassy of Denmark website for the most current visa information.

  • Passport should be valid for at least six months beyond your stay. For additional details about travel into and within Schengen countries, please see our Schengen fact sheet.
  • You may enter for Denmark for up to 90 days for tourist purposes without a visa.
  • Further useful information, in English and Danish, can be found on the Danish Immigration Service website.
  • If you are a student or prospective student, your student visa allows you to enter 30 days prior to the start of your program and remain for 14 days after the end of your program. More detailed information is available on the Danish Immigration Service website.
  • Greenland and the Faroe Islands are not party to the Schengen Agreement; however, you may travel to either location for 90 days for business or tourism purposes without a visa.
  • Residence and work permits issued exclusively for Greenland or the Faroe Islands are not valid for travel to Schengen countries.

HIV/AIDS Restrictions: The U.S. Department of State is unaware of any HIV/AIDS entry restrictions for visitors to or foreign residents of Denmark.

Dual Nationality: As of September 1, 2015, Denmark allows the acquisition of dual citizenship. More information can be found on the Danish Ministry of Immigration’s website.

Information about dual nationality or the prevention of international child abduction can be found on our website. For further information about customs regulations, please read our customs information page.

Terrorism: Credible information indicates terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Europe. European governments are taking action to guard against terrorist attacks; however, all European countries remain potentially vulnerable to attacks from transnational terrorist organizations. On February 14, 2015, at an event in Copenhagen, Denmark, a gunman opened fire killing one person and wounding three police officers. U.S. citizens should be aware that attacks can take place without prior warning. 

When traveling or living in Denmark, you should:

  • Be aware of your local security situation, and take appropriate steps to bolster your personal security.  
  • You should monitor media and local information sources, and factor updated information into personal travel plans and activities.  
  • You should address specific safety concerns to Danish law enforcement authorities who have responsibility for the safety and security of all residents and visitors to Denmark.
  • Avoid demonstrations, and exercise caution if in the vicinity of any large gatherings, protests, or demonstrations. Demonstrations and large events intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational. 
  • Large public gatherings can affect all major incoming transportation arteries to the city in which they occur. 

Freetown Christiania, located in the Christianshavn area of Copenhagen, is known for illicit drug activity. Recent drug enforcement efforts have resulted in clashes between the police and Christiania residents. Christiania residents have imposed a strict no-photography policy; tourists have been assaulted and robbed for taking pictures. Police and emergency services are limited in Christiania.

Crime: Violent confrontations involving organized crime groups operating in Denmark occasionally take place. Travelers should be aware of their surroundings and immediately leave the area if they feel threatened. Pickpocketing and purse-snatching operate aggressively in areas frequented by tourists, as well as on crowded trains and buses, and at train stations – Copenhagen Central Station in particular. More sophisticated thieves also target the Copenhagen Airport and cruise ship quays. Do not place any bags containing valuables, such as your passport or credit cards, on the ground or on the back of a chair. Watch your computer bag, which is particularly desirable to thieves.  U.S. citizens are encouraged to review the OSAC Crime and Safety Report for more information on Crime in Denmark.

Victims of Crime: Report crimes to the local police at 112 and contact the U.S. Embassy at +(45) 3341-7100 or +(45) 3341-7400 for after-hours assistance. For non-life threatening situations, individuals in the greater Copenhagen area may dial 1813 to reach an urgent medical helpline. Local authorities are responsible for investigating and prosecuting crimes.

See our webpage on help for U.S. victims of crime overseas.

We can:

  • help you find appropriate medical care
  • assist you in reporting a crime to the police
  • contact relatives or friends with your written consent
  • explain the local criminal justice process in general terms
  • provide a list of local attorneys
  • provide our information on victim’s compensation programs in the United States
  • provide an emergency loan for repatriation to the United States and/or limited medical support in cases of destitution
  • help you find accommodation and arrange flights home in cases of destitution
  • replace a stolen or lost passport

Denmark Victim Compensation Program: Denmark has a program to provide financial compensation to victims who suffer serious injuries due to crime.

Domestic Violence:  U.S. citizen victims of domestic violence may contact the Embassy for assistance.

For further information:

Excellent medical facilities are widely available in Denmark. Hospitals are modern and fully-equipped. Medical facilities in Greenland and the Faroe Islands are limited, and evacuation is required for serious illness or injury.  

  • Emergency medical treatment is free of charge; however, the patient is charged for follow-up care.
  • Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments.

We do not pay medical bills, and U.S. Medicare does not pay claims overseas.

Medical Insurance: Make sure your health insurance plan provides coverage overseas. Most care providers overseas only accept cash payments. See our webpage for more information on insurance providers for overseas coverage

We strongly recommend supplemental insurance (our webpage) to cover medical evacuation. 

If traveling with prescription medication, check with the government of Denmark to ensure the medication is legal in Denmark. Always carry your prescriptions medication in its original packing with your doctor’s prescription.

Vaccinations: Be up-to-date on all vaccinations recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

For further health information, go to:

Criminal Penalties: You are subject to local laws. If you violate local laws, even unknowingly, you may be expelled, arrested, or imprisoned. 

Furthermore, some crimes are also prosecutable in the U.S., regardless of local law. See our website on crimes against minors abroad and the Department of Justice website.

Arrest Notification: If you are arrested or detained, ask police or prison officials to notify the U.S. Embassy immediately. See our webpage for further information. 

  • Penalties for possessing, using, or trafficking in illegal drugs are strict, and convicted offenders can expect long jail sentences and heavy fines
  • Driving under the influence may lead to confiscation of your driver’s license and could land you immediately in jail.
  • Possession of dangerous weapons, including knives, may result in criminal penalties.
  • Your U.S. passport won’t help you avoid arrest or prosecution if you break the law in Denmark.

Danish Compulsory Military Service:

  • All male citizens 18 years of age and resident in Denmark must participate in a military draft. 
  • Conscription periods vary from four to 12 months, according to specialization.

Greenland: Special Circumstances

Removal of Natural Resources:

  • Greenland has strict laws regarding removal of natural resources, including any precious and semi-precious metals, stones, and gemstones. Check with local authorities before attempting to extract or export any of these materials.

Cruise Ship Travel: If you are considering travel on cruise ships near Greenland, you should:

  • Be aware that search and rescue capabilities are restricted due to limited capacity and long distances between populated areas.
  • Be aware that the combined search-and-rescue ship capacity is less than what would be needed to respond to an incident.
  • Check the operational records and the experience of captains and crews operating vessels in Arctic waters when selecting cruises off the shores of Greenland.

Greenland by land: Greenland’s landscape is vast and remote. Periods of darkness, extreme temperatures, and fast-changing weather are common.

  • You should use experienced guides.
  • Official permission is required for travel into the huge Northeast Greenland National Park or for treks across the central ice fields. Check with your tour operator to make sure that the company has received the necessary permission for such trips.
  • Persons unfamiliar with the area can become disoriented easily and risk long-term exposure to the elements.
  • Greenland mountains are of moderate altitude, but are technically difficult.  You should be familiar with ascent and descent routes.
  • Local authorities will rescue individuals in difficulty, but land search and rescue capabilities are limited and subject to weather restrictions.
  • You may be billed for the cost of rescue services.
  • For more information about traveling to Greenland please visit Greenland Tourism

Faith-Based Travelers: See our following webpages for details:

LGBTI Travelers: There are no legal restrictions on same-sex sexual relations or the organization of LGBTI events in Denmark. See our LGBTI travel information page and section six of the Department of State's Human Rights Report for further details.

Persons with Mobility Issues: Danish law prohibits discrimination against persons with physical and mental disabilities in employment, education, and access to health care or other state services. In addition:

  • Danish law mandates access to buildings, education, information, and communications for persons with disabilities.
  • Public transportation can accommodate persons with disabilities, but many buildings and outdoor sites are not easily accessible for the disabled. 
  • Accessibility information is available at Visit Denmark.

Students: See our students abroad page and FBI travel tips.

Women Travelers: See our travel tips for women travelers.

Road Conditions and Safety: Danish roads are of high quality and connect all areas of the country.

  • Driving in Denmark is on the right side of the road.
  • Road signs use standard international symbols.
  • Many urban streets have traffic lanes reserved for public transport only.
  • Bicycles are widely used, and bike lanes are very common.
  • Bicycles have the right-of-way. Many accidents occur when pedestrians and vehicles fail to give the right-of-way to bicycles.

Greenland has no established road system. Most domestic travel is by foot, boat, or air.

The majority of the Faroe Islands are interconnected by roads and tunnels, and boats. On the large islands even small hamlets are generally accessible by road. Travel on the smaller islands is mostly done on foot.

Traffic Laws: 

  • You must be 18 years of age to drive a car in Denmark.
  • Your U.S. state’s driver’s license is acceptable in Denmark for up to 90 days.
  • Long-term residents must obtain a valid Danish driver’s license.
  • The speed limit is 50 km/h in urban areas, 80 km/h on open roads, and 130km/h on expressway, unless otherwise noted on traffic signs.
  • You must use your seat belt while driving in a vehicle.
  • Children between 3-12 years of age or under 36kg and/or 135 cm in height must be in a car seat.
  • Driving any vehicle, including a bicycle, under the influence of alcohol or drugs is considered a very serious offense. 
  • It is illegal to use a hand-held cell phone while driving.
  • Laws are strictly enforced and violations can result in stiff fines and jail sentences.

Public Transportation: Denmark has an extensive and efficient public transportation system. Trains, buses, and ferries connect Copenhagen with other major cities in Denmark and with Norway, Sweden, Poland, and Germany.

Please refer to our road safety page for more information. Also, we suggest that you visit Visit Denmark and Denmark’s Ministry of Transport for more information.

Aviation Safety Oversight: The U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has assessed the Government of Denmark’s Civil Aviation Authority as being in compliance with International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) aviation safety standards for oversight of Denmark’s air carrier operations. Further information may be found on the FAA’s safety assessment page.

Maritime Travel: Mariners planning travel to Denmark should also check for U.S. maritime advisories and alerts at www.marad.dot.gov/msci. Information may also be posted to the U.S. Coast Guard homeport website, https:homeport.uscg.mil, and the NGA broadcast warnings website (select “broadcast warnings”).

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